The Book of Daniel, Part 1 of 2

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  • Striding Lion from the Ishtar Gate of the palace of Nebuchadnezzar, Babylon. Pergamon Museum, Berlin, Germany\n\nThe colorful striding lion, its mouth opened in a threatening roar, once decorated a side of the 'Processional Way' in ancient Babylon (the Biblical city of Babel). The 'Processional Way' led out of the city through a massive gate named for the Mesopotamian goddess of love and war, Ishtar, whose symbol was the lion. Each year, during the celebration of the great New Year Festival, the images of the city's deities were carried out through the Ishtar Gate and along the 'Processional Way' past some 120 lions such as this one to a special festival house north of the city. Source: http://oi.uchicago.edu/OI/MUS/HIGH/OIM_A7481_c_72dpi.html\n
  • Striding Lion from the Ishtar Gate of the palace of Nebuchadnezzar, Babylon. Pergamon Museum, Berlin, Germany\n\nThe colorful striding lion, its mouth opened in a threatening roar, once decorated a side of the 'Processional Way' in ancient Babylon (the Biblical city of Babel). The 'Processional Way' led out of the city through a massive gate named for the Mesopotamian goddess of love and war, Ishtar, whose symbol was the lion. Each year, during the celebration of the great New Year Festival, the images of the city's deities were carried out through the Ishtar Gate and along the 'Processional Way' past some 120 lions such as this one to a special festival house north of the city. Source: http://oi.uchicago.edu/OI/MUS/HIGH/OIM_A7481_c_72dpi.html\n
  • \n
  • Ziggurat was “a 650- ft. glimmering enamel” structure (Beth Moore p.11)\n“Practically all the buildings were of brick, for stone was rare in Mesopotamia, but the bricks were often faced with enameled tiles of brilliant blue, yellow, or white, adorned with animal and other figures in glazed relief, which remain to this day supreme in their kind.” Beth Moore, Daniel, p. 14\n\n
  • Ziggurat was “a 650- ft. glimmering enamel” structure (Beth Moore p.11)\n“Practically all the buildings were of brick, for stone was rare in Mesopotamia, but the bricks were often faced with enameled tiles of brilliant blue, yellow, or white, adorned with animal and other figures in glazed relief, which remain to this day supreme in their kind.” Beth Moore, Daniel, p. 14\n\n
  • Ziggurat was “a 650- ft. glimmering enamel” structure (Beth Moore p.11)\n“Practically all the buildings were of brick, for stone was rare in Mesopotamia, but the bricks were often faced with enameled tiles of brilliant blue, yellow, or white, adorned with animal and other figures in glazed relief, which remain to this day supreme in their kind.” Beth Moore, Daniel, p. 14\n\n
  • Ziggurat was “a 650- ft. glimmering enamel” structure (Beth Moore p.11)\n“Practically all the buildings were of brick, for stone was rare in Mesopotamia, but the bricks were often faced with enameled tiles of brilliant blue, yellow, or white, adorned with animal and other figures in glazed relief, which remain to this day supreme in their kind.” Beth Moore, Daniel, p. 14\n\n
  • Ziggurat was “a 650- ft. glimmering enamel” structure (Beth Moore p.11)\n“Practically all the buildings were of brick, for stone was rare in Mesopotamia, but the bricks were often faced with enameled tiles of brilliant blue, yellow, or white, adorned with animal and other figures in glazed relief, which remain to this day supreme in their kind.” Beth Moore, Daniel, p. 14\n\n
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  • Ziggurat was “a 650- ft. glimmering enamel” structure (Beth Moore p.11)\n“Practically all the buildings were of brick, for stone was rare in Mesopotamia, but the bricks were often faced with enameled tiles of brilliant blue, yellow, or white, adorned with animal and other figures in glazed relief, which remain to this day supreme in their kind.” Beth Moore, Daniel, p. 14\n\n
  • Ziggurat was “a 650- ft. glimmering enamel” structure (Beth Moore p.11)\n“Practically all the buildings were of brick, for stone was rare in Mesopotamia, but the bricks were often faced with enameled tiles of brilliant blue, yellow, or white, adorned with animal and other figures in glazed relief, which remain to this day supreme in their kind.” Beth Moore, Daniel, p. 14\n\n
  • Ziggurat was “a 650- ft. glimmering enamel” structure (Beth Moore p.11)\n“Practically all the buildings were of brick, for stone was rare in Mesopotamia, but the bricks were often faced with enameled tiles of brilliant blue, yellow, or white, adorned with animal and other figures in glazed relief, which remain to this day supreme in their kind.” Beth Moore, Daniel, p. 14\n\n
  • “Daniel’s prophecy is, in many respects, the most remarkable of any in the sacred record. \n* It is the most comprehensive. \n* It was the first prophecy giving a consecutive history of the world from that time to the end. \n* It located the most of its predictions within well-defined prophetic periods, though reaching many centuries into the future. \n* It gave the first definite chronological prophecy of the coming of the Messiah. It marked the time of this event so definitely that the Jews forbid any attempt to interpret its numbers, since that prophecy shows them to be without excuse in rejecting Christ; and so accurately had its minute and literal predictions been fulfilled down to the time of Porphyry, A.D. 250, that he declared (the only loophole he could devise for his hard-pressed skepticism) that the predictions were not written in the age of Babylon, but after the events themselves had occurred. This evasion, however, is not now available; for every succeeding century has borne additional evidence to the truthfulness of the prophecy, and we are just now, in our own day, approaching the climax of its fulfillment.”\nSource: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan.htm\n
  • “Daniel’s prophecy is, in many respects, the most remarkable of any in the sacred record. \n* It is the most comprehensive. \n* It was the first prophecy giving a consecutive history of the world from that time to the end. \n* It located the most of its predictions within well-defined prophetic periods, though reaching many centuries into the future. \n* It gave the first definite chronological prophecy of the coming of the Messiah. It marked the time of this event so definitely that the Jews forbid any attempt to interpret its numbers, since that prophecy shows them to be without excuse in rejecting Christ; and so accurately had its minute and literal predictions been fulfilled down to the time of Porphyry, A.D. 250, that he declared (the only loophole he could devise for his hard-pressed skepticism) that the predictions were not written in the age of Babylon, but after the events themselves had occurred. This evasion, however, is not now available; for every succeeding century has borne additional evidence to the truthfulness of the prophecy, and we are just now, in our own day, approaching the climax of its fulfillment.”\nSource: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan.htm\n
  • “Daniel’s prophecy is, in many respects, the most remarkable of any in the sacred record. \n* It is the most comprehensive. \n* It was the first prophecy giving a consecutive history of the world from that time to the end. \n* It located the most of its predictions within well-defined prophetic periods, though reaching many centuries into the future. \n* It gave the first definite chronological prophecy of the coming of the Messiah. It marked the time of this event so definitely that the Jews forbid any attempt to interpret its numbers, since that prophecy shows them to be without excuse in rejecting Christ; and so accurately had its minute and literal predictions been fulfilled down to the time of Porphyry, A.D. 250, that he declared (the only loophole he could devise for his hard-pressed skepticism) that the predictions were not written in the age of Babylon, but after the events themselves had occurred. This evasion, however, is not now available; for every succeeding century has borne additional evidence to the truthfulness of the prophecy, and we are just now, in our own day, approaching the climax of its fulfillment.”\nSource: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan.htm\n
  • “Daniel’s prophecy is, in many respects, the most remarkable of any in the sacred record. \n* It is the most comprehensive. \n* It was the first prophecy giving a consecutive history of the world from that time to the end. \n* It located the most of its predictions within well-defined prophetic periods, though reaching many centuries into the future. \n* It gave the first definite chronological prophecy of the coming of the Messiah. It marked the time of this event so definitely that the Jews forbid any attempt to interpret its numbers, since that prophecy shows them to be without excuse in rejecting Christ; and so accurately had its minute and literal predictions been fulfilled down to the time of Porphyry, A.D. 250, that he declared (the only loophole he could devise for his hard-pressed skepticism) that the predictions were not written in the age of Babylon, but after the events themselves had occurred. This evasion, however, is not now available; for every succeeding century has borne additional evidence to the truthfulness of the prophecy, and we are just now, in our own day, approaching the climax of its fulfillment.”\nSource: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan.htm\n
  • Illustrates the succession of powers that would conquer God's people from the time of the Babylonian captivity to the Second Coming of Christ.\n\n“Daniel 11 alone contains 100 specific prophecies of historical events that literally came true.” Source: Open Bible Intro, p. 832\n\nThere are at least 18 verses in Revelation that allude to the book of Daniel, as well as three verses in Matthew, and one verse in 2 Thessalonians.\n\nDaniel answers the universal, ultimate question of destiny: “Where is this all going, and how will it work out?”\n
  • Illustrates the succession of powers that would conquer God's people from the time of the Babylonian captivity to the Second Coming of Christ.\n\n“Daniel 11 alone contains 100 specific prophecies of historical events that literally came true.” Source: Open Bible Intro, p. 832\n\nThere are at least 18 verses in Revelation that allude to the book of Daniel, as well as three verses in Matthew, and one verse in 2 Thessalonians.\n\nDaniel answers the universal, ultimate question of destiny: “Where is this all going, and how will it work out?”\n
  • Illustrates the succession of powers that would conquer God's people from the time of the Babylonian captivity to the Second Coming of Christ.\n\n“Daniel 11 alone contains 100 specific prophecies of historical events that literally came true.” Source: Open Bible Intro, p. 832\n\nThere are at least 18 verses in Revelation that allude to the book of Daniel, as well as three verses in Matthew, and one verse in 2 Thessalonians.\n\nDaniel answers the universal, ultimate question of destiny: “Where is this all going, and how will it work out?”\n
  • Illustrates the succession of powers that would conquer God's people from the time of the Babylonian captivity to the Second Coming of Christ.\n\n“Daniel 11 alone contains 100 specific prophecies of historical events that literally came true.” Source: Open Bible Intro, p. 832\n\nThere are at least 18 verses in Revelation that allude to the book of Daniel, as well as three verses in Matthew, and one verse in 2 Thessalonians.\n\nDaniel answers the universal, ultimate question of destiny: “Where is this all going, and how will it work out?”\n
  • Illustrates the succession of powers that would conquer God's people from the time of the Babylonian captivity to the Second Coming of Christ.\n\n“Daniel 11 alone contains 100 specific prophecies of historical events that literally came true.” Source: Open Bible Intro, p. 832\n\nThere are at least 18 verses in Revelation that allude to the book of Daniel, as well as three verses in Matthew, and one verse in 2 Thessalonians.\n\nDaniel answers the universal, ultimate question of destiny: “Where is this all going, and how will it work out?”\n
  • Daniel’s life and ministry bridge the entire seventy year period of Babylonian captivity. Deported to Babylon at the age of sixteen, and handpicked for government service, Daniel becomes God’s prophetic mouthpiece to the Gentile and Jewish world declaring God’s present and eternal purpose. Nine of the twelve chapters in his book revolve around dreams, including God-given visions involving trees, animals, beasts, and images. In both his personal adventures and prophetic visions, Daniel shows God’s guidance, intervention, and power in the affairs of men.\n\nThough we have a more minute account of his early life than is recorded of that of any other prophet, yet his birth and lineage are left in complete obscurity, except that he was of the royal line, probably of the house of David, which had at this time become very numerous. He is supposed to have died at Shushan, or Susa, in Persia, about the 530 B.C., aged nearly ninety-four years; his age being the probable reason why he did not return to Judea with other Hebrew captives, under the proclamation of Cyrus (Ezra 1: 1), 536 B.C., which marked the close of the seventy years' captivity. Source: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan.htm\n\nBook of Josephus. Josephus states that the book of Daniel was shown to Alexander the Great when he approached the city of Jerusalem (Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews, Book XI, chapter VIII, section 5). History says that Alexander the Great approached Jerusalem around 331 BC. This means that the book of Daniel existed before this event. It predicted that Jerusalem would be conquered by Greece. Some critics will accept Josephus’ other accounts as being accurate, yet dispute this fact.\n\n“Josephus (about A.D. 40-100), writes: "When the Book of Daniel was shown to Alexander the Great (d. 323 B.C.), wherein Daniel declared that one of the Greeks should destroy the empire of the Persians, he supposed that himself was the person intended".” Source: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04621b.htm\n\nEzekiel's Reference. Most critics widely accept the book of Ezekiel as being written between 586 BC and 538 BC. What is fascinating is that the author, Ezekiel, refers to Daniel in Ezekiel 14:14, 20. This implies that Daniel was alive during his time. Daniel claims to be the author (Daniel 12:4) of the book which bears his name and to have lived during the life of Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 1-2) and Darius (Dan. 9:1). This implies that Daniel was a contemporary of Ezekiel and lived to see the fall of Babylon (Dan. 5:30-31).\nLanguage of Daniel: To the embarrassment of the critics, excavations have also proven that the Aramaic of Daniel was an Imperial Aramaic of the seventh century (600 B.C.) and not the Aramaic found later. The Babylonians did read and write in Aramaic (Dan. 2:4). With the Dead Sea scrolls and recent archaeological findings, the critics of Daniel are having to reconsider their objections. \nSource: http://www.neverthirsty.org/pp/series/DAN/D001/D0011.html\nAramaic was the lingua franca of the Ancient world (cf. 2 Kings 18:26). It was therefore appropriate that messages concerning the Gentile nations contained within the central section of the book be recorded in this language. The beginning and end of the book, which relate specifically to the Jewish nation, are written in Hebrew. Source: http://www.biblicalstudies.org.uk/article_daniel.html#t8\n\n
  • Daniel’s life and ministry bridge the entire seventy year period of Babylonian captivity. Deported to Babylon at the age of sixteen, and handpicked for government service, Daniel becomes God’s prophetic mouthpiece to the Gentile and Jewish world declaring God’s present and eternal purpose. Nine of the twelve chapters in his book revolve around dreams, including God-given visions involving trees, animals, beasts, and images. In both his personal adventures and prophetic visions, Daniel shows God’s guidance, intervention, and power in the affairs of men.\n\nThough we have a more minute account of his early life than is recorded of that of any other prophet, yet his birth and lineage are left in complete obscurity, except that he was of the royal line, probably of the house of David, which had at this time become very numerous. He is supposed to have died at Shushan, or Susa, in Persia, about the 530 B.C., aged nearly ninety-four years; his age being the probable reason why he did not return to Judea with other Hebrew captives, under the proclamation of Cyrus (Ezra 1: 1), 536 B.C., which marked the close of the seventy years' captivity. Source: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan.htm\n\nBook of Josephus. Josephus states that the book of Daniel was shown to Alexander the Great when he approached the city of Jerusalem (Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews, Book XI, chapter VIII, section 5). History says that Alexander the Great approached Jerusalem around 331 BC. This means that the book of Daniel existed before this event. It predicted that Jerusalem would be conquered by Greece. Some critics will accept Josephus’ other accounts as being accurate, yet dispute this fact.\n\n“Josephus (about A.D. 40-100), writes: "When the Book of Daniel was shown to Alexander the Great (d. 323 B.C.), wherein Daniel declared that one of the Greeks should destroy the empire of the Persians, he supposed that himself was the person intended".” Source: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04621b.htm\n\nEzekiel's Reference. Most critics widely accept the book of Ezekiel as being written between 586 BC and 538 BC. What is fascinating is that the author, Ezekiel, refers to Daniel in Ezekiel 14:14, 20. This implies that Daniel was alive during his time. Daniel claims to be the author (Daniel 12:4) of the book which bears his name and to have lived during the life of Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 1-2) and Darius (Dan. 9:1). This implies that Daniel was a contemporary of Ezekiel and lived to see the fall of Babylon (Dan. 5:30-31).\nLanguage of Daniel: To the embarrassment of the critics, excavations have also proven that the Aramaic of Daniel was an Imperial Aramaic of the seventh century (600 B.C.) and not the Aramaic found later. The Babylonians did read and write in Aramaic (Dan. 2:4). With the Dead Sea scrolls and recent archaeological findings, the critics of Daniel are having to reconsider their objections. \nSource: http://www.neverthirsty.org/pp/series/DAN/D001/D0011.html\nAramaic was the lingua franca of the Ancient world (cf. 2 Kings 18:26). It was therefore appropriate that messages concerning the Gentile nations contained within the central section of the book be recorded in this language. The beginning and end of the book, which relate specifically to the Jewish nation, are written in Hebrew. Source: http://www.biblicalstudies.org.uk/article_daniel.html#t8\n\n
  • Daniel’s life and ministry bridge the entire seventy year period of Babylonian captivity. Deported to Babylon at the age of sixteen, and handpicked for government service, Daniel becomes God’s prophetic mouthpiece to the Gentile and Jewish world declaring God’s present and eternal purpose. Nine of the twelve chapters in his book revolve around dreams, including God-given visions involving trees, animals, beasts, and images. In both his personal adventures and prophetic visions, Daniel shows God’s guidance, intervention, and power in the affairs of men.\n\nThough we have a more minute account of his early life than is recorded of that of any other prophet, yet his birth and lineage are left in complete obscurity, except that he was of the royal line, probably of the house of David, which had at this time become very numerous. He is supposed to have died at Shushan, or Susa, in Persia, about the 530 B.C., aged nearly ninety-four years; his age being the probable reason why he did not return to Judea with other Hebrew captives, under the proclamation of Cyrus (Ezra 1: 1), 536 B.C., which marked the close of the seventy years' captivity. Source: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan.htm\n\nBook of Josephus. Josephus states that the book of Daniel was shown to Alexander the Great when he approached the city of Jerusalem (Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews, Book XI, chapter VIII, section 5). History says that Alexander the Great approached Jerusalem around 331 BC. This means that the book of Daniel existed before this event. It predicted that Jerusalem would be conquered by Greece. Some critics will accept Josephus’ other accounts as being accurate, yet dispute this fact.\n\n“Josephus (about A.D. 40-100), writes: "When the Book of Daniel was shown to Alexander the Great (d. 323 B.C.), wherein Daniel declared that one of the Greeks should destroy the empire of the Persians, he supposed that himself was the person intended".” Source: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04621b.htm\n\nEzekiel's Reference. Most critics widely accept the book of Ezekiel as being written between 586 BC and 538 BC. What is fascinating is that the author, Ezekiel, refers to Daniel in Ezekiel 14:14, 20. This implies that Daniel was alive during his time. Daniel claims to be the author (Daniel 12:4) of the book which bears his name and to have lived during the life of Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 1-2) and Darius (Dan. 9:1). This implies that Daniel was a contemporary of Ezekiel and lived to see the fall of Babylon (Dan. 5:30-31).\nLanguage of Daniel: To the embarrassment of the critics, excavations have also proven that the Aramaic of Daniel was an Imperial Aramaic of the seventh century (600 B.C.) and not the Aramaic found later. The Babylonians did read and write in Aramaic (Dan. 2:4). With the Dead Sea scrolls and recent archaeological findings, the critics of Daniel are having to reconsider their objections. \nSource: http://www.neverthirsty.org/pp/series/DAN/D001/D0011.html\nAramaic was the lingua franca of the Ancient world (cf. 2 Kings 18:26). It was therefore appropriate that messages concerning the Gentile nations contained within the central section of the book be recorded in this language. The beginning and end of the book, which relate specifically to the Jewish nation, are written in Hebrew. Source: http://www.biblicalstudies.org.uk/article_daniel.html#t8\n\n
  • Daniel’s life and ministry bridge the entire seventy year period of Babylonian captivity. Deported to Babylon at the age of sixteen, and handpicked for government service, Daniel becomes God’s prophetic mouthpiece to the Gentile and Jewish world declaring God’s present and eternal purpose. Nine of the twelve chapters in his book revolve around dreams, including God-given visions involving trees, animals, beasts, and images. In both his personal adventures and prophetic visions, Daniel shows God’s guidance, intervention, and power in the affairs of men.\n\nThough we have a more minute account of his early life than is recorded of that of any other prophet, yet his birth and lineage are left in complete obscurity, except that he was of the royal line, probably of the house of David, which had at this time become very numerous. He is supposed to have died at Shushan, or Susa, in Persia, about the 530 B.C., aged nearly ninety-four years; his age being the probable reason why he did not return to Judea with other Hebrew captives, under the proclamation of Cyrus (Ezra 1: 1), 536 B.C., which marked the close of the seventy years' captivity. Source: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan.htm\n\nBook of Josephus. Josephus states that the book of Daniel was shown to Alexander the Great when he approached the city of Jerusalem (Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews, Book XI, chapter VIII, section 5). History says that Alexander the Great approached Jerusalem around 331 BC. This means that the book of Daniel existed before this event. It predicted that Jerusalem would be conquered by Greece. Some critics will accept Josephus’ other accounts as being accurate, yet dispute this fact.\n\n“Josephus (about A.D. 40-100), writes: "When the Book of Daniel was shown to Alexander the Great (d. 323 B.C.), wherein Daniel declared that one of the Greeks should destroy the empire of the Persians, he supposed that himself was the person intended".” Source: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04621b.htm\n\nEzekiel's Reference. Most critics widely accept the book of Ezekiel as being written between 586 BC and 538 BC. What is fascinating is that the author, Ezekiel, refers to Daniel in Ezekiel 14:14, 20. This implies that Daniel was alive during his time. Daniel claims to be the author (Daniel 12:4) of the book which bears his name and to have lived during the life of Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 1-2) and Darius (Dan. 9:1). This implies that Daniel was a contemporary of Ezekiel and lived to see the fall of Babylon (Dan. 5:30-31).\nLanguage of Daniel: To the embarrassment of the critics, excavations have also proven that the Aramaic of Daniel was an Imperial Aramaic of the seventh century (600 B.C.) and not the Aramaic found later. The Babylonians did read and write in Aramaic (Dan. 2:4). With the Dead Sea scrolls and recent archaeological findings, the critics of Daniel are having to reconsider their objections. \nSource: http://www.neverthirsty.org/pp/series/DAN/D001/D0011.html\nAramaic was the lingua franca of the Ancient world (cf. 2 Kings 18:26). It was therefore appropriate that messages concerning the Gentile nations contained within the central section of the book be recorded in this language. The beginning and end of the book, which relate specifically to the Jewish nation, are written in Hebrew. Source: http://www.biblicalstudies.org.uk/article_daniel.html#t8\n\n
  • Daniel’s life and ministry bridge the entire seventy year period of Babylonian captivity. Deported to Babylon at the age of sixteen, and handpicked for government service, Daniel becomes God’s prophetic mouthpiece to the Gentile and Jewish world declaring God’s present and eternal purpose. Nine of the twelve chapters in his book revolve around dreams, including God-given visions involving trees, animals, beasts, and images. In both his personal adventures and prophetic visions, Daniel shows God’s guidance, intervention, and power in the affairs of men.\n\nThough we have a more minute account of his early life than is recorded of that of any other prophet, yet his birth and lineage are left in complete obscurity, except that he was of the royal line, probably of the house of David, which had at this time become very numerous. He is supposed to have died at Shushan, or Susa, in Persia, about the 530 B.C., aged nearly ninety-four years; his age being the probable reason why he did not return to Judea with other Hebrew captives, under the proclamation of Cyrus (Ezra 1: 1), 536 B.C., which marked the close of the seventy years' captivity. Source: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan.htm\n\nBook of Josephus. Josephus states that the book of Daniel was shown to Alexander the Great when he approached the city of Jerusalem (Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews, Book XI, chapter VIII, section 5). History says that Alexander the Great approached Jerusalem around 331 BC. This means that the book of Daniel existed before this event. It predicted that Jerusalem would be conquered by Greece. Some critics will accept Josephus’ other accounts as being accurate, yet dispute this fact.\n\n“Josephus (about A.D. 40-100), writes: "When the Book of Daniel was shown to Alexander the Great (d. 323 B.C.), wherein Daniel declared that one of the Greeks should destroy the empire of the Persians, he supposed that himself was the person intended".” Source: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04621b.htm\n\nEzekiel's Reference. Most critics widely accept the book of Ezekiel as being written between 586 BC and 538 BC. What is fascinating is that the author, Ezekiel, refers to Daniel in Ezekiel 14:14, 20. This implies that Daniel was alive during his time. Daniel claims to be the author (Daniel 12:4) of the book which bears his name and to have lived during the life of Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 1-2) and Darius (Dan. 9:1). This implies that Daniel was a contemporary of Ezekiel and lived to see the fall of Babylon (Dan. 5:30-31).\nLanguage of Daniel: To the embarrassment of the critics, excavations have also proven that the Aramaic of Daniel was an Imperial Aramaic of the seventh century (600 B.C.) and not the Aramaic found later. The Babylonians did read and write in Aramaic (Dan. 2:4). With the Dead Sea scrolls and recent archaeological findings, the critics of Daniel are having to reconsider their objections. \nSource: http://www.neverthirsty.org/pp/series/DAN/D001/D0011.html\nAramaic was the lingua franca of the Ancient world (cf. 2 Kings 18:26). It was therefore appropriate that messages concerning the Gentile nations contained within the central section of the book be recorded in this language. The beginning and end of the book, which relate specifically to the Jewish nation, are written in Hebrew. Source: http://www.biblicalstudies.org.uk/article_daniel.html#t8\n\n
  • Daniel’s life and ministry bridge the entire seventy year period of Babylonian captivity. Deported to Babylon at the age of sixteen, and handpicked for government service, Daniel becomes God’s prophetic mouthpiece to the Gentile and Jewish world declaring God’s present and eternal purpose. Nine of the twelve chapters in his book revolve around dreams, including God-given visions involving trees, animals, beasts, and images. In both his personal adventures and prophetic visions, Daniel shows God’s guidance, intervention, and power in the affairs of men.\n\nThough we have a more minute account of his early life than is recorded of that of any other prophet, yet his birth and lineage are left in complete obscurity, except that he was of the royal line, probably of the house of David, which had at this time become very numerous. He is supposed to have died at Shushan, or Susa, in Persia, about the 530 B.C., aged nearly ninety-four years; his age being the probable reason why he did not return to Judea with other Hebrew captives, under the proclamation of Cyrus (Ezra 1: 1), 536 B.C., which marked the close of the seventy years' captivity. Source: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan.htm\n\nBook of Josephus. Josephus states that the book of Daniel was shown to Alexander the Great when he approached the city of Jerusalem (Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews, Book XI, chapter VIII, section 5). History says that Alexander the Great approached Jerusalem around 331 BC. This means that the book of Daniel existed before this event. It predicted that Jerusalem would be conquered by Greece. Some critics will accept Josephus’ other accounts as being accurate, yet dispute this fact.\n\n“Josephus (about A.D. 40-100), writes: "When the Book of Daniel was shown to Alexander the Great (d. 323 B.C.), wherein Daniel declared that one of the Greeks should destroy the empire of the Persians, he supposed that himself was the person intended".” Source: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04621b.htm\n\nEzekiel's Reference. Most critics widely accept the book of Ezekiel as being written between 586 BC and 538 BC. What is fascinating is that the author, Ezekiel, refers to Daniel in Ezekiel 14:14, 20. This implies that Daniel was alive during his time. Daniel claims to be the author (Daniel 12:4) of the book which bears his name and to have lived during the life of Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 1-2) and Darius (Dan. 9:1). This implies that Daniel was a contemporary of Ezekiel and lived to see the fall of Babylon (Dan. 5:30-31).\nLanguage of Daniel: To the embarrassment of the critics, excavations have also proven that the Aramaic of Daniel was an Imperial Aramaic of the seventh century (600 B.C.) and not the Aramaic found later. The Babylonians did read and write in Aramaic (Dan. 2:4). With the Dead Sea scrolls and recent archaeological findings, the critics of Daniel are having to reconsider their objections. \nSource: http://www.neverthirsty.org/pp/series/DAN/D001/D0011.html\nAramaic was the lingua franca of the Ancient world (cf. 2 Kings 18:26). It was therefore appropriate that messages concerning the Gentile nations contained within the central section of the book be recorded in this language. The beginning and end of the book, which relate specifically to the Jewish nation, are written in Hebrew. Source: http://www.biblicalstudies.org.uk/article_daniel.html#t8\n\n
  • “ . . . until the 19th century the knowledge of the Babylonia and Assyria was based on the Old Testament and a few Greek writers. Not until the discovery of ancient documents . . . and the decipherment of the cuneiform script and the languages written in this script, did the history and civilization of Babylonia and Assyria become known.“ Source: Encyclopedia Britannica.\n\nDaniel chapter 5 has Belshazzar as the King of Babylon, this has often been disputed by the critics. The discovery of the Nabonidus Chronicle provided an precise explanation that a greed with Daniel’s account of the situation in Babylon.\n\nSecular history says Nabonidus was the King of Babylon, Daniel says Belshazzar was king. Critics pointed to this, saying Daniel is in error, this changed as a result of the discovery of the Nabonidus Chronicle. Sir Henry Rawlinson discovered a cylinder with an inscription in the Euphrates River which cleared the confusion about the King of Babylon.\n\nThere were two kings of Babylon in Daniel’s day, a father and son. The father Nabonidus installed his son Belshazzar as co-regent, Nabonidus spent much of his time (10 years away from Babylon) warring in such countries as Arabia. When the Persians conquered the city in 539 B.C. Belshazzar was killed. Nabonidus was later captured and sent to exile. This explained the promise made to Daniel in Daniel 5:29, after Daniel explained the meaning of the writing on the wall, Behshazzar promised to make him third ruler. Source: http://www.truthnet.org/Daniel/Introduction/\n \n\n29 Then Belshazzar gave the command, and they clothed Daniel with purple and put a chain of gold around his neck, and made a proclamation concerning him that he should be the third ruler in the kingdom. Daniel 5:29\n\nAsphenaz, is mentioned in the first chapter of Daniel (1:3 KJV) as master of the Eunuchs. The critics claim no such person ever existed. Recent discoveries again proved the accuracy of the book of Daniel. Asphenaz name has been found on monuments of ancient Babylon which are now in the Pergamon Museum, Berlin, Germany. The Babylonian monument had inscribed the following statement, “Ashpenaz, master of eunuchs in the time of Nebuchadnezzar”\n\nThe Dead Sea Scrolls, 4Q242, a Qumran scroll dating between 75-80 B.C. called “The Prayer of Nabonidus.” It is an apocryphal account of a healing of Nabonidus that is probably based on Daniel 4, but it can neither confirm nor deny the historical reliability of Daniel 4. Source: NIV Archaelogical Study Bible, Zondervan, 2005, p. 1400.\n
  • “ . . . until the 19th century the knowledge of the Babylonia and Assyria was based on the Old Testament and a few Greek writers. Not until the discovery of ancient documents . . . and the decipherment of the cuneiform script and the languages written in this script, did the history and civilization of Babylonia and Assyria become known.“ Source: Encyclopedia Britannica.\n\nDaniel chapter 5 has Belshazzar as the King of Babylon, this has often been disputed by the critics. The discovery of the Nabonidus Chronicle provided an precise explanation that a greed with Daniel’s account of the situation in Babylon.\n\nSecular history says Nabonidus was the King of Babylon, Daniel says Belshazzar was king. Critics pointed to this, saying Daniel is in error, this changed as a result of the discovery of the Nabonidus Chronicle. Sir Henry Rawlinson discovered a cylinder with an inscription in the Euphrates River which cleared the confusion about the King of Babylon.\n\nThere were two kings of Babylon in Daniel’s day, a father and son. The father Nabonidus installed his son Belshazzar as co-regent, Nabonidus spent much of his time (10 years away from Babylon) warring in such countries as Arabia. When the Persians conquered the city in 539 B.C. Belshazzar was killed. Nabonidus was later captured and sent to exile. This explained the promise made to Daniel in Daniel 5:29, after Daniel explained the meaning of the writing on the wall, Behshazzar promised to make him third ruler. Source: http://www.truthnet.org/Daniel/Introduction/\n \n\n29 Then Belshazzar gave the command, and they clothed Daniel with purple and put a chain of gold around his neck, and made a proclamation concerning him that he should be the third ruler in the kingdom. Daniel 5:29\n\nAsphenaz, is mentioned in the first chapter of Daniel (1:3 KJV) as master of the Eunuchs. The critics claim no such person ever existed. Recent discoveries again proved the accuracy of the book of Daniel. Asphenaz name has been found on monuments of ancient Babylon which are now in the Pergamon Museum, Berlin, Germany. The Babylonian monument had inscribed the following statement, “Ashpenaz, master of eunuchs in the time of Nebuchadnezzar”\n\nThe Dead Sea Scrolls, 4Q242, a Qumran scroll dating between 75-80 B.C. called “The Prayer of Nabonidus.” It is an apocryphal account of a healing of Nabonidus that is probably based on Daniel 4, but it can neither confirm nor deny the historical reliability of Daniel 4. Source: NIV Archaelogical Study Bible, Zondervan, 2005, p. 1400.\n
  • “ . . . until the 19th century the knowledge of the Babylonia and Assyria was based on the Old Testament and a few Greek writers. Not until the discovery of ancient documents . . . and the decipherment of the cuneiform script and the languages written in this script, did the history and civilization of Babylonia and Assyria become known.“ Source: Encyclopedia Britannica.\n\nDaniel chapter 5 has Belshazzar as the King of Babylon, this has often been disputed by the critics. The discovery of the Nabonidus Chronicle provided an precise explanation that a greed with Daniel’s account of the situation in Babylon.\n\nSecular history says Nabonidus was the King of Babylon, Daniel says Belshazzar was king. Critics pointed to this, saying Daniel is in error, this changed as a result of the discovery of the Nabonidus Chronicle. Sir Henry Rawlinson discovered a cylinder with an inscription in the Euphrates River which cleared the confusion about the King of Babylon.\n\nThere were two kings of Babylon in Daniel’s day, a father and son. The father Nabonidus installed his son Belshazzar as co-regent, Nabonidus spent much of his time (10 years away from Babylon) warring in such countries as Arabia. When the Persians conquered the city in 539 B.C. Belshazzar was killed. Nabonidus was later captured and sent to exile. This explained the promise made to Daniel in Daniel 5:29, after Daniel explained the meaning of the writing on the wall, Behshazzar promised to make him third ruler. Source: http://www.truthnet.org/Daniel/Introduction/\n \n\n29 Then Belshazzar gave the command, and they clothed Daniel with purple and put a chain of gold around his neck, and made a proclamation concerning him that he should be the third ruler in the kingdom. Daniel 5:29\n\nAsphenaz, is mentioned in the first chapter of Daniel (1:3 KJV) as master of the Eunuchs. The critics claim no such person ever existed. Recent discoveries again proved the accuracy of the book of Daniel. Asphenaz name has been found on monuments of ancient Babylon which are now in the Pergamon Museum, Berlin, Germany. The Babylonian monument had inscribed the following statement, “Ashpenaz, master of eunuchs in the time of Nebuchadnezzar”\n\nThe Dead Sea Scrolls, 4Q242, a Qumran scroll dating between 75-80 B.C. called “The Prayer of Nabonidus.” It is an apocryphal account of a healing of Nabonidus that is probably based on Daniel 4, but it can neither confirm nor deny the historical reliability of Daniel 4. Source: NIV Archaelogical Study Bible, Zondervan, 2005, p. 1400.\n
  • “ . . . until the 19th century the knowledge of the Babylonia and Assyria was based on the Old Testament and a few Greek writers. Not until the discovery of ancient documents . . . and the decipherment of the cuneiform script and the languages written in this script, did the history and civilization of Babylonia and Assyria become known.“ Source: Encyclopedia Britannica.\n\nDaniel chapter 5 has Belshazzar as the King of Babylon, this has often been disputed by the critics. The discovery of the Nabonidus Chronicle provided an precise explanation that a greed with Daniel’s account of the situation in Babylon.\n\nSecular history says Nabonidus was the King of Babylon, Daniel says Belshazzar was king. Critics pointed to this, saying Daniel is in error, this changed as a result of the discovery of the Nabonidus Chronicle. Sir Henry Rawlinson discovered a cylinder with an inscription in the Euphrates River which cleared the confusion about the King of Babylon.\n\nThere were two kings of Babylon in Daniel’s day, a father and son. The father Nabonidus installed his son Belshazzar as co-regent, Nabonidus spent much of his time (10 years away from Babylon) warring in such countries as Arabia. When the Persians conquered the city in 539 B.C. Belshazzar was killed. Nabonidus was later captured and sent to exile. This explained the promise made to Daniel in Daniel 5:29, after Daniel explained the meaning of the writing on the wall, Behshazzar promised to make him third ruler. Source: http://www.truthnet.org/Daniel/Introduction/\n \n\n29 Then Belshazzar gave the command, and they clothed Daniel with purple and put a chain of gold around his neck, and made a proclamation concerning him that he should be the third ruler in the kingdom. Daniel 5:29\n\nAsphenaz, is mentioned in the first chapter of Daniel (1:3 KJV) as master of the Eunuchs. The critics claim no such person ever existed. Recent discoveries again proved the accuracy of the book of Daniel. Asphenaz name has been found on monuments of ancient Babylon which are now in the Pergamon Museum, Berlin, Germany. The Babylonian monument had inscribed the following statement, “Ashpenaz, master of eunuchs in the time of Nebuchadnezzar”\n\nThe Dead Sea Scrolls, 4Q242, a Qumran scroll dating between 75-80 B.C. called “The Prayer of Nabonidus.” It is an apocryphal account of a healing of Nabonidus that is probably based on Daniel 4, but it can neither confirm nor deny the historical reliability of Daniel 4. Source: NIV Archaelogical Study Bible, Zondervan, 2005, p. 1400.\n
  • “The city of Babylon was the capital of the ancient land of Babylonia in southern Mesopotamia. It was situated on the Euphrates River about 50 miles south of modern Baghdad, just north of what is now the modern Iraqi town of al-Hillah.\n\nThe tremendous wealth and power of this city, along with its monumental size and appearance, were certainly considered a Biblical myth, that is, until its foundations were unearthed and its riches substantiated during the 19th century. Archaeologists stood in awe as their discoveries revealed that certain stories in the Bible were an actual situation that had happened in time.\n\nA quick overview of the writings of the prophet Isaiah in the Bible, especially chapter 13, reveals some predictions concerning Babylon that stagger the imagination.\n\nThe Word "Babylon"\n\nBabylon is Akkadian "babilani" which means "the Gate of God(s)" and it became the capital of the land of Babylonia. The etymology of the name Babel in the Bible means "confused" (Gen 11:9) and throughout the Bible, Babylon was a symbol of the confusion caused by godlessness. The name Babylon is the Greek form of the Hebrew name Babel.” Source: http://www.bible-history.com/babylonia/BabyloniaHistory_of_Babylonia.htm\n\n
  • \n
  • Egypt: Around 3000 B.C., Narmer unites upper and lower Egypt, marking the beginning of the first Egyptian dynasty. From 3000 B.C. until 332 B.C (when Alexander the Great of Greece conquered the Egyptian Empire), a series of 30 dynasties ruled Egypt. Source: World History- The Human Experience, National Geographic Textbook.\n\n\n
  • Egypt: Around 3000 B.C., Narmer unites upper and lower Egypt, marking the beginning of the first Egyptian dynasty. From 3000 B.C. until 332 B.C (when Alexander the Great of Greece conquered the Egyptian Empire), a series of 30 dynasties ruled Egypt. Source: World History- The Human Experience, National Geographic Textbook.\n\n\n
  • Egypt: Around 3000 B.C., Narmer unites upper and lower Egypt, marking the beginning of the first Egyptian dynasty. From 3000 B.C. until 332 B.C (when Alexander the Great of Greece conquered the Egyptian Empire), a series of 30 dynasties ruled Egypt. Source: World History- The Human Experience, National Geographic Textbook.\n\n\n
  • Egypt: Around 3000 B.C., Narmer unites upper and lower Egypt, marking the beginning of the first Egyptian dynasty. From 3000 B.C. until 332 B.C (when Alexander the Great of Greece conquered the Egyptian Empire), a series of 30 dynasties ruled Egypt. Source: World History- The Human Experience, National Geographic Textbook.\n\n\n
  • Egypt: Around 3000 B.C., Narmer unites upper and lower Egypt, marking the beginning of the first Egyptian dynasty. From 3000 B.C. until 332 B.C (when Alexander the Great of Greece conquered the Egyptian Empire), a series of 30 dynasties ruled Egypt. Source: World History- The Human Experience, National Geographic Textbook.\n\n\n
  • Egypt: Around 3000 B.C., Narmer unites upper and lower Egypt, marking the beginning of the first Egyptian dynasty. From 3000 B.C. until 332 B.C (when Alexander the Great of Greece conquered the Egyptian Empire), a series of 30 dynasties ruled Egypt. Source: World History- The Human Experience, National Geographic Textbook.\n\n\n
  • Hammurabi: 1790BC, King Hammurabi of Babylon dominated Mesopotamia, and historians consider his greatest achievement to be his effort “to make justice appear in the land.” He collected laws of the various Mesopotamian city-states and created a law code for the entire region, consisting of 282 sections dealing with most aspects of daily life, from the property of married women, adoption, inheritance, interest rates on loans, to damage to fields by cattle. In this image, King Hammurabi stands in front of the sun god Shamash at the top of the stone slab upon which is inscribed Hammurabi’s code of Laws. Shamash- the supreme judge- delivers the laws to the King. Source: World History- The Human Experience, National Geographic Textbook.\nPharaoh Necho II 610-595 killed Josiah when he met him at Megiddo. Tried to prop up Assyrian empire as buffer against BabylonAssyrians Conquer Egypt: Conquer Thebes, Egypt (Valley of the Kings)\n\nThe neo-Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Nineveh, capital of Assyria, was destroyed in 612 BC by the Babylonians and Medes. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605 (per the Babylonian Chronicle); first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ezekiel and 10,000 others). Destruction of Jerusalem in 586. Babylon taken by Cyrus of Persia in 539.]\n\n--If Daniel was born during Josiah's reforms (ca. 621), he was about 16 when deported to Babylon in 605. Death: “The time and circumstances of Daniel's death have not been recorded. However, Daniel was still alive in the third year of Cyrus according to the Bible (Daniel 1:3); and he would have been almost 100 years old at that point, having been brought to Babylon when he was in his teens, more than 80 years previously. He possibly died at Susa, where a tomb presumed to be his is also located, the site of which is known as Shush-Daniel.” Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel\n\n
  • Hammurabi: 1790BC, King Hammurabi of Babylon dominated Mesopotamia, and historians consider his greatest achievement to be his effort “to make justice appear in the land.” He collected laws of the various Mesopotamian city-states and created a law code for the entire region, consisting of 282 sections dealing with most aspects of daily life, from the property of married women, adoption, inheritance, interest rates on loans, to damage to fields by cattle. In this image, King Hammurabi stands in front of the sun god Shamash at the top of the stone slab upon which is inscribed Hammurabi’s code of Laws. Shamash- the supreme judge- delivers the laws to the King. Source: World History- The Human Experience, National Geographic Textbook.\nPharaoh Necho II 610-595 killed Josiah when he met him at Megiddo. Tried to prop up Assyrian empire as buffer against BabylonAssyrians Conquer Egypt: Conquer Thebes, Egypt (Valley of the Kings)\n\nThe neo-Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Nineveh, capital of Assyria, was destroyed in 612 BC by the Babylonians and Medes. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605 (per the Babylonian Chronicle); first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ezekiel and 10,000 others). Destruction of Jerusalem in 586. Babylon taken by Cyrus of Persia in 539.]\n\n--If Daniel was born during Josiah's reforms (ca. 621), he was about 16 when deported to Babylon in 605. Death: “The time and circumstances of Daniel's death have not been recorded. However, Daniel was still alive in the third year of Cyrus according to the Bible (Daniel 1:3); and he would have been almost 100 years old at that point, having been brought to Babylon when he was in his teens, more than 80 years previously. He possibly died at Susa, where a tomb presumed to be his is also located, the site of which is known as Shush-Daniel.” Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel\n\n
  • Hammurabi: 1790BC, King Hammurabi of Babylon dominated Mesopotamia, and historians consider his greatest achievement to be his effort “to make justice appear in the land.” He collected laws of the various Mesopotamian city-states and created a law code for the entire region, consisting of 282 sections dealing with most aspects of daily life, from the property of married women, adoption, inheritance, interest rates on loans, to damage to fields by cattle. In this image, King Hammurabi stands in front of the sun god Shamash at the top of the stone slab upon which is inscribed Hammurabi’s code of Laws. Shamash- the supreme judge- delivers the laws to the King. Source: World History- The Human Experience, National Geographic Textbook.\nPharaoh Necho II 610-595 killed Josiah when he met him at Megiddo. Tried to prop up Assyrian empire as buffer against BabylonAssyrians Conquer Egypt: Conquer Thebes, Egypt (Valley of the Kings)\n\nThe neo-Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Nineveh, capital of Assyria, was destroyed in 612 BC by the Babylonians and Medes. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605 (per the Babylonian Chronicle); first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ezekiel and 10,000 others). Destruction of Jerusalem in 586. Babylon taken by Cyrus of Persia in 539.]\n\n--If Daniel was born during Josiah's reforms (ca. 621), he was about 16 when deported to Babylon in 605. Death: “The time and circumstances of Daniel's death have not been recorded. However, Daniel was still alive in the third year of Cyrus according to the Bible (Daniel 1:3); and he would have been almost 100 years old at that point, having been brought to Babylon when he was in his teens, more than 80 years previously. He possibly died at Susa, where a tomb presumed to be his is also located, the site of which is known as Shush-Daniel.” Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel\n\n
  • Hammurabi: 1790BC, King Hammurabi of Babylon dominated Mesopotamia, and historians consider his greatest achievement to be his effort “to make justice appear in the land.” He collected laws of the various Mesopotamian city-states and created a law code for the entire region, consisting of 282 sections dealing with most aspects of daily life, from the property of married women, adoption, inheritance, interest rates on loans, to damage to fields by cattle. In this image, King Hammurabi stands in front of the sun god Shamash at the top of the stone slab upon which is inscribed Hammurabi’s code of Laws. Shamash- the supreme judge- delivers the laws to the King. Source: World History- The Human Experience, National Geographic Textbook.\nPharaoh Necho II 610-595 killed Josiah when he met him at Megiddo. Tried to prop up Assyrian empire as buffer against BabylonAssyrians Conquer Egypt: Conquer Thebes, Egypt (Valley of the Kings)\n\nThe neo-Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Nineveh, capital of Assyria, was destroyed in 612 BC by the Babylonians and Medes. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605 (per the Babylonian Chronicle); first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ezekiel and 10,000 others). Destruction of Jerusalem in 586. Babylon taken by Cyrus of Persia in 539.]\n\n--If Daniel was born during Josiah's reforms (ca. 621), he was about 16 when deported to Babylon in 605. Death: “The time and circumstances of Daniel's death have not been recorded. However, Daniel was still alive in the third year of Cyrus according to the Bible (Daniel 1:3); and he would have been almost 100 years old at that point, having been brought to Babylon when he was in his teens, more than 80 years previously. He possibly died at Susa, where a tomb presumed to be his is also located, the site of which is known as Shush-Daniel.” Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel\n\n
  • Hammurabi: 1790BC, King Hammurabi of Babylon dominated Mesopotamia, and historians consider his greatest achievement to be his effort “to make justice appear in the land.” He collected laws of the various Mesopotamian city-states and created a law code for the entire region, consisting of 282 sections dealing with most aspects of daily life, from the property of married women, adoption, inheritance, interest rates on loans, to damage to fields by cattle. In this image, King Hammurabi stands in front of the sun god Shamash at the top of the stone slab upon which is inscribed Hammurabi’s code of Laws. Shamash- the supreme judge- delivers the laws to the King. Source: World History- The Human Experience, National Geographic Textbook.\nPharaoh Necho II 610-595 killed Josiah when he met him at Megiddo. Tried to prop up Assyrian empire as buffer against BabylonAssyrians Conquer Egypt: Conquer Thebes, Egypt (Valley of the Kings)\n\nThe neo-Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Nineveh, capital of Assyria, was destroyed in 612 BC by the Babylonians and Medes. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605 (per the Babylonian Chronicle); first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ezekiel and 10,000 others). Destruction of Jerusalem in 586. Babylon taken by Cyrus of Persia in 539.]\n\n--If Daniel was born during Josiah's reforms (ca. 621), he was about 16 when deported to Babylon in 605. Death: “The time and circumstances of Daniel's death have not been recorded. However, Daniel was still alive in the third year of Cyrus according to the Bible (Daniel 1:3); and he would have been almost 100 years old at that point, having been brought to Babylon when he was in his teens, more than 80 years previously. He possibly died at Susa, where a tomb presumed to be his is also located, the site of which is known as Shush-Daniel.” Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel\n\n
  • Hammurabi: 1790BC, King Hammurabi of Babylon dominated Mesopotamia, and historians consider his greatest achievement to be his effort “to make justice appear in the land.” He collected laws of the various Mesopotamian city-states and created a law code for the entire region, consisting of 282 sections dealing with most aspects of daily life, from the property of married women, adoption, inheritance, interest rates on loans, to damage to fields by cattle. In this image, King Hammurabi stands in front of the sun god Shamash at the top of the stone slab upon which is inscribed Hammurabi’s code of Laws. Shamash- the supreme judge- delivers the laws to the King. Source: World History- The Human Experience, National Geographic Textbook.\nPharaoh Necho II 610-595 killed Josiah when he met him at Megiddo. Tried to prop up Assyrian empire as buffer against BabylonAssyrians Conquer Egypt: Conquer Thebes, Egypt (Valley of the Kings)\n\nThe neo-Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Nineveh, capital of Assyria, was destroyed in 612 BC by the Babylonians and Medes. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605 (per the Babylonian Chronicle); first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ezekiel and 10,000 others). Destruction of Jerusalem in 586. Babylon taken by Cyrus of Persia in 539.]\n\n--If Daniel was born during Josiah's reforms (ca. 621), he was about 16 when deported to Babylon in 605. Death: “The time and circumstances of Daniel's death have not been recorded. However, Daniel was still alive in the third year of Cyrus according to the Bible (Daniel 1:3); and he would have been almost 100 years old at that point, having been brought to Babylon when he was in his teens, more than 80 years previously. He possibly died at Susa, where a tomb presumed to be his is also located, the site of which is known as Shush-Daniel.” Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel\n\n
  • Hammurabi: 1790BC, King Hammurabi of Babylon dominated Mesopotamia, and historians consider his greatest achievement to be his effort “to make justice appear in the land.” He collected laws of the various Mesopotamian city-states and created a law code for the entire region, consisting of 282 sections dealing with most aspects of daily life, from the property of married women, adoption, inheritance, interest rates on loans, to damage to fields by cattle. In this image, King Hammurabi stands in front of the sun god Shamash at the top of the stone slab upon which is inscribed Hammurabi’s code of Laws. Shamash- the supreme judge- delivers the laws to the King. Source: World History- The Human Experience, National Geographic Textbook.\nPharaoh Necho II 610-595 killed Josiah when he met him at Megiddo. Tried to prop up Assyrian empire as buffer against BabylonAssyrians Conquer Egypt: Conquer Thebes, Egypt (Valley of the Kings)\n\nThe neo-Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Nineveh, capital of Assyria, was destroyed in 612 BC by the Babylonians and Medes. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605 (per the Babylonian Chronicle); first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ezekiel and 10,000 others). Destruction of Jerusalem in 586. Babylon taken by Cyrus of Persia in 539.]\n\n--If Daniel was born during Josiah's reforms (ca. 621), he was about 16 when deported to Babylon in 605. Death: “The time and circumstances of Daniel's death have not been recorded. However, Daniel was still alive in the third year of Cyrus according to the Bible (Daniel 1:3); and he would have been almost 100 years old at that point, having been brought to Babylon when he was in his teens, more than 80 years previously. He possibly died at Susa, where a tomb presumed to be his is also located, the site of which is known as Shush-Daniel.” Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel\n\n
  • Hammurabi: 1790BC, King Hammurabi of Babylon dominated Mesopotamia, and historians consider his greatest achievement to be his effort “to make justice appear in the land.” He collected laws of the various Mesopotamian city-states and created a law code for the entire region, consisting of 282 sections dealing with most aspects of daily life, from the property of married women, adoption, inheritance, interest rates on loans, to damage to fields by cattle. In this image, King Hammurabi stands in front of the sun god Shamash at the top of the stone slab upon which is inscribed Hammurabi’s code of Laws. Shamash- the supreme judge- delivers the laws to the King. Source: World History- The Human Experience, National Geographic Textbook.\nPharaoh Necho II 610-595 killed Josiah when he met him at Megiddo. Tried to prop up Assyrian empire as buffer against BabylonAssyrians Conquer Egypt: Conquer Thebes, Egypt (Valley of the Kings)\n\nThe neo-Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Nineveh, capital of Assyria, was destroyed in 612 BC by the Babylonians and Medes. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605 (per the Babylonian Chronicle); first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ezekiel and 10,000 others). Destruction of Jerusalem in 586. Babylon taken by Cyrus of Persia in 539.]\n\n--If Daniel was born during Josiah's reforms (ca. 621), he was about 16 when deported to Babylon in 605. Death: “The time and circumstances of Daniel's death have not been recorded. However, Daniel was still alive in the third year of Cyrus according to the Bible (Daniel 1:3); and he would have been almost 100 years old at that point, having been brought to Babylon when he was in his teens, more than 80 years previously. He possibly died at Susa, where a tomb presumed to be his is also located, the site of which is known as Shush-Daniel.” Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel\n\n
  • Hammurabi: 1790BC, King Hammurabi of Babylon dominated Mesopotamia, and historians consider his greatest achievement to be his effort “to make justice appear in the land.” He collected laws of the various Mesopotamian city-states and created a law code for the entire region, consisting of 282 sections dealing with most aspects of daily life, from the property of married women, adoption, inheritance, interest rates on loans, to damage to fields by cattle. In this image, King Hammurabi stands in front of the sun god Shamash at the top of the stone slab upon which is inscribed Hammurabi’s code of Laws. Shamash- the supreme judge- delivers the laws to the King. Source: World History- The Human Experience, National Geographic Textbook.\nPharaoh Necho II 610-595 killed Josiah when he met him at Megiddo. Tried to prop up Assyrian empire as buffer against BabylonAssyrians Conquer Egypt: Conquer Thebes, Egypt (Valley of the Kings)\n\nThe neo-Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Nineveh, capital of Assyria, was destroyed in 612 BC by the Babylonians and Medes. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605 (per the Babylonian Chronicle); first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ezekiel and 10,000 others). Destruction of Jerusalem in 586. Babylon taken by Cyrus of Persia in 539.]\n\n--If Daniel was born during Josiah's reforms (ca. 621), he was about 16 when deported to Babylon in 605. Death: “The time and circumstances of Daniel's death have not been recorded. However, Daniel was still alive in the third year of Cyrus according to the Bible (Daniel 1:3); and he would have been almost 100 years old at that point, having been brought to Babylon when he was in his teens, more than 80 years previously. He possibly died at Susa, where a tomb presumed to be his is also located, the site of which is known as Shush-Daniel.” Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel\n\n
  • Hammurabi: 1790BC, King Hammurabi of Babylon dominated Mesopotamia, and historians consider his greatest achievement to be his effort “to make justice appear in the land.” He collected laws of the various Mesopotamian city-states and created a law code for the entire region, consisting of 282 sections dealing with most aspects of daily life, from the property of married women, adoption, inheritance, interest rates on loans, to damage to fields by cattle. In this image, King Hammurabi stands in front of the sun god Shamash at the top of the stone slab upon which is inscribed Hammurabi’s code of Laws. Shamash- the supreme judge- delivers the laws to the King. Source: World History- The Human Experience, National Geographic Textbook.\nPharaoh Necho II 610-595 killed Josiah when he met him at Megiddo. Tried to prop up Assyrian empire as buffer against BabylonAssyrians Conquer Egypt: Conquer Thebes, Egypt (Valley of the Kings)\n\nThe neo-Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Nineveh, capital of Assyria, was destroyed in 612 BC by the Babylonians and Medes. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605 (per the Babylonian Chronicle); first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ezekiel and 10,000 others). Destruction of Jerusalem in 586. Babylon taken by Cyrus of Persia in 539.]\n\n--If Daniel was born during Josiah's reforms (ca. 621), he was about 16 when deported to Babylon in 605. Death: “The time and circumstances of Daniel's death have not been recorded. However, Daniel was still alive in the third year of Cyrus according to the Bible (Daniel 1:3); and he would have been almost 100 years old at that point, having been brought to Babylon when he was in his teens, more than 80 years previously. He possibly died at Susa, where a tomb presumed to be his is also located, the site of which is known as Shush-Daniel.” Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel\n\n
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  • “Jehoiakim He whom Jehovah has set up, the second son of Josiah, and eighteenth king of Judah, which he ruled over for eleven years (610-599 B.C.). His original name was Eliakim (q.v.). On the death of his father his younger brother Jehoahaz (= Shallum, Jer 22:11), who favoured the Chaldeans against the Egyptians, was made king by the people; but the king of Egypt, Pharaoh-necho, invaded the land and deposed Jehoahaz (Kg2 23:33, Kg2 23:34; Jer 22:10), setting Eliakim on the throne in his stead, and changing his name to Jehoiakim. After this the king of Egypt took no part in Jewish politics, having been defeated by the Chaldeans at Carchemish (Kg2 24:7; Jer 46:2). Palestine was now invaded and conquered by Nebuchadnezzar. Jehoiakim was taken prisoner and carried captive to Babylon (Ch2 36:6, Ch2 36:7). It was at this time that Daniel also and his three companions were taken captive to Babylon (Dan 1:1, Dan 1:2). Nebuchadnezzar reinstated Jehoiakim on his throne, but treated him as a vassal king. In the year after this, Jeremiah caused his prophecies to be read by Baruch in the court of the temple. Jehoiakim, hearing of this, had them also read in the royal palace before himself. The words displeased him, and taking the roll from the hands of Baruch he cut it in pieces and threw it into the fire (Jer 36:23). During his disastrous reign there was a return to the old idolatry and corruption of the days of Manasseh. After three years of subjection to Babylon, Jehoiakim withheld his tribute and threw off the yoke (Kg2 24:1), hoping to make himself independent. Nebuchadnezzar sent bands of Chaldeans, Syrians, and Ammonites (Kg2 24:2) to chastise his rebellious vassal. They cruelly harassed the whole country (compare Jer 49:1). The king came to a violent death, and his body having been thrown over the wall of Jerusalem, to convince the besieging army that he was dead, after having been dragged away, was buried beyond the gates of Jerusalem "with the burial of an ass," 599 B.C. (Jer 22:18, Jer 22:19; Jer 36:30). Nebuchadnezzar placed his son Jehoiachin on the throne, wishing still to retain the kingdom of Judah as tributary to him.” Source: Easton’s Bible Dictionary, http://www.sacred-texts.com/bib/ebd/ebd201.htm\n\nThe story of Jehoaikim is found in 2 Kings 23:34-37, 2 Kings 24:1-5, and 2 Chronicles 36:4-8. The name Jehoiakim means "God will arise." Source: http://www.aboutbibleprophecy.com/p78.htm\n\nBabylonian Chronicle:\n The Babylonian Chronicle records events in ancient Babylon dating from about 750 BC to 280 BC. This tablet is part of that chronicle and records events from 605-594 BC including Nebuchadnezzar II's campaigns in the west, where Jerusalem is. It also records the defeat of the Assyrians and the fall of the Assyrian Empire and the rising threat of Egypt. It records the Battle of Carchemish where Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon defeated Pharoah Necho of Egypt in 605 BC. It records Nebuchadnezzar's rise to power, it records the removing of Jehoiachin, king of Judah and inserting Zedekiah as king in his place, as recorded in Scripture, and it records the capture of Jerusalem on the 16th of March, 597 BC. The discovery of this part of the Babylonian Chronicle is important in the study of Biblical Archaeology because it contains several events mentioned in the Bible that correspond exactly.\n\n"And in the fifth month, on the seventh day of the month, which is the nineteenth year of king Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, came Nebuzaradan, captain of the guard, a servant of the king of Babylon, unto Jerusalem: And he burnt the house of the LORD, and the king's house, and all the houses of Jerusalem, and every great man's house burnt he with fire." 2 Kings 25:8\nSource: http://www.bible-history.com/archaeology/babylon/babylonian-chronicle.html\n\nDate Dispute:\n“We are told that Nebuchadnezzar came to Jerusalem during the third year of Jehoiakim’s reign. But Jeremiah 46:2 says this occurred in the fourth year of Jehoiakim’s reign. The difference is that the Babylonians counted the first year as the ascension year and the next year as the first year of a king’s reign. This fact is found in the first and second chapters. In the first chapter, Daniel says that he was trained for three years (Dan. 1:5) before he entered the king’s service (Dan. 1:18). So the chapter marks the end of Daniel’s third year of captivity, but Daniel 2:1 says this is also the second year of Nebuchadnezzar’s reign. Nebuchadnezzar has been the ruler for three years: one ascension year plus two years as king. Daniel, the author, was trained to count the reign of a ruler as a Babylonian would. He counted Jehoiakim’s reign in the same way.” Source: http://www.neverthirsty.org/pp/series/DAN/D002/D002.html\n
  • “Jehoiakim He whom Jehovah has set up, the second son of Josiah, and eighteenth king of Judah, which he ruled over for eleven years (610-599 B.C.). His original name was Eliakim (q.v.). On the death of his father his younger brother Jehoahaz (= Shallum, Jer 22:11), who favoured the Chaldeans against the Egyptians, was made king by the people; but the king of Egypt, Pharaoh-necho, invaded the land and deposed Jehoahaz (Kg2 23:33, Kg2 23:34; Jer 22:10), setting Eliakim on the throne in his stead, and changing his name to Jehoiakim. After this the king of Egypt took no part in Jewish politics, having been defeated by the Chaldeans at Carchemish (Kg2 24:7; Jer 46:2). Palestine was now invaded and conquered by Nebuchadnezzar. Jehoiakim was taken prisoner and carried captive to Babylon (Ch2 36:6, Ch2 36:7). It was at this time that Daniel also and his three companions were taken captive to Babylon (Dan 1:1, Dan 1:2). Nebuchadnezzar reinstated Jehoiakim on his throne, but treated him as a vassal king. In the year after this, Jeremiah caused his prophecies to be read by Baruch in the court of the temple. Jehoiakim, hearing of this, had them also read in the royal palace before himself. The words displeased him, and taking the roll from the hands of Baruch he cut it in pieces and threw it into the fire (Jer 36:23). During his disastrous reign there was a return to the old idolatry and corruption of the days of Manasseh. After three years of subjection to Babylon, Jehoiakim withheld his tribute and threw off the yoke (Kg2 24:1), hoping to make himself independent. Nebuchadnezzar sent bands of Chaldeans, Syrians, and Ammonites (Kg2 24:2) to chastise his rebellious vassal. They cruelly harassed the whole country (compare Jer 49:1). The king came to a violent death, and his body having been thrown over the wall of Jerusalem, to convince the besieging army that he was dead, after having been dragged away, was buried beyond the gates of Jerusalem "with the burial of an ass," 599 B.C. (Jer 22:18, Jer 22:19; Jer 36:30). Nebuchadnezzar placed his son Jehoiachin on the throne, wishing still to retain the kingdom of Judah as tributary to him.” Source: Easton’s Bible Dictionary, http://www.sacred-texts.com/bib/ebd/ebd201.htm\n\nThe story of Jehoaikim is found in 2 Kings 23:34-37, 2 Kings 24:1-5, and 2 Chronicles 36:4-8. The name Jehoiakim means "God will arise." Source: http://www.aboutbibleprophecy.com/p78.htm\n\nBabylonian Chronicle:\n The Babylonian Chronicle records events in ancient Babylon dating from about 750 BC to 280 BC. This tablet is part of that chronicle and records events from 605-594 BC including Nebuchadnezzar II's campaigns in the west, where Jerusalem is. It also records the defeat of the Assyrians and the fall of the Assyrian Empire and the rising threat of Egypt. It records the Battle of Carchemish where Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon defeated Pharoah Necho of Egypt in 605 BC. It records Nebuchadnezzar's rise to power, it records the removing of Jehoiachin, king of Judah and inserting Zedekiah as king in his place, as recorded in Scripture, and it records the capture of Jerusalem on the 16th of March, 597 BC. The discovery of this part of the Babylonian Chronicle is important in the study of Biblical Archaeology because it contains several events mentioned in the Bible that correspond exactly.\n\n"And in the fifth month, on the seventh day of the month, which is the nineteenth year of king Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, came Nebuzaradan, captain of the guard, a servant of the king of Babylon, unto Jerusalem: And he burnt the house of the LORD, and the king's house, and all the houses of Jerusalem, and every great man's house burnt he with fire." 2 Kings 25:8\nSource: http://www.bible-history.com/archaeology/babylon/babylonian-chronicle.html\n\nDate Dispute:\n“We are told that Nebuchadnezzar came to Jerusalem during the third year of Jehoiakim’s reign. But Jeremiah 46:2 says this occurred in the fourth year of Jehoiakim’s reign. The difference is that the Babylonians counted the first year as the ascension year and the next year as the first year of a king’s reign. This fact is found in the first and second chapters. In the first chapter, Daniel says that he was trained for three years (Dan. 1:5) before he entered the king’s service (Dan. 1:18). So the chapter marks the end of Daniel’s third year of captivity, but Daniel 2:1 says this is also the second year of Nebuchadnezzar’s reign. Nebuchadnezzar has been the ruler for three years: one ascension year plus two years as king. Daniel, the author, was trained to count the reign of a ruler as a Babylonian would. He counted Jehoiakim’s reign in the same way.” Source: http://www.neverthirsty.org/pp/series/DAN/D002/D002.html\n
  • “Jehoiakim He whom Jehovah has set up, the second son of Josiah, and eighteenth king of Judah, which he ruled over for eleven years (610-599 B.C.). His original name was Eliakim (q.v.). On the death of his father his younger brother Jehoahaz (= Shallum, Jer 22:11), who favoured the Chaldeans against the Egyptians, was made king by the people; but the king of Egypt, Pharaoh-necho, invaded the land and deposed Jehoahaz (Kg2 23:33, Kg2 23:34; Jer 22:10), setting Eliakim on the throne in his stead, and changing his name to Jehoiakim. After this the king of Egypt took no part in Jewish politics, having been defeated by the Chaldeans at Carchemish (Kg2 24:7; Jer 46:2). Palestine was now invaded and conquered by Nebuchadnezzar. Jehoiakim was taken prisoner and carried captive to Babylon (Ch2 36:6, Ch2 36:7). It was at this time that Daniel also and his three companions were taken captive to Babylon (Dan 1:1, Dan 1:2). Nebuchadnezzar reinstated Jehoiakim on his throne, but treated him as a vassal king. In the year after this, Jeremiah caused his prophecies to be read by Baruch in the court of the temple. Jehoiakim, hearing of this, had them also read in the royal palace before himself. The words displeased him, and taking the roll from the hands of Baruch he cut it in pieces and threw it into the fire (Jer 36:23). During his disastrous reign there was a return to the old idolatry and corruption of the days of Manasseh. After three years of subjection to Babylon, Jehoiakim withheld his tribute and threw off the yoke (Kg2 24:1), hoping to make himself independent. Nebuchadnezzar sent bands of Chaldeans, Syrians, and Ammonites (Kg2 24:2) to chastise his rebellious vassal. They cruelly harassed the whole country (compare Jer 49:1). The king came to a violent death, and his body having been thrown over the wall of Jerusalem, to convince the besieging army that he was dead, after having been dragged away, was buried beyond the gates of Jerusalem "with the burial of an ass," 599 B.C. (Jer 22:18, Jer 22:19; Jer 36:30). Nebuchadnezzar placed his son Jehoiachin on the throne, wishing still to retain the kingdom of Judah as tributary to him.” Source: Easton’s Bible Dictionary, http://www.sacred-texts.com/bib/ebd/ebd201.htm\n\nThe story of Jehoaikim is found in 2 Kings 23:34-37, 2 Kings 24:1-5, and 2 Chronicles 36:4-8. The name Jehoiakim means "God will arise." Source: http://www.aboutbibleprophecy.com/p78.htm\n\nBabylonian Chronicle:\n The Babylonian Chronicle records events in ancient Babylon dating from about 750 BC to 280 BC. This tablet is part of that chronicle and records events from 605-594 BC including Nebuchadnezzar II's campaigns in the west, where Jerusalem is. It also records the defeat of the Assyrians and the fall of the Assyrian Empire and the rising threat of Egypt. It records the Battle of Carchemish where Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon defeated Pharoah Necho of Egypt in 605 BC. It records Nebuchadnezzar's rise to power, it records the removing of Jehoiachin, king of Judah and inserting Zedekiah as king in his place, as recorded in Scripture, and it records the capture of Jerusalem on the 16th of March, 597 BC. The discovery of this part of the Babylonian Chronicle is important in the study of Biblical Archaeology because it contains several events mentioned in the Bible that correspond exactly.\n\n"And in the fifth month, on the seventh day of the month, which is the nineteenth year of king Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, came Nebuzaradan, captain of the guard, a servant of the king of Babylon, unto Jerusalem: And he burnt the house of the LORD, and the king's house, and all the houses of Jerusalem, and every great man's house burnt he with fire." 2 Kings 25:8\nSource: http://www.bible-history.com/archaeology/babylon/babylonian-chronicle.html\n\nDate Dispute:\n“We are told that Nebuchadnezzar came to Jerusalem during the third year of Jehoiakim’s reign. But Jeremiah 46:2 says this occurred in the fourth year of Jehoiakim’s reign. The difference is that the Babylonians counted the first year as the ascension year and the next year as the first year of a king’s reign. This fact is found in the first and second chapters. In the first chapter, Daniel says that he was trained for three years (Dan. 1:5) before he entered the king’s service (Dan. 1:18). So the chapter marks the end of Daniel’s third year of captivity, but Daniel 2:1 says this is also the second year of Nebuchadnezzar’s reign. Nebuchadnezzar has been the ruler for three years: one ascension year plus two years as king. Daniel, the author, was trained to count the reign of a ruler as a Babylonian would. He counted Jehoiakim’s reign in the same way.” Source: http://www.neverthirsty.org/pp/series/DAN/D002/D002.html\n
  • “Jehoiakim He whom Jehovah has set up, the second son of Josiah, and eighteenth king of Judah, which he ruled over for eleven years (610-599 B.C.). His original name was Eliakim (q.v.). On the death of his father his younger brother Jehoahaz (= Shallum, Jer 22:11), who favoured the Chaldeans against the Egyptians, was made king by the people; but the king of Egypt, Pharaoh-necho, invaded the land and deposed Jehoahaz (Kg2 23:33, Kg2 23:34; Jer 22:10), setting Eliakim on the throne in his stead, and changing his name to Jehoiakim. After this the king of Egypt took no part in Jewish politics, having been defeated by the Chaldeans at Carchemish (Kg2 24:7; Jer 46:2). Palestine was now invaded and conquered by Nebuchadnezzar. Jehoiakim was taken prisoner and carried captive to Babylon (Ch2 36:6, Ch2 36:7). It was at this time that Daniel also and his three companions were taken captive to Babylon (Dan 1:1, Dan 1:2). Nebuchadnezzar reinstated Jehoiakim on his throne, but treated him as a vassal king. In the year after this, Jeremiah caused his prophecies to be read by Baruch in the court of the temple. Jehoiakim, hearing of this, had them also read in the royal palace before himself. The words displeased him, and taking the roll from the hands of Baruch he cut it in pieces and threw it into the fire (Jer 36:23). During his disastrous reign there was a return to the old idolatry and corruption of the days of Manasseh. After three years of subjection to Babylon, Jehoiakim withheld his tribute and threw off the yoke (Kg2 24:1), hoping to make himself independent. Nebuchadnezzar sent bands of Chaldeans, Syrians, and Ammonites (Kg2 24:2) to chastise his rebellious vassal. They cruelly harassed the whole country (compare Jer 49:1). The king came to a violent death, and his body having been thrown over the wall of Jerusalem, to convince the besieging army that he was dead, after having been dragged away, was buried beyond the gates of Jerusalem "with the burial of an ass," 599 B.C. (Jer 22:18, Jer 22:19; Jer 36:30). Nebuchadnezzar placed his son Jehoiachin on the throne, wishing still to retain the kingdom of Judah as tributary to him.” Source: Easton’s Bible Dictionary, http://www.sacred-texts.com/bib/ebd/ebd201.htm\n\nThe story of Jehoaikim is found in 2 Kings 23:34-37, 2 Kings 24:1-5, and 2 Chronicles 36:4-8. The name Jehoiakim means "God will arise." Source: http://www.aboutbibleprophecy.com/p78.htm\n\nBabylonian Chronicle:\n The Babylonian Chronicle records events in ancient Babylon dating from about 750 BC to 280 BC. This tablet is part of that chronicle and records events from 605-594 BC including Nebuchadnezzar II's campaigns in the west, where Jerusalem is. It also records the defeat of the Assyrians and the fall of the Assyrian Empire and the rising threat of Egypt. It records the Battle of Carchemish where Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon defeated Pharoah Necho of Egypt in 605 BC. It records Nebuchadnezzar's rise to power, it records the removing of Jehoiachin, king of Judah and inserting Zedekiah as king in his place, as recorded in Scripture, and it records the capture of Jerusalem on the 16th of March, 597 BC. The discovery of this part of the Babylonian Chronicle is important in the study of Biblical Archaeology because it contains several events mentioned in the Bible that correspond exactly.\n\n"And in the fifth month, on the seventh day of the month, which is the nineteenth year of king Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, came Nebuzaradan, captain of the guard, a servant of the king of Babylon, unto Jerusalem: And he burnt the house of the LORD, and the king's house, and all the houses of Jerusalem, and every great man's house burnt he with fire." 2 Kings 25:8\nSource: http://www.bible-history.com/archaeology/babylon/babylonian-chronicle.html\n\nDate Dispute:\n“We are told that Nebuchadnezzar came to Jerusalem during the third year of Jehoiakim’s reign. But Jeremiah 46:2 says this occurred in the fourth year of Jehoiakim’s reign. The difference is that the Babylonians counted the first year as the ascension year and the next year as the first year of a king’s reign. This fact is found in the first and second chapters. In the first chapter, Daniel says that he was trained for three years (Dan. 1:5) before he entered the king’s service (Dan. 1:18). So the chapter marks the end of Daniel’s third year of captivity, but Daniel 2:1 says this is also the second year of Nebuchadnezzar’s reign. Nebuchadnezzar has been the ruler for three years: one ascension year plus two years as king. Daniel, the author, was trained to count the reign of a ruler as a Babylonian would. He counted Jehoiakim’s reign in the same way.” Source: http://www.neverthirsty.org/pp/series/DAN/D002/D002.html\n
  • “Jehoiakim He whom Jehovah has set up, the second son of Josiah, and eighteenth king of Judah, which he ruled over for eleven years (610-599 B.C.). His original name was Eliakim (q.v.). On the death of his father his younger brother Jehoahaz (= Shallum, Jer 22:11), who favoured the Chaldeans against the Egyptians, was made king by the people; but the king of Egypt, Pharaoh-necho, invaded the land and deposed Jehoahaz (Kg2 23:33, Kg2 23:34; Jer 22:10), setting Eliakim on the throne in his stead, and changing his name to Jehoiakim. After this the king of Egypt took no part in Jewish politics, having been defeated by the Chaldeans at Carchemish (Kg2 24:7; Jer 46:2). Palestine was now invaded and conquered by Nebuchadnezzar. Jehoiakim was taken prisoner and carried captive to Babylon (Ch2 36:6, Ch2 36:7). It was at this time that Daniel also and his three companions were taken captive to Babylon (Dan 1:1, Dan 1:2). Nebuchadnezzar reinstated Jehoiakim on his throne, but treated him as a vassal king. In the year after this, Jeremiah caused his prophecies to be read by Baruch in the court of the temple. Jehoiakim, hearing of this, had them also read in the royal palace before himself. The words displeased him, and taking the roll from the hands of Baruch he cut it in pieces and threw it into the fire (Jer 36:23). During his disastrous reign there was a return to the old idolatry and corruption of the days of Manasseh. After three years of subjection to Babylon, Jehoiakim withheld his tribute and threw off the yoke (Kg2 24:1), hoping to make himself independent. Nebuchadnezzar sent bands of Chaldeans, Syrians, and Ammonites (Kg2 24:2) to chastise his rebellious vassal. They cruelly harassed the whole country (compare Jer 49:1). The king came to a violent death, and his body having been thrown over the wall of Jerusalem, to convince the besieging army that he was dead, after having been dragged away, was buried beyond the gates of Jerusalem "with the burial of an ass," 599 B.C. (Jer 22:18, Jer 22:19; Jer 36:30). Nebuchadnezzar placed his son Jehoiachin on the throne, wishing still to retain the kingdom of Judah as tributary to him.” Source: Easton’s Bible Dictionary, http://www.sacred-texts.com/bib/ebd/ebd201.htm\n\nThe story of Jehoaikim is found in 2 Kings 23:34-37, 2 Kings 24:1-5, and 2 Chronicles 36:4-8. The name Jehoiakim means "God will arise." Source: http://www.aboutbibleprophecy.com/p78.htm\n\nBabylonian Chronicle:\n The Babylonian Chronicle records events in ancient Babylon dating from about 750 BC to 280 BC. This tablet is part of that chronicle and records events from 605-594 BC including Nebuchadnezzar II's campaigns in the west, where Jerusalem is. It also records the defeat of the Assyrians and the fall of the Assyrian Empire and the rising threat of Egypt. It records the Battle of Carchemish where Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon defeated Pharoah Necho of Egypt in 605 BC. It records Nebuchadnezzar's rise to power, it records the removing of Jehoiachin, king of Judah and inserting Zedekiah as king in his place, as recorded in Scripture, and it records the capture of Jerusalem on the 16th of March, 597 BC. The discovery of this part of the Babylonian Chronicle is important in the study of Biblical Archaeology because it contains several events mentioned in the Bible that correspond exactly.\n\n"And in the fifth month, on the seventh day of the month, which is the nineteenth year of king Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, came Nebuzaradan, captain of the guard, a servant of the king of Babylon, unto Jerusalem: And he burnt the house of the LORD, and the king's house, and all the houses of Jerusalem, and every great man's house burnt he with fire." 2 Kings 25:8\nSource: http://www.bible-history.com/archaeology/babylon/babylonian-chronicle.html\n\nDate Dispute:\n“We are told that Nebuchadnezzar came to Jerusalem during the third year of Jehoiakim’s reign. But Jeremiah 46:2 says this occurred in the fourth year of Jehoiakim’s reign. The difference is that the Babylonians counted the first year as the ascension year and the next year as the first year of a king’s reign. This fact is found in the first and second chapters. In the first chapter, Daniel says that he was trained for three years (Dan. 1:5) before he entered the king’s service (Dan. 1:18). So the chapter marks the end of Daniel’s third year of captivity, but Daniel 2:1 says this is also the second year of Nebuchadnezzar’s reign. Nebuchadnezzar has been the ruler for three years: one ascension year plus two years as king. Daniel, the author, was trained to count the reign of a ruler as a Babylonian would. He counted Jehoiakim’s reign in the same way.” Source: http://www.neverthirsty.org/pp/series/DAN/D002/D002.html\n
  • “Jehoiakim He whom Jehovah has set up, the second son of Josiah, and eighteenth king of Judah, which he ruled over for eleven years (610-599 B.C.). His original name was Eliakim (q.v.). On the death of his father his younger brother Jehoahaz (= Shallum, Jer 22:11), who favoured the Chaldeans against the Egyptians, was made king by the people; but the king of Egypt, Pharaoh-necho, invaded the land and deposed Jehoahaz (Kg2 23:33, Kg2 23:34; Jer 22:10), setting Eliakim on the throne in his stead, and changing his name to Jehoiakim. After this the king of Egypt took no part in Jewish politics, having been defeated by the Chaldeans at Carchemish (Kg2 24:7; Jer 46:2). Palestine was now invaded and conquered by Nebuchadnezzar. Jehoiakim was taken prisoner and carried captive to Babylon (Ch2 36:6, Ch2 36:7). It was at this time that Daniel also and his three companions were taken captive to Babylon (Dan 1:1, Dan 1:2). Nebuchadnezzar reinstated Jehoiakim on his throne, but treated him as a vassal king. In the year after this, Jeremiah caused his prophecies to be read by Baruch in the court of the temple. Jehoiakim, hearing of this, had them also read in the royal palace before himself. The words displeased him, and taking the roll from the hands of Baruch he cut it in pieces and threw it into the fire (Jer 36:23). During his disastrous reign there was a return to the old idolatry and corruption of the days of Manasseh. After three years of subjection to Babylon, Jehoiakim withheld his tribute and threw off the yoke (Kg2 24:1), hoping to make himself independent. Nebuchadnezzar sent bands of Chaldeans, Syrians, and Ammonites (Kg2 24:2) to chastise his rebellious vassal. They cruelly harassed the whole country (compare Jer 49:1). The king came to a violent death, and his body having been thrown over the wall of Jerusalem, to convince the besieging army that he was dead, after having been dragged away, was buried beyond the gates of Jerusalem "with the burial of an ass," 599 B.C. (Jer 22:18, Jer 22:19; Jer 36:30). Nebuchadnezzar placed his son Jehoiachin on the throne, wishing still to retain the kingdom of Judah as tributary to him.” Source: Easton’s Bible Dictionary, http://www.sacred-texts.com/bib/ebd/ebd201.htm\n\nThe story of Jehoaikim is found in 2 Kings 23:34-37, 2 Kings 24:1-5, and 2 Chronicles 36:4-8. The name Jehoiakim means "God will arise." Source: http://www.aboutbibleprophecy.com/p78.htm\n\nBabylonian Chronicle:\n The Babylonian Chronicle records events in ancient Babylon dating from about 750 BC to 280 BC. This tablet is part of that chronicle and records events from 605-594 BC including Nebuchadnezzar II's campaigns in the west, where Jerusalem is. It also records the defeat of the Assyrians and the fall of the Assyrian Empire and the rising threat of Egypt. It records the Battle of Carchemish where Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon defeated Pharoah Necho of Egypt in 605 BC. It records Nebuchadnezzar's rise to power, it records the removing of Jehoiachin, king of Judah and inserting Zedekiah as king in his place, as recorded in Scripture, and it records the capture of Jerusalem on the 16th of March, 597 BC. The discovery of this part of the Babylonian Chronicle is important in the study of Biblical Archaeology because it contains several events mentioned in the Bible that correspond exactly.\n\n"And in the fifth month, on the seventh day of the month, which is the nineteenth year of king Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, came Nebuzaradan, captain of the guard, a servant of the king of Babylon, unto Jerusalem: And he burnt the house of the LORD, and the king's house, and all the houses of Jerusalem, and every great man's house burnt he with fire." 2 Kings 25:8\nSource: http://www.bible-history.com/archaeology/babylon/babylonian-chronicle.html\n\nDate Dispute:\n“We are told that Nebuchadnezzar came to Jerusalem during the third year of Jehoiakim’s reign. But Jeremiah 46:2 says this occurred in the fourth year of Jehoiakim’s reign. The difference is that the Babylonians counted the first year as the ascension year and the next year as the first year of a king’s reign. This fact is found in the first and second chapters. In the first chapter, Daniel says that he was trained for three years (Dan. 1:5) before he entered the king’s service (Dan. 1:18). So the chapter marks the end of Daniel’s third year of captivity, but Daniel 2:1 says this is also the second year of Nebuchadnezzar’s reign. Nebuchadnezzar has been the ruler for three years: one ascension year plus two years as king. Daniel, the author, was trained to count the reign of a ruler as a Babylonian would. He counted Jehoiakim’s reign in the same way.” Source: http://www.neverthirsty.org/pp/series/DAN/D002/D002.html\n
  • •1 [Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605; first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ezekiel and 10,000 others). Destruction of Jerusalem in 586. Babylon taken by Cyrus of Persia in 539.]\n\nAs R. Campbell Thompson declares: "Events had already shown that Nebuchadrezzar was a vigorous and brilliant commander, and physically as well as mentally a strong man, fully worthy of succeeding his father. He was to become the greatest man of his time in the Near East, as a soldier, a statesman, and an architect. Had his successors been of such a stamp instead of callow boys or dilettanti without redeeming vigor, the Persians would have found Babylonia a harder problem. 'All the nations,' says Jeremiah (Jeremiah 27: 7, R. V.), 'shall serve him, and his son, and his son's son, until the time of his own land come.' " Source: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan2.htm\n\n Nebuchadnezzar was also known for his harshness “whomever he wished he killed and whomever he wished he spared alive; and whomever he wished he elevated and whomever he wished he humbled.” Dan. 5:19 . In 586 B.C., King Zedekiah, the youngest son of Josiah, tried to escape from the Babylonian siege at night. When he and his sons were caught, they saw the cruel actions of Nebuchadnezzar, who blinded Zedekiah after he witnessed the murder of his sons (Jeremiah 39:5). Nebuchadnezzar, was also known for burning people alive as we see in Daniel chapter 3. Source: http://www.truthnet.org/Daniel/Chapter1/\n\n\nNebucahdnezzar is mentioned by name 88 times in 8 OT books, and God refers to this powerful, polytheistic emperor as a “my servant” on several occasions (Jer. 25:9; Ezek.29:20)! God calls him King of Kings in Ezek.26:7. \nImage from Persepolis, Iran http://www.pbase.com/ismail999/image/23114312\n\nWith a directness characteristic of the sacred writers, Daniel enters at once upon his subject. He begins his book in a simple historical style. Like one conscious of uttering only well-known truth, he proceeds at once to state a variety of particulars by which his accuracy could be tested. The overthrow of Jerusalem recorded here was predicted by Jeremiah, and was accomplished in 606 B.C.[*] (Jeremiah 25: 8-11.) Jeremiah places this captivity in the fourth year of Jehoiakim, Daniel in the third. This seemingly discrepancy is explained by the fact that Nebuchadnezzar set out on his expedition near the close of the third year of Jehoiakim, from which point Daniel reckons. Source: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan1.htm\n
  • •1 [Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605; first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ezekiel and 10,000 others). Destruction of Jerusalem in 586. Babylon taken by Cyrus of Persia in 539.]\n\nAs R. Campbell Thompson declares: "Events had already shown that Nebuchadrezzar was a vigorous and brilliant commander, and physically as well as mentally a strong man, fully worthy of succeeding his father. He was to become the greatest man of his time in the Near East, as a soldier, a statesman, and an architect. Had his successors been of such a stamp instead of callow boys or dilettanti without redeeming vigor, the Persians would have found Babylonia a harder problem. 'All the nations,' says Jeremiah (Jeremiah 27: 7, R. V.), 'shall serve him, and his son, and his son's son, until the time of his own land come.' " Source: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan2.htm\n\n Nebuchadnezzar was also known for his harshness “whomever he wished he killed and whomever he wished he spared alive; and whomever he wished he elevated and whomever he wished he humbled.” Dan. 5:19 . In 586 B.C., King Zedekiah, the youngest son of Josiah, tried to escape from the Babylonian siege at night. When he and his sons were caught, they saw the cruel actions of Nebuchadnezzar, who blinded Zedekiah after he witnessed the murder of his sons (Jeremiah 39:5). Nebuchadnezzar, was also known for burning people alive as we see in Daniel chapter 3. Source: http://www.truthnet.org/Daniel/Chapter1/\n\n\nNebucahdnezzar is mentioned by name 88 times in 8 OT books, and God refers to this powerful, polytheistic emperor as a “my servant” on several occasions (Jer. 25:9; Ezek.29:20)! God calls him King of Kings in Ezek.26:7. \nImage from Persepolis, Iran http://www.pbase.com/ismail999/image/23114312\n\nWith a directness characteristic of the sacred writers, Daniel enters at once upon his subject. He begins his book in a simple historical style. Like one conscious of uttering only well-known truth, he proceeds at once to state a variety of particulars by which his accuracy could be tested. The overthrow of Jerusalem recorded here was predicted by Jeremiah, and was accomplished in 606 B.C.[*] (Jeremiah 25: 8-11.) Jeremiah places this captivity in the fourth year of Jehoiakim, Daniel in the third. This seemingly discrepancy is explained by the fact that Nebuchadnezzar set out on his expedition near the close of the third year of Jehoiakim, from which point Daniel reckons. Source: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan1.htm\n
  • •1 [Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605; first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ezekiel and 10,000 others). Destruction of Jerusalem in 586. Babylon taken by Cyrus of Persia in 539.]\n\nAs R. Campbell Thompson declares: "Events had already shown that Nebuchadrezzar was a vigorous and brilliant commander, and physically as well as mentally a strong man, fully worthy of succeeding his father. He was to become the greatest man of his time in the Near East, as a soldier, a statesman, and an architect. Had his successors been of such a stamp instead of callow boys or dilettanti without redeeming vigor, the Persians would have found Babylonia a harder problem. 'All the nations,' says Jeremiah (Jeremiah 27: 7, R. V.), 'shall serve him, and his son, and his son's son, until the time of his own land come.' " Source: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan2.htm\n\n Nebuchadnezzar was also known for his harshness “whomever he wished he killed and whomever he wished he spared alive; and whomever he wished he elevated and whomever he wished he humbled.” Dan. 5:19 . In 586 B.C., King Zedekiah, the youngest son of Josiah, tried to escape from the Babylonian siege at night. When he and his sons were caught, they saw the cruel actions of Nebuchadnezzar, who blinded Zedekiah after he witnessed the murder of his sons (Jeremiah 39:5). Nebuchadnezzar, was also known for burning people alive as we see in Daniel chapter 3. Source: http://www.truthnet.org/Daniel/Chapter1/\n\n\nNebucahdnezzar is mentioned by name 88 times in 8 OT books, and God refers to this powerful, polytheistic emperor as a “my servant” on several occasions (Jer. 25:9; Ezek.29:20)! God calls him King of Kings in Ezek.26:7. \nImage from Persepolis, Iran http://www.pbase.com/ismail999/image/23114312\n\nWith a directness characteristic of the sacred writers, Daniel enters at once upon his subject. He begins his book in a simple historical style. Like one conscious of uttering only well-known truth, he proceeds at once to state a variety of particulars by which his accuracy could be tested. The overthrow of Jerusalem recorded here was predicted by Jeremiah, and was accomplished in 606 B.C.[*] (Jeremiah 25: 8-11.) Jeremiah places this captivity in the fourth year of Jehoiakim, Daniel in the third. This seemingly discrepancy is explained by the fact that Nebuchadnezzar set out on his expedition near the close of the third year of Jehoiakim, from which point Daniel reckons. Source: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan1.htm\n
  • •1 [Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605; first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ezekiel and 10,000 others). Destruction of Jerusalem in 586. Babylon taken by Cyrus of Persia in 539.]\n\nAs R. Campbell Thompson declares: "Events had already shown that Nebuchadrezzar was a vigorous and brilliant commander, and physically as well as mentally a strong man, fully worthy of succeeding his father. He was to become the greatest man of his time in the Near East, as a soldier, a statesman, and an architect. Had his successors been of such a stamp instead of callow boys or dilettanti without redeeming vigor, the Persians would have found Babylonia a harder problem. 'All the nations,' says Jeremiah (Jeremiah 27: 7, R. V.), 'shall serve him, and his son, and his son's son, until the time of his own land come.' " Source: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan2.htm\n\n Nebuchadnezzar was also known for his harshness “whomever he wished he killed and whomever he wished he spared alive; and whomever he wished he elevated and whomever he wished he humbled.” Dan. 5:19 . In 586 B.C., King Zedekiah, the youngest son of Josiah, tried to escape from the Babylonian siege at night. When he and his sons were caught, they saw the cruel actions of Nebuchadnezzar, who blinded Zedekiah after he witnessed the murder of his sons (Jeremiah 39:5). Nebuchadnezzar, was also known for burning people alive as we see in Daniel chapter 3. Source: http://www.truthnet.org/Daniel/Chapter1/\n\n\nNebucahdnezzar is mentioned by name 88 times in 8 OT books, and God refers to this powerful, polytheistic emperor as a “my servant” on several occasions (Jer. 25:9; Ezek.29:20)! God calls him King of Kings in Ezek.26:7. \nImage from Persepolis, Iran http://www.pbase.com/ismail999/image/23114312\n\nWith a directness characteristic of the sacred writers, Daniel enters at once upon his subject. He begins his book in a simple historical style. Like one conscious of uttering only well-known truth, he proceeds at once to state a variety of particulars by which his accuracy could be tested. The overthrow of Jerusalem recorded here was predicted by Jeremiah, and was accomplished in 606 B.C.[*] (Jeremiah 25: 8-11.) Jeremiah places this captivity in the fourth year of Jehoiakim, Daniel in the third. This seemingly discrepancy is explained by the fact that Nebuchadnezzar set out on his expedition near the close of the third year of Jehoiakim, from which point Daniel reckons. Source: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan1.htm\n
  • •1 [Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605; first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ezekiel and 10,000 others). Destruction of Jerusalem in 586. Babylon taken by Cyrus of Persia in 539.]\n\nAs R. Campbell Thompson declares: "Events had already shown that Nebuchadrezzar was a vigorous and brilliant commander, and physically as well as mentally a strong man, fully worthy of succeeding his father. He was to become the greatest man of his time in the Near East, as a soldier, a statesman, and an architect. Had his successors been of such a stamp instead of callow boys or dilettanti without redeeming vigor, the Persians would have found Babylonia a harder problem. 'All the nations,' says Jeremiah (Jeremiah 27: 7, R. V.), 'shall serve him, and his son, and his son's son, until the time of his own land come.' " Source: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan2.htm\n\n Nebuchadnezzar was also known for his harshness “whomever he wished he killed and whomever he wished he spared alive; and whomever he wished he elevated and whomever he wished he humbled.” Dan. 5:19 . In 586 B.C., King Zedekiah, the youngest son of Josiah, tried to escape from the Babylonian siege at night. When he and his sons were caught, they saw the cruel actions of Nebuchadnezzar, who blinded Zedekiah after he witnessed the murder of his sons (Jeremiah 39:5). Nebuchadnezzar, was also known for burning people alive as we see in Daniel chapter 3. Source: http://www.truthnet.org/Daniel/Chapter1/\n\n\nNebucahdnezzar is mentioned by name 88 times in 8 OT books, and God refers to this powerful, polytheistic emperor as a “my servant” on several occasions (Jer. 25:9; Ezek.29:20)! God calls him King of Kings in Ezek.26:7. \nImage from Persepolis, Iran http://www.pbase.com/ismail999/image/23114312\n\nWith a directness characteristic of the sacred writers, Daniel enters at once upon his subject. He begins his book in a simple historical style. Like one conscious of uttering only well-known truth, he proceeds at once to state a variety of particulars by which his accuracy could be tested. The overthrow of Jerusalem recorded here was predicted by Jeremiah, and was accomplished in 606 B.C.[*] (Jeremiah 25: 8-11.) Jeremiah places this captivity in the fourth year of Jehoiakim, Daniel in the third. This seemingly discrepancy is explained by the fact that Nebuchadnezzar set out on his expedition near the close of the third year of Jehoiakim, from which point Daniel reckons. Source: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan1.htm\n
  • Babylon is described by the Greek historian Herodotus (about 485-425 BC). The writer Berosus also credits Nebuchadnezzar with the construction of the 'Hanging Gardens' which, according to tradition, he built to remind his wife of her home, in the mountains of Iran. No evidence survives for the Gardens at Babylon, however, and the story may relate to the earlier extensive gardens built around the Assyrian capital Nineveh. (Source: British Museum text on the Brick of Nebuchadnezzar II)\nZiggurat: “Ziggurats were temples for the Mesopotamian gods. Each city built temples to their own favorite gods. The ziggurat of Babylon had eight platforms of bricks with a temple for Marduk on the summit, where the Babylonians believed the god slept at night. The ziggurat was so tall (probably 10-15 stories) that it had benches halfway up for people to rest on during the climb up the ramps linking the different platforms.” p. 13 Timeline of the Ancient World by the British Museum.\n“The ancient historian Herodotus said that Babylon was more magnificent than any city in the known world. Babylon was a place of beauty which featured one of the seven wonders of the ancient world - the Hanging Gardens. God had also given Nebuchadnezzar an empire greater than the Assyrian Empire. His empire was a military superpower.” Source: http://www.neverthirsty.org/pp/series/DAN/D003/D003.html Herodotus also wrote that the city walls of Babylon, which some say were a second of the Seven Wonders of the World, had enough space on top to enable a four-horse chariot to turn around. Source: The Cultural Atlas of the World: Mesopotamia and the Ancient Near East, by Michael Roaf\nHerodotus account primary source: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/greek-babylon.html\n\n“According to accounts, the gardens were built to cheer up Nebuchadnezzar's homesick wife, Amyitis. Amyitis, daughter of the king of the Medes, was married to Nebuchadnezzar to create an alliance between the nations. The land she came from, though, was green, rugged and mountainous, and she found the flat, sun-baked terrain of Mesopotamia depressing. The king decided to recreate her homeland by building an artificial mountain with rooftop gardens.\n\nThe Hanging Gardens probably did not really "hang" in the sense of being suspended from cables or ropes. The name comes from an inexact translation of the Greek word kremastos or the Latin word pensilis, which mean not just "hanging", but "overhanging" as in the case of a terrace or balcony.\n\nThe Greek geographer Strabo, who described the gardens in first century BC, wrote, "It consists of vaulted terraces raised one above another, and resting upon cube-shaped pillars. These are hollow and filled with earth to allow trees of the largest size to be planted. The pillars, the vaults, and terraces are constructed of baked brick and asphalt."\n\n"The ascent to the highest story is by stairs, and at their side are water engines, by means of which persons, appointed expressly for the purpose, are continually employed in raising water from the Euphrates into the garden." “ Source: http://www.unmuseum.org/hangg.htm\n
  • Babylon is described by the Greek historian Herodotus (about 485-425 BC). The writer Berosus also credits Nebuchadnezzar with the construction of the 'Hanging Gardens' which, according to tradition, he built to remind his wife of her home, in the mountains of Iran. No evidence survives for the Gardens at Babylon, however, and the story may relate to the earlier extensive gardens built around the Assyrian capital Nineveh. (Source: British Museum text on the Brick of Nebuchadnezzar II)\nZiggurat: “Ziggurats were temples for the Mesopotamian gods. Each city built temples to their own favorite gods. The ziggurat of Babylon had eight platforms of bricks with a temple for Marduk on the summit, where the Babylonians believed the god slept at night. The ziggurat was so tall (probably 10-15 stories) that it had benches halfway up for people to rest on during the climb up the ramps linking the different platforms.” p. 13 Timeline of the Ancient World by the British Museum.\n“The ancient historian Herodotus said that Babylon was more magnificent than any city in the known world. Babylon was a place of beauty which featured one of the seven wonders of the ancient world - the Hanging Gardens. God had also given Nebuchadnezzar an empire greater than the Assyrian Empire. His empire was a military superpower.” Source: http://www.neverthirsty.org/pp/series/DAN/D003/D003.html Herodotus also wrote that the city walls of Babylon, which some say were a second of the Seven Wonders of the World, had enough space on top to enable a four-horse chariot to turn around. Source: The Cultural Atlas of the World: Mesopotamia and the Ancient Near East, by Michael Roaf\nHerodotus account primary source: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/greek-babylon.html\n\n“According to accounts, the gardens were built to cheer up Nebuchadnezzar's homesick wife, Amyitis. Amyitis, daughter of the king of the Medes, was married to Nebuchadnezzar to create an alliance between the nations. The land she came from, though, was green, rugged and mountainous, and she found the flat, sun-baked terrain of Mesopotamia depressing. The king decided to recreate her homeland by building an artificial mountain with rooftop gardens.\n\nThe Hanging Gardens probably did not really "hang" in the sense of being suspended from cables or ropes. The name comes from an inexact translation of the Greek word kremastos or the Latin word pensilis, which mean not just "hanging", but "overhanging" as in the case of a terrace or balcony.\n\nThe Greek geographer Strabo, who described the gardens in first century BC, wrote, "It consists of vaulted terraces raised one above another, and resting upon cube-shaped pillars. These are hollow and filled with earth to allow trees of the largest size to be planted. The pillars, the vaults, and terraces are constructed of baked brick and asphalt."\n\n"The ascent to the highest story is by stairs, and at their side are water engines, by means of which persons, appointed expressly for the purpose, are continually employed in raising water from the Euphrates into the garden." “ Source: http://www.unmuseum.org/hangg.htm\n
  • Babylon is described by the Greek historian Herodotus (about 485-425 BC). The writer Berosus also credits Nebuchadnezzar with the construction of the 'Hanging Gardens' which, according to tradition, he built to remind his wife of her home, in the mountains of Iran. No evidence survives for the Gardens at Babylon, however, and the story may relate to the earlier extensive gardens built around the Assyrian capital Nineveh. (Source: British Museum text on the Brick of Nebuchadnezzar II)\nZiggurat: “Ziggurats were temples for the Mesopotamian gods. Each city built temples to their own favorite gods. The ziggurat of Babylon had eight platforms of bricks with a temple for Marduk on the summit, where the Babylonians believed the god slept at night. The ziggurat was so tall (probably 10-15 stories) that it had benches halfway up for people to rest on during the climb up the ramps linking the different platforms.” p. 13 Timeline of the Ancient World by the British Museum.\n“The ancient historian Herodotus said that Babylon was more magnificent than any city in the known world. Babylon was a place of beauty which featured one of the seven wonders of the ancient world - the Hanging Gardens. God had also given Nebuchadnezzar an empire greater than the Assyrian Empire. His empire was a military superpower.” Source: http://www.neverthirsty.org/pp/series/DAN/D003/D003.html Herodotus also wrote that the city walls of Babylon, which some say were a second of the Seven Wonders of the World, had enough space on top to enable a four-horse chariot to turn around. Source: The Cultural Atlas of the World: Mesopotamia and the Ancient Near East, by Michael Roaf\nHerodotus account primary source: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/greek-babylon.html\n\n“According to accounts, the gardens were built to cheer up Nebuchadnezzar's homesick wife, Amyitis. Amyitis, daughter of the king of the Medes, was married to Nebuchadnezzar to create an alliance between the nations. The land she came from, though, was green, rugged and mountainous, and she found the flat, sun-baked terrain of Mesopotamia depressing. The king decided to recreate her homeland by building an artificial mountain with rooftop gardens.\n\nThe Hanging Gardens probably did not really "hang" in the sense of being suspended from cables or ropes. The name comes from an inexact translation of the Greek word kremastos or the Latin word pensilis, which mean not just "hanging", but "overhanging" as in the case of a terrace or balcony.\n\nThe Greek geographer Strabo, who described the gardens in first century BC, wrote, "It consists of vaulted terraces raised one above another, and resting upon cube-shaped pillars. These are hollow and filled with earth to allow trees of the largest size to be planted. The pillars, the vaults, and terraces are constructed of baked brick and asphalt."\n\n"The ascent to the highest story is by stairs, and at their side are water engines, by means of which persons, appointed expressly for the purpose, are continually employed in raising water from the Euphrates into the garden." “ Source: http://www.unmuseum.org/hangg.htm\n
  • Herodotus ( 484-430 B.C) describes the city of Babylon in his day and its splendor.\n\nThe city stands on a broad plain, and is an exact square 120 furlongs[1] (13.63 miles) in length each way, so that the entire circuits is four hundred and eighty furlongs (54.52 miles)….It is surrounded, in the first place, by a broard and deep moat, full of water, behind which rises a wall fifty royal cubits in width, (87 feet ) and two hundred in height (350 feet). \n\nOn the top, along the edges of the wall, they constructed buildings on a single chamber facing one another, leaving between them room for a four horse chariot to turn. In the circuit of the wall are a hundred gates, all of brass, with brazen lintels and side-posts.\n\nThe city is divided into two portions by the river which runs through the midst of it. The river is the Eurphrates, broad, deep, swift stream, which rises in Armenia….The city wall is brought down on both sides to the edge of the stream. \n\nThe houses are mostly three and four stories high; the streets all run in straight lines, not only those parallel to the river, but also the cross streets which lead down to the waterside.[2]The Histories, Herodotus, Translation by George Rawlinson, Everyman Library, 1992, The First Book entitled Clio, (178-180) Source: http://www.truthnet.org/Daniel/Chapter4/\n
  • Herodotus ( 484-430 B.C) describes the city of Babylon in his day and its splendor.\n\nThe city stands on a broad plain, and is an exact square 120 furlongs[1] (13.63 miles) in length each way, so that the entire circuits is four hundred and eighty furlongs (54.52 miles)….It is surrounded, in the first place, by a broard and deep moat, full of water, behind which rises a wall fifty royal cubits in width, (87 feet ) and two hundred in height (350 feet). \n\nOn the top, along the edges of the wall, they constructed buildings on a single chamber facing one another, leaving between them room for a four horse chariot to turn. In the circuit of the wall are a hundred gates, all of brass, with brazen lintels and side-posts.\n\nThe city is divided into two portions by the river which runs through the midst of it. The river is the Eurphrates, broad, deep, swift stream, which rises in Armenia….The city wall is brought down on both sides to the edge of the stream. \n\nThe houses are mostly three and four stories high; the streets all run in straight lines, not only those parallel to the river, but also the cross streets which lead down to the waterside.[2]The Histories, Herodotus, Translation by George Rawlinson, Everyman Library, 1992, The First Book entitled Clio, (178-180) Source: http://www.truthnet.org/Daniel/Chapter4/\n
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  • 1. The Statue of Zeus, Olympia, Greece\n2. The Temple of Artemis, Ephesus\n3. THe Tomb of King Mausolus, Halicarnassus\n4. The Colossus of Rhodes\n5. The Lighthouse of Alexandria, Alexandria, Egypt\n6. The Great Pyramids, Giza, Egypt\n7. The Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Babylon\n
  • The ziggarut obstruct the view of the area of the Southern Palace buildings and Hanging Gardens\n
  • The Ishtar Gate, one of the eight gates of the inner city of Babylon, was built during the reign of Nebuchadnezzar II (604- 562 BC). Only the foundations of the gate were found, going down some 45 feet, with molded, unglazed figures. The gateway has been reconstructed in the Pergamon Museum, Berlin, from the glazed bricks found, so its original height is different in size. Reconstructed height is 47 feet.\n\nIt was one of the eight gates of the inner city of Babylon. It was built in about 575 BC, the eighth fortified gate in the city. It is one of the most impressive monuments rediscovered in the ancient Near East. The Ishtar gate was decorated with glazed brick reliefs, in tiers, of dragons and young bulls. The gate itself was a double one, and on its south side was a vast antechamber. Through the gatehouse ran a stone-and brick-paved avenue, the so-called Processional Way, which has been traced over a length of more than half a mile.\nKing Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon dedicated the great Ishtar Gate to the goddess Ishtar. It was the main entrance into Babylon. King Nebuchadnezzar II performed elaborate building projects in Babylon around 604-562 BC. His goal was to beautify his capital. He restored the temple of Marduk, the chief god, and also built himself a magnificent palace with the famous Hanging Gardens, which was reported by the Greek historian Herodotus to have been one of the wonders of the world.\nThe Bible records that it was Nebuchadnezzar who destroyed Jerusalem, brought the kingdom of Judah to an end, and carried off the Jews into exile. The Ishtar Gate was the starting point for processions. The Babylonians would assemble in front of it and march through the triumphal arch and proceed along the Sacred Way to the 7-story Ziggurat, which was crowned near the temple of Marduk.\nThe gateway was completely covered with beautifully colored glazed bricks. Its reliefs of dragons and bulls symbolized the gods Marduk and Adad. Enameled tiles of glorious blue surrounded the brightly colored yellow and brown beasts. In front of the gateway outside the city was a road with walls decorated with reliefs of lions and glazed yellow tiles. The Ishtar gate was reconstructed in Berlin out of material excavated by Robert Koldeway.\nThe Dedicatory Inscription on the Ishtar Gate reads:\n"Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylon, the faithful prince appointed by the will of Marduk, the highest of princely princes, beloved of Nabu, of prudent counsel, who has learned to embrace wisdom, who fathomed their divine being and reveres their majesty, the untiring governor, who always takes to heart the care of the cult of Esagila and Ezida and is constantly concerned with the well-being of Babylon and Borsippa, the wise, the humble, the caretaker of Esagila and Ezida, the firstborn son of Nabopolassar, the King of Babylon.\nBoth gate entrances of Imgur-Ellil and Nemetti-Ellil following the filling of the street from Babylon had become increasingly lower. Therefore, I pulled down these gates and laid their foundations at the water table with asphalt and bricks and had them made of bricks with blue stone on which wonderful bulls and dragons were depicted. I covered their roofs by laying majestic cedars length-wise over them. I hung doors of cedar adorned with bronze at all the gate openings. I placed wild bulls and ferocious dragons in the gateways and thus adorned them with luxurious splendor so that people might gaze on them in wonder.\nI let the temple of Esiskursiskur (the highest festival house of Markduk, the Lord of the Gods a place of joy and celebration for the major and minor gods) be built firm like a mountain in the precinct of Babylon of asphalt and fired bricks." Source: http://www.bible-history.com/archaeology/babylon/ishtar-gate.html\n
  • Ziggurat was “a 650- ft. glimmering enamel” structure (Beth Moore p.11)\n“Practically all the buildings were of brick, for stone was rare in Mesopotamia, but the bricks were often faced with enameled tiles of brilliant blue, yellow, or white, adorned with animal and other figures in glazed relief, which remain to this day supreme in their kind.” Beth Moore, Daniel, p. 14\n\n
  • Ziggurat was “a 650- ft. glimmering enamel” structure (Beth Moore p.11)\n“Practically all the buildings were of brick, for stone was rare in Mesopotamia, but the bricks were often faced with enameled tiles of brilliant blue, yellow, or white, adorned with animal and other figures in glazed relief, which remain to this day supreme in their kind.” Beth Moore, Daniel, p. 14\n\n
  • Ziggurat was “a 650- ft. glimmering enamel” structure (Beth Moore p.11)\n“Practically all the buildings were of brick, for stone was rare in Mesopotamia, but the bricks were often faced with enameled tiles of brilliant blue, yellow, or white, adorned with animal and other figures in glazed relief, which remain to this day supreme in their kind.” Beth Moore, Daniel, p. 14\n\n
  • Ziggurat was “a 650- ft. glimmering enamel” structure (Beth Moore p.11)\n“Practically all the buildings were of brick, for stone was rare in Mesopotamia, but the bricks were often faced with enameled tiles of brilliant blue, yellow, or white, adorned with animal and other figures in glazed relief, which remain to this day supreme in their kind.” Beth Moore, Daniel, p. 14\n\n
  • The ancient city of Babylon is sixty miles south west of Baghdad.\nIt is about 14 miles (22.5 km) on each side, surrounded by a moat. The wall had 250 towers 450 feet high (37m) and it was 35 feet (10.7m) below ground. The wall was 56 miles long (90 km), 300 feet high (91m) and 25 feet (7.6m) thick. A chariot could be driven on the wall. There was a second wall 75 feet (23m) behind the first. Most modern view these figures as an exaggeration of the city. They feel the real dimensions to be only ¼ of the size described by Herodotus with the city only measuring 17 miles around rather then 56 miles. The city at this time is only partially excavated, and based upon the location of the mounds the city limits are more or less indicated, but this is complicated by the Euphrates River change in course. Source: http://www.truthnet.org/Daniel/Chapter5/; Source: http://www.teachinghearts.org/dre00maps.html#europeunite\n\n
  • The Ishtar Gate, one of the eight gates of the inner city of Babylon, was built during the reign of Nebuchadnezzar II (604- 562 BC). Only the foundations of the gate were found, going down some 45 feet, with molded, unglazed figures. The gateway has been reconstructed in the Pergamon Museum, Berlin, from the glazed bricks found, so its original height is different in size. Reconstructed height is 47 feet.\n\nIt was one of the eight gates of the inner city of Babylon. It was built in about 575 BC, the eighth fortified gate in the city. It is one of the most impressive monuments rediscovered in the ancient Near East. The Ishtar gate was decorated with glazed brick reliefs, in tiers, of dragons and young bulls. The gate itself was a double one, and on its south side was a vast antechamber. Through the gatehouse ran a stone-and brick-paved avenue, the so-called Processional Way, which has been traced over a length of more than half a mile.\nKing Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon dedicated the great Ishtar Gate to the goddess Ishtar. It was the main entrance into Babylon. King Nebuchadnezzar II performed elaborate building projects in Babylon around 604-562 BC. His goal was to beautify his capital. He restored the temple of Marduk, the chief god, and also built himself a magnificent palace with the famous Hanging Gardens, which was reported by the Greek historian Herodotus to have been one of the wonders of the world.\nThe Bible records that it was Nebuchadnezzar who destroyed Jerusalem, brought the kingdom of Judah to an end, and carried off the Jews into exile. The Ishtar Gate was the starting point for processions. The Babylonians would assemble in front of it and march through the triumphal arch and proceed along the Sacred Way to the 7-story Ziggurat, which was crowned near the temple of Marduk.\nThe gateway was completely covered with beautifully colored glazed bricks. Its reliefs of dragons and bulls symbolized the gods Marduk and Adad. Enameled tiles of glorious blue surrounded the brightly colored yellow and brown beasts. In front of the gateway outside the city was a road with walls decorated with reliefs of lions and glazed yellow tiles. The Ishtar gate was reconstructed in Berlin out of material excavated by Robert Koldeway.\nThe Dedicatory Inscription on the Ishtar Gate reads:\n"Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylon, the faithful prince appointed by the will of Marduk, the highest of princely princes, beloved of Nabu, of prudent counsel, who has learned to embrace wisdom, who fathomed their divine being and reveres their majesty, the untiring governor, who always takes to heart the care of the cult of Esagila and Ezida and is constantly concerned with the well-being of Babylon and Borsippa, the wise, the humble, the caretaker of Esagila and Ezida, the firstborn son of Nabopolassar, the King of Babylon.\nBoth gate entrances of Imgur-Ellil and Nemetti-Ellil following the filling of the street from Babylon had become increasingly lower. Therefore, I pulled down these gates and laid their foundations at the water table with asphalt and bricks and had them made of bricks with blue stone on which wonderful bulls and dragons were depicted. I covered their roofs by laying majestic cedars length-wise over them. I hung doors of cedar adorned with bronze at all the gate openings. I placed wild bulls and ferocious dragons in the gateways and thus adorned them with luxurious splendor so that people might gaze on them in wonder.\nI let the temple of Esiskursiskur (the highest festival house of Markduk, the Lord of the Gods a place of joy and celebration for the major and minor gods) be built firm like a mountain in the precinct of Babylon of asphalt and fired bricks." Source: http://www.bible-history.com/archaeology/babylon/ishtar-gate.html\n
  • Marduk: Principal god of the city of Babylon. From about the twelfth century BC Marduk was regarded as the king of all the gods. His symbol is a spade or hoe and he is associated with the mythical snake-dragon. (Source: British Museum definitions)\n\nPortrayed the dragon Sirrush of the god Marduk and the bull of the god Adad.\n
  • Babylon was excavated by Robert Koldeway between 1899 and 1917 on behalf of the Deutsche Orient-Gesellschaft and much material is now in the Vordersaistiche Museum Berlin. Since 1958 the Iraq Directorate-General of Antiquities has carried out further investigations. Unfortunately, the earlier levels are inaccessible beneath the high water table. Source: http://iraqipages.com/iraq_mesopotamia/babylon.htm\n\nIf you have to be a captive, at least Daniel was so in a gorgeous place for seventy years! There was nothing like Babylon in the world at that time.\n
  • Each year, during the celebration of the great New Year Festival, the images of the city's deities were carried out through the Ishtar Gate and along the 'Processional Way' past some 120 lions such as this one to a special festival house north of the city. Source: http://oi.uchicago.edu/OI/MUS/HIGH/OIM_A7481.html Lions: Molded brick with polychrome glaze\n\nThe word Easter is also a form of Ishtar, the ancient Babylonian goddess of fertility. As Ashtoreth, which is the Hebrew plural form denoting various local manifestations of Astarte, she was the Canaanite fertility goddess Athtarath, or Ashtoreth. From this, the Greeks derived Astarte.\n
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  • Saddam himself had not helped. He had much of the ancient site rebuilt and developed as a tourist site as part of efforts to portray himself as Nebuchadnezzar's modern successor and turn Mesopotamia once more into a regional superpower. He built a contemporary ziggurat-shaped palace nearby and carved out an underground car park among archeological deposits.\n\nBut after entering Babylon in April 2003, coalition forces turned the site into a base camp, flattening and compressing tracts of ruins as they built a helicopter pad and fuel stations. The soldiers filled sandbags with archeological fragments and dug trenches through unexcavated areas, while tanks crushed slabs of original 2,600-year-old paving.\n\n"All of these things have combined to do a lot of damage to what is one of the most important, sensitive archeological sites in the whole world," John Curtis, curator of the British Museum's Near East department, said last year.\nSource: Belfast Telegraph Home > News\n\nArticle Title: “US colonel offers Iraq an apology of sorts for devastation of Babylon” By Rupert Cornwell in Washington 17 April 2006\n\nMore:\nArchaeological cost of invasion\n\n* US Marines from the First Expeditionary Force first set up camp in Babylon in April 2003\n\n* Soldiers filled protective sandbags with sand containing ancient artifacts\n\n* 2,600-year-old pavements were crushed by heavy military vehicles\n\n* Landing helicopters caused structural damage to some of the city's ancient buildings and sandblasted fragile bricks in the palace of Nebuchadnezzar\n\n* Archaeologists say gravel brought in to build car parks and helipads has contaminated key sites\n\n* US troops have also been accused of causing damage to the 5,000-year-old city of Kish by the Iraqi Ministry for Tourism and Antiquities \n
  • Nebuchadnezzar II (Nabu-Kudurri-usur, 'O Nabu, protect the son') came to the throne in 604 BC, on the death of his father Nabopolassar. The Babylonians had gained the Assyrian empire with hard fighting having allied themselves with the Medes from Iran. After his coronation in Babylon the new king campaigned in Syria for five months. In 601 BC Nebuchadnezzar marched to the Egyptian frontier.(Primary source document: http://www.livius.org/cg-cm/chronicles/abc5/jerusalem.html) The Babylonian and Egyptian armies clashed and both sides suffered heavy losses. Over the next few years the struggle between the Babylonians and Egyptians continued and in the course of these campaigns Jerusalem was captured (597 BC). Problems in this region persisted when Zedekiah, the Babylonian-appointed king of Judah, rebelled. As a result, in 587-6 BC Jerusalem was taken again and a large section of the population deported.\nThe most spectacular evidence of Nebuchadnezzar's military successes are his building works in Babylonia. All the great old cities were extensively rebuilt. Most notable was the development of Babylon. The fabulous remains were revealed by German excavations early this century and much material is now in the Vordersaistiche Museum Berlin. After 594 BC little is known about the political events of Nebuchadnezzar's reign. He was succeeded by his son Amel-Mardul (biblical Evil-Merodach) in 562 BC. \n\nSource: http://www.thebritishmuseum.ac.uk/compass/ixbin/hixclient.exe?_IXDB_=compass&_IXFIRST_=1&_IXMAXHITS_=1&_IXSPFX_=graphical/full/&$+with+all_unique_id_index+is+$=ENC111105&submit-button=summary\n
  • Nebuchadnezzar II (Nabu-Kudurri-usur, 'O Nabu, protect the son') came to the throne in 604 BC, on the death of his father Nabopolassar. The Babylonians had gained the Assyrian empire with hard fighting having allied themselves with the Medes from Iran. After his coronation in Babylon the new king campaigned in Syria for five months. In 601 BC Nebuchadnezzar marched to the Egyptian frontier.(Primary source document: http://www.livius.org/cg-cm/chronicles/abc5/jerusalem.html) The Babylonian and Egyptian armies clashed and both sides suffered heavy losses. Over the next few years the struggle between the Babylonians and Egyptians continued and in the course of these campaigns Jerusalem was captured (597 BC). Problems in this region persisted when Zedekiah, the Babylonian-appointed king of Judah, rebelled. As a result, in 587-6 BC Jerusalem was taken again and a large section of the population deported.\nThe most spectacular evidence of Nebuchadnezzar's military successes are his building works in Babylonia. All the great old cities were extensively rebuilt. Most notable was the development of Babylon. The fabulous remains were revealed by German excavations early this century and much material is now in the Vordersaistiche Museum Berlin. After 594 BC little is known about the political events of Nebuchadnezzar's reign. He was succeeded by his son Amel-Mardul (biblical Evil-Merodach) in 562 BC. \n\nSource: http://www.thebritishmuseum.ac.uk/compass/ixbin/hixclient.exe?_IXDB_=compass&_IXFIRST_=1&_IXMAXHITS_=1&_IXSPFX_=graphical/full/&$+with+all_unique_id_index+is+$=ENC111105&submit-button=summary\n
  • Nebuchadnezzar II (Nabu-Kudurri-usur, 'O Nabu, protect the son') came to the throne in 604 BC, on the death of his father Nabopolassar. The Babylonians had gained the Assyrian empire with hard fighting having allied themselves with the Medes from Iran. After his coronation in Babylon the new king campaigned in Syria for five months. In 601 BC Nebuchadnezzar marched to the Egyptian frontier.(Primary source document: http://www.livius.org/cg-cm/chronicles/abc5/jerusalem.html) The Babylonian and Egyptian armies clashed and both sides suffered heavy losses. Over the next few years the struggle between the Babylonians and Egyptians continued and in the course of these campaigns Jerusalem was captured (597 BC). Problems in this region persisted when Zedekiah, the Babylonian-appointed king of Judah, rebelled. As a result, in 587-6 BC Jerusalem was taken again and a large section of the population deported.\nThe most spectacular evidence of Nebuchadnezzar's military successes are his building works in Babylonia. All the great old cities were extensively rebuilt. Most notable was the development of Babylon. The fabulous remains were revealed by German excavations early this century and much material is now in the Vordersaistiche Museum Berlin. After 594 BC little is known about the political events of Nebuchadnezzar's reign. He was succeeded by his son Amel-Mardul (biblical Evil-Merodach) in 562 BC. \n\nSource: http://www.thebritishmuseum.ac.uk/compass/ixbin/hixclient.exe?_IXDB_=compass&_IXFIRST_=1&_IXMAXHITS_=1&_IXSPFX_=graphical/full/&$+with+all_unique_id_index+is+$=ENC111105&submit-button=summary\n
  • These archeological finds represents a vindication of the critics of Scripture, for which prior to the 1916 excavations of Babylon, no physical evidence of Nebuchadnezzar existed. Another one of these bricks can be seen at the museum of Israel in Jerusalem. But now, we even have the recovered the back wall of Nebuchadnezzar’s actual throne room...\n\n2007 Discovery: In July, 2007, Michael Jursa, a visiting Assyriologist at the British Museum discovered this cuneiform tablet among the museum’s collection of 130,000 Assyrian cuneiform tablets which is a 2,500 year old receipt of temple payment to Nebuchadnezzar II by one of Nebuchadnezzar’s chief officers referenced in Jeremiah 39:3.\n
  • These archeological finds represents a vindication of the critics of Scripture, for which prior to the 1916 excavations of Babylon, no physical evidence of Nebuchadnezzar existed. Another one of these bricks can be seen at the museum of Israel in Jerusalem. But now, we even have the recovered the back wall of Nebuchadnezzar’s actual throne room...\n\n2007 Discovery: In July, 2007, Michael Jursa, a visiting Assyriologist at the British Museum discovered this cuneiform tablet among the museum’s collection of 130,000 Assyrian cuneiform tablets which is a 2,500 year old receipt of temple payment to Nebuchadnezzar II by one of Nebuchadnezzar’s chief officers referenced in Jeremiah 39:3.\n
  • These archeological finds represents a vindication of the critics of Scripture, for which prior to the 1916 excavations of Babylon, no physical evidence of Nebuchadnezzar existed. Another one of these bricks can be seen at the museum of Israel in Jerusalem. But now, we even have the recovered the back wall of Nebuchadnezzar’s actual throne room...\n\n2007 Discovery: In July, 2007, Michael Jursa, a visiting Assyriologist at the British Museum discovered this cuneiform tablet among the museum’s collection of 130,000 Assyrian cuneiform tablets which is a 2,500 year old receipt of temple payment to Nebuchadnezzar II by one of Nebuchadnezzar’s chief officers referenced in Jeremiah 39:3.\n
  • •1-2The captivity of Jerusalem. [Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605; first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ezekiel and 10,000 others). Destruction of Jerusalem in 586. Babylon taken by Cyrus of Persia in 539.]\n\n--If Daniel was born during Josiah's reforms (ca. 621), he was about 16 when deported to Babylon in 605.\n\n--His world had crumbled about him. 900 mile walk from Jerusalem to Babylon.\n\nWorship at Solomon’s Temple continued uninterrupted for 426 years, until Nebucadnezzar’s army destroyed it in 586 B.C.. Upon returning from exile in Babylon, the Jews would spend decades rebuilding the temple as Herod’s Temple, completing it in 68 A.D., only to be destroyed shortly thereafter by the Roman Legions in 70A.D., with the Roman general Titus carrying off the temple vessels.\n\n
  • •1-2The captivity of Jerusalem. [Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605; first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ezekiel and 10,000 others). Destruction of Jerusalem in 586. Babylon taken by Cyrus of Persia in 539.]\n\n--If Daniel was born during Josiah's reforms (ca. 621), he was about 16 when deported to Babylon in 605.\n\n--His world had crumbled about him. 900 mile walk from Jerusalem to Babylon.\n\nWorship at Solomon’s Temple continued uninterrupted for 426 years, until Nebucadnezzar’s army destroyed it in 586 B.C.. Upon returning from exile in Babylon, the Jews would spend decades rebuilding the temple as Herod’s Temple, completing it in 68 A.D., only to be destroyed shortly thereafter by the Roman Legions in 70A.D., with the Roman general Titus carrying off the temple vessels.\n\n
  • Hezekiah displaying the entire wealth of Jerusalem to the King of Babylon (who was visiting to check on Hezekiah’s failing health and Judah’s miraculous defeat of Sennacherib, King of Assyria’s army, by God sending an angel killing 185,000 of the surrounding Assyrian soldiers -2Chron. 32:21)) triggered the deportation of Judah to Babylon, which would occur about 100 years later (605 B.C.).\n\nWhen this king had vaingloriously shown to the messengers of the king of Babylon all the treasures and holy things of his palace and kingdom, Hezekiah was told that all these good things would be carried as trophies to the city of Babylon, and that even his own children, his descendants would be taken away and be eunuchs in the palace of the king there. (2 Kings 20: 14-18.)\nSource: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan1.htm\n\n2 Kings 20:14-19 “Then Isaiah the prophet came to King Hezekiah and said to him, “What did these men say, and from where have they come to you?” And Hezekiah said, “They have come from a far country, from Babylon.” \nHe said, “What have they seen in your house?” So Hezekiah answered, “They have seen all that is in my house; there is nothing among my treasuries that I have not shown them.” \n¶ Then Isaiah said to Hezekiah, “Hear the word of the LORD. \n‘Behold, the days are coming when all that is in your house, and all that your fathers have laid up in store to this day will be carried to Babylon; nothing shall be left,’ says the LORD. \n‘Some of your sons who shall issue from you, whom you will beget, will be taken away; and they will become officials in the palace of the king of Babylon.’” \nThen Hezekiah said to Isaiah, “The word of the LORD which you have spoken is good.” For he thought, “Is it not so, if there will be peace and truth in my days?” A\n
  • Hezekiah displaying the entire wealth of Jerusalem to the King of Babylon (who was visiting to check on Hezekiah’s failing health and Judah’s miraculous defeat of Sennacherib, King of Assyria’s army, by God sending an angel killing 185,000 of the surrounding Assyrian soldiers -2Chron. 32:21)) triggered the deportation of Judah to Babylon, which would occur about 100 years later (605 B.C.).\n\nWhen this king had vaingloriously shown to the messengers of the king of Babylon all the treasures and holy things of his palace and kingdom, Hezekiah was told that all these good things would be carried as trophies to the city of Babylon, and that even his own children, his descendants would be taken away and be eunuchs in the palace of the king there. (2 Kings 20: 14-18.)\nSource: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan1.htm\n\n2 Kings 20:14-19 “Then Isaiah the prophet came to King Hezekiah and said to him, “What did these men say, and from where have they come to you?” And Hezekiah said, “They have come from a far country, from Babylon.” \nHe said, “What have they seen in your house?” So Hezekiah answered, “They have seen all that is in my house; there is nothing among my treasuries that I have not shown them.” \n¶ Then Isaiah said to Hezekiah, “Hear the word of the LORD. \n‘Behold, the days are coming when all that is in your house, and all that your fathers have laid up in store to this day will be carried to Babylon; nothing shall be left,’ says the LORD. \n‘Some of your sons who shall issue from you, whom you will beget, will be taken away; and they will become officials in the palace of the king of Babylon.’” \nThen Hezekiah said to Isaiah, “The word of the LORD which you have spoken is good.” For he thought, “Is it not so, if there will be peace and truth in my days?” A\n
  • See also 2 Kings 23:26: “However, the LORD did not turn from the fierceness of His great wrath with which His anger burned against Judah, because of all the provocations with which Manasseh had provoked Him. And the LORD said, ‘I will remove Judah also from My sight, as I have removed Israel. And I will cast off Jerusalem, this city which I have chosen, and the temple which I said, ‘My name shall be there.’”\n\nDespite King Manasseh’s grandson Josiah’s righteous repentance and godly behavior throughout his reign over Judah, God’s wrath reaches a trip-point where there is “no remedy,” and He simply will not forgive. Righteous behavior may delay His wrath, but will not avert it. May I neither provoke Him to wrath against me or my progeny!\n
  • See also 2 Kings 23:26: “However, the LORD did not turn from the fierceness of His great wrath with which His anger burned against Judah, because of all the provocations with which Manasseh had provoked Him. And the LORD said, ‘I will remove Judah also from My sight, as I have removed Israel. And I will cast off Jerusalem, this city which I have chosen, and the temple which I said, ‘My name shall be there.’”\n\nDespite King Manasseh’s grandson Josiah’s righteous repentance and godly behavior throughout his reign over Judah, God’s wrath reaches a trip-point where there is “no remedy,” and He simply will not forgive. Righteous behavior may delay His wrath, but will not avert it. May I neither provoke Him to wrath against me or my progeny!\n
  • “The prince of Babylon won Hezekiah’s favor by appearing sympathetic to his illness. Hezekiah then dropped his guard and showed every treasure in Judah. The existence of the priceless articles of Judah was rehearsed in the ears of the Babylonian rulers for the next one hundred years.” Beth Moore, Daniel, p. 17\n
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  • Jer. 27:5 “I have made the earth, the men and the beasts which are on the face of the earth by My great power and by My outstretched arm, and I will give it to the one who is pleasing in My sight. : Nebuchadnezzar!\n
  • Jer. 27:5 “I have made the earth, the men and the beasts which are on the face of the earth by My great power and by My outstretched arm, and I will give it to the one who is pleasing in My sight. : Nebuchadnezzar!\n
  • Application: When God says something, He means it!\n
  • The captivity of Jerusalem. Pharoah Necho imprisoned Jehoahaz and made Eliakim the son of Josiah king in the place of Josiah his father, and changed his name to Jehoiakim, and took Jehoahaz away and brought him to Egypt (2Kings 23:33-34). [Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605; first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ezekiel and 10,000 others). Destruction of Jerusalem in 586. Babylon taken by Cyrus of Persia in 539.]\n\n Babylon conquered Jerusalem three times. First in 605 B.C., following the Battle of Carchemish, Second, in 598 B.C., following the rebellion of Jehoiakim, who died before the siege was ended, and his son Jehoiachin was taken captive along with Ezekiel the prophet. The third time is 586 B.C., Babylonian armies destroy the city, the walls and the Temple. Most people are killed, some hostages are taken to Babylon, the poorest people are left in the land and some escape to Egypt, taking Jeremiah there as a captive. Lamentations covers this period, the third fall of Jerusalem. Source: http://www.truthnet.org/Daniel/Chapter1/\n\nJehoiakim, though bound for the purpose of being taken to Babylon, humbled himself and was permitted to remain as ruler in Jerusalem, tributary to the king of Babylon.\nThis was the first time Jerusalem was taken by Nebuchadnezzar. Twice subsequently the city revolted, but was recaptured by the same king, and more severely dealt with each succeeding time. The second overthrow was during the time of Jehoiachin, son of Jehoiakim, when all the sacred vessels were either taken or destroyed, and the best of the inhabitants of were led with the king into captivity. The third was under Zedekiah, when the city endured a formidable siege. During its continuance for a year and a half, the inhabitants of the city suffered all the horrors of extreme famine. At length the garrison and the king attempted to escape from the city, but they were captured by the Chaldeans. The sons of the king were slain before his face. His eyes were put out, and he was taken to Babylon. Thus was fulfilled the prediction of Ezekiel that he should be carried to Babylon, and die there, yet he should not see the place. (Ezekiel 12: 13.) The city and temple were at this time utterly destroyed, and the entire population of the country, with the exception of a few husbandmen, were carried captive to Babylon, in 586 B.C. \nSource: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/clt4/drdan1.htm\n
  • The captivity of Jerusalem. Pharoah Necho imprisoned Jehoahaz and made Eliakim the son of Josiah king in the place of Josiah his father, and changed his name to Jehoiakim, and took Jehoahaz away and brought him to Egypt (2Kings 23:33-34). [Babylonian empire began with Nabopolassar on the death of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria in 626. Consolodated when Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh Necho in 605; first deportation from Jerusalem (royal family and nobility). Second deportation in 597 (Ez