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Isn't Christianity Just A Psychological Crutch?
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Isn't Christianity Just A Psychological Crutch?

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  • Often-Asked Questions:\nCan you actually prove that God exists?\nSince God's existence cannot be proved, isn't agnosticism the most reasonable position?\nHasn yt science demonstrated that the idea of a God is unnecessary?\nWhy postulate a God when evolution explains the origin of life and man?\n\n
  • Isn ft Christianity, like all religions, just a crutch for\nemotionally weak people? Don't people just create God in order to cope with the\nfuture? Why should it matter what you believe as long as you\nhave a sincere faith? If you were raised to believe in God, can you ever deny\nthat preconditioning? What if I don't need religion?\n\n
  • Isn ft Christianity, like all religions, just a crutch for\nemotionally weak people? Don't people just create God in order to cope with the\nfuture? Why should it matter what you believe as long as you\nhave a sincere faith? If you were raised to believe in God, can you ever deny\nthat preconditioning? What if I don't need religion?\n\n
  • Isn ft Christianity, like all religions, just a crutch for\nemotionally weak people? Don't people just create God in order to cope with the\nfuture? Why should it matter what you believe as long as you\nhave a sincere faith? If you were raised to believe in God, can you ever deny\nthat preconditioning? What if I don't need religion?\n\n
  • Isn ft Christianity, like all religions, just a crutch for\nemotionally weak people? Don't people just create God in order to cope with the\nfuture? Why should it matter what you believe as long as you\nhave a sincere faith? If you were raised to believe in God, can you ever deny\nthat preconditioning? What if I don't need religion?\n\n
  • Isn ft Christianity, like all religions, just a crutch for\nemotionally weak people? Don't people just create God in order to cope with the\nfuture? Why should it matter what you believe as long as you\nhave a sincere faith? If you were raised to believe in God, can you ever deny\nthat preconditioning? What if I don't need religion?\n\n
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  • To answer this question, we must first understand the definition of the word psychological. It has been defined in the dictionary as "existing in the mind," or "reality as it is perceived." If an experience is merely psychological, then it must be totally subjective, without any objective data to substantiate a conclusion.\n\n\n
  • To answer this question, we must first understand the definition of the word psychological. It has been defined in the dictionary as "existing in the mind," or "reality as it is perceived." If an experience is merely psychological, then it must be totally subjective, without any objective data to substantiate a conclusion.\n\n\n
  • Either Christianity is a subjective experience that has no objective reality, or it is an experience that has an objective basis (see Chart 18). \n\n\n
  • Either Christianity is a subjective experience that has no objective reality, or it is an experience that has an objective basis (see Chart 18). \n\n\n
  • Before examining these two options, we should make it clear that a position is not rendered false just because it is completely subjective. This just removes it from the sphere of investigation. If Christianity can be relegated to the state of total subjectivity, we will be hard pressed to prove the validity of our claims. Remember, though, that many critics have found the corner of subjectivity a comfortable one into which they can sweep opposing views when faced with an uncomfortable decision.\n\n\n
  • Before examining these two options, we should make it clear that a position is not rendered false just because it is completely subjective. This just removes it from the sphere of investigation. If Christianity can be relegated to the state of total subjectivity, we will be hard pressed to prove the validity of our claims. Remember, though, that many critics have found the corner of subjectivity a comfortable one into which they can sweep opposing views when faced with an uncomfortable decision.\n\n\n
  • Before examining these two options, we should make it clear that a position is not rendered false just because it is completely subjective. This just removes it from the sphere of investigation. If Christianity can be relegated to the state of total subjectivity, we will be hard pressed to prove the validity of our claims. Remember, though, that many critics have found the corner of subjectivity a comfortable one into which they can sweep opposing views when faced with an uncomfortable decision.\n\n\n
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  • The major skeptics of religion, such as Sartre, Russell, Marx, and Freud, have portrayed religion as something for the emotionally weak, for those who can't cope with the future on their own. Marx saw the problem as economic; religion is the carrot on a stick used by the upper classes to keep the lower classes from revolting. The masses were kept in tow with the promise of a better existence in the next life if they persevered now. \n\nFreud and others related religion to the fear that comes from contending with natural forces. According to Freud, man invented God to help him deal with the dangers and unknowns of life. Now that man is more sophisticated and less superstitious, there is little need for God.\n\n
  • The major skeptics of religion, such as Sartre, Russell, Marx, and Freud, have portrayed religion as something for the emotionally weak, for those who can't cope with the future on their own. Marx saw the problem as economic; religion is the carrot on a stick used by the upper classes to keep the lower classes from revolting. The masses were kept in tow with the promise of a better existence in the next life if they persevered now. \n\nFreud and others related religion to the fear that comes from contending with natural forces. According to Freud, man invented God to help him deal with the dangers and unknowns of life. Now that man is more sophisticated and less superstitious, there is little need for God.\n\n
  • The major skeptics of religion, such as Sartre, Russell, Marx, and Freud, have portrayed religion as something for the emotionally weak, for those who can't cope with the future on their own. Marx saw the problem as economic; religion is the carrot on a stick used by the upper classes to keep the lower classes from revolting. The masses were kept in tow with the promise of a better existence in the next life if they persevered now. \n\nFreud and others related religion to the fear that comes from contending with natural forces. According to Freud, man invented God to help him deal with the dangers and unknowns of life. Now that man is more sophisticated and less superstitious, there is little need for God.\n\n
  • We agree that religion can be a crutch. Some highly emotional and weak people seek religion because they are too insecure to face the future on their own. They invent their own gods to assist them through life's burdens and woes. Christianity is often caricatured by the media as an escape mechanism for emotionally needy people. But the fact that religion can be a crutch doesn't actually mean that it always is.\n\n
  • We agree that religion can be a crutch. Some highly emotional and weak people seek religion because they are too insecure to face the future on their own. They invent their own gods to assist them through life's burdens and woes. Christianity is often caricatured by the media as an escape mechanism for emotionally needy people. But the fact that religion can be a crutch doesn't actually mean that it always is.\n\n
  • We agree that religion can be a crutch. Some highly emotional and weak people seek religion because they are too insecure to face the future on their own. They invent their own gods to assist them through life's burdens and woes. Christianity is often caricatured by the media as an escape mechanism for emotionally needy people. But the fact that religion can be a crutch doesn't actually mean that it always is.\n\n
  • We agree that religion can be a crutch. Some highly emotional and weak people seek religion because they are too insecure to face the future on their own. They invent their own gods to assist them through life's burdens and woes. Christianity is often caricatured by the media as an escape mechanism for emotionally needy people. But the fact that religion can be a crutch doesn't actually mean that it always is.\n\n
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  • Let us now examine some psychological objections to Christianity. The first objection is preconditioning. Some try to invalidate the Christian's claim to be objective by stating that Christians were preconditioned to believe in Christ by their family and culture. They make two false assumptions:\n\n(1) All Christians were raised in a Christian environment. On the contrary, a survey of Christians would indicate many came to Christianity out of religiously hostile or neutral environments.\n\n
  • Let us now examine some psychological objections to Christianity. The first objection is preconditioning. Some try to invalidate the Christian's claim to be objective by stating that Christians were preconditioned to believe in Christ by their family and culture. They make two false assumptions:\n\n(1) All Christians were raised in a Christian environment. On the contrary, a survey of Christians would indicate many came to Christianity out of religiously hostile or neutral environments.\n\n
  • Let us now examine some psychological objections to Christianity. The first objection is preconditioning. Some try to invalidate the Christian's claim to be objective by stating that Christians were preconditioned to believe in Christ by their family and culture. They make two false assumptions:\n\n(1) All Christians were raised in a Christian environment. On the contrary, a survey of Christians would indicate many came to Christianity out of religiously hostile or neutral environments.\n\n
  • Let us now examine some psychological objections to Christianity. The first objection is preconditioning. Some try to invalidate the Christian's claim to be objective by stating that Christians were preconditioned to believe in Christ by their family and culture. They make two false assumptions:\n\n(1) All Christians were raised in a Christian environment. On the contrary, a survey of Christians would indicate many came to Christianity out of religiously hostile or neutral environments.\n\n
  • (2) If a person is preconditioned, his position is not valid. But preconditioning does not make a position true or false. The question to be asked is, "Does my preconditioning have any objective reality?" \n\n
  • (2) If a person is preconditioned, his position is not valid. But preconditioning does not make a position true or false. The question to be asked is, "Does my preconditioning have any objective reality?" \n\n
  • (2) If a person is preconditioned, his position is not valid. But preconditioning does not make a position true or false. The question to be asked is, "Does my preconditioning have any objective reality?" \n\n
  • (2) If a person is preconditioned, his position is not valid. But preconditioning does not make a position true or false. The question to be asked is, "Does my preconditioning have any objective reality?" \n\n
  • Most people in America were preconditioned to believe in Santa Claus when they were young. As they matured, they understood that Santa Claus was really their parents. Their preconditioning was false because the object was false. But most people were also preconditioned when they were young to believe that fire is extremely hot, and as they matured, their experience confirmed their preconditioning. Don't allow a person to fall into the trap of rejecting Christianity just because he was preconditioned to believe it as a child. Preconditioning does not validate or invalidate a position. An investigation of the validity of Christianity's claims should lead to a search for some kind of objective basis.\n
  • Most people in America were preconditioned to believe in Santa Claus when they were young. As they matured, they understood that Santa Claus was really their parents. Their preconditioning was false because the object was false. But most people were also preconditioned when they were young to believe that fire is extremely hot, and as they matured, their experience confirmed their preconditioning. Don't allow a person to fall into the trap of rejecting Christianity just because he was preconditioned to believe it as a child. Preconditioning does not validate or invalidate a position. An investigation of the validity of Christianity's claims should lead to a search for some kind of objective basis.\n
  • Critics may attack Christianity's claim to be objective by raising a second objection: belief and emotions do not determine truth They assume that Christians declare Christianity to be true on the basis of their own beliefs and emotions. But this assumption is false. Christianity is true because of Christ and who He is, and not because Christians have beliefs or emotions. One's belief in something does not make it true and, conversely, one's lack of belief does not make something false.\n\n
  • Critics may attack Christianity's claim to be objective by raising a second objection: belief and emotions do not determine truth They assume that Christians declare Christianity to be true on the basis of their own beliefs and emotions. But this assumption is false. Christianity is true because of Christ and who He is, and not because Christians have beliefs or emotions. One's belief in something does not make it true and, conversely, one's lack of belief does not make something false.\n\n
  • Critics may attack Christianity's claim to be objective by raising a second objection: belief and emotions do not determine truth They assume that Christians declare Christianity to be true on the basis of their own beliefs and emotions. But this assumption is false. Christianity is true because of Christ and who He is, and not because Christians have beliefs or emotions. One's belief in something does not make it true and, conversely, one's lack of belief does not make something false.\n\n
  • For example, suppose someone decides to believe that every time she throws a ball up it will come down. Does it come down because she believes it will? No, it comes down because of gravity and not because of her belief. \nSuppose another person no longer believed that the law of gravity existed. Would we encourage that person to leap from the tallest building in town? Obviously not, for he would plummet to earth. The law of gravity is valid on the basis of its objective criteria, and not on the basis of one's belief or lack of belief.\n\n
  • Or, take the case of a patient with a deadly bacterial infection. When this patient gets a dose of morphine, the symptoms of her disease are erased because of the numbing effects of the drug. The patient believes she is cured. But believing she is cured and being cured are two different things. Now suppose the patient receives penicillin instead of morphine. She still has her pain while being cured and thus believes that the medicine is having no effect. But her lack of belief does not alter the reality of her cure. We must remember that one's belief is only as valid as the object in which it is placed. The Christian does not attempt to validate Christianity on the basis of his subjective beliefs and emotions. Instead, he turns to the objective data regarding Christ.\n\n\n
  • The third objection raised to demonstrate that Christianity is subjective rather than objective is that experience does not determine truth. The assumption here is that Christians have sought to prove the truth of Christianity on the basis of their experience. This is also false. Experience or lack of it can lead a person to a conclusion, but it remains a subjective conclusion and therefore removed from the sphere of investigation. An individual's personal experience can verify truth but it doesn't prove it.\n\n
  • The third objection raised to demonstrate that Christianity is subjective rather than objective is that experience does not determine truth. The assumption here is that Christians have sought to prove the truth of Christianity on the basis of their experience. This is also false. Experience or lack of it can lead a person to a conclusion, but it remains a subjective conclusion and therefore removed from the sphere of investigation. An individual's personal experience can verify truth but it doesn't prove it.\n\n
  • The third objection raised to demonstrate that Christianity is subjective rather than objective is that experience does not determine truth. The assumption here is that Christians have sought to prove the truth of Christianity on the basis of their experience. This is also false. Experience or lack of it can lead a person to a conclusion, but it remains a subjective conclusion and therefore removed from the sphere of investigation. An individual's personal experience can verify truth but it doesn't prove it.\n\n
  • An I.Q. test will affirm that a genius is a genius, but the experience of taking the test did not make him a genius. He was a genius and the test confirmed it. A blind man may never have seen a sunset, but he should not conclude from this that sunsets don't exist.\nFrom these objections we can conclude first that the Christian viewpoint cannot be dismissed on the basis of preconditioning. The real question should be, "Is there any objective reality to one's preconditioning?" Second, a belief or an experience does not prove a position, nor does a lack of belief or experience disprove a position. Again, the real question is whether there is any objective reality to one's belief or experience. If not, then the Christian position might be a psychological crutch.\n\n
  • An I.Q. test will affirm that a genius is a genius, but the experience of taking the test did not make him a genius. He was a genius and the test confirmed it. A blind man may never have seen a sunset, but he should not conclude from this that sunsets don't exist.\nFrom these objections we can conclude first that the Christian viewpoint cannot be dismissed on the basis of preconditioning. The real question should be, "Is there any objective reality to one's preconditioning?" Second, a belief or an experience does not prove a position, nor does a lack of belief or experience disprove a position. Again, the real question is whether there is any objective reality to one's belief or experience. If not, then the Christian position might be a psychological crutch.\n\n
  • An I.Q. test will affirm that a genius is a genius, but the experience of taking the test did not make him a genius. He was a genius and the test confirmed it. A blind man may never have seen a sunset, but he should not conclude from this that sunsets don't exist.\nFrom these objections we can conclude first that the Christian viewpoint cannot be dismissed on the basis of preconditioning. The real question should be, "Is there any objective reality to one's preconditioning?" Second, a belief or an experience does not prove a position, nor does a lack of belief or experience disprove a position. Again, the real question is whether there is any objective reality to one's belief or experience. If not, then the Christian position might be a psychological crutch.\n\n
  • An I.Q. test will affirm that a genius is a genius, but the experience of taking the test did not make him a genius. He was a genius and the test confirmed it. A blind man may never have seen a sunset, but he should not conclude from this that sunsets don't exist.\nFrom these objections we can conclude first that the Christian viewpoint cannot be dismissed on the basis of preconditioning. The real question should be, "Is there any objective reality to one's preconditioning?" Second, a belief or an experience does not prove a position, nor does a lack of belief or experience disprove a position. Again, the real question is whether there is any objective reality to one's belief or experience. If not, then the Christian position might be a psychological crutch.\n\n
  • It seems that on many occasions it would suit man's fancy not to have to answer to an almighty God. If there is no God, the consequences of one's actions can be minimized. Could it be that the atheist eliminates God so that his own fear of having to face such a Being can be reduced? The very character of God is disturbing to men in rebellion against Him. He is holy, unchanging, all-powerful, and all-knowing. Ability to dismiss the concept of this kind of God would alleviate a great deal of guilt in the hearts of men.\n\n
  • It seems that on many occasions it would suit man's fancy not to have to answer to an almighty God. If there is no God, the consequences of one's actions can be minimized. Could it be that the atheist eliminates God so that his own fear of having to face such a Being can be reduced? The very character of God is disturbing to men in rebellion against Him. He is holy, unchanging, all-powerful, and all-knowing. Ability to dismiss the concept of this kind of God would alleviate a great deal of guilt in the hearts of men.\n\n
  • It seems that on many occasions it would suit man's fancy not to have to answer to an almighty God. If there is no God, the consequences of one's actions can be minimized. Could it be that the atheist eliminates God so that his own fear of having to face such a Being can be reduced? The very character of God is disturbing to men in rebellion against Him. He is holy, unchanging, all-powerful, and all-knowing. Ability to dismiss the concept of this kind of God would alleviate a great deal of guilt in the hearts of men.\n\n
  • It seems that on many occasions it would suit man's fancy not to have to answer to an almighty God. If there is no God, the consequences of one's actions can be minimized. Could it be that the atheist eliminates God so that his own fear of having to face such a Being can be reduced? The very character of God is disturbing to men in rebellion against Him. He is holy, unchanging, all-powerful, and all-knowing. Ability to dismiss the concept of this kind of God would alleviate a great deal of guilt in the hearts of men.\n\n
  • It seems that on many occasions it would suit man's fancy not to have to answer to an almighty God. If there is no God, the consequences of one's actions can be minimized. Could it be that the atheist eliminates God so that his own fear of having to face such a Being can be reduced? The very character of God is disturbing to men in rebellion against Him. He is holy, unchanging, all-powerful, and all-knowing. Ability to dismiss the concept of this kind of God would alleviate a great deal of guilt in the hearts of men.\n\n
  • Everyone needs meaning in life. That is why every society has religious manifestations. Seeking meaning (basic questions about life) is not a sign of weakness. It is not a matter of if we seek meaning; only a matter of how. Someone once said it does not matter what we believe as long as we believe in something. But faith is only as good as the object in which it is placed.\n\n
  • Everyone needs meaning in life. That is why every society has religious manifestations. Seeking meaning (basic questions about life) is not a sign of weakness. It is not a matter of if we seek meaning; only a matter of how. Someone once said it does not matter what we believe as long as we believe in something. But faith is only as good as the object in which it is placed.\n\n
  • Take, for example, the story of two men hiking in Colorado in January. When dusk came upon them quickly, their only hope for getting back to the lodge before dark was to cut across the lake. One of the men was afraid the ice would not support him and hesitated. His friend reminded him that it was the middle of January, the ice had to be at least six feet thick, and they had no reason to worry. The frightened man had little faith and so he inched his way back to the lodge. The ice supported him; his faith was small but its object was strong. Later that year the two men were again hiking and dusk came upon them suddenly. The once fearful man now suggested they cut across the lake. The first man, however, told his now brave friend that it was late May and the ice was no thicker than a quarter of an inch. But he could not be dissuaded, for his faith was great. So he ventured a few feet from shore and crashed through the ice. His faith was much stronger the second time, but the object of his faith far less sound. Our faith is only as good as its object.\n\n
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  • While probing for an objective reality, we must decide how much and what kind of proof we will need. Here we must return to chapter 3 and review the section dealing with proof.\nIn our quest for legal and historical proof, we turn to the object of Christianity and examine the person and work of Christ. The most critical historical event in this connection is the Resurrection. The Resurrection is the jugular vein of Christianity —if it is true, so is Christianity.\n\n
  • While probing for an objective reality, we must decide how much and what kind of proof we will need. Here we must return to chapter 3 and review the section dealing with proof.\nIn our quest for legal and historical proof, we turn to the object of Christianity and examine the person and work of Christ. The most critical historical event in this connection is the Resurrection. The Resurrection is the jugular vein of Christianity —if it is true, so is Christianity.\n\n
  • While probing for an objective reality, we must decide how much and what kind of proof we will need. Here we must return to chapter 3 and review the section dealing with proof.\nIn our quest for legal and historical proof, we turn to the object of Christianity and examine the person and work of Christ. The most critical historical event in this connection is the Resurrection. The Resurrection is the jugular vein of Christianity —if it is true, so is Christianity.\n\n
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  • The declaration made by Christ in John 14:6, "I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no one comes to the Father but through Me," exposed the need of every man, woman, and child. If Christianity is true, we all have a real need for Christ, even though we may not feel a need. A person may have a rare disease and be in need of medical attention, even though he doesn't feel a need for it. Children have a real need for nutritional, well-balanced meals, but they may not feel they have a need.\n\n
  • The declaration made by Christ in John 14:6, "I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no one comes to the Father but through Me," exposed the need of every man, woman, and child. If Christianity is true, we all have a real need for Christ, even though we may not feel a need. A person may have a rare disease and be in need of medical attention, even though he doesn't feel a need for it. Children have a real need for nutritional, well-balanced meals, but they may not feel they have a need.\n\n
  • Earlier, we said that a crutch assumes a problem or need and the supply of aid or assistance. We have already seen man's need and problem — sin which resulted in death and separation from God (Rom. 3:23; 6:23). But Christ doesn't offer a crutch; He gives us a cure. He substituted His life for ours so that we would not have to pay the penalty (Mark 10:45). This substitution was a full payment, a complete restoration. A person on a crutch is hindered and hobbles along with an artificial aid. Christians are not given a crutch for minimal assistance but are given a complete cure which provides maximal abundance.\n\n\n
  • Earlier, we said that a crutch assumes a problem or need and the supply of aid or assistance. We have already seen man's need and problem — sin which resulted in death and separation from God (Rom. 3:23; 6:23). But Christ doesn't offer a crutch; He gives us a cure. He substituted His life for ours so that we would not have to pay the penalty (Mark 10:45). This substitution was a full payment, a complete restoration. A person on a crutch is hindered and hobbles along with an artificial aid. Christians are not given a crutch for minimal assistance but are given a complete cure which provides maximal abundance.\n\n\n
  • Earlier, we said that a crutch assumes a problem or need and the supply of aid or assistance. We have already seen man's need and problem — sin which resulted in death and separation from God (Rom. 3:23; 6:23). But Christ doesn't offer a crutch; He gives us a cure. He substituted His life for ours so that we would not have to pay the penalty (Mark 10:45). This substitution was a full payment, a complete restoration. A person on a crutch is hindered and hobbles along with an artificial aid. Christians are not given a crutch for minimal assistance but are given a complete cure which provides maximal abundance.\n\n\n
  • Christians should not claim that Christianity is true because they experienced it; rather, they should say that Christianity is true and their experience confirms it. Experience plays a supportive role in substantiating the validity of Christianity. Imagine rising before dawn for a week. You stand on your back porch with a compass in hand and wait for the sun. Each morning as it rises, you position your compass and see that the sun rises in the east. Now, your getting up each morning with a compass didn't cause the sun to come up in the east. The truth is that the sun comes up in the east each morning, and your experience with the compass verified that truth.\n\n
  • Christians should not claim that Christianity is true because they experienced it; rather, they should say that Christianity is true and their experience confirms it. Experience plays a supportive role in substantiating the validity of Christianity. Imagine rising before dawn for a week. You stand on your back porch with a compass in hand and wait for the sun. Each morning as it rises, you position your compass and see that the sun rises in the east. Now, your getting up each morning with a compass didn't cause the sun to come up in the east. The truth is that the sun comes up in the east each morning, and your experience with the compass verified that truth.\n\n
  • Christians should not claim that Christianity is true because they experienced it; rather, they should say that Christianity is true and their experience confirms it. Experience plays a supportive role in substantiating the validity of Christianity. Imagine rising before dawn for a week. You stand on your back porch with a compass in hand and wait for the sun. Each morning as it rises, you position your compass and see that the sun rises in the east. Now, your getting up each morning with a compass didn't cause the sun to come up in the east. The truth is that the sun comes up in the east each morning, and your experience with the compass verified that truth.\n\n
  • We laid out a detailed analysis of the proofs for the Resurrection and concluded that Christianity was based on a solid foundation of objectivity rather than a shifting foundation of subjectivity. Christianity is not rejected because it has been examined and found wanting for objective truth; it is often rejected because it hasn't been examined at all.\nIf you are talking to an unbeliever, this is an appropriate time to focus on an explanation of the Gospel. Christ is the answer to man's problems, and we have objective verification as to His worthiness.\n
  • We laid out a detailed analysis of the proofs for the Resurrection and concluded that Christianity was based on a solid foundation of objectivity rather than a shifting foundation of subjectivity. Christianity is not rejected because it has been examined and found wanting for objective truth; it is often rejected because it hasn't been examined at all.\nIf you are talking to an unbeliever, this is an appropriate time to focus on an explanation of the Gospel. Christ is the answer to man's problems, and we have objective verification as to His worthiness.\n
  • We laid out a detailed analysis of the proofs for the Resurrection and concluded that Christianity was based on a solid foundation of objectivity rather than a shifting foundation of subjectivity. Christianity is not rejected because it has been examined and found wanting for objective truth; it is often rejected because it hasn't been examined at all.\nIf you are talking to an unbeliever, this is an appropriate time to focus on an explanation of the Gospel. Christ is the answer to man's problems, and we have objective verification as to His worthiness.\n
  • We laid out a detailed analysis of the proofs for the Resurrection and concluded that Christianity was based on a solid foundation of objectivity rather than a shifting foundation of subjectivity. Christianity is not rejected because it has been examined and found wanting for objective truth; it is often rejected because it hasn't been examined at all.\nIf you are talking to an unbeliever, this is an appropriate time to focus on an explanation of the Gospel. Christ is the answer to man's problems, and we have objective verification as to His worthiness.\n
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Isn't Christianity Just A Psychological Crutch? Isn't Christianity Just A Psychological Crutch? Presentation Transcript

  • Isn’t Christianity Just aPsychological Crutch? © Dr. Ken Boa and Bill Ibsen 2007. All Rights Reserved. 1
  • Isn’t Christianity Just aPsychological Crutch? 2
  • Isn’t Christianity Just aPsychological Crutch? Isn’t Christianity, like all religions, just a crutch for emotionally weak people? 2 View slide
  • Isn’t Christianity Just aPsychological Crutch? Isn’t Christianity, like all religions, just a crutch for emotionally weak people? Dont people just create God in order to cope with the future? 2 View slide
  • Isn’t Christianity Just aPsychological Crutch? Isn’t Christianity, like all religions, just a crutch for emotionally weak people? Dont people just create God in order to cope with the future? Why should it matter what you believe as long as you have a sincere faith? 2
  • Isn’t Christianity Just aPsychological Crutch? Isn’t Christianity, like all religions, just a crutch for emotionally weak people? Dont people just create God in order to cope with the future? Why should it matter what you believe as long as you have a sincere faith? If you were raised to believe in God, can you ever deny that preconditioning? 2
  • Isn’t Christianity Just aPsychological Crutch? Isn’t Christianity, like all religions, just a crutch for emotionally weak people? Dont people just create God in order to cope with the future? Why should it matter what you believe as long as you have a sincere faith? If you were raised to believe in God, can you ever deny that preconditioning? What if I dont need religion? 2
  • Isn’t Christianity Just aPsychological Crutch? 3
  • Isn’t Christianity Just aPsychological Crutch? Option I: Christianity is Subjective 3
  • Isn’t Christianity Just aPsychological Crutch? Option I: Christianity is Subjective Option II: Christianity is Objective 3
  • Psychological: 4
  • Psychological: "existing in the mind" "reality as it is perceived" 4
  • Psychological: "existing in the mind" "reality as it is perceived"Totally subjective, without any objective data to substantiate a conclusion 4
  • Two Options Isn’t Christianity Just a Psychological Crutch? 5
  • Two Options Isn’t Christianity Just a Psychological Crutch? Christianity is Subjective 5
  • Two Options Isn’t Christianity Just a Psychological Crutch? Christianity is Christianity is Subjective Objective 5
  • A Little Logic ObjectiveSubjective 6
  • A Little Logic Objective A position is not rendered false just because it is completely subjectiveSubjective 6
  • A Little Logic Objective A position is not rendered false just because it is completely subjective This just removes it from the sphere of investigationSubjective 6
  • A Little Logic Objective A position is not rendered false just because it is completely subjective This just removes it from the sphere of investigation Difficult to prove the validity of subjective claimsSubjective 6
  • Option I:Christianity is Subjective 7
  • Crutch- A Negative Connotation 8
  • Crutch- A Negative Connotation Assumes the presence of a problem or need 8
  • Crutch- A Negative Connotation Assumes the presence of a problem or need Assumes the supply of aid or assistance 8
  • Major Skeptics of Religion Jean-Paul Sartre 9
  • Major Skeptics of Religion Karl Marx 9
  • Major Skeptics of Religion Bertrand Russell 9
  • Major Skeptics of Religion Sigmund Freud 9
  • Religion Can be a Crutch 10
  • Religion Can be a Crutch Highly emotional and weak people 10
  • Religion Can be a Crutch Highly emotional and weak people Invent their own gods to assist them through lifes burdens and woes 10
  • Religion Can be a Crutch Highly emotional and weak people Invent their own gods to assist them through lifes burdens and woes Christianity is often portrayed this way 10
  • Religion Can be a Crutch Highly emotional and weak people Invent their own gods to assist them through lifes burdens and woes Christianity is often portrayed this way Though religion can be a crutch doesnt actually mean that it always is 10
  • Psychological Objections toChristianity 11
  • Psychological Objections toChristianity Preconditioning 11
  • Psychological Objections toChristianity Preconditioning Belief and emotions determine truth 11
  • Psychological Objections toChristianity Preconditioning Belief and emotions determine truth Experience determines truth 11
  • Psychological Objection #1:Preconditioning 12
  • Psychological Objection #1:Preconditioning Christians were preconditioned to believe in Christ by their family and culture 12
  • Psychological Objection #1:Preconditioning Christians were preconditioned to believe in Christ by their family and culture False Assumption #1: 12
  • Psychological Objection #1:Preconditioning Christians were preconditioned to believe in Christ by their family and culture False Assumption #1: All Christians were raised in a Christian environment 12
  • Psychological Objection #1:Preconditioning Christians were preconditioned to believe in Christ by their family and culture False Assumption #1: All Christians were raised in a Christian environment Many came to Christianity out of religiously hostile or neutral environments. 12
  • Psychological Objection #1:Preconditioning 13
  • Psychological Objection #1:Preconditioning False Assumption #2: 13
  • Psychological Objection #1:Preconditioning False Assumption #2: If a person is preconditioned, his position is not valid 13
  • Psychological Objection #1:Preconditioning False Assumption #2: If a person is preconditioned, his position is not valid Preconditioning does not make a position true or false 13
  • Psychological Objection #1:Preconditioning False Assumption #2: If a person is preconditioned, his position is not valid Preconditioning does not make a position true or false "Does my preconditioning have any objective reality?" 13
  • PreconditioningPreconditioning does notvalidate or invalidate a position 14
  • PreconditioningPreconditioning does notvalidate or invalidate a position 14
  • PreconditioningPreconditioning does notvalidate or invalidate a position 14
  • Psychological Objection #2:Belief and emotions do notdetermine truth 15
  • Psychological Objection #2:Belief and emotions do notdetermine truth Assumption that Christians declare Christianity to be true on the basis of their own beliefs and emotions 15
  • Psychological Objection #2:Belief and emotions do notdetermine truth Assumption that Christians declare Christianity to be true on the basis of their own beliefs and emotions False assumption because: 15
  • Psychological Objection #2:Belief and emotions do notdetermine truth Assumption that Christians declare Christianity to be true on the basis of their own beliefs and emotions False assumption because: Ones belief in something does not make it true and, conversely, ones lack of belief does not make something false 15
  • Objective Criteria vs. SubjectiveBeliefs 16
  • Objective Criteria vs. SubjectiveBeliefs 16
  • 17
  • 17
  • Psychological Objection #3:Experience does not determinetruth 18
  • Psychological Objection #3:Experience does not determinetruth False Assumption : 18
  • Psychological Objection #3:Experience does not determinetruth False Assumption : Christians have sought to prove the truth of Christianity on the basis of their experience 18
  • Psychological Objection #3:Experience does not determinetruth False Assumption : Christians have sought to prove the truth of Christianity on the basis of their experience An individuals personal experience can verify truth but it doesnt prove it 18
  • Key Points and Questions 19
  • Key Points and Questions The Christian viewpoint cannot be dismissed on the basis of preconditioning 19
  • Key Points and Questions The Christian viewpoint cannot be dismissed on the basis of preconditioning "Is there any objective reality to ones preconditioning?” 19
  • Key Points and Questions The Christian viewpoint cannot be dismissed on the basis of preconditioning "Is there any objective reality to ones preconditioning?” A belief or an experience does not prove a position, nor does a lack of belief or experience disprove a position 19
  • Key Points and Questions The Christian viewpoint cannot be dismissed on the basis of preconditioning "Is there any objective reality to ones preconditioning?” A belief or an experience does not prove a position, nor does a lack of belief or experience disprove a position “Is there any objective reality to ones belief or experience?” 19
  • Psychology of Atheism 20
  • Psychology of Atheism The tables can be turned: 20
  • Psychology of Atheism The tables can be turned: The atheist eliminates God so that his own fear of having to face such a Being can be reduced 20
  • Psychology of Atheism The tables can be turned: The atheist eliminates God so that his own fear of having to face such a Being can be reduced Alleviates guilt 20
  • Psychology of Atheism The tables can be turned: The atheist eliminates God so that his own fear of having to face such a Being can be reduced Alleviates guilt Eliminates accountability 20
  • Psychology of Atheism The tables can be turned: The atheist eliminates God so that his own fear of having to face such a Being can be reduced Alleviates guilt Eliminates accountability Predicted in Romans 1:18-32 20
  • Everyone Needs Meaning in Life 21
  • Everyone Needs Meaning in Life Not a matter of if we seeking meaning; its a matter of how 21
  • Everyone Needs Meaning in Life Not a matter of if we seeking meaning; its a matter of how Faith is only as good as its object 21
  • 22
  • Option II:Christianity is Objective 23
  • Legal Historical Proof 24
  • Legal Historical Proof The object of Christianity: the person and work of Christ 24
  • Legal Historical Proof The object of Christianity: the person and work of Christ Jugular vein of Christianity: the Resurrection 24
  • Legal Historical Proof The object of Christianity: the person and work of Christ Jugular vein of Christianity: the Resurrection If the Resurrection is true, Christianity is true 24
  • The Resurrection of Christ andClaims of ChristThe Resurrection of Christ (1611-12), by Pieter Rubens 25
  • The Resurrection of Christ andClaims of Christ Established beyond a reasonable doubt the resurrection of Jesus ChristThe Resurrection of Christ (1611-12), by Pieter Rubens 25
  • The Resurrection of Christ andClaims of Christ Established beyond a reasonable doubt the resurrection of Jesus Christ The object of faith in Christianity is sound, and therefore, faith in this object is well-placedThe Resurrection of Christ (1611-12), by Pieter Rubens 25
  • The Resurrection of Christ andClaims of Christ Established beyond a reasonable doubt the resurrection of Jesus Christ The object of faith in Christianity is sound, and therefore, faith in this object is well-placed Christianity has an objective foundation and is not merely aThe Resurrection of Christ (1611-12), psychological crutch by Pieter Rubens 25
  • Everyone Has a Need for Christ (May Not Feel It) John 14:6: "I am the way, and the truth, and the life;no one comes to the Father but through Me," 26
  • Everyone Has a Need for Christ (May Not Feel It) John 14:6: If Christianity is true, we all "I am the way, have a real need for Christ and the truth, and the life;no one comes to the Father but through Me," 26
  • Everyone Has a Need for Christ (May Not Feel It) John 14:6: If Christianity is true, we all "I am the way, have a real need for Christ and the truth, and the life; True regardless of whether we feel it or notno one comes to the Father but through Me," 26
  • Christianity is Not a Crutch But aCure 27
  • Christianity is Not a Crutch But aCure Mans need and problem — sin which resulted in death and separation from God (Romans 3:23; 6:23) 27
  • Christianity is Not a Crutch But aCure Mans need and problem — sin which resulted in death and separation from God (Romans 3:23; 6:23) Christ’s complete cure: 27
  • Christianity is Not a Crutch But aCure Mans need and problem — sin which resulted in death and separation from God (Romans 3:23; 6:23) Christ’s complete cure: Substitutionary death paying my penalty for sin 27
  • Christianity Works Because It IsTrue 28
  • Christianity Works Because It IsTrue Not “Christianity is true because I’ve experienced it” 28
  • Christianity Works Because It IsTrue Not “Christianity is true because I’ve experienced it” Instead “Christianity is true and my experience confirms it” 28
  • Christianity Works Because It IsTrue Not “Christianity is true because I’ve experienced it” Instead “Christianity is true and my experience confirms it” Experience plays a supportive role in substantiating the validity of Christianity 28
  • Christianity is Objective 29
  • Christianity is Objective Resurrection proofs 29
  • Christianity is Objective Resurrection proofs Christianity is based on a solid foundation of objectivity rather than a shifting foundation of subjectivity 29
  • Christianity is Objective Resurrection proofs Christianity is based on a solid foundation of objectivity rather than a shifting foundation of subjectivity Christianity is not rejected because it has been examined and found wanting for objective truth; it is often rejected because it hasnt been examined at all 29
  • Christianity is Objective Resurrection proofs Christianity is based on a solid foundation of objectivity rather than a shifting foundation of subjectivity Christianity is not rejected because it has been examined and found wanting for objective truth; it is often rejected because it hasnt been examined at all The Gospel 29
  • The End 30
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  • Reflections Ministries Resources Reflections - A free monthly teaching letter 31
  • Reflections Ministries Resources Reflections - A free monthly teaching letter 31
  • Reflections Ministries Resources Reflections - A free monthly teaching letter 31
  • Reflections Ministries Resources Reflections - A free monthly teaching letter KenBoa.org website - Daily Growth email and free text and audio resources 31
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