Nurturing Spirituality

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  • Sheep are to follow behind their shepherds. Some sheep follow hard on the heels of the shepherd, while others move only because the sheep in front of them have moved. Still others are on the periphery of the flock. Like these distant sheep, the majority of believers live on the level of secondhand rather than firsthand experience of the Shepherd.\n
  • SOLUTION: Some people come to Jesus as a solution to their relational, physical, emotional, or financial problems. When He doesn’t rectify their difficulties in the way they had hoped, their unrealized expectations can paralyze further growth. We cannot follow Jesus when we are asking Him to follow us. We limit our spiritual development when we fail to make the transition from seeing Jesus as a problem solver to seeing Him as our life.\n\nSPECTATOR: Other people slip into religious activities as ends in themselves or develop spectator or consumer mentalities in church. Devotion to duty or to safety and comfort dissipate passion for the person of Christ.\n
  • SOLUTION: Some people come to Jesus as a solution to their relational, physical, emotional, or financial problems. When He doesn’t rectify their difficulties in the way they had hoped, their unrealized expectations can paralyze further growth. We cannot follow Jesus when we are asking Him to follow us. We limit our spiritual development when we fail to make the transition from seeing Jesus as a problem solver to seeing Him as our life.\n\nSPECTATOR: Other people slip into religious activities as ends in themselves or develop spectator or consumer mentalities in church. Devotion to duty or to safety and comfort dissipate passion for the person of Christ.\n
  • SOLUTION: Some people come to Jesus as a solution to their relational, physical, emotional, or financial problems. When He doesn’t rectify their difficulties in the way they had hoped, their unrealized expectations can paralyze further growth. We cannot follow Jesus when we are asking Him to follow us. We limit our spiritual development when we fail to make the transition from seeing Jesus as a problem solver to seeing Him as our life.\n\nSPECTATOR: Other people slip into religious activities as ends in themselves or develop spectator or consumer mentalities in church. Devotion to duty or to safety and comfort dissipate passion for the person of Christ.\n
  • SOLUTION: Some people come to Jesus as a solution to their relational, physical, emotional, or financial problems. When He doesn’t rectify their difficulties in the way they had hoped, their unrealized expectations can paralyze further growth. We cannot follow Jesus when we are asking Him to follow us. We limit our spiritual development when we fail to make the transition from seeing Jesus as a problem solver to seeing Him as our life.\n\nSPECTATOR: Other people slip into religious activities as ends in themselves or develop spectator or consumer mentalities in church. Devotion to duty or to safety and comfort dissipate passion for the person of Christ.\n
  • Many people back off when they encounter their first taste of the cost of discipleship. When they come to suspect that the cost of living in Christ is dying to self (Jn. 12:24-26), they may reach for their rights rather than embrace the Cross. The idea that we forfeited our rights when we came to Jesus and that life is all about Him and not about us does not sit well in a world that values temporal assets above eternal goods.\n\nThe world, the flesh, and the devil are powerful forces that conspire to bar the way to apprenticeship in the ways of Jesus.\n
  • Many people back off when they encounter their first taste of the cost of discipleship. When they come to suspect that the cost of living in Christ is dying to self (Jn. 12:24-26), they may reach for their rights rather than embrace the Cross. The idea that we forfeited our rights when we came to Jesus and that life is all about Him and not about us does not sit well in a world that values temporal assets above eternal goods.\n\nThe world, the flesh, and the devil are powerful forces that conspire to bar the way to apprenticeship in the ways of Jesus.\n
  • Many people back off when they encounter their first taste of the cost of discipleship. When they come to suspect that the cost of living in Christ is dying to self (Jn. 12:24-26), they may reach for their rights rather than embrace the Cross. The idea that we forfeited our rights when we came to Jesus and that life is all about Him and not about us does not sit well in a world that values temporal assets above eternal goods.\n\nThe world, the flesh, and the devil are powerful forces that conspire to bar the way to apprenticeship in the ways of Jesus.\n
  • Many people back off when they encounter their first taste of the cost of discipleship. When they come to suspect that the cost of living in Christ is dying to self (Jn. 12:24-26), they may reach for their rights rather than embrace the Cross. The idea that we forfeited our rights when we came to Jesus and that life is all about Him and not about us does not sit well in a world that values temporal assets above eternal goods.\n\nThe world, the flesh, and the devil are powerful forces that conspire to bar the way to apprenticeship in the ways of Jesus.\n
  • Leroy Eims, The Lost Art of Disciple Making\n
  • Leroy Eims, The Lost Art of Disciple Making\n
  • Leroy Eims, The Lost Art of Disciple Making\n
  • Leroy Eims, The Lost Art of Disciple Making\n
  • Leroy Eims, The Lost Art of Disciple Making\n
  • Leroy Eims, The Lost Art of Disciple Making\n
  • Leroy Eims, The Lost Art of Disciple Making\n
  • Leroy Eims, The Lost Art of Disciple Making\n
  • Leroy Eims, The Lost Art of Disciple Making\n
  • There’s a balance that discipler’s must strike between teaching their disciples to balance the extremes of independence and codependence with interdependence.\n\nThe sheep are not mine; they belong to the Great Shepherd.\n
  • There’s a balance that discipler’s must strike between teaching their disciples to balance the extremes of independence and codependence with interdependence.\n\nThe sheep are not mine; they belong to the Great Shepherd.\n
  • There’s a balance that discipler’s must strike between teaching their disciples to balance the extremes of independence and codependence with interdependence.\n\nThe sheep are not mine; they belong to the Great Shepherd.\n
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  • There are three primary dynamics in the discipleship process: exposing, equipping, and encouraging/exhorting. \nExposing centers on the example and character of the discipler.\nEquipping centers on the nature of the teaching and training.\nEncouraging/Exhorting centers on the accountability and character of the disciple.\n\n
  • There are three primary dynamics in the discipleship process: exposing, equipping, and encouraging/exhorting. \nExposing centers on the example and character of the discipler.\nEquipping centers on the nature of the teaching and training.\nEncouraging/Exhorting centers on the accountability and character of the disciple.\n\n
  • There are three primary dynamics in the discipleship process: exposing, equipping, and encouraging/exhorting. \nExposing centers on the example and character of the discipler.\nEquipping centers on the nature of the teaching and training.\nEncouraging/Exhorting centers on the accountability and character of the disciple.\n\n
  • There are three primary dynamics in the discipleship process: exposing, equipping, and encouraging/exhorting. \nExposing centers on the example and character of the discipler.\nEquipping centers on the nature of the teaching and training.\nEncouraging/Exhorting centers on the accountability and character of the disciple.\n\n
  • There are three primary dynamics in the discipleship process: exposing, equipping, and encouraging/exhorting. \nExposing centers on the example and character of the discipler.\nEquipping centers on the nature of the teaching and training.\nEncouraging/Exhorting centers on the accountability and character of the disciple.\n\n
  • There are three primary dynamics in the discipleship process: exposing, equipping, and encouraging/exhorting. \nExposing centers on the example and character of the discipler.\nEquipping centers on the nature of the teaching and training.\nEncouraging/Exhorting centers on the accountability and character of the disciple.\n\n
  • There are three primary dynamics in the discipleship process: exposing, equipping, and encouraging/exhorting. \nExposing centers on the example and character of the discipler.\nEquipping centers on the nature of the teaching and training.\nEncouraging/Exhorting centers on the accountability and character of the disciple.\n\n
  • There are three primary dynamics in the discipleship process: exposing, equipping, and encouraging/exhorting. \nExposing centers on the example and character of the discipler.\nEquipping centers on the nature of the teaching and training.\nEncouraging/Exhorting centers on the accountability and character of the disciple.\n\n
  • There are three primary dynamics in the discipleship process: exposing, equipping, and encouraging/exhorting. \nExposing centers on the example and character of the discipler.\nEquipping centers on the nature of the teaching and training.\nEncouraging/Exhorting centers on the accountability and character of the disciple.\n\n
  • There are three primary dynamics in the discipleship process: exposing, equipping, and encouraging/exhorting. \nExposing centers on the example and character of the discipler.\nEquipping centers on the nature of the teaching and training.\nEncouraging/Exhorting centers on the accountability and character of the disciple.\n\n
  • There are three primary dynamics in the discipleship process: exposing, equipping, and encouraging/exhorting. \nExposing centers on the example and character of the discipler.\nEquipping centers on the nature of the teaching and training.\nEncouraging/Exhorting centers on the accountability and character of the disciple.\n\n
  • There are three primary dynamics in the discipleship process: exposing, equipping, and encouraging/exhorting. \nExposing centers on the example and character of the discipler.\nEquipping centers on the nature of the teaching and training.\nEncouraging/Exhorting centers on the accountability and character of the disciple.\n\n
  • \nNote: These dynamics are not chronological but concurrent.\nThe left and right columns are incarnational and focus on the heart of the discipler and disciple. The being-character-heart component is one of the most overlooked aspects to the discipleship process.\n
  • \nNote: These dynamics are not chronological but concurrent.\nThe left and right columns are incarnational and focus on the heart of the discipler and disciple. The being-character-heart component is one of the most overlooked aspects to the discipleship process.\n
  • \nNote: These dynamics are not chronological but concurrent.\nThe left and right columns are incarnational and focus on the heart of the discipler and disciple. The being-character-heart component is one of the most overlooked aspects to the discipleship process.\n
  • \nNote: These dynamics are not chronological but concurrent.\nThe left and right columns are incarnational and focus on the heart of the discipler and disciple. The being-character-heart component is one of the most overlooked aspects to the discipleship process.\n
  • As we have seen, we must be disciples to make disciples. When disciplers grow in the way they incarnate the grace and truth of life in Christ, they also grow in authenticity and personal authority. Their holy aspiration and personal passion become contagious as they make discipleship attractive. Their words are empowered by their example, and their vision of kingdom living galvanizes others to lay hold of the same vision and passion.\n
  • As we have seen, we must be disciples to make disciples. When disciplers grow in the way they incarnate the grace and truth of life in Christ, they also grow in authenticity and personal authority. Their holy aspiration and personal passion become contagious as they make discipleship attractive. Their words are empowered by their example, and their vision of kingdom living galvanizes others to lay hold of the same vision and passion.\n
  • As we have seen, we must be disciples to make disciples. When disciplers grow in the way they incarnate the grace and truth of life in Christ, they also grow in authenticity and personal authority. Their holy aspiration and personal passion become contagious as they make discipleship attractive. Their words are empowered by their example, and their vision of kingdom living galvanizes others to lay hold of the same vision and passion.\n
  • As we have seen, we must be disciples to make disciples. When disciplers grow in the way they incarnate the grace and truth of life in Christ, they also grow in authenticity and personal authority. Their holy aspiration and personal passion become contagious as they make discipleship attractive. Their words are empowered by their example, and their vision of kingdom living galvanizes others to lay hold of the same vision and passion.\n
  • As we have seen, we must be disciples to make disciples. When disciplers grow in the way they incarnate the grace and truth of life in Christ, they also grow in authenticity and personal authority. Their holy aspiration and personal passion become contagious as they make discipleship attractive. Their words are empowered by their example, and their vision of kingdom living galvanizes others to lay hold of the same vision and passion.\n
  • As we have seen, we must be disciples to make disciples. When disciplers grow in the way they incarnate the grace and truth of life in Christ, they also grow in authenticity and personal authority. Their holy aspiration and personal passion become contagious as they make discipleship attractive. Their words are empowered by their example, and their vision of kingdom living galvanizes others to lay hold of the same vision and passion.\n
  • But when disciplers descend from growth to maintenance or to regression in their walk with the Lord,\nthey minister out of the borrowed capital of their former vitality \nand depend on their knowledge and skill rather than the fullness of the Spirit.\nTheir authenticity and spiritual charisma erode, and they can no longer encourage others to do those things they hear and see in them (Phil. 4:9)\n
  • But when disciplers descend from growth to maintenance or to regression in their walk with the Lord,\nthey minister out of the borrowed capital of their former vitality \nand depend on their knowledge and skill rather than the fullness of the Spirit.\nTheir authenticity and spiritual charisma erode, and they can no longer encourage others to do those things they hear and see in them (Phil. 4:9)\n
  • But when disciplers descend from growth to maintenance or to regression in their walk with the Lord,\nthey minister out of the borrowed capital of their former vitality \nand depend on their knowledge and skill rather than the fullness of the Spirit.\nTheir authenticity and spiritual charisma erode, and they can no longer encourage others to do those things they hear and see in them (Phil. 4:9)\n
  • But when disciplers descend from growth to maintenance or to regression in their walk with the Lord,\nthey minister out of the borrowed capital of their former vitality \nand depend on their knowledge and skill rather than the fullness of the Spirit.\nTheir authenticity and spiritual charisma erode, and they can no longer encourage others to do those things they hear and see in them (Phil. 4:9)\n
  • But when disciplers descend from growth to maintenance or to regression in their walk with the Lord,\nthey minister out of the borrowed capital of their former vitality \nand depend on their knowledge and skill rather than the fullness of the Spirit.\nTheir authenticity and spiritual charisma erode, and they can no longer encourage others to do those things they hear and see in them (Phil. 4:9)\n
  • But when disciplers descend from growth to maintenance or to regression in their walk with the Lord,\nthey minister out of the borrowed capital of their former vitality \nand depend on their knowledge and skill rather than the fullness of the Spirit.\nTheir authenticity and spiritual charisma erode, and they can no longer encourage others to do those things they hear and see in them (Phil. 4:9)\n
  • 1. The purpose of equipping is to show people how to learn AND apply the Word in such a way that the truth is understood and integrated in the context of everyday life. In this way, disciples progress in principles and practice, in theory and technique, in convictions and conduct.\n\n2. Equipping is the second primary dynamic in the discipleship process and should involve both teaching and training. Unfortunately, most discipleship programs seem to be limited to this dimension, and many of these emphasize either imparting knowledge (teaching) or developing skills (training).\n\n\n
  • 1. The purpose of equipping is to show people how to learn AND apply the Word in such a way that the truth is understood and integrated in the context of everyday life. In this way, disciples progress in principles and practice, in theory and technique, in convictions and conduct.\n\n2. Equipping is the second primary dynamic in the discipleship process and should involve both teaching and training. Unfortunately, most discipleship programs seem to be limited to this dimension, and many of these emphasize either imparting knowledge (teaching) or developing skills (training).\n\n\n
  • 1. The purpose of equipping is to show people how to learn AND apply the Word in such a way that the truth is understood and integrated in the context of everyday life. In this way, disciples progress in principles and practice, in theory and technique, in convictions and conduct.\n\n2. Equipping is the second primary dynamic in the discipleship process and should involve both teaching and training. Unfortunately, most discipleship programs seem to be limited to this dimension, and many of these emphasize either imparting knowledge (teaching) or developing skills (training).\n\n\n
  • 1. The purpose of equipping is to show people how to learn AND apply the Word in such a way that the truth is understood and integrated in the context of everyday life. In this way, disciples progress in principles and practice, in theory and technique, in convictions and conduct.\n\n2. Equipping is the second primary dynamic in the discipleship process and should involve both teaching and training. Unfortunately, most discipleship programs seem to be limited to this dimension, and many of these emphasize either imparting knowledge (teaching) or developing skills (training).\n\n\n
  • The living Word of God, Jesus Christ, is made known through the written Word of God, and the written Word of God is disclosed through the proclaimed Word of God in preaching and teaching.\n\n1/2. Solid teaching helps renew the mind and enables believers to adjust their thinking in light of the world view revealed in Scripture.\n\n3. Our thinking molds our lives, and progress in true spirituality requires the development of a biblical filter system. As we conform our thinking to the Word rather than the world, we become increasingly confident in God’s sovereign and loving purposes, and this growing level of trust spills over into our priorities and the decisions that flow from them.\n
  • The living Word of God, Jesus Christ, is made known through the written Word of God, and the written Word of God is disclosed through the proclaimed Word of God in preaching and teaching.\n\n1/2. Solid teaching helps renew the mind and enables believers to adjust their thinking in light of the world view revealed in Scripture.\n\n3. Our thinking molds our lives, and progress in true spirituality requires the development of a biblical filter system. As we conform our thinking to the Word rather than the world, we become increasingly confident in God’s sovereign and loving purposes, and this growing level of trust spills over into our priorities and the decisions that flow from them.\n
  • The living Word of God, Jesus Christ, is made known through the written Word of God, and the written Word of God is disclosed through the proclaimed Word of God in preaching and teaching.\n\n1/2. Solid teaching helps renew the mind and enables believers to adjust their thinking in light of the world view revealed in Scripture.\n\n3. Our thinking molds our lives, and progress in true spirituality requires the development of a biblical filter system. As we conform our thinking to the Word rather than the world, we become increasingly confident in God’s sovereign and loving purposes, and this growing level of trust spills over into our priorities and the decisions that flow from them.\n
  • The living Word of God, Jesus Christ, is made known through the written Word of God, and the written Word of God is disclosed through the proclaimed Word of God in preaching and teaching.\n\n1/2. Solid teaching helps renew the mind and enables believers to adjust their thinking in light of the world view revealed in Scripture.\n\n3. Our thinking molds our lives, and progress in true spirituality requires the development of a biblical filter system. As we conform our thinking to the Word rather than the world, we become increasingly confident in God’s sovereign and loving purposes, and this growing level of trust spills over into our priorities and the decisions that flow from them.\n
  • There is no permanent change without a change in perspective, since our perspective shapes our priorities, and our priorities shape our practice.\n
  • There is no permanent change without a change in perspective, since our perspective shapes our priorities, and our priorities shape our practice.\n
  • There is no permanent change without a change in perspective, since our perspective shapes our priorities, and our priorities shape our practice.\n
  • Since there is a reciprocal relationship between thinking and habits, attitudes and actions, belief and behavior, it is important to avoid the two extremes of all theory or all technique. The equipping dynamic in the discipleship process should strive for a balanced combination of teaching and training.\n
  • Since there is a reciprocal relationship between thinking and habits, attitudes and actions, belief and behavior, it is important to avoid the two extremes of all theory or all technique. The equipping dynamic in the discipleship process should strive for a balanced combination of teaching and training.\n
  • Since there is a reciprocal relationship between thinking and habits, attitudes and actions, belief and behavior, it is important to avoid the two extremes of all theory or all technique. The equipping dynamic in the discipleship process should strive for a balanced combination of teaching and training.\n
  • Since there is a reciprocal relationship between thinking and habits, attitudes and actions, belief and behavior, it is important to avoid the two extremes of all theory or all technique. The equipping dynamic in the discipleship process should strive for a balanced combination of teaching and training.\n
  • Since there is a reciprocal relationship between thinking and habits, attitudes and actions, belief and behavior, it is important to avoid the two extremes of all theory or all technique. The equipping dynamic in the discipleship process should strive for a balanced combination of teaching and training.\n
  • Since there is a reciprocal relationship between thinking and habits, attitudes and actions, belief and behavior, it is important to avoid the two extremes of all theory or all technique. The equipping dynamic in the discipleship process should strive for a balanced combination of teaching and training.\n
  • A wealth of teaching tools is available. Basic teaching programs usually provide an overview of core issues such as salvation, elements of spiritual growth, Bible reading, prayer, marriage and parenting, evangelism, and stewardship. \n\nIntermediate and advanced teaching programs often include apologetics, Bible book studies, OT and NT surveys, biblical and systematic theology, and church history.\n\nFrequently overlooked areas include: biblical view of the authority of Scripture, hope, purpose, motivation, contentment & gratitude, work and leisure, and value systems. Others include the development of personal convictions, the role of tribulation in our lives, spiritual warfare, and the process of spiritual formation.\n\nWhen believers are taught to think through these issues, they are better equipped to relate timeless truths to the concerns of daily experiences.\n
  • A wealth of teaching tools is available. Basic teaching programs usually provide an overview of core issues such as salvation, elements of spiritual growth, Bible reading, prayer, marriage and parenting, evangelism, and stewardship. \n\nIntermediate and advanced teaching programs often include apologetics, Bible book studies, OT and NT surveys, biblical and systematic theology, and church history.\n\nFrequently overlooked areas include: biblical view of the authority of Scripture, hope, purpose, motivation, contentment & gratitude, work and leisure, and value systems. Others include the development of personal convictions, the role of tribulation in our lives, spiritual warfare, and the process of spiritual formation.\n\nWhen believers are taught to think through these issues, they are better equipped to relate timeless truths to the concerns of daily experiences.\n
  • A wealth of teaching tools is available. Basic teaching programs usually provide an overview of core issues such as salvation, elements of spiritual growth, Bible reading, prayer, marriage and parenting, evangelism, and stewardship. \n\nIntermediate and advanced teaching programs often include apologetics, Bible book studies, OT and NT surveys, biblical and systematic theology, and church history.\n\nFrequently overlooked areas include: biblical view of the authority of Scripture, hope, purpose, motivation, contentment & gratitude, work and leisure, and value systems. Others include the development of personal convictions, the role of tribulation in our lives, spiritual warfare, and the process of spiritual formation.\n\nWhen believers are taught to think through these issues, they are better equipped to relate timeless truths to the concerns of daily experiences.\n
  • A wealth of teaching tools is available. Basic teaching programs usually provide an overview of core issues such as salvation, elements of spiritual growth, Bible reading, prayer, marriage and parenting, evangelism, and stewardship. \n\nIntermediate and advanced teaching programs often include apologetics, Bible book studies, OT and NT surveys, biblical and systematic theology, and church history.\n\nFrequently overlooked areas include: biblical view of the authority of Scripture, hope, purpose, motivation, contentment & gratitude, work and leisure, and value systems. Others include the development of personal convictions, the role of tribulation in our lives, spiritual warfare, and the process of spiritual formation.\n\nWhen believers are taught to think through these issues, they are better equipped to relate timeless truths to the concerns of daily experiences.\n
  • A wealth of teaching tools is available. Basic teaching programs usually provide an overview of core issues such as salvation, elements of spiritual growth, Bible reading, prayer, marriage and parenting, evangelism, and stewardship. \n\nIntermediate and advanced teaching programs often include apologetics, Bible book studies, OT and NT surveys, biblical and systematic theology, and church history.\n\nFrequently overlooked areas include: biblical view of the authority of Scripture, hope, purpose, motivation, contentment & gratitude, work and leisure, and value systems. Others include the development of personal convictions, the role of tribulation in our lives, spiritual warfare, and the process of spiritual formation.\n\nWhen believers are taught to think through these issues, they are better equipped to relate timeless truths to the concerns of daily experiences.\n
  • A wealth of teaching tools is available. Basic teaching programs usually provide an overview of core issues such as salvation, elements of spiritual growth, Bible reading, prayer, marriage and parenting, evangelism, and stewardship. \n\nIntermediate and advanced teaching programs often include apologetics, Bible book studies, OT and NT surveys, biblical and systematic theology, and church history.\n\nFrequently overlooked areas include: biblical view of the authority of Scripture, hope, purpose, motivation, contentment & gratitude, work and leisure, and value systems. Others include the development of personal convictions, the role of tribulation in our lives, spiritual warfare, and the process of spiritual formation.\n\nWhen believers are taught to think through these issues, they are better equipped to relate timeless truths to the concerns of daily experiences.\n
  • 1. Discipleship programs that are limited to imparting knowledge run the risk of orthodoxy without orthopraxy, correct thinking without correct application.\n\n2. Teaching equips disciples with truth.\n\n3. Training equips disciples with skills. Training programs center on the formation of holy habits and practical skills so that disciples will acquire ingrained responses to the opportunities, challenges, and temptations they encounter every day. Teaching without training can lead to a growing disparity between beliefs and behavior, profession and practice. Thus, it is just as important to focus on practice as it is on principles.\n\n4. Training in positive habit formation and life skills relates to the disciplines of the spiritual life. In this way, disciples are shown how to become apprentices of the Master (Jesus) in their habits of thinking, feeling, and action, as they learn to respond in biblically appropriate ways to people and circumstances. \n
  • 1. Discipleship programs that are limited to imparting knowledge run the risk of orthodoxy without orthopraxy, correct thinking without correct application.\n\n2. Teaching equips disciples with truth.\n\n3. Training equips disciples with skills. Training programs center on the formation of holy habits and practical skills so that disciples will acquire ingrained responses to the opportunities, challenges, and temptations they encounter every day. Teaching without training can lead to a growing disparity between beliefs and behavior, profession and practice. Thus, it is just as important to focus on practice as it is on principles.\n\n4. Training in positive habit formation and life skills relates to the disciplines of the spiritual life. In this way, disciples are shown how to become apprentices of the Master (Jesus) in their habits of thinking, feeling, and action, as they learn to respond in biblically appropriate ways to people and circumstances. \n
  • 1. Discipleship programs that are limited to imparting knowledge run the risk of orthodoxy without orthopraxy, correct thinking without correct application.\n\n2. Teaching equips disciples with truth.\n\n3. Training equips disciples with skills. Training programs center on the formation of holy habits and practical skills so that disciples will acquire ingrained responses to the opportunities, challenges, and temptations they encounter every day. Teaching without training can lead to a growing disparity between beliefs and behavior, profession and practice. Thus, it is just as important to focus on practice as it is on principles.\n\n4. Training in positive habit formation and life skills relates to the disciplines of the spiritual life. In this way, disciples are shown how to become apprentices of the Master (Jesus) in their habits of thinking, feeling, and action, as they learn to respond in biblically appropriate ways to people and circumstances. \n
  • 1. Discipleship programs that are limited to imparting knowledge run the risk of orthodoxy without orthopraxy, correct thinking without correct application.\n\n2. Teaching equips disciples with truth.\n\n3. Training equips disciples with skills. Training programs center on the formation of holy habits and practical skills so that disciples will acquire ingrained responses to the opportunities, challenges, and temptations they encounter every day. Teaching without training can lead to a growing disparity between beliefs and behavior, profession and practice. Thus, it is just as important to focus on practice as it is on principles.\n\n4. Training in positive habit formation and life skills relates to the disciplines of the spiritual life. In this way, disciples are shown how to become apprentices of the Master (Jesus) in their habits of thinking, feeling, and action, as they learn to respond in biblically appropriate ways to people and circumstances. \n
  • 1. Discipleship programs that are limited to imparting knowledge run the risk of orthodoxy without orthopraxy, correct thinking without correct application.\n\n2. Teaching equips disciples with truth.\n\n3. Training equips disciples with skills. Training programs center on the formation of holy habits and practical skills so that disciples will acquire ingrained responses to the opportunities, challenges, and temptations they encounter every day. Teaching without training can lead to a growing disparity between beliefs and behavior, profession and practice. Thus, it is just as important to focus on practice as it is on principles.\n\n4. Training in positive habit formation and life skills relates to the disciplines of the spiritual life. In this way, disciples are shown how to become apprentices of the Master (Jesus) in their habits of thinking, feeling, and action, as they learn to respond in biblically appropriate ways to people and circumstances. \n
  • 1. Discipleship programs that are limited to imparting knowledge run the risk of orthodoxy without orthopraxy, correct thinking without correct application.\n\n2. Teaching equips disciples with truth.\n\n3. Training equips disciples with skills. Training programs center on the formation of holy habits and practical skills so that disciples will acquire ingrained responses to the opportunities, challenges, and temptations they encounter every day. Teaching without training can lead to a growing disparity between beliefs and behavior, profession and practice. Thus, it is just as important to focus on practice as it is on principles.\n\n4. Training in positive habit formation and life skills relates to the disciplines of the spiritual life. In this way, disciples are shown how to become apprentices of the Master (Jesus) in their habits of thinking, feeling, and action, as they learn to respond in biblically appropriate ways to people and circumstances. \n
  • Discipleship training programs stress different skills and techniques, but the most common training objectives include:\n\n1. Bible study skills (e.g. reading, inductive study methods, memorization, meditation)\n2. Cultivation of a daily quiet (devotional) time\n3. Methods of prayer\n5. How to share one’s faith with another\n6. Discerning God’s will\n7. Leadership development\n\nOthers: identification and use of spiritual gifts, laying hold of spiritual resources, dealing with temptation, etc.\n
  • Discipleship training programs stress different skills and techniques, but the most common training objectives include:\n\n1. Bible study skills (e.g. reading, inductive study methods, memorization, meditation)\n2. Cultivation of a daily quiet (devotional) time\n3. Methods of prayer\n5. How to share one’s faith with another\n6. Discerning God’s will\n7. Leadership development\n\nOthers: identification and use of spiritual gifts, laying hold of spiritual resources, dealing with temptation, etc.\n
  • Discipleship training programs stress different skills and techniques, but the most common training objectives include:\n\n1. Bible study skills (e.g. reading, inductive study methods, memorization, meditation)\n2. Cultivation of a daily quiet (devotional) time\n3. Methods of prayer\n5. How to share one’s faith with another\n6. Discerning God’s will\n7. Leadership development\n\nOthers: identification and use of spiritual gifts, laying hold of spiritual resources, dealing with temptation, etc.\n
  • Discipleship training programs stress different skills and techniques, but the most common training objectives include:\n\n1. Bible study skills (e.g. reading, inductive study methods, memorization, meditation)\n2. Cultivation of a daily quiet (devotional) time\n3. Methods of prayer\n5. How to share one’s faith with another\n6. Discerning God’s will\n7. Leadership development\n\nOthers: identification and use of spiritual gifts, laying hold of spiritual resources, dealing with temptation, etc.\n
  • Discipleship training programs stress different skills and techniques, but the most common training objectives include:\n\n1. Bible study skills (e.g. reading, inductive study methods, memorization, meditation)\n2. Cultivation of a daily quiet (devotional) time\n3. Methods of prayer\n5. How to share one’s faith with another\n6. Discerning God’s will\n7. Leadership development\n\nOthers: identification and use of spiritual gifts, laying hold of spiritual resources, dealing with temptation, etc.\n
  • Discipleship training programs stress different skills and techniques, but the most common training objectives include:\n\n1. Bible study skills (e.g. reading, inductive study methods, memorization, meditation)\n2. Cultivation of a daily quiet (devotional) time\n3. Methods of prayer\n5. How to share one’s faith with another\n6. Discerning God’s will\n7. Leadership development\n\nOthers: identification and use of spiritual gifts, laying hold of spiritual resources, dealing with temptation, etc.\n
  • The third primary dynamic in the disipleship process concerns the character and heart of the disciple. Progress in spiritual growth requires a growing apprentice to be receptive and responsive.\n\nSince effective nuturing addresses the whole person, the discipling relationship requires sincerity, authenticity, and candor. \n\nFAT: All three qualities must be simultaneously present in both the disciple and the discipler for the relationship to function.\n
  • The third primary dynamic in the disipleship process concerns the character and heart of the disciple. Progress in spiritual growth requires a growing apprentice to be receptive and responsive.\n\nSince effective nuturing addresses the whole person, the discipling relationship requires sincerity, authenticity, and candor. \n\nFAT: All three qualities must be simultaneously present in both the disciple and the discipler for the relationship to function.\n
  • The third primary dynamic in the disipleship process concerns the character and heart of the disciple. Progress in spiritual growth requires a growing apprentice to be receptive and responsive.\n\nSince effective nuturing addresses the whole person, the discipling relationship requires sincerity, authenticity, and candor. \n\nFAT: All three qualities must be simultaneously present in both the disciple and the discipler for the relationship to function.\n
  • The third primary dynamic in the disipleship process concerns the character and heart of the disciple. Progress in spiritual growth requires a growing apprentice to be receptive and responsive.\n\nSince effective nuturing addresses the whole person, the discipling relationship requires sincerity, authenticity, and candor. \n\nFAT: All three qualities must be simultaneously present in both the disciple and the discipler for the relationship to function.\n
  • The third primary dynamic in the disipleship process concerns the character and heart of the disciple. Progress in spiritual growth requires a growing apprentice to be receptive and responsive.\n\nSince effective nuturing addresses the whole person, the discipling relationship requires sincerity, authenticity, and candor. \n\nFAT: All three qualities must be simultaneously present in both the disciple and the discipler for the relationship to function.\n
  • The third primary dynamic in the disipleship process concerns the character and heart of the disciple. Progress in spiritual growth requires a growing apprentice to be receptive and responsive.\n\nSince effective nuturing addresses the whole person, the discipling relationship requires sincerity, authenticity, and candor. \n\nFAT: All three qualities must be simultaneously present in both the disciple and the discipler for the relationship to function.\n
  • The third primary dynamic in the disipleship process concerns the character and heart of the disciple. Progress in spiritual growth requires a growing apprentice to be receptive and responsive.\n\nSince effective nuturing addresses the whole person, the discipling relationship requires sincerity, authenticity, and candor. \n\nFAT: All three qualities must be simultaneously present in both the disciple and the discipler for the relationship to function.\n
  • The third primary dynamic in the disipleship process concerns the character and heart of the disciple. Progress in spiritual growth requires a growing apprentice to be receptive and responsive.\n\nSince effective nuturing addresses the whole person, the discipling relationship requires sincerity, authenticity, and candor. \n\nFAT: All three qualities must be simultaneously present in both the disciple and the discipler for the relationship to function.\n
  • The third primary dynamic in the disipleship process concerns the character and heart of the disciple. Progress in spiritual growth requires a growing apprentice to be receptive and responsive.\n\nSince effective nuturing addresses the whole person, the discipling relationship requires sincerity, authenticity, and candor. \n\nFAT: All three qualities must be simultaneously present in both the disciple and the discipler for the relationship to function.\n
  • 1. The discipler should create an atmosphere in which obedience and submission to the lordship of Christ is the expected norm.\n\n2. Teaching and training are not ends in themselves but as servants of the central impetus of discipleship: radical committment to the person of Jesus.\n\n
  • 1. The discipler should create an atmosphere in which obedience and submission to the lordship of Christ is the expected norm.\n\n2. Teaching and training are not ends in themselves but as servants of the central impetus of discipleship: radical committment to the person of Jesus.\n\n
  • 1. The discipler should create an atmosphere in which obedience and submission to the lordship of Christ is the expected norm.\n\n2. Teaching and training are not ends in themselves but as servants of the central impetus of discipleship: radical committment to the person of Jesus.\n\n
  • 1. The discipler should create an atmosphere in which obedience and submission to the lordship of Christ is the expected norm.\n\n2. Teaching and training are not ends in themselves but as servants of the central impetus of discipleship: radical committment to the person of Jesus.\n\n
  • The most obvious discipleship settings have been placed in front of us.\n1. See marriage as a mutual discipling relationship\n\n2. When parents model what it is to love and walk with Jesus, they develop an authenticity that gives them credibility and authority when they teach and train their children. Should be an intentional, not spontaneous process.\n\n3/4. Avoid the common error of separating our vocation and our ministry. Our work provides us with a sphere of influence and interaction; friendships take on a new dimension when we perceive them as a context in which we love and serve people with eternal purposes at heart.\n\n5. Society is also a potential arena for nurturing spirituality when we recognize a specific burden to be active in the world as a calling to express love and mercy of Christ to those who are need.\n
  • The most obvious discipleship settings have been placed in front of us.\n1. See marriage as a mutual discipling relationship\n\n2. When parents model what it is to love and walk with Jesus, they develop an authenticity that gives them credibility and authority when they teach and train their children. Should be an intentional, not spontaneous process.\n\n3/4. Avoid the common error of separating our vocation and our ministry. Our work provides us with a sphere of influence and interaction; friendships take on a new dimension when we perceive them as a context in which we love and serve people with eternal purposes at heart.\n\n5. Society is also a potential arena for nurturing spirituality when we recognize a specific burden to be active in the world as a calling to express love and mercy of Christ to those who are need.\n
  • The most obvious discipleship settings have been placed in front of us.\n1. See marriage as a mutual discipling relationship\n\n2. When parents model what it is to love and walk with Jesus, they develop an authenticity that gives them credibility and authority when they teach and train their children. Should be an intentional, not spontaneous process.\n\n3/4. Avoid the common error of separating our vocation and our ministry. Our work provides us with a sphere of influence and interaction; friendships take on a new dimension when we perceive them as a context in which we love and serve people with eternal purposes at heart.\n\n5. Society is also a potential arena for nurturing spirituality when we recognize a specific burden to be active in the world as a calling to express love and mercy of Christ to those who are need.\n
  • The most obvious discipleship settings have been placed in front of us.\n1. See marriage as a mutual discipling relationship\n\n2. When parents model what it is to love and walk with Jesus, they develop an authenticity that gives them credibility and authority when they teach and train their children. Should be an intentional, not spontaneous process.\n\n3/4. Avoid the common error of separating our vocation and our ministry. Our work provides us with a sphere of influence and interaction; friendships take on a new dimension when we perceive them as a context in which we love and serve people with eternal purposes at heart.\n\n5. Society is also a potential arena for nurturing spirituality when we recognize a specific burden to be active in the world as a calling to express love and mercy of Christ to those who are need.\n
  • The most obvious discipleship settings have been placed in front of us.\n1. See marriage as a mutual discipling relationship\n\n2. When parents model what it is to love and walk with Jesus, they develop an authenticity that gives them credibility and authority when they teach and train their children. Should be an intentional, not spontaneous process.\n\n3/4. Avoid the common error of separating our vocation and our ministry. Our work provides us with a sphere of influence and interaction; friendships take on a new dimension when we perceive them as a context in which we love and serve people with eternal purposes at heart.\n\n5. Society is also a potential arena for nurturing spirituality when we recognize a specific burden to be active in the world as a calling to express love and mercy of Christ to those who are need.\n
  • 1/2/3. A personal commitment to meeting regularly with a small group and/or with individuals for the purpose of spiritual development is always worth the investment of time and effort. In both cases, the relational component should be as central as the content.\n\n4. Our vision should be to bring apprentices to the point where they are willing and able to disciple others.\n\n5. Jesus built a team around Himself. A team ministry provides fellowship, interdependence, encouragement, division of labor, cooperation, synergism, and a broad gift mix. Members commit to a common cause by covenanting together to fulfill a vision and mission. They also commit to community (each other) and this partnership creates an environment of grace and mutual bonding as they purpose to walk together in peace and trust.\n
  • 1/2/3. A personal commitment to meeting regularly with a small group and/or with individuals for the purpose of spiritual development is always worth the investment of time and effort. In both cases, the relational component should be as central as the content.\n\n4. Our vision should be to bring apprentices to the point where they are willing and able to disciple others.\n\n5. Jesus built a team around Himself. A team ministry provides fellowship, interdependence, encouragement, division of labor, cooperation, synergism, and a broad gift mix. Members commit to a common cause by covenanting together to fulfill a vision and mission. They also commit to community (each other) and this partnership creates an environment of grace and mutual bonding as they purpose to walk together in peace and trust.\n
  • 1/2/3. A personal commitment to meeting regularly with a small group and/or with individuals for the purpose of spiritual development is always worth the investment of time and effort. In both cases, the relational component should be as central as the content.\n\n4. Our vision should be to bring apprentices to the point where they are willing and able to disciple others.\n\n5. Jesus built a team around Himself. A team ministry provides fellowship, interdependence, encouragement, division of labor, cooperation, synergism, and a broad gift mix. Members commit to a common cause by covenanting together to fulfill a vision and mission. They also commit to community (each other) and this partnership creates an environment of grace and mutual bonding as they purpose to walk together in peace and trust.\n
  • 1/2/3. A personal commitment to meeting regularly with a small group and/or with individuals for the purpose of spiritual development is always worth the investment of time and effort. In both cases, the relational component should be as central as the content.\n\n4. Our vision should be to bring apprentices to the point where they are willing and able to disciple others.\n\n5. Jesus built a team around Himself. A team ministry provides fellowship, interdependence, encouragement, division of labor, cooperation, synergism, and a broad gift mix. Members commit to a common cause by covenanting together to fulfill a vision and mission. They also commit to community (each other) and this partnership creates an environment of grace and mutual bonding as they purpose to walk together in peace and trust.\n
  • 1/2/3. A personal commitment to meeting regularly with a small group and/or with individuals for the purpose of spiritual development is always worth the investment of time and effort. In both cases, the relational component should be as central as the content.\n\n4. Our vision should be to bring apprentices to the point where they are willing and able to disciple others.\n\n5. Jesus built a team around Himself. A team ministry provides fellowship, interdependence, encouragement, division of labor, cooperation, synergism, and a broad gift mix. Members commit to a common cause by covenanting together to fulfill a vision and mission. They also commit to community (each other) and this partnership creates an environment of grace and mutual bonding as they purpose to walk together in peace and trust.\n
  • \n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • 1. The first phase in this series is the preparation of the soil. Unless the ground is cleared and plowed, it will not be ready to receive the seed. \n\n2. After the soil is harrowed and furrowed, the second phase, sowing of the seed, takes place.\n\n3. Cultivation, the third phase, is the lengthiest part of the agricultural process; it involves irrigation, fertilization, and weed control. \n\n4. Only when the crop is mature is it ready to undergo the brief fourth phase of reaping. When we substitute “soul” for “soil,” the spiritual analogy of these four phases to the processes of evangelism become obvious.\n\n5. Before people are ready to receive the seed of the Word, their souls must be prepared, and there are many ways in which this can happen. Often God uses adversities and setbacks to pull people away from their illusions of autonomy so they can begin to see their true condition of spiritual need. \n\n6. The sowing of the seed is exposure to the truths of the Word of God, and the process of cultivation is the gradual realization that these truths speak to their deep needs. The Lord uses His servants in each of these phases as they pray for people without Christ, develop relationships with them in areas of common ground, and share their own journeys when appropriate.\n* Key Thought: If we are involved in any one of these four phases, we are doing evangelism.\n
  • Most models of evangelism center on the reaping side of the agricultural spectrum, which tends to promote a more confrontational style (which is understandable since the harvest is the desired result of the whole process), and can foster a superficial “hit and run” technique.\n\nThe unstable configuration on the left portrays the problem of attempting to reap with minimal cultivation. There are exceptions, but we should expect the cultivation phase of evangelism to take more time than the reaping phase. Otherwise we may be inclined to bruise the fruit by attempting to pick it too soon. \n\nThe stable triangle on the right illustrates the importance of planting the seed of the gospel in well-prepared soil in such a way that reaping is the by-product of faithful and patient cultivation.\n
  • Most models of evangelism center on the reaping side of the agricultural spectrum, which tends to promote a more confrontational style (which is understandable since the harvest is the desired result of the whole process), and can foster a superficial “hit and run” technique.\n\nThe unstable configuration on the left portrays the problem of attempting to reap with minimal cultivation. There are exceptions, but we should expect the cultivation phase of evangelism to take more time than the reaping phase. Otherwise we may be inclined to bruise the fruit by attempting to pick it too soon. \n\nThe stable triangle on the right illustrates the importance of planting the seed of the gospel in well-prepared soil in such a way that reaping is the by-product of faithful and patient cultivation.\n
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  • In practice, both believers and unbelievers are uncomfortable with evangelism.\nJames Stuart, professor of NT at the University of Edinburgh, put is this way:\n“The threat to Christianity is not atheism, materialism, or communism. The greatest threat to Christianity is Christians who are trying to sneak into heaven incognito without ever having shared their faith.”\n
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  • 1. Remember that people are not projects. It is good to desire and pray for their salvation, but this outcome must never be a personal goal.\n\n2. If it degenerates into a goal, you will seek to manipulate the relationship to bring it about, and this will have negative consequences. Your part is to love and serve them unconditionally and to leave the results to God.\n\n3. When you have natural opportunities to transition from small talk to spiritual things, seek to avoid cliches and theological jargon.\n\n4. And be sensitive enough not to be pushy or argumentative.\n\n5. Treat outsiders with “gentleness and respect” (1Pe. 3:15) and use responses that stimulate rather than stifle open discussion.\n
  • 1. Remember that people are not projects. It is good to desire and pray for their salvation, but this outcome must never be a personal goal.\n\n2. If it degenerates into a goal, you will seek to manipulate the relationship to bring it about, and this will have negative consequences. Your part is to love and serve them unconditionally and to leave the results to God.\n\n3. When you have natural opportunities to transition from small talk to spiritual things, seek to avoid cliches and theological jargon.\n\n4. And be sensitive enough not to be pushy or argumentative.\n\n5. Treat outsiders with “gentleness and respect” (1Pe. 3:15) and use responses that stimulate rather than stifle open discussion.\n
  • 1. Remember that people are not projects. It is good to desire and pray for their salvation, but this outcome must never be a personal goal.\n\n2. If it degenerates into a goal, you will seek to manipulate the relationship to bring it about, and this will have negative consequences. Your part is to love and serve them unconditionally and to leave the results to God.\n\n3. When you have natural opportunities to transition from small talk to spiritual things, seek to avoid cliches and theological jargon.\n\n4. And be sensitive enough not to be pushy or argumentative.\n\n5. Treat outsiders with “gentleness and respect” (1Pe. 3:15) and use responses that stimulate rather than stifle open discussion.\n
  • 1. Remember that people are not projects. It is good to desire and pray for their salvation, but this outcome must never be a personal goal.\n\n2. If it degenerates into a goal, you will seek to manipulate the relationship to bring it about, and this will have negative consequences. Your part is to love and serve them unconditionally and to leave the results to God.\n\n3. When you have natural opportunities to transition from small talk to spiritual things, seek to avoid cliches and theological jargon.\n\n4. And be sensitive enough not to be pushy or argumentative.\n\n5. Treat outsiders with “gentleness and respect” (1Pe. 3:15) and use responses that stimulate rather than stifle open discussion.\n
  • 1. Remember that people are not projects. It is good to desire and pray for their salvation, but this outcome must never be a personal goal.\n\n2. If it degenerates into a goal, you will seek to manipulate the relationship to bring it about, and this will have negative consequences. Your part is to love and serve them unconditionally and to leave the results to God.\n\n3. When you have natural opportunities to transition from small talk to spiritual things, seek to avoid cliches and theological jargon.\n\n4. And be sensitive enough not to be pushy or argumentative.\n\n5. Treat outsiders with “gentleness and respect” (1Pe. 3:15) and use responses that stimulate rather than stifle open discussion.\n
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  • Jesus bookended His earthly ministry with evangelism. He began by calling His disciples to be fishers of men, and ended by commissioning them to be His witnesses in the world (Acts 1:8)\n
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  • Nurturing Spirituality

    1. 1. NurturingSpirituality A Lifestyle of Evangelism and DisicpleshipDr. Kenneth Boa and Bill Ibsen
    2. 2. Overview
    3. 3. OverviewA Philosophy of Discipleship
    4. 4. OverviewA Philosophy of DiscipleshipThe Process, Product, and Context of Discipleship
    5. 5. OverviewA Philosophy of DiscipleshipThe Process, Product, and Context of DiscipleshipA Philosophy of Evangelism
    6. 6. OverviewA Philosophy of DiscipleshipThe Process, Product, and Context of DiscipleshipA Philosophy of EvangelismOvercoming the Barriers to Evangelism
    7. 7. A Philosophy of Discipleship
    8. 8. Nurturing Spirituality
    9. 9. Nurturing SpiritualityLifestyle of discipleship and evangelism
    10. 10. Nurturing SpiritualityLifestyle of discipleship and evangelismRelated to God’s purpose for us
    11. 11. Nurturing SpiritualityLifestyle of discipleship and evangelismRelated to God’s purpose for us Become like His Son
    12. 12. Nurturing SpiritualityLifestyle of discipleship and evangelismRelated to God’s purpose for us Become like His Son Reproduce Jesus’ life in others
    13. 13. What is Nurturing?
    14. 14. What is Nurturing? Building into another
    15. 15. What is Nurturing? Building into another Feeding another
    16. 16. What is Nurturing? Building into another Feeding another Protecting another
    17. 17. What is Nurturing? Building into another Feeding another Protecting another Encouraging another
    18. 18. What is Nurturing? Building into another Feeding another Protecting another Encouraging another Training another
    19. 19. What is Nurturing? Building into another Feeding another Protecting another Encouraging another Training another Maturing another
    20. 20. Expressions of Love
    21. 21. Expressions of LoveAgape = The steady intention of one’s willtoward another’s highest good
    22. 22. Expressions of LoveAgape = The steady intention of one’s willtoward another’s highest goodGreatest good for believers: discipleship
    23. 23. Expressions of LoveAgape = The steady intention of one’s willtoward another’s highest goodGreatest good for believers: discipleshipGreatest good for unbelievers: evangelism
    24. 24. Spectrum of Spirituality-10 -5 +5 +10
    25. 25. Spectrum of Spirituality Unwillingto Consider the Claims of Christ -10 -5 +5 +10
    26. 26. Spectrum of Spirituality Unwilling Willingto Consider to Consider the Claims the Claims of Christ of Christ -10 -5 +5 +10
    27. 27. Spectrum of Spirituality Unwilling Willingto Consider to Consider the Claims the Claims New of Christ of Christ Believer -10 -5 +5 +10
    28. 28. Spectrum of Spirituality Unwilling Willingto Consider to Consider the Claims the Claims New Responding of Christ of Christ Believer & Growing -10 -5 +5 +10
    29. 29. Spectrum of Spirituality Unwilling Willingto Consider to Consider the Claims the Claims New Responding Reproducing of Christ of Christ Believer & Growing Disciple -10 -5 +5 +10
    30. 30. Spectrum of Spirituality Unwilling Willingto Consider to Consider the Claims the Claims New Responding Reproducing of Christ of Christ Believer & Growing Disciple -10 -5 +5 +10 Evangelism
    31. 31. Spectrum of Spirituality Unwilling Willingto Consider to Consider the Claims the Claims New Responding Reproducing of Christ of Christ Believer & Growing Disciple -10 -5 +5 +10 Evangelism Discipleship
    32. 32. Following the Shepherd
    33. 33. Spiritual Growth Inhibitors
    34. 34. Spiritual Growth Inhibitors Jesus as a “solution”
    35. 35. Spiritual Growth Inhibitors Jesus as a “solution” Religious activities as ends themselves
    36. 36. Spiritual Growth Inhibitors Jesus as a “solution” Religious activities as ends themselves Spectator mentality
    37. 37. Spiritual Growth Inhibitors Jesus as a “solution” Religious activities as ends themselves Spectator mentality Consumer mentality
    38. 38. Spiritual Growth Inhibitors
    39. 39. Spiritual Growth Inhibitors Cost of discipleship
    40. 40. Spiritual Growth Inhibitors Cost of discipleship World
    41. 41. Spiritual Growth Inhibitors Cost of discipleship World Flesh
    42. 42. Spiritual Growth Inhibitors Cost of discipleship World Flesh Devil
    43. 43. 4 Phases of Movement from Conversion to Maturity
    44. 44. 4 Phases of Movement from Conversion to Maturity
    45. 45. 4 Phases of Movement from Conversion to MaturityEvangelizin Establishin Equippin Empowering g g gConverts Disciples Workers Leaders
    46. 46. 4 Phases of Movement from Conversion to MaturityEvangelizin Establishin Equippin Empowering g g gConverts Disciples Workers Leaders
    47. 47. 4 Phases of Movement from Conversion to MaturityEvangelizin Establishin Equippin Empowering g g gConverts Disciples Workers Leaders
    48. 48. 4 Phases of Movement from Conversion to MaturityEvangelizin Establishin Equippin Empowering g g gConverts Disciples Workers Leaders
    49. 49. 4 Phases of Movement from Conversion to MaturityEvangelizin Establishin Equippin Empowering g g gConverts Disciples Workers Leaders
    50. 50. 4 Phases of Movement from Conversion to MaturityEvangelizin Establishin Equippin Empowering g g gConverts Disciples Workers Leaders
    51. 51. 4 Phases of Movement from Conversion to MaturityEvangelizin Establishin Equippin Empowering g g gConverts Disciples Workers Leaders
    52. 52. 4 Phases of Movement from Conversion to MaturityEvangelizin Establishin Equippin Empowering g g gConverts Disciples Workers Leaders
    53. 53. Balance Act of Discipleship
    54. 54. Balance Act of Discipleship Independent
    55. 55. Balance Act of DiscipleshipCodependent Independent
    56. 56. Balance Act of DiscipleshipCodependent Interdependent Independent
    57. 57. New Converts Disciples WorkersLeaders
    58. 58. New Converts Disciples WorkersLeaders
    59. 59. Developmenta Developing Developmental Role ofDevelopmental l Spiritual Goals Discipler Needs FocusNew Converts Love, Health, Protection, Mother New life Growth Nourishment Disciples Boundaries, Training, Life in Father Obedience Learning Christ Growing Contribution, Christ’s Independence Coach Maturity Life in Us & Activity Workers Christ’s Life Relationships Multiplication Peer Through UsLeaders
    60. 60. Developmenta Developing Developmental Role ofDevelopmental l Spiritual Goals Discipler Needs FocusNew Converts Love, Health, Protection, Mother New life Growth Nourishment Disciples Boundaries, Training, Life in Father Obedience Learning Christ Growing Contribution, Christ’s Independence Coach Maturity Life in Us & Activity Workers Christ’s Life Relationships Multiplication Peer Through UsLeaders
    61. 61. Developmenta Developing Developmental Role ofDevelopmental l Spiritual Goals Discipler Needs FocusNew Converts Love, Health, Protection, Mother New life Growth Nourishment Disciples Boundaries, Training, Life in Father Obedience Learning Christ Growing Contribution, Christ’s Independence Coach Maturity Life in Us & Activity Workers Christ’s Life Relationships Multiplication Peer Through UsLeaders
    62. 62. Developmenta Developing Developmental Role ofDevelopmental l Spiritual Goals Discipler Needs FocusNew Converts Love, Health, Protection, Mother New life Growth Nourishment Disciples Boundaries, Training, Life in Father Obedience Learning Christ Growing Contribution, Christ’s Independence Coach Maturity Life in Us & Activity Workers Christ’s Life Relationships Multiplication Peer Through UsLeaders
    63. 63. Developmenta Developing Developmental Role ofDevelopmental l Spiritual Goals Discipler Needs FocusNew Converts Love, Health, Protection, Mother New life Growth Nourishment Disciples Boundaries, Training, Life in Father Obedience Learning Christ Growing Contribution, Christ’s Independence Coach Maturity Life in Us & Activity Workers Christ’s Life Relationships Multiplication Peer Through UsLeaders
    64. 64. Discipleship Principles
    65. 65. Discipleship PrinciplesWe must be disciples to make disciples
    66. 66. Discipleship PrinciplesWe must be disciples to make disciplesDiscipleship is a dependent process
    67. 67. Discipleship PrinciplesWe must be disciples to make disciplesDiscipleship is a dependent processConcentration is crucial to multiplication
    68. 68. Discipleship PrinciplesWe must be disciples to make disciplesDiscipleship is a dependent processConcentration is crucial to multiplicationPeople are not our disciples
    69. 69. Discipleship Principles
    70. 70. Discipleship Principles Reproduction is a mark of discipleship
    71. 71. Discipleship Principles Reproduction is a mark of discipleship There is not maturity without ministry
    72. 72. Discipleship Principles Reproduction is a mark of discipleship There is not maturity without ministry We cannot measure our ministries
    73. 73. Discipleship Principles Reproduction is a mark of discipleship There is not maturity without ministry We cannot measure our ministries Discipleship is more than a program
    74. 74. Discipleship Principles
    75. 75. Discipleship PrinciplesDiscipleship requires a servant attitude
    76. 76. Discipleship PrinciplesDiscipleship requires a servant attitudeSpiritual friendship is a component ofDiscipleship
    77. 77. Discipleship PrinciplesDiscipleship requires a servant attitudeSpiritual friendship is a component ofDiscipleshipEffective discipleship requires more than onemethod
    78. 78. The Process, Product, and Context of Discipleship
    79. 79. Primary Dynamics ofDiscipleship Process
    80. 80. Primary Dynamics ofDiscipleship Process Exposing
    81. 81. Primary Dynamics ofDiscipleship Process Exposing Equipping
    82. 82. Primary Dynamics ofDiscipleship Process Exposing Equipping Encouragement/ Exhortation
    83. 83. Other Aspects of the Discipleship Process
    84. 84. Other Aspects of the Discipleship Process Being
    85. 85. Other Aspects of the Discipleship Process Being Knowing
    86. 86. Other Aspects of the Discipleship Process Being Doing Knowing
    87. 87. Other Aspects of the Discipleship Process Being Doing Character Knowing
    88. 88. Other Aspects of the Discipleship Process Being Doing Character Knowing Training
    89. 89. Other Aspects of the Discipleship Process Being Doing Character Teaching Knowing Training
    90. 90. Other Aspects of the Discipleship Process Being Doing Character Teaching Heart Knowing Training
    91. 91. Other Aspects of the Discipleship Process Being Doing Character Teaching Heart Knowing Training Head
    92. 92. Other Aspects of the Discipleship Process Being Doing Character Teaching Heart Hands Knowing Training Head
    93. 93. ENCOURAGINGEXPOSING EQUIPPING /EXHORTING Teaching Training Thinking Habits Example Obedience Theory Technique (Modeling) & Accountability Truth Skills Principles Practice Being Being Knowing Doing (Discipler) (disciple) Character Convictions Conduct Character Heart Head Hands Heart
    94. 94. ENCOURAGINGEXPOSING EQUIPPING /EXHORTING Teaching Training Thinking Habits Example Obedience Theory Technique (Modeling) & Accountability Truth Skills Principles Practice Being Being Knowing Doing (Discipler) (disciple) Character Convictions Conduct Character Heart Head Hands Heart
    95. 95. ENCOURAGINGEXPOSING EQUIPPING /EXHORTING Teaching Training Thinking Habits Example Obedience Theory Technique (Modeling) & Accountability Truth Skills Principles Practice Being Being Knowing Doing (Discipler) (disciple) Character Convictions Conduct Character Heart Head Hands Heart
    96. 96. ENCOURAGINGEXPOSING EQUIPPING /EXHORTING Teaching Training Thinking Habits Example Obedience Theory Technique (Modeling) & Accountability Truth Skills Principles Practice Being Being Knowing Doing (Discipler) (disciple) Character Convictions Conduct Character Heart Head Hands Heart
    97. 97. Exposing
    98. 98. ExposingExposure to tangible demonstrations of believing
    99. 99. ExposingExposure to tangible demonstrations of believing Inspiration from integrated:
    100. 100. ExposingExposure to tangible demonstrations of believing Inspiration from integrated: Words & Works
    101. 101. ExposingExposure to tangible demonstrations of believing Inspiration from integrated: Words & Works Lips & Life
    102. 102. ExposingExposure to tangible demonstrations of believing Inspiration from integrated: Words & Works Lips & Life Attitudes & Actions
    103. 103. ExposingExposure to tangible demonstrations of believing Inspiration from integrated: Words & Works Lips & Life Attitudes & ActionsTeaching through precept and example
    104. 104. Dangers of Exposure by Stagnating Disciplers
    105. 105. Dangers of Exposure by Stagnating DisciplersDescent from growth to maintenance
    106. 106. Dangers of Exposure by Stagnating DisciplersDescent from growth to maintenanceRegression in walk with Jesus
    107. 107. Dangers of Exposure by Stagnating DisciplersDescent from growth to maintenanceRegression in walk with Jesus Minister from borrowed capital of former vitality
    108. 108. Dangers of Exposure by Stagnating DisciplersDescent from growth to maintenanceRegression in walk with Jesus Minister from borrowed capital of former vitality Depend on knowledge/skill, not the Spirit
    109. 109. Dangers of Exposure by Stagnating DisciplersDescent from growth to maintenanceRegression in walk with Jesus Minister from borrowed capital of former vitality Depend on knowledge/skill, not the Spirit Authenticity and spiritual charisma erode
    110. 110. Dangers of Exposure by Stagnating DisciplersDescent from growth to maintenanceRegression in walk with Jesus Minister from borrowed capital of former vitality Depend on knowledge/skill, not the Spirit Authenticity and spiritual charisma erode Cannot encourage imitation
    111. 111. Equipping
    112. 112. EquippingEquipping purpose: How tolearn and apply the Wordin everyday life
    113. 113. EquippingEquipping purpose: How tolearn and apply the Wordin everyday lifeMost discipleship programsare limited to:
    114. 114. EquippingEquipping purpose: How tolearn and apply the Wordin everyday lifeMost discipleship programsare limited to: Knowledge (teaching)
    115. 115. EquippingEquipping purpose: How tolearn and apply the Wordin everyday lifeMost discipleship programsare limited to: Knowledge (teaching) Skills (training)
    116. 116. Teaching
    117. 117. TeachingRenews the mind
    118. 118. TeachingRenews the mindImparts a biblical worldview
    119. 119. TeachingRenews the mindImparts a biblical worldviewConform our thinking to Word, not world
    120. 120. TeachingRenews the mindImparts a biblical worldviewConform our thinking to Word, not worldNo permanent change without a perspectivechange
    121. 121. Perspective
    122. 122. Perspective Priorities
    123. 123. Perspective Priorities Practice
    124. 124. Reciprocal Relationships
    125. 125. Reciprocal RelationshipsThinking Habits
    126. 126. Reciprocal RelationshipsThinking HabitsAttitudes Actions
    127. 127. Reciprocal RelationshipsThinking HabitsAttitudes ActionsBelief Behavior
    128. 128. Reciprocal RelationshipsThinking HabitsAttitudes ActionsBelief Behavior
    129. 129. Reciprocal RelationshipsThinking HabitsAttitudes ActionsBelief BehaviorTheory
    130. 130. Reciprocal RelationshipsThinking HabitsAttitudes ActionsBelief BehaviorTheory Technique
    131. 131. Teaching Programs
    132. 132. Teaching ProgramsSalvation
    133. 133. Teaching ProgramsSalvationSpiritual growth
    134. 134. Teaching ProgramsSalvationSpiritual growthBible reading/study
    135. 135. Teaching ProgramsSalvationSpiritual growthBible reading/studyPrayer
    136. 136. Teaching ProgramsSalvationSpiritual growthBible reading/studyPrayerMarriage/Parenting
    137. 137. Teaching ProgramsSalvationSpiritual growthBible reading/studyPrayerMarriage/ParentingStewardship
    138. 138. Training
    139. 139. Training
    140. 140. Training Orthodoxy without orthopraxy
    141. 141. Training Orthodoxy without orthopraxy Teaching > truth
    142. 142. Training Orthodoxy without orthopraxy Teaching > truth Training > skills
    143. 143. Training Orthodoxy without orthopraxy Teaching > truth Training > skills Positive habit formation
    144. 144. Training Orthodoxy without orthopraxy Teaching > truth Training > skills Positive habit formation Life skills
    145. 145. Basic Training Topics
    146. 146. Basic Training Topics Bible study skills
    147. 147. Basic Training Topics Bible study skills Daily quiet time
    148. 148. Basic Training Topics Bible study skills Daily quiet time Methods of prayer
    149. 149. Basic Training Topics Bible study skills Daily quiet time Methods of prayer Methods of evangelism
    150. 150. Basic Training Topics Bible study skills Daily quiet time Methods of prayer Methods of evangelism Discerning God’s will
    151. 151. Basic Training Topics Bible study skills Daily quiet time Methods of prayer Methods of evangelism Discerning God’s will Leadership development
    152. 152. Encouraging & Exhorting
    153. 153. Encouraging & Exhorting A disciple must be receptive and responsive
    154. 154. Encouraging & Exhorting A disciple must be receptive and responsiveFAT
    155. 155. Encouraging & Exhorting A disciple must be receptive and responsiveF HA OT T
    156. 156. Encouraging & Exhorting A disciple must be receptive and responsiveFaithful HA OT T
    157. 157. Encouraging & Exhorting A disciple must be receptive and responsiveFaithful HA vailable OT T
    158. 158. Encouraging & Exhorting A disciple must be receptive and responsiveFaithful HA vailable OTeachable T
    159. 159. Encouraging & Exhorting A disciple must be receptive and responsiveFaithful HonestA vailable OTeachable T
    160. 160. Encouraging & Exhorting A disciple must be receptive and responsiveFaithful HonestA vailable OpenTeachable T
    161. 161. Encouraging & Exhorting A disciple must be receptive and responsiveFaithful HonestA vailable OpenTeachable Transparent
    162. 162. Encouraging & Exhorting
    163. 163. Encouraging & ExhortingProgressive obedience and accountability
    164. 164. Encouraging & ExhortingProgressive obedience and accountabilityTeaching and training are not ends in themselves
    165. 165. Encouraging & ExhortingProgressive obedience and accountabilityTeaching and training are not ends in themselves Goal is fostering radical commitment to Jesus
    166. 166. Encouraging & ExhortingProgressive obedience and accountabilityTeaching and training are not ends in themselves Goal is fostering radical commitment to Jesus Cost: personal dedication, self-denial, obedience
    167. 167. The Context of Discipleship
    168. 168. The Context of Discipleship Marriage
    169. 169. The Context of Discipleship Marriage Parenting
    170. 170. The Context of Discipleship Marriage Parenting Friendships
    171. 171. The Context of Discipleship Marriage Parenting Friendships Work
    172. 172. The Context of Discipleship Marriage Parenting Friendships Work Society
    173. 173. The Context of Discipleship
    174. 174. The Context of Discipleship Small-Group
    175. 175. The Context of Discipleship Small-Group One-on-One
    176. 176. The Context of Discipleship Small-Group One-on-One Relational component as central as content
    177. 177. The Context of Discipleship Small-Group One-on-One Relational component as central as content Vision: Maturity to reproduction
    178. 178. The Context of Discipleship Small-Group One-on-One Relational component as central as content Vision: Maturity to reproduction Team ministry
    179. 179. A Philosophy of Evangelism
    180. 180. The Process of Evangelism
    181. 181. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    182. 182. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    183. 183. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    184. 184. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    185. 185. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    186. 186. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    187. 187. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    188. 188. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    189. 189. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    190. 190. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    191. 191. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    192. 192. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    193. 193. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    194. 194. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    195. 195. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    196. 196. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    197. 197. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    198. 198. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    199. 199. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    200. 200. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus
    201. 201. The Process of Evangelism Sowing Reaping BringingPreparing Cultivating the the into the the soil the soil seed harvest barnClearing Irrigation Sowing Fertilization Reaping GatheringPlowing WeedAdversity Exposur Internalizing Submittin Growing in ControlSetbacks e to Word g to Community Word Jesus If we’re involved in any one of these five phases, we’re doing evangelism
    202. 202. Cultivating Requires More Time Than Reaping
    203. 203. Cultivating Requires More Time Than Reaping Rea ping Cult ivating
    204. 204. Cultivating Requires More Time Than Reaping Rea ping Reaping Cult ivating Cultivating
    205. 205. Friendship Evangelism Love Truth Actions Reasons Walk Talk Life LipsIncarnation Proclamation Intention Information
    206. 206. Friendship Evangelism Love Truth Actions Reasons Walk Talk Life LipsIncarnation Proclamation Intention Information
    207. 207. Friendship Evangelism Love Truth Actions Reasons Walk Talk Life LipsIncarnation Proclamation Intention Information
    208. 208. Friendship Evangelism Love Truth Actions Reasons Walk Talk Life LipsIncarnation Proclamation Intention Information
    209. 209. Friendship Evangelism Love Truth Actions Reasons Walk Talk Life LipsIncarnation Proclamation Intention Information
    210. 210. Friendship Evangelism Love Truth Actions Reasons Walk Talk Life LipsIncarnation Proclamation Intention Information
    211. 211. Friendship Evangelism Love Truth Actions Reasons Walk Talk Life LipsIncarnation Proclamation Intention Information
    212. 212. Friendship Evangelism Love Truth Actions Reasons Walk Talk Life LipsIncarnation Proclamation Intention Information EXTREMES
    213. 213. Friendship Evangelism Love Truth Actions Reasons Walk Talk Life Lips Incarnation Proclamation Intention InformationAll Friendship/No Evangelism EXTREMES
    214. 214. Friendship Evangelism Love Truth Actions Reasons Walk Talk Life Lips Incarnation Proclamation Intention InformationAll Friendship/ No Friendship/No Evangelism All Evangelism EXTREMES
    215. 215. A Biblical Philosophy of Evangelism
    216. 216. A Biblical Philosophy of Evangelism Evangelism is a process
    217. 217. A Biblical Philosophy of Evangelism Evangelism is a process The results belong to God
    218. 218. A Biblical Philosophy of Evangelism Evangelism is a process The results belong to God Cultivating requires more time than reaping
    219. 219. A Biblical Philosophy of Evangelism Evangelism is a process The results belong to God Cultivating requires more time than reaping Evangelism largely relates to the Church scattered
    220. 220. A Biblical Philosophy of Evangelism
    221. 221. A Biblical Philosophy of Evangelism Evangelism is an eternal investment
    222. 222. A Biblical Philosophy of Evangelism Evangelism is an eternal investment We can evangelize for the wrong reasons
    223. 223. A Biblical Philosophy of Evangelism Evangelism is an eternal investment We can evangelize for the wrong reasons Evangelism involves words and deeds
    224. 224. A Biblical Philosophy of Evangelism Evangelism is an eternal investment We can evangelize for the wrong reasons Evangelism involves words and deeds Evangelism and discipleship should be integrated
    225. 225. Overcoming the Barriers to Evangelism
    226. 226. Barriers for Believers
    227. 227. Barriers for Believers The Barrier of Method
    228. 228. Barriers for Believers The Barrier of Method The Barrier of Fear
    229. 229. Barriers for Believers The Barrier of Method The Barrier of Fear The Barrier of Inadequacy
    230. 230. Barriers for Believers
    231. 231. Barriers for BelieversThe Barrier of Indifference
    232. 232. Barriers for BelieversThe Barrier of IndifferenceThe Barrier of Time
    233. 233. Barriers for BelieversThe Barrier of IndifferenceThe Barrier of TimeThe Barrier of Isolation
    234. 234. Barriers for Unbelievers
    235. 235. Barriers for Unbelievers The Emotional Barrier
    236. 236. Barriers for Unbelievers The Emotional Barrier The Intellectual Barrier
    237. 237. Barriers for Unbelievers The Emotional Barrier The Intellectual Barrier The Volitional Barrier
    238. 238. Barriers to Evangelism
    239. 239. Barriers to EvangelismBeliever
    240. 240. Barriers to EvangelismBeliever Unbeliever
    241. 241. Barriers to EvangelismBeliever Unbeliever
    242. 242. Barriers to Evangelism F E A RBeliever Unbeliever
    243. 243. Barriers to Evangelism M E F T E H A O R DBeliever Unbeliever
    244. 244. Barriers to Evangelism I N M A D E E F T Q E H U A A O C R D YBeliever Unbeliever
    245. 245. Barriers to Evangelism I N M A D E E F T T Q E U I H A A M O C R E D YBeliever Unbeliever
    246. 246. Barriers to Evangelism I N I D N I M A F D E E F F T E T Q R E U I H E A A M N O C R E C D Y EBeliever Unbeliever
    247. 247. Barriers to Evangelism I N I I D N S I M A O F D L E E F A F T E T Q R T E U I I H E A A M N O O C N R E C D Y EBeliever Unbeliever
    248. 248. Barriers to Evangelism I N I I D N S E I A M M F O D L O E E F A T F T E T Q R T I E U I I O H E A A M N O N O C N A R E C D Y E LBeliever Unbeliever
    249. 249. Barriers to Evangelism I I N N I I D T N S E I E A M M F O L D L O E E F A T L F T E E T Q R T I C E U I I O H E T A A M N O N U O C N A R E C A D Y E L LBeliever Unbeliever
    250. 250. Barriers to Evangelism I I N N I I V D T N S E O I E A M L M F O L D L O I E E F A T L T F T E E T Q R T I C I E U I I O O H E T A A M N O N U N O C N A A R E C A D Y E L L LBeliever Unbeliever
    251. 251. The Context of Evangelism
    252. 252. The Context of EvangelismPeople are not projects
    253. 253. The Context of EvangelismPeople are not projectsYou cannot manipulate people and serve themat the same time
    254. 254. The Context of EvangelismPeople are not projectsYou cannot manipulate people and serve themat the same timeAvoid clichés and theological jargon
    255. 255. The Context of EvangelismPeople are not projectsYou cannot manipulate people and serve themat the same timeAvoid clichés and theological jargonDon’t be pushy or argumentative
    256. 256. The Context of EvangelismPeople are not projectsYou cannot manipulate people and serve themat the same timeAvoid clichés and theological jargonDon’t be pushy or argumentativeTreat outsiders with gentleness and reverence
    257. 257. Balancing Words & Works
    258. 258. Balancing Words & Works
    259. 259. Balancing Words & Works WALK WISELY TALK GRACIOUSLY Colossians 4:5 Colossians 4:6 Let your speech always be withConduct yourselves with wisdom grace, as though seasoned with salt, toward outsiders, making the so that you will know how you should most of the opportunity. respond to each person. Relational Evangelism
    260. 260. Balancing Words & Works WALK WISELY TALK GRACIOUSLY Colossians 4:5 Colossians 4:6 Let your speech always be withConduct yourselves with wisdom grace, as though seasoned with salt, toward outsiders, making the so that you will know how you should most of the opportunity. respond to each person. Relational Evangelism
    261. 261. Extremes
    262. 262. ExtremesAll TalkNo Walk
    263. 263. ExtremesAll TalkNo Walk No Talk All Walk
    264. 264. Extremes All Talk No Walk No Talk All WalkEvangelism withoutFriendship
    265. 265. Extremes All Talk No Walk No Talk All WalkEvangelism Friendship without withoutFriendship Evangelism
    266. 266. Our Relational Networks
    267. 267. Our Relational Networks Family Our biological network Friends Our social network Co-workers Our vocational network Our geographical Neighbors network
    268. 268. Our Relational Networks Family Our biological network Friends Our social network Co-workers Our vocational network Our geographical Neighbors network
    269. 269. Our Relational Networks Family Our biological network Friends Our social network Co-workers Our vocational network Our geographical Neighbors network
    270. 270. Our Relational Networks Family Our biological network Friends Our social network Co-workers Our vocational network Our geographical Neighbors network
    271. 271. “Be fishers of men” Mt. 4:19
    272. 272. The End
    273. 273. Reflections Ministries
    274. 274. Reflections MinistriesReflections - A free monthly teaching letter
    275. 275. Reflections MinistriesReflections - A free monthly teaching letterReflectionsMinistries.org website - Daily Growthemail and free text and audio resources
    276. 276. KENBOA.ORG KenBoa.org ken_boa Kenneth Boa

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