Process SpiritualityLife and Growth as a Process, not an Event         Dr. Kenneth Boa and Bill Ibsen        © Dr. Kenneth...
Messages from the World           2
Messages from the World• The World says what we achieve and  accomplish determines who we are                    2
Messages from the World• The World says what we achieve and  accomplish determines who we are  • Money, power, prestige, p...
Messages from the World• The World says what we achieve and  accomplish determines who we are  • Money, power, prestige, p...
Messages from the Word          3
Messages from the Word• The Word teaches that who we are in Christ  should be the basis for what we do                     3
Messages from the Word• The Word teaches that who we are in Christ  should be the basis for what we do  • Key is faithfuln...
Messages from the Word• The Word teaches that who we are in Christ  should be the basis for what we do  • Key is faithfuln...
What Is Process Spirituality?              4
What Is Process Spirituality?  • Stresses a progressive spiritual    formation (process) over a results-    based focus (p...
What Is Process Spirituality?  • Stresses a progressive spiritual    formation (process) over a results-    based focus (p...
What Is Process Spirituality?  • Stresses a progressive spiritual    formation (process) over a results-    based focus (p...
What Is Process Spirituality?  • Stresses a progressive spiritual    formation (process) over a results-    based focus (p...
Process Spirituality     Overview         5
Process Spirituality        Overview1. Process Versus Product                  5
Process Spirituality        Overview1. Process Versus Product2. Being Versus Doing                  5
Process Spirituality        Overview1. Process Versus Product2. Being Versus Doing3. Trust, Gratitude and Contentment     ...
1. Process vs. Product
Always Living in  the Future       7
Always Living in        the Future• Tendency to invest energies in  accomplishing future goals                   7
Always Living in        the Future• Tendency to invest energies in  accomplishing future goals• Before accomplishing one g...
Always Living in        the Future• Tendency to invest energies in  accomplishing future goals• Before accomplishing one g...
Always Living in        the Future• Tendency to invest energies in  accomplishing future goals• Before accomplishing one g...
The Present Moment        8
The Present Moment               Time        8
The Present Moment                  Time            Now        8
The Present Moment                   Time            Now   Eternity        8
The Present Moment      “To live in the past and future is easy.To live in the present is like threading a needle.”       ...
The PreciousPresent Moment      9
The Precious     Present Moment• Treasure the passing opportunities of  this life and become more alive to the  present mo...
The Precious     Present Moment• Treasure the passing opportunities of  this life and become more alive to the  present mo...
The Precious     Present Moment• Treasure the passing opportunities of  this life and become more alive to the  present mo...
The Precious      Present Moment• Treasure the passing opportunities of  this life and become more alive to the  present m...
“Be careful then how you conduct yourselves:    like sensible men, not like simpletons.
“Be careful then how you conduct yourselves:    like sensible men, not like simpletons.     Use the present opportunity to...
Practice Staying in   the Present         11
Practice Staying in          the Present“Our greatest business in life is not tosee what lies dimly at a distance, but  to...
Practice Staying in          the Present“Our greatest business in life is not tosee what lies dimly at a distance, but  to...
A Step-by-Step Journey
A Step-by-Step Journey• Life is a journey
A Step-by-Step Journey• Life is a journey• We are headed home
A Step-by-Step Journey• Life is a journey• We are headed home• Cannot be attained by a  combination of  technique and  inf...
A Step-by-Step Journey• Life is a journey• We are headed home• Cannot be attained by a  combination of  technique and  inf...
A Step-by-Step Journey• Life is a journey• We are headed home• Cannot be attained by a  combination of  technique and  inf...
Spiritual Formation is  a Lifelong Process
Spiritual Formation is    a Lifelong Process• Spiritual formation is working out what  God has already worked in us  (Phil...
Spiritual Formation is    a Lifelong Process• Spiritual formation is working out what  God has already worked in us  (Phil...
Spiritual Formation is    a Lifelong Process• Spiritual formation is working out what  God has already worked in us  (Phil...
Spiritual Formation is    a Lifelong Process• Spiritual formation is working out what  God has already worked in us  (Phil...
What Spiritual Growth…          14
What Spiritual Growth…          14
What Spiritual Growth…   IS NOT:                  IS:      Event                ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart ...
What Spiritual Growth…   IS NOT:                  IS:      Event                ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart ...
What Spiritual Growth…   IS NOT:                  IS:      Event                ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart ...
What Spiritual Growth…   IS NOT:                  IS:      Event                ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart ...
What Spiritual Growth…   IS NOT:                  IS:      Event                ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart ...
What Spiritual Growth…   IS NOT:                  IS:      Event                ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart ...
What Spiritual Growth…   IS NOT:                  IS:      Event                ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart ...
What Spiritual Growth…   IS NOT:                  IS:      Event                ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart ...
What Spiritual Growth…   IS NOT:                  IS:      Event                ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart ...
What Spiritual Growth…   IS NOT:                  IS:      Event                ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart ...
What Spiritual Growth…   IS NOT:                  IS:      Event                ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart ...
What Spiritual Growth…   IS NOT:                  IS:      Event                ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart ...
15
Spiritual growth is a step-by-step,                    15
Spiritual growth is a step-by-step,                 moment-by-moment,                  15
Spiritual growth is a step-by-step,                 moment-by-moment,                 choice-by-choice,                  15
Spiritual growth is a step-by-step,                 moment-by-moment,                 choice-by-choice,                   ...
Spiritual growth is a step-by-step,                 moment-by-moment,                 choice-by-choice,                   ...
Spiritual growth is a step-by-step,                 moment-by-moment,                   choice-by-choice,                 ...
Spiritual growth is a step-by-step,                 moment-by-moment,                     choice-by-choice,               ...
The Dynamic of the Spiritual Life                16
The Dynamic of the Spiritual Life  “But now   Faith                16
The Dynamic of the Spiritual Life  “But now   Faith                  Hope                16
The Dynamic of the Spiritual Life               Love  “But now   Faith                  Hope                16
The Dynamic of the Spiritual Life               Love                      abide these three;                      but the ...
17
Faith               Love                HopeAppropriated in the    Active in the     Anticipating the      PAST           ...
Faith               Love                HopeAppropriated in the    Active in the     Anticipating the      PAST           ...
Faith               Love                HopeAppropriated in the    Active in the     Anticipating the      PAST           ...
Faith               Love                HopeAppropriated in the    Active in the     Anticipating the      PAST           ...
Faith               Love                HopeAppropriated in the    Active in the     Anticipating the      PAST           ...
Faith               Love                HopeAppropriated in the    Active in the     Anticipating the      PAST           ...
Faith               Love                HopeAppropriated in the    Active in the     Anticipating the      PAST           ...
Faith               Love                HopeAppropriated in the    Active in the     Anticipating the      PAST           ...
2. Being vs. Doing
TheChristian Life
TheChristian Life          Loving God          Completely
TheChristian Life          Loving God   Loving Ourselves          Completely      Correctly
TheChristian Life                  Loving Others                 Compassionately          Loving God      Loving Ourselves...
TheChristian Life                  Loving Others                 Compassionately          Loving God      Loving Ourselves...
TheChristian Life                  Loving Others                 Compassionately          Loving God      Loving Ourselves...
TheChristian Life                  Loving Others                 Compassionately          Loving God      Loving Ourselves...
TheChristian Life                  Loving Others                 Compassionately          Loving God      Loving Ourselves...
TheChristian Life                  Loving Others                 Compassionately          Loving God      Loving Ourselves...
TheChristian Life                  Loving Others                 Compassionately                    Doing          Loving ...
TheChristian Life                  Loving Others                 Compassionately                     Doing          Loving...
TheChristian Life                  Loving Others                 Compassionately                     Doing          Loving...
TheChristian Life                  Loving Others                 Compassionately                     Doing                ...
Being Versus Doing        20
Being Versus Doing1. The Problem of Busyness           20
Being Versus Doing1. The Problem of Busyness2. Causes Versus Christ                  20
Being Versus Doing1. The Problem of Busyness2. Causes Versus Christ3. Intimacy Versus Activity                  20
Being Versus Doing1. The Problem of Busyness2. Causes Versus Christ3. Intimacy Versus Activity4. Practicing His Presence  ...
The Problem of Busyness           21
The Problem of Busyness• Modern dilemma of busyness elevates doing over being                     21
The Problem of Busyness• Modern dilemma of busyness  elevates doing over being• Future-oriented culture                   ...
The Problem of Busyness• Modern dilemma of busyness  elevates doing over being• Future-oriented culture• Time used for res...
The Problem of Busyness• Modern dilemma of busyness  elevates doing over being• Future-oriented culture• Time used for res...
The Problem of Busyness• Modern dilemma of busyness  elevates doing over being• Future-oriented culture• Time used for res...
Life in the Fast Lane          22
Life in the Fast Lane• Blowing and Going!                       22
Life in the Fast Lane• Blowing and Going!• Slamming and Jamming!                       22
Life in the Fast Lane• Blowing and Going!• Slamming and Jamming!• Running and Gunning!                       22
Life in the Fast Lane• Blowing and Going!• Slamming and Jamming!• Running and Gunning!      “We are warned not to waste ti...
23
“Most middle-class Americans tend               23
“Most middle-class Americans tend           to worship their work,               23
“Most middle-class Americans tend           to worship their work,         to work at their play, and                23
“Most middle-class Americans tend           to worship their work,         to work at their play, and         to play at t...
Combating Busyness        24
Combating Busyness• Develop a clear sense of your mission so  you can say “No” to the good and “Yes”  to the best         ...
Combating Busyness• Develop a clear sense of your mission so  you can say “No” to the good and “Yes”  to the best• Know yo...
Combating Busyness• Develop a clear sense of your mission so  you can say “No” to the good and “Yes”  to the best• Know yo...
Combating Busyness        25
Combating Busyness• Seek a balance between:                   25
Combating Busyness• Seek a balance between:  – Rest and Work                    25
Combating Busyness• Seek a balance between:  • Rest and Work  – Recharging and Discharging                    26
Combating Busyness• Seek a balance between:  • Rest and Work  • Recharging and Discharging  – Depth and Breadth           ...
Combating Busyness• Seek a balance between:  • Rest and Work  • Recharging and Discharging  • Depth and Breadth  – Inward ...
Combating Busyness• Seek a balance between:  • Rest and Work  • Recharging and Discharging  • Depth and Breadth  • Inward ...
Combating Busyness• Seek a balance between:  • Rest and Work  • Recharging and Discharging  • Depth and Breadth  • Inward ...
Combating Busyness• Seek a balance between:  • Rest and Work  • Recharging and Discharging  • Depth and Breadth  • Inward ...
Combating Busyness Tips           32
Combating Busyness Tips• Reduce commitments  to excel in a few  things                      32
Combating Busyness Tips• Reduce commitments  to excel in a few  things• Rest requires faith!                         32
Combating Busyness Tips• Reduce commitments  to excel in a few  things• Rest requires faith!• Don’t allow  diversions and ...
Combating Busyness Tips           33
Combating Busyness Tips           • Live and savor the                present moment           33
Combating Busyness Tips           • Live and savor the                present moment           • Manage time loosely      ...
Combating Busyness Tips           • Live and savor the                present moment           • Manage time loosely      ...
Being Versus Doing1. The Problem of Busyness2. Causes Versus Christ3. Intimacy Versus Activity4. Practicing His Presence  ...
Causes Versus Christ         35
Causes Versus Christ• The world drives people to find security,  significance and satisfaction in wrong  places.            ...
Causes Versus Christ• The world drives people to find security,  significance and satisfaction in wrong  places.• Many Chris...
Causes Versus Christ• The world drives people to find security,  significance and satisfaction in wrong  places.• Many Chris...
Causes Versus Christ         36
Causes Versus Christ• Meaning is not found in a quest for self,  but in a calling to know God.                    36
Causes Versus Christ• Meaning is not found in a quest for self,  but in a calling to know God.• Intimacy with Christ leads...
Specific Causes Versus Christ             37
Specific Causes Versus Christ • Education               37
Specific Causes Versus Christ • Education • Politics               37
Specific Causes Versus Christ • Education • Politics • Social Action                   37
Specific Causes Versus Christ • Education • Politics • Social Action • Environmental   Action                   37
Specific Causes Versus Christ • Education • Politics • Social Action • Environmental   Action • Rearing godly kids         ...
Specific Causes Versus Christ • Education • Politics                  • Building a company                               fo...
Specific Causes Versus Christ • Education • Politics                  • Building a company                                f...
Specific Causes Versus Christ • Education • Politics                  • Building a company                                f...
Specific Causes Versus Christ • Education • Politics                  • Building a company                                f...
Even worthy causes will not sustain growthin our interior life
Even worthy causes will not sustain growthin our interior life         if we are not constantly cultivating               ...
Chambers on Causes vs. Christ              39
Chambers on Causes vs. Christ    ““If I am devoted to the cause of              humanity only,I will soon be exhausted and...
Chambers on Causes vs. Christ      ““If I am devoted to the cause of                humanity only,  I will soon be exhaust...
Chambers on Causes vs. Christ              40
Chambers on Causes vs. Christ  “The greatest competitor of devotion      to Jesus is service for Him…                     ...
Chambers on Causes vs. Christ        “The greatest competitor of devotion            to Jesus is service for Him…We count ...
Chambers on Causes vs. Christ        “The greatest competitor of devotion            to Jesus is service for Him…We count ...
Being Versus Doing1. The Problem of Busyness2. Causes Versus Christ3. Intimacy Versus Activity4. Practicing His Presence  ...
Intimacy Versus Activity           42
Intimacy Versus Activity• Must not confuse “spiritual” activity  with intimacy with Jesus.                    42
Intimacy Versus Activity• Must not confuse “spiritual” activity  with intimacy with Jesus.• Actions and service alone do n...
Intimacy Versus Activity• Must not confuse “spiritual” activity  with intimacy with Jesus.• Actions and service alone do n...
Intimacy Versus Activity• Must not confuse “spiritual” activity  with intimacy with Jesus.• Actions and service alone do n...
Intimacy Versus Activity           43
Intimacy Versus Activity• Requires a rhythm of:                   43
Intimacy Versus Activity• Requires a rhythm of:  • Solitude and engagement                   43
Intimacy Versus Activity• Requires a rhythm of:  • Solitude and engagement  • Restoration and application                 ...
Intimacy Versus Activity• Requires a rhythm of:  • Solitude and engagement  • Restoration and application  • Intimacy with...
The Common Mistake
The Common Mistake• Supposing that actions and service to  Jesus will lead to intimacy with Jesus
The Common Mistake• Supposing that actions and service to  Jesus will lead to intimacy with Jesus• Instead of ministry flow...
The Common Mistake• Supposing that actions and service to  Jesus will lead to intimacy with Jesus• Instead of ministry flow...
The Common Mistake• Supposing that actions and service to  Jesus will lead to intimacy with Jesus• Instead of ministry flow...
Intimacy with Jesus Occurs:             47
Intimacy with Jesus Occurs:  Inside Out               47
Intimacy with Jesus Occurs:  Inside Out        Outside In               47
Energizes
BEING                      DOING Intimacy with Christ      Activity in the world       Solitude                Engagement ...
BEING                      DOING Intimacy with Christ      Activity in the world       Solitude                Engagement ...
BEING                      DOING Intimacy with Christ      Activity in the world       Solitude                Engagement ...
BEING                      DOING Intimacy with Christ      Activity in the world       Solitude                Engagement ...
BEING                      DOING Intimacy with Christ      Activity in the world       Solitude                Engagement ...
BEING                      DOING Intimacy with Christ      Activity in the world       Solitude                Engagement ...
BEING                      DOING Intimacy with Christ      Activity in the world       Solitude                Engagement ...
BEING                      DOING Intimacy with Christ      Activity in the world       Solitude                Engagement ...
BEING                      DOING Intimacy with Christ      Activity in the world       Solitude                Engagement ...
BEING                      DOING Intimacy with Christ      Activity in the world       Solitude                Engagement ...
BEING                      DOING Intimacy with Christ      Activity in the world       Solitude                Engagement ...
BEING                      DOING Intimacy with Christ      Activity in the world       Solitude                Engagement ...
Being Versus Doing1. The Problem of Busyness2. Causes Versus Christ3. Intimacy Versus Activity4. Practicing His Presence  ...
Practicing His Presence: Scriptural Principles           50
Practicing His Presence:   Scriptural Principles• Abide in Jesus and let His words abide in  you (Jn.15:4-7)              ...
Practicing His Presence:   Scriptural Principles• Abide in Jesus and let His words abide in  you (Jn.15:4-7)• Set your min...
Practicing His Presence:   Scriptural Principles• Abide in Jesus and let His words abide in   you (Jn.15:4-7)• Set your mi...
Practicing His Presence:       Scriptures           51
Practicing His Presence:                 Scriptures• Keep seeking the things  above where Christ is  (Col. 3:1-2)         ...
Practicing His Presence:                 Scriptures• Keep seeking the things  above where Christ is  (Col. 3:1-2)• Rejoice...
Practicing His Presence:                 Scriptures• Keep seeking the things  above where Christ is  (Col. 3:1-2)• Rejoice...
Practicing His Presence Tips             52
Practicing His Presence Tips • Use flash prayers                      52
Practicing His Presence Tips • Use flash prayers • Use short prayers                       52
Practicing His Presence Tips • Use flash prayers • Use short prayers • Pray and work                       52
Practicing His Presence Tips •   Use flash prayers •   Use short prayers •   Pray and work •   Play to an Audience of One  ...
Practicing His Presence Tips •   Use flash prayers •   Use short prayers •   Pray and work •   Play to an Audience of One •...
Practicing His Presence Tips             53
Practicing His Presence Tips• Develop an eye for  God’s beauty                       53
Practicing His Presence Tips• Develop an eye for  God’s beauty• Turn pleasure into  sources of adoration                  ...
Practicing His Presence Tips• Develop an eye for  God’s beauty• Turn pleasure into  sources of adoration• See every person...
Practicing His Presence Tips• Develop an eye for  God’s beauty• Turn pleasure into  sources of adoration• See every person...
The Beauty of God
3. Trust, Gratitude, and Contentment
Trust, Gratitude, and Contentment   1. Letting Loose of Control      and Results   2. Cultivating a Heart of Gratitude   3...
Control: A Great Enemy of   Process Spirituality            57
Control: A Great Enemy of      Process Spirituality• Craving to control our environment                    57
Control: A Great Enemy of      Process Spirituality• Craving to control our environment• Desire to determine results of ou...
Control: A Great Enemy of      Process Spirituality• Craving to control our environment• Desire to determine results of ou...
Control: A Great Enemy of      Process Spirituality• Craving to control our environment• Desire to determine results of ou...
Control: A Great Enemy of      Process Spirituality• Craving to control our environment• Desire to determine results of ou...
Control: A Great Enemy of      Process Spirituality• Craving to control our environment• Desire to determine results of ou...
Control: A Great Enemy of      Process Spirituality• Craving to control our environment• Desire to determine results of ou...
Faithfulness to the Process but Trusting God for the Results               58
Faithfulness to the Process but   Trusting God for the ResultsOPPORTUNITY OBEDIENCE                                  OUTCO...
Faithfulness to the Process but   Trusting God for the ResultsOPPORTUNITY OBEDIENCE                                  OUTCO...
Faithfulness to the Process but   Trusting God for the ResultsOPPORTUNITY OBEDIENCE                                  OUTCO...
Faithfulness to the Process but   Trusting God for the ResultsOPPORTUNITY OBEDIENCE                                  OUTCO...
Faithfulness to the Process but   Trusting God for the ResultsOPPORTUNITY OBEDIENCE                                  OUTCO...
Keys for Letting Loose
Keys for Letting Loose• Receive each day and whatever it brings  as from the hand of God
Keys for Letting Loose• Receive each day and whatever it brings  as from the hand of God  • God is good and has our best i...
Keys for Letting Loose• Receive each day and whatever it brings  as from the hand of God  • God is good and has our best i...
Keys for Letting Loose• Receive each day and whatever it brings  as from the hand of God  • God is good and has our best i...
Trust, Gratitude, and Contentment   1. Letting Loose of Control and Results   2. Cultivating a Heart of      Gratitude   3...
Gratitude    61
Gratitude“If he is not stupid, he is monstrously ungrateful!                       Phenomenally ungrateful.               ...
Gratitude“If he is not stupid, he is monstrously ungrateful!                            Phenomenally ungrateful.In fact, I...
Gratitude    62
Gratitude• Forgetfulness always leads to ingratitude.                     62
Gratitude• Forgetfulness always leads to ingratitude.• Gratitude is a choice, not merely a feeling.                      62
Gratitude• Forgetfulness always leads to ingratitude.• Gratitude is a choice, not merely a feeling.• We cannot give thanks...
Gratitude• Forgetfulness always leads to ingratitude.• Gratitude is a choice, not merely a feeling.• We cannot give thanks...
“As they had their pasture, they becamesatisfied, and being satisfied, their heart became    proud; therefore they forgot Me...
Extremes in Forgetting God’s        Goodness             64
Extremes in Forgetting God’s           GoodnessPresumption                64
Extremes in Forgetting God’s           GoodnessPresumption               Resentment,                           Bitterness ...
Daily Exercise of Remembering:              65
Daily Exercise of Remembering: • God’s Deliverance in the Past                    65
Daily Exercise of Remembering: • God’s Deliverance in the Past • God’s Benefits in the Present                    65
Daily Exercise of Remembering: • God’s Deliverance in the Past • God’s Benefits in the Present • God’s Promises in the Futu...
Daily Exercise of Remembering:    • God’s Deliverance in the Past    • God’s Benefits in the Present    • God’s Promises in...
Trust, Gratitude, and Contentment  1. Letting Loose of Control and Results  2. Cultivating a Heart of Gratitude  3. The se...
Dissatisfaction       67
Dissatisfaction• Most live in the future rather than in the  present.                      67
Dissatisfaction• Most live in the future rather than in the  present.• “In the days ahead, we’ll make up for our  present ...
Dissatisfaction• Most live in the future rather than in the  present.• “In the days ahead, we’ll make up for our  present ...
Dissatisfaction• Most live in the future rather than in the  present.• “In the days ahead, we’ll make up for our  present ...
Contentment
Contentment• Often a direct ratio between a society’s  affluence and its discontentment
Contentment• Often a direct ratio between a society’s  affluence and its discontentment  • The more they have, the more    ...
Contentment• Often a direct ratio between a society’s  affluence and its discontentment  • The more they have, the more    ...
Contentment• Often a direct ratio between a society’s  affluence and its discontentment  • The more they have, the more    ...
The Secret of Contentment            69
The Secret of Contentment• Not found in having everything but in  being satisfied with everything we have                  ...
The Secret of Contentment• Not found in having everything but in  being satisfied with everything we have• Contentment shou...
The Secret of Contentment• Not found in having everything but in  being satisfied with everything we have• Contentment shou...
The Secret of Contentment• Not found in having everything but in  being satisfied with everything we have• Contentment shou...
“I have learned to be content in whatever           circumstances I am.
“I have learned to be content in whatever  circumstances I am. I know how to getalong with humble means, and I also knowho...
“I have learned to be content in whatever   circumstances I am. I know how to getIalong with humble along with humble mean...
“I have learned to be content in whatever  circumstances I am. I know how to getalong with humble means, and I also knowho...
in “I have learned circumstance Iin whatever the      any and every to be content have learnedsecretcircumstances Iand goi...
Who Determines the Content of         Your Life?              73
Who Determines the Content of         Your Life?              73
Who Determines the Content of         Your Life?    SELF              CHRIST   Comparison         Contentment  Covetousnes...
Who Determines the Content of         Your Life?    SELF              CHRIST   Comparison         Contentment  Covetousnes...
In Learning to Be Content, We          Become:              74
In Learning to Be Content, We          Become:   • Less impressed by numbers                74
In Learning to Be Content, We          Become:   • Less impressed by numbers   • Less driven to achieve                 74
In Learning to Be Content, We          Become:   • Less impressed by numbers   • Less driven to achieve   • More alive to ...
The End   75
Reflections Ministries Resources                                  76
Reflections Ministries Resources           Reflections - A free monthly teaching letter                                     ...
Reflections Ministries Resources           Reflections - A free monthly teaching letter                                     ...
Reflections Ministries Resources           Reflections - A free monthly teaching letter                                     ...
Reflections Ministries Resources           Reflections - A free monthly teaching letter           KenBoa.org website - Daily...
DVD Series             77
DVD Series - Audio/visual presentations of crucial topics                                                  77
DVD Series - Audio/visual presentations of crucial topics - $20 each                                                  77
DVD Series - Audio/visual presentations of crucial topics - $20 each - Call 800-DRAW NEAR (800-372-9632)                  ...
KENBOA.ORG KenBoa.org ken_boa     Kenneth Boa
Process Spirituality
Process Spirituality
Process Spirituality
Process Spirituality
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  • For many people, life has become so filled with the if-onlys of the future that today becomes an inconvenient obstacle in the path of reaching tommorrow. \n\n1. During most of our lives, we have a natural tendency to invest our energies in goals and accomplishments we hope to achieve in the days ahead.\n\n2. The problem is that even when we are able to attain these ends, we are already thinking of the next one.\n\n3. Thus, moving from product to product, we are rarely alive to the realities of the present. We are fully capable of doing this for decades, but there eventually comes a point where the days ahead are few and the memories behind are abundant. At this point, many people make a conscious switch to living in the the past instead of the future.\n\n4. \n
  • For many people, life has become so filled with the if-onlys of the future that today becomes an inconvenient obstacle in the path of reaching tommorrow. \n\n1. During most of our lives, we have a natural tendency to invest our energies in goals and accomplishments we hope to achieve in the days ahead.\n\n2. The problem is that even when we are able to attain these ends, we are already thinking of the next one.\n\n3. Thus, moving from product to product, we are rarely alive to the realities of the present. We are fully capable of doing this for decades, but there eventually comes a point where the days ahead are few and the memories behind are abundant. At this point, many people make a conscious switch to living in the the past instead of the future.\n\n4. \n
  • For many people, life has become so filled with the if-onlys of the future that today becomes an inconvenient obstacle in the path of reaching tommorrow. \n\n1. During most of our lives, we have a natural tendency to invest our energies in goals and accomplishments we hope to achieve in the days ahead.\n\n2. The problem is that even when we are able to attain these ends, we are already thinking of the next one.\n\n3. Thus, moving from product to product, we are rarely alive to the realities of the present. We are fully capable of doing this for decades, but there eventually comes a point where the days ahead are few and the memories behind are abundant. At this point, many people make a conscious switch to living in the the past instead of the future.\n\n4. \n
  • For many people, life has become so filled with the if-onlys of the future that today becomes an inconvenient obstacle in the path of reaching tommorrow. \n\n1. During most of our lives, we have a natural tendency to invest our energies in goals and accomplishments we hope to achieve in the days ahead.\n\n2. The problem is that even when we are able to attain these ends, we are already thinking of the next one.\n\n3. Thus, moving from product to product, we are rarely alive to the realities of the present. We are fully capable of doing this for decades, but there eventually comes a point where the days ahead are few and the memories behind are abundant. At this point, many people make a conscious switch to living in the the past instead of the future.\n\n4. \n
  • As Walker Percy observed in his novel Lancelot, “To live in the past and future is easy. To live in the present is like threading a needle.”\n\nThe present is the only point in which time intersects eternity.\n
  • As Walker Percy observed in his novel Lancelot, “To live in the past and future is easy. To live in the present is like threading a needle.”\n\nThe present is the only point in which time intersects eternity.\n
  • As Walker Percy observed in his novel Lancelot, “To live in the past and future is easy. To live in the present is like threading a needle.”\n\nThe present is the only point in which time intersects eternity.\n
  • As Walker Percy observed in his novel Lancelot, “To live in the past and future is easy. To live in the present is like threading a needle.”\n\nThe present is the only point in which time intersects eternity.\n
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  • 1. Try to live from moment to moment and hold a looser grip on your long-term plans.\n\n2. “Wherever you are, be all there. Live to the hilt any situation you believe to be the will of God.” - Jim Elliott\n
  • 1. Try to live from moment to moment and hold a looser grip on your long-term plans.\n\n2. “Wherever you are, be all there. Live to the hilt any situation you believe to be the will of God.” - Jim Elliott\n
  • 1. The best metaphor for life as a whole and for the spiritual life in particular is that of a journey. Literature abounds with this imagery (e.g. John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress). As followers of the Way, we are travelers on a quest, a voyage, and odyssey, a pilgrimage.\n\n2. If we are following Christ, we are headed for home, but there are stages along the way, and lessons to be learned. This is why it is a mistake to view the spiritual life as a static condition or a state of being that can be attained by a combination of technique and information. To follow Christ is to move into territory that is unknown to us and to count on His purposeful guidance, His grace when we go off the path, and His presence when we feel alone. It is to learn to respond to God’s providential care in deepening ways and to accept the pilgrim character of earthly existence with its uncertainties, setbacks, disappointments, surprises, and joys. It is to remember that we are in a process of gradual conformity to the image of Christ so that we can love and serve others along the way.\n
  • 1. The best metaphor for life as a whole and for the spiritual life in particular is that of a journey. Literature abounds with this imagery (e.g. John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress). As followers of the Way, we are travelers on a quest, a voyage, and odyssey, a pilgrimage.\n\n2. If we are following Christ, we are headed for home, but there are stages along the way, and lessons to be learned. This is why it is a mistake to view the spiritual life as a static condition or a state of being that can be attained by a combination of technique and information. To follow Christ is to move into territory that is unknown to us and to count on His purposeful guidance, His grace when we go off the path, and His presence when we feel alone. It is to learn to respond to God’s providential care in deepening ways and to accept the pilgrim character of earthly existence with its uncertainties, setbacks, disappointments, surprises, and joys. It is to remember that we are in a process of gradual conformity to the image of Christ so that we can love and serve others along the way.\n
  • 1. The best metaphor for life as a whole and for the spiritual life in particular is that of a journey. Literature abounds with this imagery (e.g. John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress). As followers of the Way, we are travelers on a quest, a voyage, and odyssey, a pilgrimage.\n\n2. If we are following Christ, we are headed for home, but there are stages along the way, and lessons to be learned. This is why it is a mistake to view the spiritual life as a static condition or a state of being that can be attained by a combination of technique and information. To follow Christ is to move into territory that is unknown to us and to count on His purposeful guidance, His grace when we go off the path, and His presence when we feel alone. It is to learn to respond to God’s providential care in deepening ways and to accept the pilgrim character of earthly existence with its uncertainties, setbacks, disappointments, surprises, and joys. It is to remember that we are in a process of gradual conformity to the image of Christ so that we can love and serve others along the way.\n
  • 1. The best metaphor for life as a whole and for the spiritual life in particular is that of a journey. Literature abounds with this imagery (e.g. John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress). As followers of the Way, we are travelers on a quest, a voyage, and odyssey, a pilgrimage.\n\n2. If we are following Christ, we are headed for home, but there are stages along the way, and lessons to be learned. This is why it is a mistake to view the spiritual life as a static condition or a state of being that can be attained by a combination of technique and information. To follow Christ is to move into territory that is unknown to us and to count on His purposeful guidance, His grace when we go off the path, and His presence when we feel alone. It is to learn to respond to God’s providential care in deepening ways and to accept the pilgrim character of earthly existence with its uncertainties, setbacks, disappointments, surprises, and joys. It is to remember that we are in a process of gradual conformity to the image of Christ so that we can love and serve others along the way.\n
  • 1. The best metaphor for life as a whole and for the spiritual life in particular is that of a journey. Literature abounds with this imagery (e.g. John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress). As followers of the Way, we are travelers on a quest, a voyage, and odyssey, a pilgrimage.\n\n2. If we are following Christ, we are headed for home, but there are stages along the way, and lessons to be learned. This is why it is a mistake to view the spiritual life as a static condition or a state of being that can be attained by a combination of technique and information. To follow Christ is to move into territory that is unknown to us and to count on His purposeful guidance, His grace when we go off the path, and His presence when we feel alone. It is to learn to respond to God’s providential care in deepening ways and to accept the pilgrim character of earthly existence with its uncertainties, setbacks, disappointments, surprises, and joys. It is to remember that we are in a process of gradual conformity to the image of Christ so that we can love and serve others along the way.\n
  • 1. The best metaphor for life as a whole and for the spiritual life in particular is that of a journey. Literature abounds with this imagery (e.g. John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress). As followers of the Way, we are travelers on a quest, a voyage, and odyssey, a pilgrimage.\n\n2. If we are following Christ, we are headed for home, but there are stages along the way, and lessons to be learned. This is why it is a mistake to view the spiritual life as a static condition or a state of being that can be attained by a combination of technique and information. To follow Christ is to move into territory that is unknown to us and to count on His purposeful guidance, His grace when we go off the path, and His presence when we feel alone. It is to learn to respond to God’s providential care in deepening ways and to accept the pilgrim character of earthly existence with its uncertainties, setbacks, disappointments, surprises, and joys. It is to remember that we are in a process of gradual conformity to the image of Christ so that we can love and serve others along the way.\n
  • 1. Spiritual formations is the lifelong process of becoming in our character and actions the new creations we already are in Christ (2Corinthians 5:17). It is the working out of what God has already worked in us (Philippians 2:12-13).\n\n2. In this life we stumble in many ways ( James 3:2) because we are still in process.\n\n3. Our sanctification is not yet complete. Sanctification is both an event (we were sanctified when we gave ourselves to Christ [1 Corinthians 6:11]) and a process (we are being sanctified [Romans 12:2; Philippians 2-3; 1 John 2:28]).\n\n4. The Christian life is not conformity to prevailing standards of holiness but a step-by-step process. This process of genuine response to what God is doing in our lives is more critical than the visible product. Spiritual formation is gradual, and we become more substantial and real as we cooperate with the proces by years of small choices in favor of God’s purpoese. Each choice, wheter to obey or resist, makes the next one possible.\n
  • 1. Spiritual formations is the lifelong process of becoming in our character and actions the new creations we already are in Christ (2Corinthians 5:17). It is the working out of what God has already worked in us (Philippians 2:12-13).\n\n2. In this life we stumble in many ways ( James 3:2) because we are still in process.\n\n3. Our sanctification is not yet complete. Sanctification is both an event (we were sanctified when we gave ourselves to Christ [1 Corinthians 6:11]) and a process (we are being sanctified [Romans 12:2; Philippians 2-3; 1 John 2:28]).\n\n4. The Christian life is not conformity to prevailing standards of holiness but a step-by-step process. This process of genuine response to what God is doing in our lives is more critical than the visible product. Spiritual formation is gradual, and we become more substantial and real as we cooperate with the proces by years of small choices in favor of God’s purpoese. Each choice, wheter to obey or resist, makes the next one possible.\n
  • 1. Spiritual formations is the lifelong process of becoming in our character and actions the new creations we already are in Christ (2Corinthians 5:17). It is the working out of what God has already worked in us (Philippians 2:12-13).\n\n2. In this life we stumble in many ways ( James 3:2) because we are still in process.\n\n3. Our sanctification is not yet complete. Sanctification is both an event (we were sanctified when we gave ourselves to Christ [1 Corinthians 6:11]) and a process (we are being sanctified [Romans 12:2; Philippians 2-3; 1 John 2:28]).\n\n4. The Christian life is not conformity to prevailing standards of holiness but a step-by-step process. This process of genuine response to what God is doing in our lives is more critical than the visible product. Spiritual formation is gradual, and we become more substantial and real as we cooperate with the proces by years of small choices in favor of God’s purpoese. Each choice, wheter to obey or resist, makes the next one possible.\n
  • 1. Spiritual formations is the lifelong process of becoming in our character and actions the new creations we already are in Christ (2Corinthians 5:17). It is the working out of what God has already worked in us (Philippians 2:12-13).\n\n2. In this life we stumble in many ways ( James 3:2) because we are still in process.\n\n3. Our sanctification is not yet complete. Sanctification is both an event (we were sanctified when we gave ourselves to Christ [1 Corinthians 6:11]) and a process (we are being sanctified [Romans 12:2; Philippians 2-3; 1 John 2:28]).\n\n4. The Christian life is not conformity to prevailing standards of holiness but a step-by-step process. This process of genuine response to what God is doing in our lives is more critical than the visible product. Spiritual formation is gradual, and we become more substantial and real as we cooperate with the proces by years of small choices in favor of God’s purpoese. Each choice, wheter to obey or resist, makes the next one possible.\n
  • 1. Spiritual growth is not an event, but a journey, a process of following Christ through the vissicitudes of life.\n2. External appearances are often deceptive, and this is why God looks at the heart. Rahab the harlot had little knowledge about the God of Israel, but applied the knowledge she had (Hebrews 11:31; James 2:25); the Pharisees, on the other hand, know the Scriptures but rejected God’s purposes. The spiritual life is not a matter of external conformity. Holiness relates to where we are now, not where we need to be later.\n3-5. Spiritual formation cannot be gained by a single formula. In a culture that promotes instant gratification, it can become wearisome for us to wait patiently on God’s timing. Many of us are tempted to bypass grace and take matters into our own hands as we seek some method, technique, seminar, or experience that will give us the results we want when we want them. But we are as incapable of changing ourselves through our own efforts as we are of manipulating God to transform us more quickly. Our task is to place ourselves under the conditions favorable to growth and look to God for our spiritual formation. He uses different paces and methods with each person. Since the inner life matures and becomes fruitful by the principle of growth, TIME is a significant part of the process.\n6. Spiritual formation is gradual, and we become more substantial and real as we cooperate with the process by YEARS of small choices in favor of God’s purposes. Each choice, whether to obey or to resist, makes the next one possible.\n7. This is a human-divine process; and God alone knows what we need and when we need it. He grows each person individually, just like plants.\n8. Spiritual formation is not uniform- like a vine or tree, there may be more growth in a single month than in all the rest of the year. If we fail to accept this uneven developmental process, we will be impatient with God and ourselves as we wait for the next growth spurt or special infusion of grace.\n
  • 1. Spiritual growth is not an event, but a journey, a process of following Christ through the vissicitudes of life.\n2. External appearances are often deceptive, and this is why God looks at the heart. Rahab the harlot had little knowledge about the God of Israel, but applied the knowledge she had (Hebrews 11:31; James 2:25); the Pharisees, on the other hand, know the Scriptures but rejected God’s purposes. The spiritual life is not a matter of external conformity. Holiness relates to where we are now, not where we need to be later.\n3-5. Spiritual formation cannot be gained by a single formula. In a culture that promotes instant gratification, it can become wearisome for us to wait patiently on God’s timing. Many of us are tempted to bypass grace and take matters into our own hands as we seek some method, technique, seminar, or experience that will give us the results we want when we want them. But we are as incapable of changing ourselves through our own efforts as we are of manipulating God to transform us more quickly. Our task is to place ourselves under the conditions favorable to growth and look to God for our spiritual formation. He uses different paces and methods with each person. Since the inner life matures and becomes fruitful by the principle of growth, TIME is a significant part of the process.\n6. Spiritual formation is gradual, and we become more substantial and real as we cooperate with the process by YEARS of small choices in favor of God’s purposes. Each choice, whether to obey or to resist, makes the next one possible.\n7. This is a human-divine process; and God alone knows what we need and when we need it. He grows each person individually, just like plants.\n8. Spiritual formation is not uniform- like a vine or tree, there may be more growth in a single month than in all the rest of the year. If we fail to accept this uneven developmental process, we will be impatient with God and ourselves as we wait for the next growth spurt or special infusion of grace.\n
  • 1. Spiritual growth is not an event, but a journey, a process of following Christ through the vissicitudes of life.\n2. External appearances are often deceptive, and this is why God looks at the heart. Rahab the harlot had little knowledge about the God of Israel, but applied the knowledge she had (Hebrews 11:31; James 2:25); the Pharisees, on the other hand, know the Scriptures but rejected God’s purposes. The spiritual life is not a matter of external conformity. Holiness relates to where we are now, not where we need to be later.\n3-5. Spiritual formation cannot be gained by a single formula. In a culture that promotes instant gratification, it can become wearisome for us to wait patiently on God’s timing. Many of us are tempted to bypass grace and take matters into our own hands as we seek some method, technique, seminar, or experience that will give us the results we want when we want them. But we are as incapable of changing ourselves through our own efforts as we are of manipulating God to transform us more quickly. Our task is to place ourselves under the conditions favorable to growth and look to God for our spiritual formation. He uses different paces and methods with each person. Since the inner life matures and becomes fruitful by the principle of growth, TIME is a significant part of the process.\n6. Spiritual formation is gradual, and we become more substantial and real as we cooperate with the process by YEARS of small choices in favor of God’s purposes. Each choice, whether to obey or to resist, makes the next one possible.\n7. This is a human-divine process; and God alone knows what we need and when we need it. He grows each person individually, just like plants.\n8. Spiritual formation is not uniform- like a vine or tree, there may be more growth in a single month than in all the rest of the year. If we fail to accept this uneven developmental process, we will be impatient with God and ourselves as we wait for the next growth spurt or special infusion of grace.\n
  • 1. Spiritual growth is not an event, but a journey, a process of following Christ through the vissicitudes of life.\n2. External appearances are often deceptive, and this is why God looks at the heart. Rahab the harlot had little knowledge about the God of Israel, but applied the knowledge she had (Hebrews 11:31; James 2:25); the Pharisees, on the other hand, know the Scriptures but rejected God’s purposes. The spiritual life is not a matter of external conformity. Holiness relates to where we are now, not where we need to be later.\n3-5. Spiritual formation cannot be gained by a single formula. In a culture that promotes instant gratification, it can become wearisome for us to wait patiently on God’s timing. Many of us are tempted to bypass grace and take matters into our own hands as we seek some method, technique, seminar, or experience that will give us the results we want when we want them. But we are as incapable of changing ourselves through our own efforts as we are of manipulating God to transform us more quickly. Our task is to place ourselves under the conditions favorable to growth and look to God for our spiritual formation. He uses different paces and methods with each person. Since the inner life matures and becomes fruitful by the principle of growth, TIME is a significant part of the process.\n6. Spiritual formation is gradual, and we become more substantial and real as we cooperate with the process by YEARS of small choices in favor of God’s purposes. Each choice, whether to obey or to resist, makes the next one possible.\n7. This is a human-divine process; and God alone knows what we need and when we need it. He grows each person individually, just like plants.\n8. Spiritual formation is not uniform- like a vine or tree, there may be more growth in a single month than in all the rest of the year. If we fail to accept this uneven developmental process, we will be impatient with God and ourselves as we wait for the next growth spurt or special infusion of grace.\n
  • 1. Spiritual growth is not an event, but a journey, a process of following Christ through the vissicitudes of life.\n2. External appearances are often deceptive, and this is why God looks at the heart. Rahab the harlot had little knowledge about the God of Israel, but applied the knowledge she had (Hebrews 11:31; James 2:25); the Pharisees, on the other hand, know the Scriptures but rejected God’s purposes. The spiritual life is not a matter of external conformity. Holiness relates to where we are now, not where we need to be later.\n3-5. Spiritual formation cannot be gained by a single formula. In a culture that promotes instant gratification, it can become wearisome for us to wait patiently on God’s timing. Many of us are tempted to bypass grace and take matters into our own hands as we seek some method, technique, seminar, or experience that will give us the results we want when we want them. But we are as incapable of changing ourselves through our own efforts as we are of manipulating God to transform us more quickly. Our task is to place ourselves under the conditions favorable to growth and look to God for our spiritual formation. He uses different paces and methods with each person. Since the inner life matures and becomes fruitful by the principle of growth, TIME is a significant part of the process.\n6. Spiritual formation is gradual, and we become more substantial and real as we cooperate with the process by YEARS of small choices in favor of God’s purposes. Each choice, whether to obey or to resist, makes the next one possible.\n7. This is a human-divine process; and God alone knows what we need and when we need it. He grows each person individually, just like plants.\n8. Spiritual formation is not uniform- like a vine or tree, there may be more growth in a single month than in all the rest of the year. If we fail to accept this uneven developmental process, we will be impatient with God and ourselves as we wait for the next growth spurt or special infusion of grace.\n
  • 1. Spiritual growth is not an event, but a journey, a process of following Christ through the vissicitudes of life.\n2. External appearances are often deceptive, and this is why God looks at the heart. Rahab the harlot had little knowledge about the God of Israel, but applied the knowledge she had (Hebrews 11:31; James 2:25); the Pharisees, on the other hand, know the Scriptures but rejected God’s purposes. The spiritual life is not a matter of external conformity. Holiness relates to where we are now, not where we need to be later.\n3-5. Spiritual formation cannot be gained by a single formula. In a culture that promotes instant gratification, it can become wearisome for us to wait patiently on God’s timing. Many of us are tempted to bypass grace and take matters into our own hands as we seek some method, technique, seminar, or experience that will give us the results we want when we want them. But we are as incapable of changing ourselves through our own efforts as we are of manipulating God to transform us more quickly. Our task is to place ourselves under the conditions favorable to growth and look to God for our spiritual formation. He uses different paces and methods with each person. Since the inner life matures and becomes fruitful by the principle of growth, TIME is a significant part of the process.\n6. Spiritual formation is gradual, and we become more substantial and real as we cooperate with the process by YEARS of small choices in favor of God’s purposes. Each choice, whether to obey or to resist, makes the next one possible.\n7. This is a human-divine process; and God alone knows what we need and when we need it. He grows each person individually, just like plants.\n8. Spiritual formation is not uniform- like a vine or tree, there may be more growth in a single month than in all the rest of the year. If we fail to accept this uneven developmental process, we will be impatient with God and ourselves as we wait for the next growth spurt or special infusion of grace.\n
  • 1. Spiritual growth is not an event, but a journey, a process of following Christ through the vissicitudes of life.\n2. External appearances are often deceptive, and this is why God looks at the heart. Rahab the harlot had little knowledge about the God of Israel, but applied the knowledge she had (Hebrews 11:31; James 2:25); the Pharisees, on the other hand, know the Scriptures but rejected God’s purposes. The spiritual life is not a matter of external conformity. Holiness relates to where we are now, not where we need to be later.\n3-5. Spiritual formation cannot be gained by a single formula. In a culture that promotes instant gratification, it can become wearisome for us to wait patiently on God’s timing. Many of us are tempted to bypass grace and take matters into our own hands as we seek some method, technique, seminar, or experience that will give us the results we want when we want them. But we are as incapable of changing ourselves through our own efforts as we are of manipulating God to transform us more quickly. Our task is to place ourselves under the conditions favorable to growth and look to God for our spiritual formation. He uses different paces and methods with each person. Since the inner life matures and becomes fruitful by the principle of growth, TIME is a significant part of the process.\n6. Spiritual formation is gradual, and we become more substantial and real as we cooperate with the process by YEARS of small choices in favor of God’s purposes. Each choice, whether to obey or to resist, makes the next one possible.\n7. This is a human-divine process; and God alone knows what we need and when we need it. He grows each person individually, just like plants.\n8. Spiritual formation is not uniform- like a vine or tree, there may be more growth in a single month than in all the rest of the year. If we fail to accept this uneven developmental process, we will be impatient with God and ourselves as we wait for the next growth spurt or special infusion of grace.\n
  • 1. Spiritual growth is not an event, but a journey, a process of following Christ through the vissicitudes of life.\n2. External appearances are often deceptive, and this is why God looks at the heart. Rahab the harlot had little knowledge about the God of Israel, but applied the knowledge she had (Hebrews 11:31; James 2:25); the Pharisees, on the other hand, know the Scriptures but rejected God’s purposes. The spiritual life is not a matter of external conformity. Holiness relates to where we are now, not where we need to be later.\n3-5. Spiritual formation cannot be gained by a single formula. In a culture that promotes instant gratification, it can become wearisome for us to wait patiently on God’s timing. Many of us are tempted to bypass grace and take matters into our own hands as we seek some method, technique, seminar, or experience that will give us the results we want when we want them. But we are as incapable of changing ourselves through our own efforts as we are of manipulating God to transform us more quickly. Our task is to place ourselves under the conditions favorable to growth and look to God for our spiritual formation. He uses different paces and methods with each person. Since the inner life matures and becomes fruitful by the principle of growth, TIME is a significant part of the process.\n6. Spiritual formation is gradual, and we become more substantial and real as we cooperate with the process by YEARS of small choices in favor of God’s purposes. Each choice, whether to obey or to resist, makes the next one possible.\n7. This is a human-divine process; and God alone knows what we need and when we need it. He grows each person individually, just like plants.\n8. Spiritual formation is not uniform- like a vine or tree, there may be more growth in a single month than in all the rest of the year. If we fail to accept this uneven developmental process, we will be impatient with God and ourselves as we wait for the next growth spurt or special infusion of grace.\n
  • 1. Spiritual growth is not an event, but a journey, a process of following Christ through the vissicitudes of life.\n2. External appearances are often deceptive, and this is why God looks at the heart. Rahab the harlot had little knowledge about the God of Israel, but applied the knowledge she had (Hebrews 11:31; James 2:25); the Pharisees, on the other hand, know the Scriptures but rejected God’s purposes. The spiritual life is not a matter of external conformity. Holiness relates to where we are now, not where we need to be later.\n3-5. Spiritual formation cannot be gained by a single formula. In a culture that promotes instant gratification, it can become wearisome for us to wait patiently on God’s timing. Many of us are tempted to bypass grace and take matters into our own hands as we seek some method, technique, seminar, or experience that will give us the results we want when we want them. But we are as incapable of changing ourselves through our own efforts as we are of manipulating God to transform us more quickly. Our task is to place ourselves under the conditions favorable to growth and look to God for our spiritual formation. He uses different paces and methods with each person. Since the inner life matures and becomes fruitful by the principle of growth, TIME is a significant part of the process.\n6. Spiritual formation is gradual, and we become more substantial and real as we cooperate with the process by YEARS of small choices in favor of God’s purposes. Each choice, whether to obey or to resist, makes the next one possible.\n7. This is a human-divine process; and God alone knows what we need and when we need it. He grows each person individually, just like plants.\n8. Spiritual formation is not uniform- like a vine or tree, there may be more growth in a single month than in all the rest of the year. If we fail to accept this uneven developmental process, we will be impatient with God and ourselves as we wait for the next growth spurt or special infusion of grace.\n
  • 1. Spiritual growth is not an event, but a journey, a process of following Christ through the vissicitudes of life.\n2. External appearances are often deceptive, and this is why God looks at the heart. Rahab the harlot had little knowledge about the God of Israel, but applied the knowledge she had (Hebrews 11:31; James 2:25); the Pharisees, on the other hand, know the Scriptures but rejected God’s purposes. The spiritual life is not a matter of external conformity. Holiness relates to where we are now, not where we need to be later.\n3-5. Spiritual formation cannot be gained by a single formula. In a culture that promotes instant gratification, it can become wearisome for us to wait patiently on God’s timing. Many of us are tempted to bypass grace and take matters into our own hands as we seek some method, technique, seminar, or experience that will give us the results we want when we want them. But we are as incapable of changing ourselves through our own efforts as we are of manipulating God to transform us more quickly. Our task is to place ourselves under the conditions favorable to growth and look to God for our spiritual formation. He uses different paces and methods with each person. Since the inner life matures and becomes fruitful by the principle of growth, TIME is a significant part of the process.\n6. Spiritual formation is gradual, and we become more substantial and real as we cooperate with the process by YEARS of small choices in favor of God’s purposes. Each choice, whether to obey or to resist, makes the next one possible.\n7. This is a human-divine process; and God alone knows what we need and when we need it. He grows each person individually, just like plants.\n8. Spiritual formation is not uniform- like a vine or tree, there may be more growth in a single month than in all the rest of the year. If we fail to accept this uneven developmental process, we will be impatient with God and ourselves as we wait for the next growth spurt or special infusion of grace.\n
  • 1. Spiritual growth is not an event, but a journey, a process of following Christ through the vissicitudes of life.\n2. External appearances are often deceptive, and this is why God looks at the heart. Rahab the harlot had little knowledge about the God of Israel, but applied the knowledge she had (Hebrews 11:31; James 2:25); the Pharisees, on the other hand, know the Scriptures but rejected God’s purposes. The spiritual life is not a matter of external conformity. Holiness relates to where we are now, not where we need to be later.\n3-5. Spiritual formation cannot be gained by a single formula. In a culture that promotes instant gratification, it can become wearisome for us to wait patiently on God’s timing. Many of us are tempted to bypass grace and take matters into our own hands as we seek some method, technique, seminar, or experience that will give us the results we want when we want them. But we are as incapable of changing ourselves through our own efforts as we are of manipulating God to transform us more quickly. Our task is to place ourselves under the conditions favorable to growth and look to God for our spiritual formation. He uses different paces and methods with each person. Since the inner life matures and becomes fruitful by the principle of growth, TIME is a significant part of the process.\n6. Spiritual formation is gradual, and we become more substantial and real as we cooperate with the process by YEARS of small choices in favor of God’s purposes. Each choice, whether to obey or to resist, makes the next one possible.\n7. This is a human-divine process; and God alone knows what we need and when we need it. He grows each person individually, just like plants.\n8. Spiritual formation is not uniform- like a vine or tree, there may be more growth in a single month than in all the rest of the year. If we fail to accept this uneven developmental process, we will be impatient with God and ourselves as we wait for the next growth spurt or special infusion of grace.\n
  • 1. Spiritual growth is not an event, but a journey, a process of following Christ through the vissicitudes of life.\n2. External appearances are often deceptive, and this is why God looks at the heart. Rahab the harlot had little knowledge about the God of Israel, but applied the knowledge she had (Hebrews 11:31; James 2:25); the Pharisees, on the other hand, know the Scriptures but rejected God’s purposes. The spiritual life is not a matter of external conformity. Holiness relates to where we are now, not where we need to be later.\n3-5. Spiritual formation cannot be gained by a single formula. In a culture that promotes instant gratification, it can become wearisome for us to wait patiently on God’s timing. Many of us are tempted to bypass grace and take matters into our own hands as we seek some method, technique, seminar, or experience that will give us the results we want when we want them. But we are as incapable of changing ourselves through our own efforts as we are of manipulating God to transform us more quickly. Our task is to place ourselves under the conditions favorable to growth and look to God for our spiritual formation. He uses different paces and methods with each person. Since the inner life matures and becomes fruitful by the principle of growth, TIME is a significant part of the process.\n6. Spiritual formation is gradual, and we become more substantial and real as we cooperate with the process by YEARS of small choices in favor of God’s purposes. Each choice, whether to obey or to resist, makes the next one possible.\n7. This is a human-divine process; and God alone knows what we need and when we need it. He grows each person individually, just like plants.\n8. Spiritual formation is not uniform- like a vine or tree, there may be more growth in a single month than in all the rest of the year. If we fail to accept this uneven developmental process, we will be impatient with God and ourselves as we wait for the next growth spurt or special infusion of grace.\n
  • 1. Spiritual growth is not an event, but a journey, a process of following Christ through the vissicitudes of life.\n2. External appearances are often deceptive, and this is why God looks at the heart. Rahab the harlot had little knowledge about the God of Israel, but applied the knowledge she had (Hebrews 11:31; James 2:25); the Pharisees, on the other hand, know the Scriptures but rejected God’s purposes. The spiritual life is not a matter of external conformity. Holiness relates to where we are now, not where we need to be later.\n3-5. Spiritual formation cannot be gained by a single formula. In a culture that promotes instant gratification, it can become wearisome for us to wait patiently on God’s timing. Many of us are tempted to bypass grace and take matters into our own hands as we seek some method, technique, seminar, or experience that will give us the results we want when we want them. But we are as incapable of changing ourselves through our own efforts as we are of manipulating God to transform us more quickly. Our task is to place ourselves under the conditions favorable to growth and look to God for our spiritual formation. He uses different paces and methods with each person. Since the inner life matures and becomes fruitful by the principle of growth, TIME is a significant part of the process.\n6. Spiritual formation is gradual, and we become more substantial and real as we cooperate with the process by YEARS of small choices in favor of God’s purposes. Each choice, whether to obey or to resist, makes the next one possible.\n7. This is a human-divine process; and God alone knows what we need and when we need it. He grows each person individually, just like plants.\n8. Spiritual formation is not uniform- like a vine or tree, there may be more growth in a single month than in all the rest of the year. If we fail to accept this uneven developmental process, we will be impatient with God and ourselves as we wait for the next growth spurt or special infusion of grace.\n
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  • “But now faith, hope, love, abide these three; but the greatest of these is love” (1 Corinthians 13:13). The great theological virtues of faith, hope, and love encapsulate the dynamic of spiritual life in Christ. Although all three relate to God’s creative purposes from eternity to eternity, faith particularly focuses on Christ’s redemptive work for us in the past, hope looks to the ultimate completion of his work in the future, and love manifests the life of Christ through us in the present. p. 259\n\n
  • “But now faith, hope, love, abide these three; but the greatest of these is love” (1 Corinthians 13:13). The great theological virtues of faith, hope, and love encapsulate the dynamic of spiritual life in Christ. Although all three relate to God’s creative purposes from eternity to eternity, faith particularly focuses on Christ’s redemptive work for us in the past, hope looks to the ultimate completion of his work in the future, and love manifests the life of Christ through us in the present. p. 259\n\n
  • “But now faith, hope, love, abide these three; but the greatest of these is love” (1 Corinthians 13:13). The great theological virtues of faith, hope, and love encapsulate the dynamic of spiritual life in Christ. Although all three relate to God’s creative purposes from eternity to eternity, faith particularly focuses on Christ’s redemptive work for us in the past, hope looks to the ultimate completion of his work in the future, and love manifests the life of Christ through us in the present. p. 259\n\n
  • “But now faith, hope, love, abide these three; but the greatest of these is love” (1 Corinthians 13:13). The great theological virtues of faith, hope, and love encapsulate the dynamic of spiritual life in Christ. Although all three relate to God’s creative purposes from eternity to eternity, faith particularly focuses on Christ’s redemptive work for us in the past, hope looks to the ultimate completion of his work in the future, and love manifests the life of Christ through us in the present. p. 259\n\n
  • The blood of Christ paid the penalty of sin, the cross of Christ overcomes the power of sin, and our resurrection in Christ will remove the presence of sin. We live between the cross and the resurrection, but even now Christ’s resurrection life empowers us to live and love.\n\nLife in Christ is the life of Christ in us--appropriated in the past, active in the present, and anticipating the future. \n\nBecause eternal life is a new and ongoing quality of life in us that will last forever, the journey of spiritual formation with its pains and joys and failures and advances is a process of rendering this new creation increasingly visible.\n
  • The blood of Christ paid the penalty of sin, the cross of Christ overcomes the power of sin, and our resurrection in Christ will remove the presence of sin. We live between the cross and the resurrection, but even now Christ’s resurrection life empowers us to live and love.\n\nLife in Christ is the life of Christ in us--appropriated in the past, active in the present, and anticipating the future. \n\nBecause eternal life is a new and ongoing quality of life in us that will last forever, the journey of spiritual formation with its pains and joys and failures and advances is a process of rendering this new creation increasingly visible.\n
  • The blood of Christ paid the penalty of sin, the cross of Christ overcomes the power of sin, and our resurrection in Christ will remove the presence of sin. We live between the cross and the resurrection, but even now Christ’s resurrection life empowers us to live and love.\n\nLife in Christ is the life of Christ in us--appropriated in the past, active in the present, and anticipating the future. \n\nBecause eternal life is a new and ongoing quality of life in us that will last forever, the journey of spiritual formation with its pains and joys and failures and advances is a process of rendering this new creation increasingly visible.\n
  • The blood of Christ paid the penalty of sin, the cross of Christ overcomes the power of sin, and our resurrection in Christ will remove the presence of sin. We live between the cross and the resurrection, but even now Christ’s resurrection life empowers us to live and love.\n\nLife in Christ is the life of Christ in us--appropriated in the past, active in the present, and anticipating the future. \n\nBecause eternal life is a new and ongoing quality of life in us that will last forever, the journey of spiritual formation with its pains and joys and failures and advances is a process of rendering this new creation increasingly visible.\n
  • The blood of Christ paid the penalty of sin, the cross of Christ overcomes the power of sin, and our resurrection in Christ will remove the presence of sin. We live between the cross and the resurrection, but even now Christ’s resurrection life empowers us to live and love.\n\nLife in Christ is the life of Christ in us--appropriated in the past, active in the present, and anticipating the future. \n\nBecause eternal life is a new and ongoing quality of life in us that will last forever, the journey of spiritual formation with its pains and joys and failures and advances is a process of rendering this new creation increasingly visible.\n
  • The blood of Christ paid the penalty of sin, the cross of Christ overcomes the power of sin, and our resurrection in Christ will remove the presence of sin. We live between the cross and the resurrection, but even now Christ’s resurrection life empowers us to live and love.\n\nLife in Christ is the life of Christ in us--appropriated in the past, active in the present, and anticipating the future. \n\nBecause eternal life is a new and ongoing quality of life in us that will last forever, the journey of spiritual formation with its pains and joys and failures and advances is a process of rendering this new creation increasingly visible.\n
  • The blood of Christ paid the penalty of sin, the cross of Christ overcomes the power of sin, and our resurrection in Christ will remove the presence of sin. We live between the cross and the resurrection, but even now Christ’s resurrection life empowers us to live and love.\n\nLife in Christ is the life of Christ in us--appropriated in the past, active in the present, and anticipating the future. \n\nBecause eternal life is a new and ongoing quality of life in us that will last forever, the journey of spiritual formation with its pains and joys and failures and advances is a process of rendering this new creation increasingly visible.\n
  • The blood of Christ paid the penalty of sin, the cross of Christ overcomes the power of sin, and our resurrection in Christ will remove the presence of sin. We live between the cross and the resurrection, but even now Christ’s resurrection life empowers us to live and love.\n\nLife in Christ is the life of Christ in us--appropriated in the past, active in the present, and anticipating the future. \n\nBecause eternal life is a new and ongoing quality of life in us that will last forever, the journey of spiritual formation with its pains and joys and failures and advances is a process of rendering this new creation increasingly visible.\n
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  • The Christian life can be simplified to just three areas: Loving God completely, loving ourselves correctly, and loving others compassionately. If I love God completely, I will know what He cares about, and I will try to please Him. In so doing, I will also embrace what He declares about me as truth, so that I can realize my completeness in Christ. When these truths begin to define our self-image, they make us secure enough to love and serve others without seeking our interests first. This, in turn, allows me up to freely give to others without expectation of reciprocity. Hopefully, then, our incarnation of Christ’s love and life will draw others to the Father.\n\nSince God is a relational being, we who are created in His image are also called to right relationships, first with Him and then with each other.\n
  • The Christian life can be simplified to just three areas: Loving God completely, loving ourselves correctly, and loving others compassionately. If I love God completely, I will know what He cares about, and I will try to please Him. In so doing, I will also embrace what He declares about me as truth, so that I can realize my completeness in Christ. When these truths begin to define our self-image, they make us secure enough to love and serve others without seeking our interests first. This, in turn, allows me up to freely give to others without expectation of reciprocity. Hopefully, then, our incarnation of Christ’s love and life will draw others to the Father.\n\nSince God is a relational being, we who are created in His image are also called to right relationships, first with Him and then with each other.\n
  • The Christian life can be simplified to just three areas: Loving God completely, loving ourselves correctly, and loving others compassionately. If I love God completely, I will know what He cares about, and I will try to please Him. In so doing, I will also embrace what He declares about me as truth, so that I can realize my completeness in Christ. When these truths begin to define our self-image, they make us secure enough to love and serve others without seeking our interests first. This, in turn, allows me up to freely give to others without expectation of reciprocity. Hopefully, then, our incarnation of Christ’s love and life will draw others to the Father.\n\nSince God is a relational being, we who are created in His image are also called to right relationships, first with Him and then with each other.\n
  • The Christian life can be simplified to just three areas: Loving God completely, loving ourselves correctly, and loving others compassionately. If I love God completely, I will know what He cares about, and I will try to please Him. In so doing, I will also embrace what He declares about me as truth, so that I can realize my completeness in Christ. When these truths begin to define our self-image, they make us secure enough to love and serve others without seeking our interests first. This, in turn, allows me up to freely give to others without expectation of reciprocity. Hopefully, then, our incarnation of Christ’s love and life will draw others to the Father.\n\nSince God is a relational being, we who are created in His image are also called to right relationships, first with Him and then with each other.\n
  • The Christian life can be simplified to just three areas: Loving God completely, loving ourselves correctly, and loving others compassionately. If I love God completely, I will know what He cares about, and I will try to please Him. In so doing, I will also embrace what He declares about me as truth, so that I can realize my completeness in Christ. When these truths begin to define our self-image, they make us secure enough to love and serve others without seeking our interests first. This, in turn, allows me up to freely give to others without expectation of reciprocity. Hopefully, then, our incarnation of Christ’s love and life will draw others to the Father.\n\nSince God is a relational being, we who are created in His image are also called to right relationships, first with Him and then with each other.\n
  • The Christian life can be simplified to just three areas: Loving God completely, loving ourselves correctly, and loving others compassionately. If I love God completely, I will know what He cares about, and I will try to please Him. In so doing, I will also embrace what He declares about me as truth, so that I can realize my completeness in Christ. When these truths begin to define our self-image, they make us secure enough to love and serve others without seeking our interests first. This, in turn, allows me up to freely give to others without expectation of reciprocity. Hopefully, then, our incarnation of Christ’s love and life will draw others to the Father.\n\nSince God is a relational being, we who are created in His image are also called to right relationships, first with Him and then with each other.\n
  • The Christian life can be simplified to just three areas: Loving God completely, loving ourselves correctly, and loving others compassionately. If I love God completely, I will know what He cares about, and I will try to please Him. In so doing, I will also embrace what He declares about me as truth, so that I can realize my completeness in Christ. When these truths begin to define our self-image, they make us secure enough to love and serve others without seeking our interests first. This, in turn, allows me up to freely give to others without expectation of reciprocity. Hopefully, then, our incarnation of Christ’s love and life will draw others to the Father.\n\nSince God is a relational being, we who are created in His image are also called to right relationships, first with Him and then with each other.\n
  • The Christian life can be simplified to just three areas: Loving God completely, loving ourselves correctly, and loving others compassionately. If I love God completely, I will know what He cares about, and I will try to please Him. In so doing, I will also embrace what He declares about me as truth, so that I can realize my completeness in Christ. When these truths begin to define our self-image, they make us secure enough to love and serve others without seeking our interests first. This, in turn, allows me up to freely give to others without expectation of reciprocity. Hopefully, then, our incarnation of Christ’s love and life will draw others to the Father.\n\nSince God is a relational being, we who are created in His image are also called to right relationships, first with Him and then with each other.\n
  • The Christian life can be simplified to just three areas: Loving God completely, loving ourselves correctly, and loving others compassionately. If I love God completely, I will know what He cares about, and I will try to please Him. In so doing, I will also embrace what He declares about me as truth, so that I can realize my completeness in Christ. When these truths begin to define our self-image, they make us secure enough to love and serve others without seeking our interests first. This, in turn, allows me up to freely give to others without expectation of reciprocity. Hopefully, then, our incarnation of Christ’s love and life will draw others to the Father.\n\nSince God is a relational being, we who are created in His image are also called to right relationships, first with Him and then with each other.\n
  • The Christian life can be simplified to just three areas: Loving God completely, loving ourselves correctly, and loving others compassionately. If I love God completely, I will know what He cares about, and I will try to please Him. In so doing, I will also embrace what He declares about me as truth, so that I can realize my completeness in Christ. When these truths begin to define our self-image, they make us secure enough to love and serve others without seeking our interests first. This, in turn, allows me up to freely give to others without expectation of reciprocity. Hopefully, then, our incarnation of Christ’s love and life will draw others to the Father.\n\nSince God is a relational being, we who are created in His image are also called to right relationships, first with Him and then with each other.\n
  • The Christian life can be simplified to just three areas: Loving God completely, loving ourselves correctly, and loving others compassionately. If I love God completely, I will know what He cares about, and I will try to please Him. In so doing, I will also embrace what He declares about me as truth, so that I can realize my completeness in Christ. When these truths begin to define our self-image, they make us secure enough to love and serve others without seeking our interests first. This, in turn, allows me up to freely give to others without expectation of reciprocity. Hopefully, then, our incarnation of Christ’s love and life will draw others to the Father.\n\nSince God is a relational being, we who are created in His image are also called to right relationships, first with Him and then with each other.\n
  • The Christian life can be simplified to just three areas: Loving God completely, loving ourselves correctly, and loving others compassionately. If I love God completely, I will know what He cares about, and I will try to please Him. In so doing, I will also embrace what He declares about me as truth, so that I can realize my completeness in Christ. When these truths begin to define our self-image, they make us secure enough to love and serve others without seeking our interests first. This, in turn, allows me up to freely give to others without expectation of reciprocity. Hopefully, then, our incarnation of Christ’s love and life will draw others to the Father.\n\nSince God is a relational being, we who are created in His image are also called to right relationships, first with Him and then with each other.\n
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  • 1. Perhaps the greatest threat to applying these truths about Process Spirituality is the busyness that stems from the way we define ourselves in terms of achievements and accomplishments. \n\n2. We live in a future-oriented culture that relates time largely to efficiency and productivity.\n\n3. Thus, we are more inclined than ever to use time to accomplish results rather than to enhance relationships.\n\n4. The civil religion of America worships the god of progress and inspires us to compete, achieve, and win for the sake of competing, achieving, and winning. \n
  • 1. Perhaps the greatest threat to applying these truths about Process Spirituality is the busyness that stems from the way we define ourselves in terms of achievements and accomplishments. \n\n2. We live in a future-oriented culture that relates time largely to efficiency and productivity.\n\n3. Thus, we are more inclined than ever to use time to accomplish results rather than to enhance relationships.\n\n4. The civil religion of America worships the god of progress and inspires us to compete, achieve, and win for the sake of competing, achieving, and winning. \n
  • 1. Perhaps the greatest threat to applying these truths about Process Spirituality is the busyness that stems from the way we define ourselves in terms of achievements and accomplishments. \n\n2. We live in a future-oriented culture that relates time largely to efficiency and productivity.\n\n3. Thus, we are more inclined than ever to use time to accomplish results rather than to enhance relationships.\n\n4. The civil religion of America worships the god of progress and inspires us to compete, achieve, and win for the sake of competing, achieving, and winning. \n
  • 1. Perhaps the greatest threat to applying these truths about Process Spirituality is the busyness that stems from the way we define ourselves in terms of achievements and accomplishments. \n\n2. We live in a future-oriented culture that relates time largely to efficiency and productivity.\n\n3. Thus, we are more inclined than ever to use time to accomplish results rather than to enhance relationships.\n\n4. The civil religion of America worships the god of progress and inspires us to compete, achieve, and win for the sake of competing, achieving, and winning. \n
  • 1. Perhaps the greatest threat to applying these truths about Process Spirituality is the busyness that stems from the way we define ourselves in terms of achievements and accomplishments. \n\n2. We live in a future-oriented culture that relates time largely to efficiency and productivity.\n\n3. Thus, we are more inclined than ever to use time to accomplish results rather than to enhance relationships.\n\n4. The civil religion of America worships the god of progress and inspires us to compete, achieve, and win for the sake of competing, achieving, and winning. \n
  • Life is so fast-paced that many have colorfully described their life as blowing and going, plotting and planning, ducking and diving, slamming and jaming\n
  • Life is so fast-paced that many have colorfully described their life as blowing and going, plotting and planning, ducking and diving, slamming and jaming\n
  • Life is so fast-paced that many have colorfully described their life as blowing and going, plotting and planning, ducking and diving, slamming and jaming\n
  • Life is so fast-paced that many have colorfully described their life as blowing and going, plotting and planning, ducking and diving, slamming and jaming\n
  • All these can drain our spiritual vitality\n1. Home: we miss relational opportunities when we are dominated by excessive activities. Consider taking inventory of these and paring them down.\n2. Work: The mistake of looking to work rather than to God for security and significance coupled with the pressured quest for more of this world’s good drive us to the idolatry of materialism and busyness. If we don’t have enough time to cultivate a quality relationship with God, our spouse, and our children, we are working too long and hard.\n3. Recreation: Hard charging approaches to recreation and vacations can devitalize us and keep us from enjoying personal and relational renewal. The Sabbath principle of restoration through being-time provides a balanced rhythm of work and rest.\n4. Church or Ministry: Becomes problematic when we take on activities and responsibilities in order to please people and meet their expectations. Not every need and request is a calling from God. Further, when we make the mistake of thinking we can contribute to the work of God, we begin to take ourselves and our ministry too seriously and tend to compromise and neglect our God-given responsibilities at home for an illusion of “serving the Lord.” \n5. Walk with God: Excessive activity draws us away from the time it takes to cultivate intimacy with God. We are often inclined to define our relationship with God in terms of doing things for Him rather than spending time with Him.\n
  • All these can drain our spiritual vitality\n1. Home: we miss relational opportunities when we are dominated by excessive activities. Consider taking inventory of these and paring them down.\n2. Work: The mistake of looking to work rather than to God for security and significance coupled with the pressured quest for more of this world’s good drive us to the idolatry of materialism and busyness. If we don’t have enough time to cultivate a quality relationship with God, our spouse, and our children, we are working too long and hard.\n3. Recreation: Hard charging approaches to recreation and vacations can devitalize us and keep us from enjoying personal and relational renewal. The Sabbath principle of restoration through being-time provides a balanced rhythm of work and rest.\n4. Church or Ministry: Becomes problematic when we take on activities and responsibilities in order to please people and meet their expectations. Not every need and request is a calling from God. Further, when we make the mistake of thinking we can contribute to the work of God, we begin to take ourselves and our ministry too seriously and tend to compromise and neglect our God-given responsibilities at home for an illusion of “serving the Lord.” \n5. Walk with God: Excessive activity draws us away from the time it takes to cultivate intimacy with God. We are often inclined to define our relationship with God in terms of doing things for Him rather than spending time with Him.\n
  • All these can drain our spiritual vitality\n1. Home: we miss relational opportunities when we are dominated by excessive activities. Consider taking inventory of these and paring them down.\n2. Work: The mistake of looking to work rather than to God for security and significance coupled with the pressured quest for more of this world’s good drive us to the idolatry of materialism and busyness. If we don’t have enough time to cultivate a quality relationship with God, our spouse, and our children, we are working too long and hard.\n3. Recreation: Hard charging approaches to recreation and vacations can devitalize us and keep us from enjoying personal and relational renewal. The Sabbath principle of restoration through being-time provides a balanced rhythm of work and rest.\n4. Church or Ministry: Becomes problematic when we take on activities and responsibilities in order to please people and meet their expectations. Not every need and request is a calling from God. Further, when we make the mistake of thinking we can contribute to the work of God, we begin to take ourselves and our ministry too seriously and tend to compromise and neglect our God-given responsibilities at home for an illusion of “serving the Lord.” \n5. Walk with God: Excessive activity draws us away from the time it takes to cultivate intimacy with God. We are often inclined to define our relationship with God in terms of doing things for Him rather than spending time with Him.\n
  • All these can drain our spiritual vitality\n1. Home: we miss relational opportunities when we are dominated by excessive activities. Consider taking inventory of these and paring them down.\n2. Work: The mistake of looking to work rather than to God for security and significance coupled with the pressured quest for more of this world’s good drive us to the idolatry of materialism and busyness. If we don’t have enough time to cultivate a quality relationship with God, our spouse, and our children, we are working too long and hard.\n3. Recreation: Hard charging approaches to recreation and vacations can devitalize us and keep us from enjoying personal and relational renewal. The Sabbath principle of restoration through being-time provides a balanced rhythm of work and rest.\n4. Church or Ministry: Becomes problematic when we take on activities and responsibilities in order to please people and meet their expectations. Not every need and request is a calling from God. Further, when we make the mistake of thinking we can contribute to the work of God, we begin to take ourselves and our ministry too seriously and tend to compromise and neglect our God-given responsibilities at home for an illusion of “serving the Lord.” \n5. Walk with God: Excessive activity draws us away from the time it takes to cultivate intimacy with God. We are often inclined to define our relationship with God in terms of doing things for Him rather than spending time with Him.\n
  • 1. Like Jesus, you must develop a clear sense of your mission so that you can invest your time with God’s calling in mind, and therefore be able to say “no” to the good and “yes” to the best. There are many good things you could do, but the good can become the enemy of the best.\n\n2. Develop an understanding of your limits so that you will budget time with the Father for restoring your inner resources\n\n3. Free yourself from bondage to the opinions, agendas, and expectations of others. Learn to say no to invitations and requests that may flatter you but could drain your time and energy.\n
  • 1. Like Jesus, you must develop a clear sense of your mission so that you can invest your time with God’s calling in mind, and therefore be able to say “no” to the good and “yes” to the best. There are many good things you could do, but the good can become the enemy of the best.\n\n2. Develop an understanding of your limits so that you will budget time with the Father for restoring your inner resources\n\n3. Free yourself from bondage to the opinions, agendas, and expectations of others. Learn to say no to invitations and requests that may flatter you but could drain your time and energy.\n
  • 1. Like Jesus, you must develop a clear sense of your mission so that you can invest your time with God’s calling in mind, and therefore be able to say “no” to the good and “yes” to the best. There are many good things you could do, but the good can become the enemy of the best.\n\n2. Develop an understanding of your limits so that you will budget time with the Father for restoring your inner resources\n\n3. Free yourself from bondage to the opinions, agendas, and expectations of others. Learn to say no to invitations and requests that may flatter you but could drain your time and energy.\n
  • Resist the temptation to allow work to invade rest.\n
  • Resist the temptation to allow work to invade rest.\n
  • Again, this will require an understanding of your personal limits both in your capacity to output and your need for input.\n
  • Sometimes we’re an inch deep and a mile wide. Look for ways to reduce your commitments so that you will not do a shoddy job on numerous tasks instead of an excellent job on a few. Avoid putting a spiritual veneer on the quest for success. It is better to pursue excellence in what we do for the glory of God (1 Corinthians 10:31) rather than success to receive honor from people.\n
  • Like recharging and discharging, seeking a balance between your inner life and your outer life simply means spending adequate time with God in order to have the interior resources to meet the challenges of the day.\n
  • Most people have one-year’s worth of experience repeated over ten years, rather than having ten year’s worth of experience because of their lack of reflection regarding what happened, why it happened, and what could be done to prevent or repeat or improve the event. We tend to move from product to product without reflection. Business call this technique doing a “post-mortum” on a completed project.\n\nAlso, be aware of the distinction between chronos (chronological, everyday events) and kairos (special opportunities or kairos moments God providentially gives you (Ephesians 5:16; Colossians 4:5) since the most significant thing you do in the course of a day may not be in your daily calendar. Seek to manage time loosely enough to enhance relationships rather than tightly to accomplish results.\n
  • Reflection always requires thinking. But eventually thinking must move to application- doing more of, less of, or keep on doing.\n
  • Ask yourself how much is enough. Unbridled wants kill contentment and drive us to greater busyness.\n
  • 1. Reduce your commitments to excel in a few things. Its is better to do just a few things well, rather than many things poorly. The counter-balance to this truth for our fast-paced, busy lives is “If its worth doing, its worth doing poorly!”\n\n2. Rest requires faith because it seems nonproductive from the world’s point of view. Since you cannot measure the product of time spend in developing your relationships with God and people, it is a risk to invest a significant amount of time in these ways.\n\n3. Be aware of the human tendency to avoid an honest examination of ourselves in the presence of God. Many people seek diversions, distractions, and busyness to elude this encounter.\n
  • 1. Reduce your commitments to excel in a few things. Its is better to do just a few things well, rather than many things poorly. The counter-balance to this truth for our fast-paced, busy lives is “If its worth doing, its worth doing poorly!”\n\n2. Rest requires faith because it seems nonproductive from the world’s point of view. Since you cannot measure the product of time spend in developing your relationships with God and people, it is a risk to invest a significant amount of time in these ways.\n\n3. Be aware of the human tendency to avoid an honest examination of ourselves in the presence of God. Many people seek diversions, distractions, and busyness to elude this encounter.\n
  • 1. Reduce your commitments to excel in a few things. Its is better to do just a few things well, rather than many things poorly. The counter-balance to this truth for our fast-paced, busy lives is “If its worth doing, its worth doing poorly!”\n\n2. Rest requires faith because it seems nonproductive from the world’s point of view. Since you cannot measure the product of time spend in developing your relationships with God and people, it is a risk to invest a significant amount of time in these ways.\n\n3. Be aware of the human tendency to avoid an honest examination of ourselves in the presence of God. Many people seek diversions, distractions, and busyness to elude this encounter.\n
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  • Emphasizing causes or activity over intimacy with the Lord Himself is another common pitfall.\n
  • 1. All of us have a built-in hunger for security, significance, and satisfaction, but our world teaches us to pursue these things in the wrong places. It should come as no surprise ,then, that the dreams and goals promoted by our culture have also infected our whole approach to the spiritual life.\n\n2. There are Christian books, seminars, and churches that have baptized the media agenda of self-orientation, success, and ambition with a spiritual veneer.\n\n3. Many believers are encouraged to set their hear on goals that actually distance them from Christ. \n
  • 1. All of us have a built-in hunger for security, significance, and satisfaction, but our world teaches us to pursue these things in the wrong places. It should come as no surprise ,then, that the dreams and goals promoted by our culture have also infected our whole approach to the spiritual life.\n\n2. There are Christian books, seminars, and churches that have baptized the media agenda of self-orientation, success, and ambition with a spiritual veneer.\n\n3. Many believers are encouraged to set their hear on goals that actually distance them from Christ. \n
  • 1. All of us have a built-in hunger for security, significance, and satisfaction, but our world teaches us to pursue these things in the wrong places. It should come as no surprise ,then, that the dreams and goals promoted by our culture have also infected our whole approach to the spiritual life.\n\n2. There are Christian books, seminars, and churches that have baptized the media agenda of self-orientation, success, and ambition with a spiritual veneer.\n\n3. Many believers are encouraged to set their hear on goals that actually distance them from Christ. \n
  • 1. By contrast, Scripture teaches that our meaning is not found in a quest for self but in a calling to know God.\n
  • 1. By contrast, Scripture teaches that our meaning is not found in a quest for self but in a calling to know God.\n
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  • Even worthy causes like helping poor children will sustain growth in our interior life if we are constantly cultivating a personal relationship with Jesus.\n\nSanctification is generated not by moral behavior but by the grace of a relationship with Christ. If we miss this, we will be driven to causes rather than to Christ. \n
  • Even worthy causes like helping poor children will sustain growth in our interior life if we are constantly cultivating a personal relationship with Jesus.\n\nSanctification is generated not by moral behavior but by the grace of a relationship with Christ. If we miss this, we will be driven to causes rather than to Christ. \n
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  • 1. Being and Doing are interrelated, but Doing should flow out of being. Unfortunately, many confuse spiritual activity (Doing) with intimacy with Jesus. \n\n2. Actions and service alone do not lead to intimacy (Being). People who work and minister without adequate restoration through prayer and meditation do not have the interior resources to manifest the fruit of the spirit in a stress-filled world.\n\n3. The biblical order is critical: what we do should flow from what we are, not the other way around.\n\n4. Otherwise our worth and identity are determined by achievements and accomplishments, and when we stop performing, we cease to be valuable.\n
  • 1. Being and Doing are interrelated, but Doing should flow out of being. Unfortunately, many confuse spiritual activity (Doing) with intimacy with Jesus. \n\n2. Actions and service alone do not lead to intimacy (Being). People who work and minister without adequate restoration through prayer and meditation do not have the interior resources to manifest the fruit of the spirit in a stress-filled world.\n\n3. The biblical order is critical: what we do should flow from what we are, not the other way around.\n\n4. Otherwise our worth and identity are determined by achievements and accomplishments, and when we stop performing, we cease to be valuable.\n
  • 1. Being and Doing are interrelated, but Doing should flow out of being. Unfortunately, many confuse spiritual activity (Doing) with intimacy with Jesus. \n\n2. Actions and service alone do not lead to intimacy (Being). People who work and minister without adequate restoration through prayer and meditation do not have the interior resources to manifest the fruit of the spirit in a stress-filled world.\n\n3. The biblical order is critical: what we do should flow from what we are, not the other way around.\n\n4. Otherwise our worth and identity are determined by achievements and accomplishments, and when we stop performing, we cease to be valuable.\n
  • 1. Being and Doing are interrelated, but Doing should flow out of being. Unfortunately, many confuse spiritual activity (Doing) with intimacy with Jesus. \n\n2. Actions and service alone do not lead to intimacy (Being). People who work and minister without adequate restoration through prayer and meditation do not have the interior resources to manifest the fruit of the spirit in a stress-filled world.\n\n3. The biblical order is critical: what we do should flow from what we are, not the other way around.\n\n4. Otherwise our worth and identity are determined by achievements and accomplishments, and when we stop performing, we cease to be valuable.\n
  • People who work and minister without adequate restoration through prayer and meditation do not have the interior resources to manifest the fruit of the spirit in a stress-filled world.\n
  • People who work and minister without adequate restoration through prayer and meditation do not have the interior resources to manifest the fruit of the spirit in a stress-filled world.\n
  • People who work and minister without adequate restoration through prayer and meditation do not have the interior resources to manifest the fruit of the spirit in a stress-filled world.\n
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  • 1. The problem is that people typically approach the spiritual life in terms of the right column, supposing that their actions and service will lead them to intimacy in their relationship with God. \n\n2. While the greatest commandment exhorts us to love the Lord our God with all our heart, soul, mind, and strength (Mark 12:30), we tend to reverse the order, thinking we can go from the outside in rather than the inside out. Instead of ministry flowing out of our relationship with God, many people suppose that ministry will sustain (or shore-up) or establish their relationship with God. \n\n3. Thus, the erroneous thinking that Doing will establish Being.\n
  • 1. The problem is that people typically approach the spiritual life in terms of the right column, supposing that their actions and service will lead them to intimacy in their relationship with God. \n\n2. While the greatest commandment exhorts us to love the Lord our God with all our heart, soul, mind, and strength (Mark 12:30), we tend to reverse the order, thinking we can go from the outside in rather than the inside out. Instead of ministry flowing out of our relationship with God, many people suppose that ministry will sustain (or shore-up) or establish their relationship with God. \n\n3. Thus, the erroneous thinking that Doing will establish Being.\n
  • 1. The problem is that people typically approach the spiritual life in terms of the right column, supposing that their actions and service will lead them to intimacy in their relationship with God. \n\n2. While the greatest commandment exhorts us to love the Lord our God with all our heart, soul, mind, and strength (Mark 12:30), we tend to reverse the order, thinking we can go from the outside in rather than the inside out. Instead of ministry flowing out of our relationship with God, many people suppose that ministry will sustain (or shore-up) or establish their relationship with God. \n\n3. Thus, the erroneous thinking that Doing will establish Being.\n
  • 1. The problem is that people typically approach the spiritual life in terms of the right column, supposing that their actions and service will lead them to intimacy in their relationship with God. \n\n2. While the greatest commandment exhorts us to love the Lord our God with all our heart, soul, mind, and strength (Mark 12:30), we tend to reverse the order, thinking we can go from the outside in rather than the inside out. Instead of ministry flowing out of our relationship with God, many people suppose that ministry will sustain (or shore-up) or establish their relationship with God. \n\n3. Thus, the erroneous thinking that Doing will establish Being.\n
  • 1. What we do should flow out of who we are, not the other way around. Said another way, our external action should derive from an internal reality. People who work and minister without adequate restoration through prayer and meditation do not have the interior resources to manifest the fruit of the Spirit in a stress-filled world. During the quiet times of the devotional life, we gain the perspective and power we need to live with character and composure in the context of daily demands. “In repentance and rest you will be saved, in quietness and trust is your strength.” (Isaiah 30:15)\n
  • 1. What we do should flow out of who we are, not the other way around. Said another way, our external action should derive from an internal reality. People who work and minister without adequate restoration through prayer and meditation do not have the interior resources to manifest the fruit of the Spirit in a stress-filled world. During the quiet times of the devotional life, we gain the perspective and power we need to live with character and composure in the context of daily demands. “In repentance and rest you will be saved, in quietness and trust is your strength.” (Isaiah 30:15)\n
  • In this table, the real life (left column) should energize the reflected life (the right column). \n
  • In this table, the real life (left column) should energize the reflected life (the right column). \n
  • In this table, the real life (left column) should energize the reflected life (the right column). \n
  • In this table, the real life (left column) should energize the reflected life (the right column). \n
  • In this table, the real life (left column) should energize the reflected life (the right column). \n
  • In this table, the real life (left column) should energize the reflected life (the right column). \n
  • In this table, the real life (left column) should energize the reflected life (the right column). \n
  • In this table, the real life (left column) should energize the reflected life (the right column). \n
  • In this table, the real life (left column) should energize the reflected life (the right column). \n
  • In this table, the real life (left column) should energize the reflected life (the right column). \n
  • In this table, the real life (left column) should energize the reflected life (the right column). \n
  • In this table, the real life (left column) should energize the reflected life (the right column). \n
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  • 1. Send up “flash prayers” at various times during the day. These are brief prayers or mental notes that acknowledge God’s presence or lift up others. They can be offered when walking, sitting down for a meal, walking, driving, waiting, listening, and so forth.\n\n2. Try using the same Short Prayer throughout the course of a day, such as the Jesus Prayer (” Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner”) or another brief prayer such as “I love you, Lord; I thank You in all things; By Your grace, Lord; Thank You, Jesus.\n\n3. Pray and work (ora et labora). Do you work with an ear that is cocked to the voice of God. When you combine prayer and action, even trivial tasks can be spiritualized through divine orientation. Invite the Lord to animate your work so that the ordinary is transmuted to the eternal.\n\n4. Play to an Audience of one; live corum deo (before the heart of God). Seek obscurity and anonymity rather than public accolades so that you will desire to please God rather than impress people.\n\n5. Pray for strangers you see while you are walking or driving. Ask the Lord to direct your prayers and listen for His promptings and impressions. Reach beyond your own concerns and become a channel of God’s grace and mercy to others.\n
  • 1. Send up “flash prayers” at various times during the day. These are brief prayers or mental notes that acknowledge God’s presence or lift up others. They can be offered when walking, sitting down for a meal, walking, driving, waiting, listening, and so forth.\n\n2. Try using the same Short Prayer throughout the course of a day, such as the Jesus Prayer (” Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner”) or another brief prayer such as “I love you, Lord; I thank You in all things; By Your grace, Lord; Thank You, Jesus.\n\n3. Pray and work (ora et labora). Do you work with an ear that is cocked to the voice of God. When you combine prayer and action, even trivial tasks can be spiritualized through divine orientation. Invite the Lord to animate your work so that the ordinary is transmuted to the eternal.\n\n4. Play to an Audience of one; live corum deo (before the heart of God). Seek obscurity and anonymity rather than public accolades so that you will desire to please God rather than impress people.\n\n5. Pray for strangers you see while you are walking or driving. Ask the Lord to direct your prayers and listen for His promptings and impressions. Reach beyond your own concerns and become a channel of God’s grace and mercy to others.\n
  • 1. Send up “flash prayers” at various times during the day. These are brief prayers or mental notes that acknowledge God’s presence or lift up others. They can be offered when walking, sitting down for a meal, walking, driving, waiting, listening, and so forth.\n\n2. Try using the same Short Prayer throughout the course of a day, such as the Jesus Prayer (” Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner”) or another brief prayer such as “I love you, Lord; I thank You in all things; By Your grace, Lord; Thank You, Jesus.\n\n3. Pray and work (ora et labora). Do you work with an ear that is cocked to the voice of God. When you combine prayer and action, even trivial tasks can be spiritualized through divine orientation. Invite the Lord to animate your work so that the ordinary is transmuted to the eternal.\n\n4. Play to an Audience of one; live corum deo (before the heart of God). Seek obscurity and anonymity rather than public accolades so that you will desire to please God rather than impress people.\n\n5. Pray for strangers you see while you are walking or driving. Ask the Lord to direct your prayers and listen for His promptings and impressions. Reach beyond your own concerns and become a channel of God’s grace and mercy to others.\n
  • 1. Send up “flash prayers” at various times during the day. These are brief prayers or mental notes that acknowledge God’s presence or lift up others. They can be offered when walking, sitting down for a meal, walking, driving, waiting, listening, and so forth.\n\n2. Try using the same Short Prayer throughout the course of a day, such as the Jesus Prayer (” Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner”) or another brief prayer such as “I love you, Lord; I thank You in all things; By Your grace, Lord; Thank You, Jesus.\n\n3. Pray and work (ora et labora). Do you work with an ear that is cocked to the voice of God. When you combine prayer and action, even trivial tasks can be spiritualized through divine orientation. Invite the Lord to animate your work so that the ordinary is transmuted to the eternal.\n\n4. Play to an Audience of one; live corum deo (before the heart of God). Seek obscurity and anonymity rather than public accolades so that you will desire to please God rather than impress people.\n\n5. Pray for strangers you see while you are walking or driving. Ask the Lord to direct your prayers and listen for His promptings and impressions. Reach beyond your own concerns and become a channel of God’s grace and mercy to others.\n
  • 1. Send up “flash prayers” at various times during the day. These are brief prayers or mental notes that acknowledge God’s presence or lift up others. They can be offered when walking, sitting down for a meal, walking, driving, waiting, listening, and so forth.\n\n2. Try using the same Short Prayer throughout the course of a day, such as the Jesus Prayer (” Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner”) or another brief prayer such as “I love you, Lord; I thank You in all things; By Your grace, Lord; Thank You, Jesus.\n\n3. Pray and work (ora et labora). Do you work with an ear that is cocked to the voice of God. When you combine prayer and action, even trivial tasks can be spiritualized through divine orientation. Invite the Lord to animate your work so that the ordinary is transmuted to the eternal.\n\n4. Play to an Audience of one; live corum deo (before the heart of God). Seek obscurity and anonymity rather than public accolades so that you will desire to please God rather than impress people.\n\n5. Pray for strangers you see while you are walking or driving. Ask the Lord to direct your prayers and listen for His promptings and impressions. Reach beyond your own concerns and become a channel of God’s grace and mercy to others.\n
  • 1. Develop an eye that looks for God’s beauty and handiwork in nature. Learn to savor the wonders of the created order, since they point beyond themselves to the presence and awesome mind of the Creator.\n\n2. Turn the other pleasures of this life (times with close friends, enjoyment of great music and food) into sources of adoration for the One who made these things possible. Cultivate a sense of gratitude for the goodness of life and the tender mercies of God that are often overlooked.\n\n3. Ask for the grace to see every person you meet and every circumstance you face today as a gift of God. Whether these experiences are bitter or sweet, acknowledge them as coming from His hand for a purpose. Look for sacred in all things, and notice the unlovely and those who are usually overlooked. Remember that EGRs (extra-grace required) in our lives are there for a purpose.\n\n4. Because we tend to live ahead of ourselves by dwelling in the future, try occasional time-stopping exercises by standing in and relishing the present moment. Realize that Jesus is with you and in you at this moment and thank Him for never leaving or forsaking you even in the smallest of things (Deuteronomy 31:6; Hebrews 13:5).\n
  • 1. Develop an eye that looks for God’s beauty and handiwork in nature. Learn to savor the wonders of the created order, since they point beyond themselves to the presence and awesome mind of the Creator.\n\n2. Turn the other pleasures of this life (times with close friends, enjoyment of great music and food) into sources of adoration for the One who made these things possible. Cultivate a sense of gratitude for the goodness of life and the tender mercies of God that are often overlooked.\n\n3. Ask for the grace to see every person you meet and every circumstance you face today as a gift of God. Whether these experiences are bitter or sweet, acknowledge them as coming from His hand for a purpose. Look for sacred in all things, and notice the unlovely and those who are usually overlooked. Remember that EGRs (extra-grace required) in our lives are there for a purpose.\n\n4. Because we tend to live ahead of ourselves by dwelling in the future, try occasional time-stopping exercises by standing in and relishing the present moment. Realize that Jesus is with you and in you at this moment and thank Him for never leaving or forsaking you even in the smallest of things (Deuteronomy 31:6; Hebrews 13:5).\n
  • 1. Develop an eye that looks for God’s beauty and handiwork in nature. Learn to savor the wonders of the created order, since they point beyond themselves to the presence and awesome mind of the Creator.\n\n2. Turn the other pleasures of this life (times with close friends, enjoyment of great music and food) into sources of adoration for the One who made these things possible. Cultivate a sense of gratitude for the goodness of life and the tender mercies of God that are often overlooked.\n\n3. Ask for the grace to see every person you meet and every circumstance you face today as a gift of God. Whether these experiences are bitter or sweet, acknowledge them as coming from His hand for a purpose. Look for sacred in all things, and notice the unlovely and those who are usually overlooked. Remember that EGRs (extra-grace required) in our lives are there for a purpose.\n\n4. Because we tend to live ahead of ourselves by dwelling in the future, try occasional time-stopping exercises by standing in and relishing the present moment. Realize that Jesus is with you and in you at this moment and thank Him for never leaving or forsaking you even in the smallest of things (Deuteronomy 31:6; Hebrews 13:5).\n
  • 1. Develop an eye that looks for God’s beauty and handiwork in nature. Learn to savor the wonders of the created order, since they point beyond themselves to the presence and awesome mind of the Creator.\n\n2. Turn the other pleasures of this life (times with close friends, enjoyment of great music and food) into sources of adoration for the One who made these things possible. Cultivate a sense of gratitude for the goodness of life and the tender mercies of God that are often overlooked.\n\n3. Ask for the grace to see every person you meet and every circumstance you face today as a gift of God. Whether these experiences are bitter or sweet, acknowledge them as coming from His hand for a purpose. Look for sacred in all things, and notice the unlovely and those who are usually overlooked. Remember that EGRs (extra-grace required) in our lives are there for a purpose.\n\n4. Because we tend to live ahead of ourselves by dwelling in the future, try occasional time-stopping exercises by standing in and relishing the present moment. Realize that Jesus is with you and in you at this moment and thank Him for never leaving or forsaking you even in the smallest of things (Deuteronomy 31:6; Hebrews 13:5).\n
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  • 1-2. One of the great enemies of Process Spirituality is the craving to control our environment and the desire to determine the results of our endeavors. \n\n3-6. Many of us have natural inclination to be manipulators, grabbers, owners, and controllers. The more we seek to rule our world, the more we resist the rule of Christ; those who grasp are afraid of being grasped by God. Thus, even in our prayers, we can adopt the mentality of a consumer rather than a servant.\n
  • 1-2. One of the great enemies of Process Spirituality is the craving to control our environment and the desire to determine the results of our endeavors. \n\n3-6. Many of us have natural inclination to be manipulators, grabbers, owners, and controllers. The more we seek to rule our world, the more we resist the rule of Christ; those who grasp are afraid of being grasped by God. Thus, even in our prayers, we can adopt the mentality of a consumer rather than a servant.\n
  • 1-2. One of the great enemies of Process Spirituality is the craving to control our environment and the desire to determine the results of our endeavors. \n\n3-6. Many of us have natural inclination to be manipulators, grabbers, owners, and controllers. The more we seek to rule our world, the more we resist the rule of Christ; those who grasp are afraid of being grasped by God. Thus, even in our prayers, we can adopt the mentality of a consumer rather than a servant.\n
  • 1-2. One of the great enemies of Process Spirituality is the craving to control our environment and the desire to determine the results of our endeavors. \n\n3-6. Many of us have natural inclination to be manipulators, grabbers, owners, and controllers. The more we seek to rule our world, the more we resist the rule of Christ; those who grasp are afraid of being grasped by God. Thus, even in our prayers, we can adopt the mentality of a consumer rather than a servant.\n
  • 1-2. One of the great enemies of Process Spirituality is the craving to control our environment and the desire to determine the results of our endeavors. \n\n3-6. Many of us have natural inclination to be manipulators, grabbers, owners, and controllers. The more we seek to rule our world, the more we resist the rule of Christ; those who grasp are afraid of being grasped by God. Thus, even in our prayers, we can adopt the mentality of a consumer rather than a servant.\n
  • 1-2. One of the great enemies of Process Spirituality is the craving to control our environment and the desire to determine the results of our endeavors. \n\n3-6. Many of us have natural inclination to be manipulators, grabbers, owners, and controllers. The more we seek to rule our world, the more we resist the rule of Christ; those who grasp are afraid of being grasped by God. Thus, even in our prayers, we can adopt the mentality of a consumer rather than a servant.\n
  • 1-2. One of the great enemies of Process Spirituality is the craving to control our environment and the desire to determine the results of our endeavors. \n\n3-6. Many of us have natural inclination to be manipulators, grabbers, owners, and controllers. The more we seek to rule our world, the more we resist the rule of Christ; those who grasp are afraid of being grasped by God. Thus, even in our prayers, we can adopt the mentality of a consumer rather than a servant.\n
  • Perhaps the most painful lesson for beleivers to learn is the wisdom of being faithful to the process and letting loose of the results, as this table shows.\nWe have little control over opportunities we encounter and the outcomes of our efforts, but we can be obedient to the processes.\n\nWe cannot be responsive to God’s purposes until we abandon our strategies to control and acknowledge his exclusive ownership of our lives.\n
  • Perhaps the most painful lesson for beleivers to learn is the wisdom of being faithful to the process and letting loose of the results, as this table shows.\nWe have little control over opportunities we encounter and the outcomes of our efforts, but we can be obedient to the processes.\n\nWe cannot be responsive to God’s purposes until we abandon our strategies to control and acknowledge his exclusive ownership of our lives.\n
  • Perhaps the most painful lesson for beleivers to learn is the wisdom of being faithful to the process and letting loose of the results, as this table shows.\nWe have little control over opportunities we encounter and the outcomes of our efforts, but we can be obedient to the processes.\n\nWe cannot be responsive to God’s purposes until we abandon our strategies to control and acknowledge his exclusive ownership of our lives.\n
  • Perhaps the most painful lesson for beleivers to learn is the wisdom of being faithful to the process and letting loose of the results, as this table shows.\nWe have little control over opportunities we encounter and the outcomes of our efforts, but we can be obedient to the processes.\n\nWe cannot be responsive to God’s purposes until we abandon our strategies to control and acknowledge his exclusive ownership of our lives.\n
  • Perhaps the most painful lesson for beleivers to learn is the wisdom of being faithful to the process and letting loose of the results, as this table shows.\nWe have little control over opportunities we encounter and the outcomes of our efforts, but we can be obedient to the processes.\n\nWe cannot be responsive to God’s purposes until we abandon our strategies to control and acknowledge his exclusive ownership of our lives.\n
  • 1. Another key to staying in the process is learning to receive each day and whatever it brings as from the hand of God. \n\n2. Because God’s character is unchanging and good, whatever circumstances He allows in the life of His children are for their good, even though they may not seem so at the time.\n\n3. Instead of asking God to change our circumstances to suit us, we can ask Him to use our circumstances to change us.\n\n4. We must trust God with the outcome of our spiritual life, because it simply cannot be measured, counted, or controlled. God alone controls the power to cause any growth, either visible or invisible. Nor, for that matter, can we measure our ministry or impact on others in this life.\n
  • 1. Another key to staying in the process is learning to receive each day and whatever it brings as from the hand of God. \n\n2. Because God’s character is unchanging and good, whatever circumstances He allows in the life of His children are for their good, even though they may not seem so at the time.\n\n3. Instead of asking God to change our circumstances to suit us, we can ask Him to use our circumstances to change us.\n\n4. We must trust God with the outcome of our spiritual life, because it simply cannot be measured, counted, or controlled. God alone controls the power to cause any growth, either visible or invisible. Nor, for that matter, can we measure our ministry or impact on others in this life.\n
  • 1. Another key to staying in the process is learning to receive each day and whatever it brings as from the hand of God. \n\n2. Because God’s character is unchanging and good, whatever circumstances He allows in the life of His children are for their good, even though they may not seem so at the time.\n\n3. Instead of asking God to change our circumstances to suit us, we can ask Him to use our circumstances to change us.\n\n4. We must trust God with the outcome of our spiritual life, because it simply cannot be measured, counted, or controlled. God alone controls the power to cause any growth, either visible or invisible. Nor, for that matter, can we measure our ministry or impact on others in this life.\n
  • 1. Another key to staying in the process is learning to receive each day and whatever it brings as from the hand of God. \n\n2. Because God’s character is unchanging and good, whatever circumstances He allows in the life of His children are for their good, even though they may not seem so at the time.\n\n3. Instead of asking God to change our circumstances to suit us, we can ask Him to use our circumstances to change us.\n\n4. We must trust God with the outcome of our spiritual life, because it simply cannot be measured, counted, or controlled. God alone controls the power to cause any growth, either visible or invisible. Nor, for that matter, can we measure our ministry or impact on others in this life.\n
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  • We are an ungrateful people, as Dostoevsky points out in this quote.\n\n
  • We are an ungrateful people, as Dostoevsky points out in this quote.\n\n
  • We cannot give thanks and complain at the same time!\nGratitude is a choice, not merely a feeling, and it requires effort especially in difficult times.\n
  • We cannot give thanks and complain at the same time!\nGratitude is a choice, not merely a feeling, and it requires effort especially in difficult times.\n
  • We cannot give thanks and complain at the same time!\nGratitude is a choice, not merely a feeling, and it requires effort especially in difficult times.\n
  • We cannot give thanks and complain at the same time!\nGratitude is a choice, not merely a feeling, and it requires effort especially in difficult times.\n
  • Our propensity to forget is a mark of our fallenness. Because of this, we should view remembering and gratitude as a discipline, a daily and intentional act, a conscious choice.\n
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  • 1. “We want a whole race perpetually in pursuit of rainbow’s end, never honest, nor kind, nor happy NOW, but always using as mere fuel wherewith to heap the altar of the future every real gift which is offered them in the Present.” Uncle Screwtape’s diabolical counsel to his nephew Wormwood in C.S. Lewis’s The Screwtape Letters is a reminder that most of us live more in the future than in the present.\n\n2. We think that the days ahead will make up for what we perceive to be our present lack. We think, “When I get this or when that happens, then I’ll be happy,” but this exercise in self-deception overlooks the fact that even when we get what we want, it never delivers what it promised.\n\n3. Most of us don’t know precisely what we want, but we are certain we don’t have it. Driven by dissatisfaction, we pursue the treasure at the end of the rainbow and rarely drink deeply at the well of the present moment, which is all we ever have.\n\n4. The truth is that if we are not satisfied with what we have, we will never be satisfied with what we want.\n
  • 1. “We want a whole race perpetually in pursuit of rainbow’s end, never honest, nor kind, nor happy NOW, but always using as mere fuel wherewith to heap the altar of the future every real gift which is offered them in the Present.” Uncle Screwtape’s diabolical counsel to his nephew Wormwood in C.S. Lewis’s The Screwtape Letters is a reminder that most of us live more in the future than in the present.\n\n2. We think that the days ahead will make up for what we perceive to be our present lack. We think, “When I get this or when that happens, then I’ll be happy,” but this exercise in self-deception overlooks the fact that even when we get what we want, it never delivers what it promised.\n\n3. Most of us don’t know precisely what we want, but we are certain we don’t have it. Driven by dissatisfaction, we pursue the treasure at the end of the rainbow and rarely drink deeply at the well of the present moment, which is all we ever have.\n\n4. The truth is that if we are not satisfied with what we have, we will never be satisfied with what we want.\n
  • 1. “We want a whole race perpetually in pursuit of rainbow’s end, never honest, nor kind, nor happy NOW, but always using as mere fuel wherewith to heap the altar of the future every real gift which is offered them in the Present.” Uncle Screwtape’s diabolical counsel to his nephew Wormwood in C.S. Lewis’s The Screwtape Letters is a reminder that most of us live more in the future than in the present.\n\n2. We think that the days ahead will make up for what we perceive to be our present lack. We think, “When I get this or when that happens, then I’ll be happy,” but this exercise in self-deception overlooks the fact that even when we get what we want, it never delivers what it promised.\n\n3. Most of us don’t know precisely what we want, but we are certain we don’t have it. Driven by dissatisfaction, we pursue the treasure at the end of the rainbow and rarely drink deeply at the well of the present moment, which is all we ever have.\n\n4. The truth is that if we are not satisfied with what we have, we will never be satisfied with what we want.\n
  • 1. “We want a whole race perpetually in pursuit of rainbow’s end, never honest, nor kind, nor happy NOW, but always using as mere fuel wherewith to heap the altar of the future every real gift which is offered them in the Present.” Uncle Screwtape’s diabolical counsel to his nephew Wormwood in C.S. Lewis’s The Screwtape Letters is a reminder that most of us live more in the future than in the present.\n\n2. We think that the days ahead will make up for what we perceive to be our present lack. We think, “When I get this or when that happens, then I’ll be happy,” but this exercise in self-deception overlooks the fact that even when we get what we want, it never delivers what it promised.\n\n3. Most of us don’t know precisely what we want, but we are certain we don’t have it. Driven by dissatisfaction, we pursue the treasure at the end of the rainbow and rarely drink deeply at the well of the present moment, which is all we ever have.\n\n4. The truth is that if we are not satisfied with what we have, we will never be satisfied with what we want.\n
  • 1. You will generally find a direct ratio between a society’s affluence and its discontentment.\n2. The more people have, the more discontent they are.\n3. Those who do not have are envious and those who do have are not satisfied.\n4. The more people have the more bored they are with life and the more preoccupied with autonomy they become.”\nMan’s lust for autonomy reveals his grotesque nature.\n\nSource: Day 208, Walt Henrichsen’s “Thought from the Diary of a Desparate Man,” The Quest for Autonomy\n
  • 1. You will generally find a direct ratio between a society’s affluence and its discontentment.\n2. The more people have, the more discontent they are.\n3. Those who do not have are envious and those who do have are not satisfied.\n4. The more people have the more bored they are with life and the more preoccupied with autonomy they become.”\nMan’s lust for autonomy reveals his grotesque nature.\n\nSource: Day 208, Walt Henrichsen’s “Thought from the Diary of a Desparate Man,” The Quest for Autonomy\n
  • 1. You will generally find a direct ratio between a society’s affluence and its discontentment.\n2. The more people have, the more discontent they are.\n3. Those who do not have are envious and those who do have are not satisfied.\n4. The more people have the more bored they are with life and the more preoccupied with autonomy they become.”\nMan’s lust for autonomy reveals his grotesque nature.\n\nSource: Day 208, Walt Henrichsen’s “Thought from the Diary of a Desparate Man,” The Quest for Autonomy\n
  • 1. You will generally find a direct ratio between a society’s affluence and its discontentment.\n2. The more people have, the more discontent they are.\n3. Those who do not have are envious and those who do have are not satisfied.\n4. The more people have the more bored they are with life and the more preoccupied with autonomy they become.”\nMan’s lust for autonomy reveals his grotesque nature.\n\nSource: Day 208, Walt Henrichsen’s “Thought from the Diary of a Desparate Man,” The Quest for Autonomy\n
  • 1. Contentment is not found in having everything but in being satisfied with everything we have. Paul told Timothy that if we have food and covering, with these shall we be content. (1 Timothy 6;7-8)\n2. Paul acknowledged God’s right to determine his circumstances, even if it meant taking him down to nothing. His contentment was not grounded in how much he had but in the One who had him.\n3. “[Contentment] requires an act of your will to put limits on your appetites.” Walt Henrichsen, “Thoughts from the Diary of a Desperate Man” Day 208\n4. We must choose to be satisfied with whatever we have right now, because this represents God’s provision for us.\n
  • 1. Contentment is not found in having everything but in being satisfied with everything we have. Paul told Timothy that if we have food and covering, with these shall we be content. (1 Timothy 6;7-8)\n2. Paul acknowledged God’s right to determine his circumstances, even if it meant taking him down to nothing. His contentment was not grounded in how much he had but in the One who had him.\n3. “[Contentment] requires an act of your will to put limits on your appetites.” Walt Henrichsen, “Thoughts from the Diary of a Desperate Man” Day 208\n4. We must choose to be satisfied with whatever we have right now, because this represents God’s provision for us.\n
  • 1. Contentment is not found in having everything but in being satisfied with everything we have. Paul told Timothy that if we have food and covering, with these shall we be content. (1 Timothy 6;7-8)\n2. Paul acknowledged God’s right to determine his circumstances, even if it meant taking him down to nothing. His contentment was not grounded in how much he had but in the One who had him.\n3. “[Contentment] requires an act of your will to put limits on your appetites.” Walt Henrichsen, “Thoughts from the Diary of a Desperate Man” Day 208\n4. We must choose to be satisfied with whatever we have right now, because this represents God’s provision for us.\n
  • 1. Contentment is not found in having everything but in being satisfied with everything we have. Paul told Timothy that if we have food and covering, with these shall we be content. (1 Timothy 6;7-8)\n2. Paul acknowledged God’s right to determine his circumstances, even if it meant taking him down to nothing. His contentment was not grounded in how much he had but in the One who had him.\n3. “[Contentment] requires an act of your will to put limits on your appetites.” Walt Henrichsen, “Thoughts from the Diary of a Desperate Man” Day 208\n4. We must choose to be satisfied with whatever we have right now, because this represents God’s provision for us.\n
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  • The real issue of contentment is whether it is Christ or ourselves who determine the content (e.g. money, position, family, circumstances) of our lives. When we seek to control the content, we invariably turn to the criterion of comparison to measure what it should look like. But comparison is the enemy of contentment.\nOnly when we allow Christ to determine the content of our lives can we discover the secret of contentment. Instead of comparing ourselves with others, we must realize that the Lord alone knows what is best for us and loves us enough to use our present circumstances to accomplish eternal good.\n
  • The real issue of contentment is whether it is Christ or ourselves who determine the content (e.g. money, position, family, circumstances) of our lives. When we seek to control the content, we invariably turn to the criterion of comparison to measure what it should look like. But comparison is the enemy of contentment.\nOnly when we allow Christ to determine the content of our lives can we discover the secret of contentment. Instead of comparing ourselves with others, we must realize that the Lord alone knows what is best for us and loves us enough to use our present circumstances to accomplish eternal good.\n
  • The real issue of contentment is whether it is Christ or ourselves who determine the content (e.g. money, position, family, circumstances) of our lives. When we seek to control the content, we invariably turn to the criterion of comparison to measure what it should look like. But comparison is the enemy of contentment.\nOnly when we allow Christ to determine the content of our lives can we discover the secret of contentment. Instead of comparing ourselves with others, we must realize that the Lord alone knows what is best for us and loves us enough to use our present circumstances to accomplish eternal good.\n
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  • Transcript of "Process Spirituality"

    1. 1. Process SpiritualityLife and Growth as a Process, not an Event Dr. Kenneth Boa and Bill Ibsen © Dr. Kenneth Boa & Bill Ibsen 2005.  All Rights Reserved.
    2. 2. Messages from the World 2
    3. 3. Messages from the World• The World says what we achieve and accomplish determines who we are 2
    4. 4. Messages from the World• The World says what we achieve and accomplish determines who we are • Money, power, prestige, production, and possessions establish human value 2
    5. 5. Messages from the World• The World says what we achieve and accomplish determines who we are • Money, power, prestige, production, and possessions establish human value • We tend to be human doings instead of human beings 2
    6. 6. Messages from the Word 3
    7. 7. Messages from the Word• The Word teaches that who we are in Christ should be the basis for what we do 3
    8. 8. Messages from the Word• The Word teaches that who we are in Christ should be the basis for what we do • Key is faithfulness in the journey rather than living from one product to the next 3
    9. 9. Messages from the Word• The Word teaches that who we are in Christ should be the basis for what we do • Key is faithfulness in the journey rather than living from one product to the next • Spiritual growth is inside out, not outside in 3
    10. 10. What Is Process Spirituality? 4
    11. 11. What Is Process Spirituality? • Stresses a progressive spiritual formation (process) over a results- based focus (product). 4
    12. 12. What Is Process Spirituality? • Stresses a progressive spiritual formation (process) over a results- based focus (product). • Emphasizes being alive to God’s action in the present. 4
    13. 13. What Is Process Spirituality? • Stresses a progressive spiritual formation (process) over a results- based focus (product). • Emphasizes being alive to God’s action in the present. • Focuses on the journey, not just the destination. 4
    14. 14. What Is Process Spirituality? • Stresses a progressive spiritual formation (process) over a results- based focus (product). • Emphasizes being alive to God’s action in the present. • Focuses on the journey, not just the destination. • Emphasizes growth from the inside out, rather from the outside in. 4
    15. 15. Process Spirituality Overview 5
    16. 16. Process Spirituality Overview1. Process Versus Product 5
    17. 17. Process Spirituality Overview1. Process Versus Product2. Being Versus Doing 5
    18. 18. Process Spirituality Overview1. Process Versus Product2. Being Versus Doing3. Trust, Gratitude and Contentment 5
    19. 19. 1. Process vs. Product
    20. 20. Always Living in the Future 7
    21. 21. Always Living in the Future• Tendency to invest energies in accomplishing future goals 7
    22. 22. Always Living in the Future• Tendency to invest energies in accomplishing future goals• Before accomplishing one goal, we’re already on to the next goal 7
    23. 23. Always Living in the Future• Tendency to invest energies in accomplishing future goals• Before accomplishing one goal, we’re already on to the next goal• Moving from product to product, we’re rarely alive to the present- for decades! 7
    24. 24. Always Living in the Future• Tendency to invest energies in accomplishing future goals• Before accomplishing one goal, we’re already on to the next goal• Moving from product to product, we’re rarely alive to the present- for decades!• Lack of contentment in the present drives our delusion that it will be found in the future 7
    25. 25. The Present Moment 8
    26. 26. The Present Moment Time 8
    27. 27. The Present Moment Time Now 8
    28. 28. The Present Moment Time Now Eternity 8
    29. 29. The Present Moment “To live in the past and future is easy.To live in the present is like threading a needle.” - Walker Percy, “Lancelot” Time Now Eternity 8
    30. 30. The PreciousPresent Moment 9
    31. 31. The Precious Present Moment• Treasure the passing opportunities of this life and become more alive to the present moment 9
    32. 32. The Precious Present Moment• Treasure the passing opportunities of this life and become more alive to the present moment• This moment is all I have 9
    33. 33. The Precious Present Moment• Treasure the passing opportunities of this life and become more alive to the present moment• This moment is all I have• Take nothing for granted; savor the blessings and joys of this moment 9
    34. 34. The Precious Present Moment• Treasure the passing opportunities of this life and become more alive to the present moment• This moment is all I have• Take nothing for granted; savor the blessings and joys of this moment• Be aware of God’s loving initiatives - in this moment 9
    35. 35. “Be careful then how you conduct yourselves: like sensible men, not like simpletons.
    36. 36. “Be careful then how you conduct yourselves: like sensible men, not like simpletons. Use the present opportunity to the full, for these are evil days…” (Eph. 5:15-17)
    37. 37. Practice Staying in the Present 11
    38. 38. Practice Staying in the Present“Our greatest business in life is not tosee what lies dimly at a distance, but to do what lies clearly at hand.” - Thomas Carlyle 11
    39. 39. Practice Staying in the Present“Our greatest business in life is not tosee what lies dimly at a distance, but to do what lies clearly at hand.” - Thomas Carlyle “Wherever you are, be all there. Live to the hilt any situation you believe to be the will of God.” - Jim Elliott 11
    40. 40. A Step-by-Step Journey
    41. 41. A Step-by-Step Journey• Life is a journey
    42. 42. A Step-by-Step Journey• Life is a journey• We are headed home
    43. 43. A Step-by-Step Journey• Life is a journey• We are headed home• Cannot be attained by a combination of technique and information
    44. 44. A Step-by-Step Journey• Life is a journey• We are headed home• Cannot be attained by a combination of technique and information• We must move into unknown territory
    45. 45. A Step-by-Step Journey• Life is a journey• We are headed home• Cannot be attained by a combination of technique and information• We must move into unknown territory • Learn to count on His guidance, grace, and presence
    46. 46. Spiritual Formation is a Lifelong Process
    47. 47. Spiritual Formation is a Lifelong Process• Spiritual formation is working out what God has already worked in us (Phil. 2:12-13)
    48. 48. Spiritual Formation is a Lifelong Process• Spiritual formation is working out what God has already worked in us (Phil. 2:12-13)• We stumble in many ways because we are still in process
    49. 49. Spiritual Formation is a Lifelong Process• Spiritual formation is working out what God has already worked in us (Phil. 2:12-13)• We stumble in many ways because we are still in processSanctification is both an event and aprocess
    50. 50. Spiritual Formation is a Lifelong Process• Spiritual formation is working out what God has already worked in us (Phil. 2:12-13)• We stumble in many ways because we are still in processSanctification is both an event and aprocessSpiritual formation is gradual: years ofmaking small choices in favor of God’s will
    51. 51. What Spiritual Growth… 14
    52. 52. What Spiritual Growth… 14
    53. 53. What Spiritual Growth… IS NOT: IS: Event ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart Change Experience Mundane Formula No Single Formula Technique No Single Technique Instantaneous Gradual Standardized Individualized Uniform Uneven Measurable Immeasurable Controllable Uncontrollable Passive Active 14
    54. 54. What Spiritual Growth… IS NOT: IS: Event ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart Change Experience Mundane Formula No Single Formula Technique No Single Technique Instantaneous Gradual Standardized Individualized Uniform Uneven Measurable Immeasurable Controllable Uncontrollable Passive Active 14
    55. 55. What Spiritual Growth… IS NOT: IS: Event ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart Change Experience Mundane Formula No Single Formula Technique No Single Technique Instantaneous Gradual Standardized Individualized Uniform Uneven Measurable Immeasurable Controllable Uncontrollable Passive Active 14
    56. 56. What Spiritual Growth… IS NOT: IS: Event ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart Change Experience Mundane Formula No Single Formula Technique No Single Technique Instantaneous Gradual Standardized Individualized Uniform Uneven Measurable Immeasurable Controllable Uncontrollable Passive Active 14
    57. 57. What Spiritual Growth… IS NOT: IS: Event ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart Change Experience Mundane Formula No Single Formula Technique No Single Technique Instantaneous Gradual Standardized Individualized Uniform Uneven Measurable Immeasurable Controllable Uncontrollable Passive Active 14
    58. 58. What Spiritual Growth… IS NOT: IS: Event ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart Change Experience Mundane Formula No Single Formula Technique No Single Technique Instantaneous Gradual Standardized Individualized Uniform Uneven Measurable Immeasurable Controllable Uncontrollable Passive Active 14
    59. 59. What Spiritual Growth… IS NOT: IS: Event ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart Change Experience Mundane Formula No Single Formula Technique No Single Technique Instantaneous Gradual Standardized Individualized Uniform Uneven Measurable Immeasurable Controllable Uncontrollable Passive Active 14
    60. 60. What Spiritual Growth… IS NOT: IS: Event ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart Change Experience Mundane Formula No Single Formula Technique No Single Technique Instantaneous Gradual Standardized Individualized Uniform Uneven Measurable Immeasurable Controllable Uncontrollable Passive Active 14
    61. 61. What Spiritual Growth… IS NOT: IS: Event ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart Change Experience Mundane Formula No Single Formula Technique No Single Technique Instantaneous Gradual Standardized Individualized Uniform Uneven Measurable Immeasurable Controllable Uncontrollable Passive Active 14
    62. 62. What Spiritual Growth… IS NOT: IS: Event ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart Change Experience Mundane Formula No Single Formula Technique No Single Technique Instantaneous Gradual Standardized Individualized Uniform Uneven Measurable Immeasurable Controllable Uncontrollable Passive Active 14
    63. 63. What Spiritual Growth… IS NOT: IS: Event ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart Change Experience Mundane Formula No Single Formula Technique No Single Technique Instantaneous Gradual Standardized Individualized Uniform Uneven Measurable Immeasurable Controllable Uncontrollable Passive Active 14
    64. 64. What Spiritual Growth… IS NOT: IS: Event ProcessExternal Conformity Internal Heart Change Experience Mundane Formula No Single Formula Technique No Single Technique Instantaneous Gradual Standardized Individualized Uniform Uneven Measurable Immeasurable Controllable Uncontrollable Passive Active 14
    65. 65. 15
    66. 66. Spiritual growth is a step-by-step, 15
    67. 67. Spiritual growth is a step-by-step, moment-by-moment, 15
    68. 68. Spiritual growth is a step-by-step, moment-by-moment, choice-by-choice, 15
    69. 69. Spiritual growth is a step-by-step, moment-by-moment, choice-by-choice, day-by-day, 15
    70. 70. Spiritual growth is a step-by-step, moment-by-moment, choice-by-choice, day-by-day,PROCESS 15
    71. 71. Spiritual growth is a step-by-step, moment-by-moment, choice-by-choice, day-by-day,PROCESS of responding to God’s constant loving initiatives... 15
    72. 72. Spiritual growth is a step-by-step, moment-by-moment, choice-by-choice, day-by-day,PROCESS of responding to God’s constant loving initiatives...mostly in the mundane, trivial details of life. 15
    73. 73. The Dynamic of the Spiritual Life 16
    74. 74. The Dynamic of the Spiritual Life “But now Faith 16
    75. 75. The Dynamic of the Spiritual Life “But now Faith Hope 16
    76. 76. The Dynamic of the Spiritual Life Love “But now Faith Hope 16
    77. 77. The Dynamic of the Spiritual Life Love abide these three; but the greatest of these is love.” - 1 Cor. 13:13 “But now Faith Hope 16
    78. 78. 17
    79. 79. Faith Love HopeAppropriated in the Active in the Anticipating the PAST PRESENT FUTUREForgiveness & Grace Love and community Purpose and Hope Salvation Sanctification Glorification Positional Progressive Ultimate Significance Satisfaction Security Hindsight Insight Foresight History Our story His story 17
    80. 80. Faith Love HopeAppropriated in the Active in the Anticipating the PAST PRESENT FUTUREForgiveness & Grace Love and community Purpose and Hope Salvation Sanctification Glorification Positional Progressive Ultimate Significance Satisfaction Security Hindsight Insight Foresight History Our story His story 17
    81. 81. Faith Love HopeAppropriated in the Active in the Anticipating the PAST PRESENT FUTUREForgiveness & Grace Love and community Purpose and Hope Salvation Sanctification Glorification Positional Progressive Ultimate Significance Satisfaction Security Hindsight Insight Foresight History Our story His story 17
    82. 82. Faith Love HopeAppropriated in the Active in the Anticipating the PAST PRESENT FUTUREForgiveness & Grace Love and community Purpose and Hope Salvation Sanctification Glorification Positional Progressive Ultimate Significance Satisfaction Security Hindsight Insight Foresight History Our story His story 17
    83. 83. Faith Love HopeAppropriated in the Active in the Anticipating the PAST PRESENT FUTUREForgiveness & Grace Love and community Purpose and Hope Salvation Sanctification Glorification Positional Progressive Ultimate Significance Satisfaction Security Hindsight Insight Foresight History Our story His story 17
    84. 84. Faith Love HopeAppropriated in the Active in the Anticipating the PAST PRESENT FUTUREForgiveness & Grace Love and community Purpose and Hope Salvation Sanctification Glorification Positional Progressive Ultimate Significance Satisfaction Security Hindsight Insight Foresight History Our story His story 17
    85. 85. Faith Love HopeAppropriated in the Active in the Anticipating the PAST PRESENT FUTUREForgiveness & Grace Love and community Purpose and Hope Salvation Sanctification Glorification Positional Progressive Ultimate Significance Satisfaction Security Hindsight Insight Foresight History Our story His story 17
    86. 86. Faith Love HopeAppropriated in the Active in the Anticipating the PAST PRESENT FUTUREForgiveness & Grace Love and community Purpose and Hope Salvation Sanctification Glorification Positional Progressive Ultimate Significance Satisfaction Security Hindsight Insight Foresight History Our story His story 17
    87. 87. 2. Being vs. Doing
    88. 88. TheChristian Life
    89. 89. TheChristian Life Loving God Completely
    90. 90. TheChristian Life Loving God Loving Ourselves Completely Correctly
    91. 91. TheChristian Life Loving Others Compassionately Loving God Loving Ourselves Completely Correctly
    92. 92. TheChristian Life Loving Others Compassionately Loving God Loving Ourselves Completely Correctly
    93. 93. TheChristian Life Loving Others Compassionately Loving God Loving Ourselves Completely Correctly
    94. 94. TheChristian Life Loving Others Compassionately Loving God Loving Ourselves Completely Correctly
    95. 95. TheChristian Life Loving Others Compassionately Loving God Loving Ourselves Completely Correctly Being
    96. 96. TheChristian Life Loving Others Compassionately Loving God Loving Ourselves Completely Correctly Being Knowing
    97. 97. TheChristian Life Loving Others Compassionately Doing Loving God Loving Ourselves Completely Correctly Being Knowing
    98. 98. TheChristian Life Loving Others Compassionately Doing Loving God Loving Ourselves Completely Correctly Being Knowing (Heart)
    99. 99. TheChristian Life Loving Others Compassionately Doing Loving God Loving Ourselves Completely Correctly Being Knowing (Heart) (Head)
    100. 100. TheChristian Life Loving Others Compassionately Doing (Hands) Loving God Loving Ourselves Completely Correctly Being Knowing (Heart) (Head)
    101. 101. Being Versus Doing 20
    102. 102. Being Versus Doing1. The Problem of Busyness 20
    103. 103. Being Versus Doing1. The Problem of Busyness2. Causes Versus Christ 20
    104. 104. Being Versus Doing1. The Problem of Busyness2. Causes Versus Christ3. Intimacy Versus Activity 20
    105. 105. Being Versus Doing1. The Problem of Busyness2. Causes Versus Christ3. Intimacy Versus Activity4. Practicing His Presence 20
    106. 106. The Problem of Busyness 21
    107. 107. The Problem of Busyness• Modern dilemma of busyness elevates doing over being 21
    108. 108. The Problem of Busyness• Modern dilemma of busyness elevates doing over being• Future-oriented culture 21
    109. 109. The Problem of Busyness• Modern dilemma of busyness elevates doing over being• Future-oriented culture• Time used for results, not relationships 21
    110. 110. The Problem of Busyness• Modern dilemma of busyness elevates doing over being• Future-oriented culture• Time used for results, not relationships• America worships the god of progress 21
    111. 111. The Problem of Busyness• Modern dilemma of busyness elevates doing over being• Future-oriented culture• Time used for results, not relationships• America worships the god of progress • Compete, achieve, win 21
    112. 112. Life in the Fast Lane 22
    113. 113. Life in the Fast Lane• Blowing and Going! 22
    114. 114. Life in the Fast Lane• Blowing and Going!• Slamming and Jamming! 22
    115. 115. Life in the Fast Lane• Blowing and Going!• Slamming and Jamming!• Running and Gunning! 22
    116. 116. Life in the Fast Lane• Blowing and Going!• Slamming and Jamming!• Running and Gunning! “We are warned not to waste time, but we are brought up to waste our lives.” - Eric Hoffer 22
    117. 117. 23
    118. 118. “Most middle-class Americans tend 23
    119. 119. “Most middle-class Americans tend to worship their work, 23
    120. 120. “Most middle-class Americans tend to worship their work, to work at their play, and 23
    121. 121. “Most middle-class Americans tend to worship their work, to work at their play, and to play at their worship.” - Gordon Dahl 23
    122. 122. Combating Busyness 24
    123. 123. Combating Busyness• Develop a clear sense of your mission so you can say “No” to the good and “Yes” to the best 24
    124. 124. Combating Busyness• Develop a clear sense of your mission so you can say “No” to the good and “Yes” to the best• Know your personal limits to budget adequate time to restore your inner resources 24
    125. 125. Combating Busyness• Develop a clear sense of your mission so you can say “No” to the good and “Yes” to the best• Know your personal limits to budget adequate time to restore your inner resources• Free yourself from bondage of opinions, agendas, and expectations of others 24
    126. 126. Combating Busyness 25
    127. 127. Combating Busyness• Seek a balance between: 25
    128. 128. Combating Busyness• Seek a balance between: – Rest and Work 25
    129. 129. Combating Busyness• Seek a balance between: • Rest and Work – Recharging and Discharging 26
    130. 130. Combating Busyness• Seek a balance between: • Rest and Work • Recharging and Discharging – Depth and Breadth 27
    131. 131. Combating Busyness• Seek a balance between: • Rest and Work • Recharging and Discharging • Depth and Breadth – Inward and Outward 28
    132. 132. Combating Busyness• Seek a balance between: • Rest and Work • Recharging and Discharging • Depth and Breadth • Inward and Outward – Reflection and Practice 29
    133. 133. Combating Busyness• Seek a balance between: • Rest and Work • Recharging and Discharging • Depth and Breadth • Inward and Outward • Reflection and Practice – Thinking and Application 30
    134. 134. Combating Busyness• Seek a balance between: • Rest and Work • Recharging and Discharging • Depth and Breadth • Inward and Outward • Reflection and Practice • Thinking and Application – Contentment and Accomplishment 31
    135. 135. Combating Busyness Tips 32
    136. 136. Combating Busyness Tips• Reduce commitments to excel in a few things 32
    137. 137. Combating Busyness Tips• Reduce commitments to excel in a few things• Rest requires faith! 32
    138. 138. Combating Busyness Tips• Reduce commitments to excel in a few things• Rest requires faith!• Don’t allow diversions and distractions to prevent honest self- examination before God 32
    139. 139. Combating Busyness Tips 33
    140. 140. Combating Busyness Tips • Live and savor the present moment 33
    141. 141. Combating Busyness Tips • Live and savor the present moment • Manage time loosely to enhance relationships 33
    142. 142. Combating Busyness Tips • Live and savor the present moment • Manage time loosely to enhance relationships • Budget time in advance for the important, not the urgent 33
    143. 143. Being Versus Doing1. The Problem of Busyness2. Causes Versus Christ3. Intimacy Versus Activity4. Practicing His Presence 34
    144. 144. Causes Versus Christ 35
    145. 145. Causes Versus Christ• The world drives people to find security, significance and satisfaction in wrong places. 35
    146. 146. Causes Versus Christ• The world drives people to find security, significance and satisfaction in wrong places.• Many Christians have baptized the world’s values with a spiritual veneer. 35
    147. 147. Causes Versus Christ• The world drives people to find security, significance and satisfaction in wrong places.• Many Christians have baptized the world’s values with a spiritual veneer. • Encourages setting hearts on things that actually distance them from Christ. 35
    148. 148. Causes Versus Christ 36
    149. 149. Causes Versus Christ• Meaning is not found in a quest for self, but in a calling to know God. 36
    150. 150. Causes Versus Christ• Meaning is not found in a quest for self, but in a calling to know God.• Intimacy with Christ leads to holiness, but attempts to be holy do not necessarily lead to intimacy. 36
    151. 151. Specific Causes Versus Christ 37
    152. 152. Specific Causes Versus Christ • Education 37
    153. 153. Specific Causes Versus Christ • Education • Politics 37
    154. 154. Specific Causes Versus Christ • Education • Politics • Social Action 37
    155. 155. Specific Causes Versus Christ • Education • Politics • Social Action • Environmental Action 37
    156. 156. Specific Causes Versus Christ • Education • Politics • Social Action • Environmental Action • Rearing godly kids 37
    157. 157. Specific Causes Versus Christ • Education • Politics • Building a company for Christ • Social Action • Environmental Action • Rearing godly kids 37
    158. 158. Specific Causes Versus Christ • Education • Politics • Building a company for Christ • Social Action • Evangelism • Environmental Action • Rearing godly kids 37
    159. 159. Specific Causes Versus Christ • Education • Politics • Building a company for Christ • Social Action • Evangelism • Environmental • Discipleship Action • Rearing godly kids 37
    160. 160. Specific Causes Versus Christ • Education • Politics • Building a company for Christ • Social Action • Evangelism • Environmental • Discipleship Action • Rearing godly kids • Learning Scripture 37
    161. 161. Even worthy causes will not sustain growthin our interior life
    162. 162. Even worthy causes will not sustain growthin our interior life if we are not constantly cultivating a personal relationship with Jesus.
    163. 163. Chambers on Causes vs. Christ 39
    164. 164. Chambers on Causes vs. Christ ““If I am devoted to the cause of humanity only,I will soon be exhausted and come to the place where my love will falter; 39
    165. 165. Chambers on Causes vs. Christ ““If I am devoted to the cause of humanity only, I will soon be exhausted and come to the place where my love will falter; but if I love Jesus Christ personally and passionately,I can serve humanity though men treat me as a door mat.” 39
    166. 166. Chambers on Causes vs. Christ 40
    167. 167. Chambers on Causes vs. Christ “The greatest competitor of devotion to Jesus is service for Him… 40
    168. 168. Chambers on Causes vs. Christ “The greatest competitor of devotion to Jesus is service for Him…We count as service what we do in the way of Christian work; Jesus Christ calls service what we are to Him, not what we do for Him… 40
    169. 169. Chambers on Causes vs. Christ “The greatest competitor of devotion to Jesus is service for Him…We count as service what we do in the way of Christian work; Jesus Christ calls service what we are to Him, not what we do for Him…The one aim of the call of God is the satisfaction of God, not a call to do something for Him.” - Oswald Chambers 40
    170. 170. Being Versus Doing1. The Problem of Busyness2. Causes Versus Christ3. Intimacy Versus Activity4. Practicing His Presence 41
    171. 171. Intimacy Versus Activity 42
    172. 172. Intimacy Versus Activity• Must not confuse “spiritual” activity with intimacy with Jesus. 42
    173. 173. Intimacy Versus Activity• Must not confuse “spiritual” activity with intimacy with Jesus.• Actions and service alone do not lead to intimacy with Jesus. 42
    174. 174. Intimacy Versus Activity• Must not confuse “spiritual” activity with intimacy with Jesus.• Actions and service alone do not lead to intimacy with Jesus.• What we do should flow from what we are, not the other way around. 42
    175. 175. Intimacy Versus Activity• Must not confuse “spiritual” activity with intimacy with Jesus.• Actions and service alone do not lead to intimacy with Jesus.• What we do should flow from what we are, not the other way around. • Otherwise worth and identity are determined by achievements and accomplishments. 42
    176. 176. Intimacy Versus Activity 43
    177. 177. Intimacy Versus Activity• Requires a rhythm of: 43
    178. 178. Intimacy Versus Activity• Requires a rhythm of: • Solitude and engagement 43
    179. 179. Intimacy Versus Activity• Requires a rhythm of: • Solitude and engagement • Restoration and application 44
    180. 180. Intimacy Versus Activity• Requires a rhythm of: • Solitude and engagement • Restoration and application • Intimacy with Christ and activity in the world 45
    181. 181. The Common Mistake
    182. 182. The Common Mistake• Supposing that actions and service to Jesus will lead to intimacy with Jesus
    183. 183. The Common Mistake• Supposing that actions and service to Jesus will lead to intimacy with Jesus• Instead of ministry flowing out of our relationship with God, many people suppose that ministry will sustain their relationship with God
    184. 184. The Common Mistake• Supposing that actions and service to Jesus will lead to intimacy with Jesus• Instead of ministry flowing out of our relationship with God, many people suppose that ministry will sustain their relationship with God • Error: Doing = Being
    185. 185. The Common Mistake• Supposing that actions and service to Jesus will lead to intimacy with Jesus• Instead of ministry flowing out of our relationship with God, many people suppose that ministry will sustain their relationship with God • Error: Doing = Being• Perfectionism and legalism often fuel this erroneous thinking
    186. 186. Intimacy with Jesus Occurs: 47
    187. 187. Intimacy with Jesus Occurs: Inside Out 47
    188. 188. Intimacy with Jesus Occurs: Inside Out Outside In 47
    189. 189. Energizes
    190. 190. BEING DOING Intimacy with Christ Activity in the world Solitude Engagement Abiding Serving Interior Exterior Relational calling Dominion calling Calling Character Energizes Invisible Visible Real life Reflected lifeRestoration of spiritual Application of spiritual energy energy Perspective Practice Rest Work
    191. 191. BEING DOING Intimacy with Christ Activity in the world Solitude Engagement Abiding Serving Interior Exterior Relational calling Dominion calling Calling Character Energizes Invisible Visible Real life Reflected lifeRestoration of spiritual Application of spiritual energy energy Perspective Practice Rest Work
    192. 192. BEING DOING Intimacy with Christ Activity in the world Solitude Engagement Abiding Serving Interior Exterior Relational calling Dominion calling Calling Character Energizes Invisible Visible Real life Reflected lifeRestoration of spiritual Application of spiritual energy energy Perspective Practice Rest Work
    193. 193. BEING DOING Intimacy with Christ Activity in the world Solitude Engagement Abiding Serving Interior Exterior Relational calling Dominion calling Calling Character Energizes Invisible Visible Real life Reflected lifeRestoration of spiritual Application of spiritual energy energy Perspective Practice Rest Work
    194. 194. BEING DOING Intimacy with Christ Activity in the world Solitude Engagement Abiding Serving Interior Exterior Relational calling Dominion calling Calling Character Energizes Invisible Visible Real life Reflected lifeRestoration of spiritual Application of spiritual energy energy Perspective Practice Rest Work
    195. 195. BEING DOING Intimacy with Christ Activity in the world Solitude Engagement Abiding Serving Interior Exterior Relational calling Dominion calling Calling Character Energizes Invisible Visible Real life Reflected lifeRestoration of spiritual Application of spiritual energy energy Perspective Practice Rest Work
    196. 196. BEING DOING Intimacy with Christ Activity in the world Solitude Engagement Abiding Serving Interior Exterior Relational calling Dominion calling Calling Character Energizes Invisible Visible Real life Reflected lifeRestoration of spiritual Application of spiritual energy energy Perspective Practice Rest Work
    197. 197. BEING DOING Intimacy with Christ Activity in the world Solitude Engagement Abiding Serving Interior Exterior Relational calling Dominion calling Calling Character Energizes Invisible Visible Real life Reflected lifeRestoration of spiritual Application of spiritual energy energy Perspective Practice Rest Work
    198. 198. BEING DOING Intimacy with Christ Activity in the world Solitude Engagement Abiding Serving Interior Exterior Relational calling Dominion calling Calling Character Energizes Invisible Visible Real life Reflected lifeRestoration of spiritual Application of spiritual energy energy Perspective Practice Rest Work
    199. 199. BEING DOING Intimacy with Christ Activity in the world Solitude Engagement Abiding Serving Interior Exterior Relational calling Dominion calling Calling Character Energizes Invisible Visible Real life Reflected lifeRestoration of spiritual Application of spiritual energy energy Perspective Practice Rest Work
    200. 200. BEING DOING Intimacy with Christ Activity in the world Solitude Engagement Abiding Serving Interior Exterior Relational calling Dominion calling Calling Character Energizes Invisible Visible Real life Reflected lifeRestoration of spiritual Application of spiritual energy energy Perspective Practice Rest Work
    201. 201. BEING DOING Intimacy with Christ Activity in the world Solitude Engagement Abiding Serving Interior Exterior Relational calling Dominion calling Calling Character Energizes Invisible Visible Real life Reflected lifeRestoration of spiritual Application of spiritual energy energy Perspective Practice Rest Work
    202. 202. Being Versus Doing1. The Problem of Busyness2. Causes Versus Christ3. Intimacy Versus Activity4. Practicing His Presence 49
    203. 203. Practicing His Presence: Scriptural Principles 50
    204. 204. Practicing His Presence: Scriptural Principles• Abide in Jesus and let His words abide in you (Jn.15:4-7) 50
    205. 205. Practicing His Presence: Scriptural Principles• Abide in Jesus and let His words abide in you (Jn.15:4-7)• Set your mind on the things of the Spirit (Rom.8:5-6) 50
    206. 206. Practicing His Presence: Scriptural Principles• Abide in Jesus and let His words abide in you (Jn.15:4-7)• Set your mind on the things of the Spirit (Rom.8:5-6)• Walk by the Spirit (Gal. 5:16, 25) 50
    207. 207. Practicing His Presence: Scriptures 51
    208. 208. Practicing His Presence: Scriptures• Keep seeking the things above where Christ is (Col. 3:1-2) 51
    209. 209. Practicing His Presence: Scriptures• Keep seeking the things above where Christ is (Col. 3:1-2)• Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, in everything give thanks (1Thess. 5:16-18) 51
    210. 210. Practicing His Presence: Scriptures• Keep seeking the things above where Christ is (Col. 3:1-2)• Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, in everything give thanks (1Thess. 5:16-18)• Run with endurance the race that is set before us, fixing our eyes on Jesus (Heb.12:1-2) 51
    211. 211. Practicing His Presence Tips 52
    212. 212. Practicing His Presence Tips • Use flash prayers 52
    213. 213. Practicing His Presence Tips • Use flash prayers • Use short prayers 52
    214. 214. Practicing His Presence Tips • Use flash prayers • Use short prayers • Pray and work 52
    215. 215. Practicing His Presence Tips • Use flash prayers • Use short prayers • Pray and work • Play to an Audience of One 52
    216. 216. Practicing His Presence Tips • Use flash prayers • Use short prayers • Pray and work • Play to an Audience of One • Pray for strangers 52
    217. 217. Practicing His Presence Tips 53
    218. 218. Practicing His Presence Tips• Develop an eye for God’s beauty 53
    219. 219. Practicing His Presence Tips• Develop an eye for God’s beauty• Turn pleasure into sources of adoration 53
    220. 220. Practicing His Presence Tips• Develop an eye for God’s beauty• Turn pleasure into sources of adoration• See every person and circumstance today as gifts of God 53
    221. 221. Practicing His Presence Tips• Develop an eye for God’s beauty• Turn pleasure into sources of adoration• See every person and circumstance today as gifts of God• Relish the present moment 53
    222. 222. The Beauty of God
    223. 223. 3. Trust, Gratitude, and Contentment
    224. 224. Trust, Gratitude, and Contentment 1. Letting Loose of Control and Results 2. Cultivating a Heart of Gratitude 3. The Secret of Contentment 56
    225. 225. Control: A Great Enemy of Process Spirituality 57
    226. 226. Control: A Great Enemy of Process Spirituality• Craving to control our environment 57
    227. 227. Control: A Great Enemy of Process Spirituality• Craving to control our environment• Desire to determine results of our endeavors 57
    228. 228. Control: A Great Enemy of Process Spirituality• Craving to control our environment• Desire to determine results of our endeavors• Natural inclination to be: 57
    229. 229. Control: A Great Enemy of Process Spirituality• Craving to control our environment• Desire to determine results of our endeavors• Natural inclination to be: • Manipulators 57
    230. 230. Control: A Great Enemy of Process Spirituality• Craving to control our environment• Desire to determine results of our endeavors• Natural inclination to be: • Manipulators • Grabbers 57
    231. 231. Control: A Great Enemy of Process Spirituality• Craving to control our environment• Desire to determine results of our endeavors• Natural inclination to be: • Manipulators • Grabbers • Owners 57
    232. 232. Control: A Great Enemy of Process Spirituality• Craving to control our environment• Desire to determine results of our endeavors• Natural inclination to be: • Manipulators • Grabbers • Owners • Controllers 57
    233. 233. Faithfulness to the Process but Trusting God for the Results 58
    234. 234. Faithfulness to the Process but Trusting God for the ResultsOPPORTUNITY OBEDIENCE OUTCOME “…even as the Lord gave “I planted, Apollos “…but God was causing theopportunity to each” 1Co.3:5 watered…” 1Co.3:6 growth” 1Co.3:6,7 Divine Human Divine Sovereignty Responsibility Sovereignty God Me God Process Process Product 58
    235. 235. Faithfulness to the Process but Trusting God for the ResultsOPPORTUNITY OBEDIENCE OUTCOME “…even as the Lord gave “I planted, Apollos “…but God was causing theopportunity to each” 1Co.3:5 watered…” 1Co.3:6 growth” 1Co.3:6,7 Divine Human Divine Sovereignty Responsibility Sovereignty God Me God Process Process Product 58
    236. 236. Faithfulness to the Process but Trusting God for the ResultsOPPORTUNITY OBEDIENCE OUTCOME “…even as the Lord gave “I planted, Apollos “…but God was causing theopportunity to each” 1Co.3:5 watered…” 1Co.3:6 growth” 1Co.3:6,7 Divine Human Divine Sovereignty Responsibility Sovereignty God Me God Process Process Product 58
    237. 237. Faithfulness to the Process but Trusting God for the ResultsOPPORTUNITY OBEDIENCE OUTCOME “…even as the Lord gave “I planted, Apollos “…but God was causing theopportunity to each” 1Co.3:5 watered…” 1Co.3:6 growth” 1Co.3:6,7 Divine Human Divine Sovereignty Responsibility Sovereignty God Me God Process Process Product 58
    238. 238. Faithfulness to the Process but Trusting God for the ResultsOPPORTUNITY OBEDIENCE OUTCOME “…even as the Lord gave “I planted, Apollos “…but God was causing theopportunity to each” 1Co.3:5 watered…” 1Co.3:6 growth” 1Co.3:6,7 Divine Human Divine Sovereignty Responsibility Sovereignty God Me God Process Process Product 58
    239. 239. Keys for Letting Loose
    240. 240. Keys for Letting Loose• Receive each day and whatever it brings as from the hand of God
    241. 241. Keys for Letting Loose• Receive each day and whatever it brings as from the hand of God • God is good and has our best interest at heart (Rom. 8:28)
    242. 242. Keys for Letting Loose• Receive each day and whatever it brings as from the hand of God • God is good and has our best interest at heart (Rom. 8:28)• Ask God to use circumstances to change us rather than asking Him to change circumstances to suit us
    243. 243. Keys for Letting Loose• Receive each day and whatever it brings as from the hand of God • God is good and has our best interest at heart (Rom. 8:28)• Ask God to use circumstances to change us rather than asking Him to change circumstances to suit us• Realize it is impossible to count, measure, or control the spiritual life
    244. 244. Trust, Gratitude, and Contentment 1. Letting Loose of Control and Results 2. Cultivating a Heart of Gratitude 3. The Secret of Contentment 60
    245. 245. Gratitude 61
    246. 246. Gratitude“If he is not stupid, he is monstrously ungrateful! Phenomenally ungrateful. 61
    247. 247. Gratitude“If he is not stupid, he is monstrously ungrateful! Phenomenally ungrateful.In fact, I believe that the best definition of man is the ungrateful biped.”- Fyodor Dostoevsky, “Notes from Underground” 61
    248. 248. Gratitude 62
    249. 249. Gratitude• Forgetfulness always leads to ingratitude. 62
    250. 250. Gratitude• Forgetfulness always leads to ingratitude.• Gratitude is a choice, not merely a feeling. 62
    251. 251. Gratitude• Forgetfulness always leads to ingratitude.• Gratitude is a choice, not merely a feeling.• We cannot give thanks and complain at the same time. 62
    252. 252. Gratitude• Forgetfulness always leads to ingratitude.• Gratitude is a choice, not merely a feeling.• We cannot give thanks and complain at the same time.• View gratitude and remembering as a discipline--daily and intentionally. 62
    253. 253. “As they had their pasture, they becamesatisfied, and being satisfied, their heart became proud; therefore they forgot Me.” Hosea 13:6
    254. 254. Extremes in Forgetting God’s Goodness 64
    255. 255. Extremes in Forgetting God’s GoodnessPresumption 64
    256. 256. Extremes in Forgetting God’s GoodnessPresumption Resentment, Bitterness 64
    257. 257. Daily Exercise of Remembering: 65
    258. 258. Daily Exercise of Remembering: • God’s Deliverance in the Past 65
    259. 259. Daily Exercise of Remembering: • God’s Deliverance in the Past • God’s Benefits in the Present 65
    260. 260. Daily Exercise of Remembering: • God’s Deliverance in the Past • God’s Benefits in the Present • God’s Promises in the Future 65
    261. 261. Daily Exercise of Remembering: • God’s Deliverance in the Past • God’s Benefits in the Present • God’s Promises in the Future“Every gift I acknowledge reveals another and anotheruntil, finally, even the most normal, obvious, seemingly mundane event or encounter proves to be filled with grace.” - Henri Nouwen 65
    262. 262. Trust, Gratitude, and Contentment 1. Letting Loose of Control and Results 2. Cultivating a Heart of Gratitude 3. The secret of Contentment 66
    263. 263. Dissatisfaction 67
    264. 264. Dissatisfaction• Most live in the future rather than in the present. 67
    265. 265. Dissatisfaction• Most live in the future rather than in the present.• “In the days ahead, we’ll make up for our present lack.” 67
    266. 266. Dissatisfaction• Most live in the future rather than in the present.• “In the days ahead, we’ll make up for our present lack.”• We don’t know what we want; we’re just sure we don’t have it now! 67
    267. 267. Dissatisfaction• Most live in the future rather than in the present.• “In the days ahead, we’ll make up for our present lack.”• We don’t know what we want; we’re just sure we don’t have it now!• If we’re not satisfied with what we have, we will never be satisfied with what we want. 67
    268. 268. Contentment
    269. 269. Contentment• Often a direct ratio between a society’s affluence and its discontentment
    270. 270. Contentment• Often a direct ratio between a society’s affluence and its discontentment • The more they have, the more discontent they are
    271. 271. Contentment• Often a direct ratio between a society’s affluence and its discontentment • The more they have, the more discontent they are • “Have-nots” are envious; “Haves” are not satisfied
    272. 272. Contentment• Often a direct ratio between a society’s affluence and its discontentment • The more they have, the more discontent they are • “Have-nots” are envious; “Haves” are not satisfied• Affluence tends to breed boredom and ingratitude, then a quest for autonomy
    273. 273. The Secret of Contentment 69
    274. 274. The Secret of Contentment• Not found in having everything but in being satisfied with everything we have 69
    275. 275. The Secret of Contentment• Not found in having everything but in being satisfied with everything we have• Contentment should be grounded not in how much we have, but in the One who has us 69
    276. 276. The Secret of Contentment• Not found in having everything but in being satisfied with everything we have• Contentment should be grounded not in how much we have, but in the One who has us• Requires an act of our will to put limits on our appetites 69
    277. 277. The Secret of Contentment• Not found in having everything but in being satisfied with everything we have• Contentment should be grounded not in how much we have, but in the One who has us• Requires an act of our will to put limits on our appetites• Choose to be satisfied with whatever we have now; this is God’s provision for us 69
    278. 278. “I have learned to be content in whatever circumstances I am.
    279. 279. “I have learned to be content in whatever circumstances I am. I know how to getalong with humble means, and I also knowhow to live in prosperity; in any and every circumstance I have learned the secret of being filled and going hungry, both ofhaving abundance and suffering need.” Phil. 4:11-12
    280. 280. “I have learned to be content in whatever circumstances I am. I know how to getIalong with humble along with humble means, and I know how to get means, and I also know how to also in prosperity; live in prosperity; live know how to in any and every circumstance I have learned the secret of being filled and going hungry, both of having abundance and suffering need.” Phil. 4:11-12
    281. 281. “I have learned to be content in whatever circumstances I am. I know how to getalong with humble means, and I also knowhow to live in prosperity; in any and every circumstance I have learned the secret of being filled and going hungry, both ofhaving abundance and suffering need.” Phil. 4:11-12
    282. 282. in “I have learned circumstance Iin whatever the any and every to be content have learnedsecretcircumstances Iand going hungry,to get of having of being filled am. I know how both abundance and suffering need.” Phil. 4:11-12 along with humble means, and I also know how to live in prosperity; in any and every circumstance I have learned the secret of being filled and going hungry, both of having abundance and suffering need.” Phil. 4:11-12
    283. 283. Who Determines the Content of Your Life? 73
    284. 284. Who Determines the Content of Your Life? 73
    285. 285. Who Determines the Content of Your Life? SELF CHRIST Comparison Contentment Covetousness Competency Competition Compassion Compromise Character 73
    286. 286. Who Determines the Content of Your Life? SELF CHRIST Comparison Contentment Covetousness Competency Competition Compassion Compromise Character 73
    287. 287. In Learning to Be Content, We Become: 74
    288. 288. In Learning to Be Content, We Become: • Less impressed by numbers 74
    289. 289. In Learning to Be Content, We Become: • Less impressed by numbers • Less driven to achieve 74
    290. 290. In Learning to Be Content, We Become: • Less impressed by numbers • Less driven to achieve • More alive to the grace of the present moment 74
    291. 291. The End 75
    292. 292. Reflections Ministries Resources 76
    293. 293. Reflections Ministries Resources Reflections - A free monthly teaching letter 76
    294. 294. Reflections Ministries Resources Reflections - A free monthly teaching letter 76
    295. 295. Reflections Ministries Resources Reflections - A free monthly teaching letter 76
    296. 296. Reflections Ministries Resources Reflections - A free monthly teaching letter KenBoa.org website - Daily Growth email and free text and audio resources 76
    297. 297. DVD Series 77
    298. 298. DVD Series - Audio/visual presentations of crucial topics 77
    299. 299. DVD Series - Audio/visual presentations of crucial topics - $20 each 77
    300. 300. DVD Series - Audio/visual presentations of crucial topics - $20 each - Call 800-DRAW NEAR (800-372-9632) 77
    301. 301. KENBOA.ORG KenBoa.org ken_boa Kenneth Boa

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