Devotional Spirituality

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  • What are the keys to loving God, and how can we cultivate a growing intimacy with Him? This presentation explores what it means to enjoy God and to trust in Him. We are most satisfied when we seek God’s pleasure above our own, and we gradually become conformed to what we most love and admire.\n\n\n
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  • We do not exist for ourselves- we exist for the Father and through the Son. The world tells us that we derive our existence from it and that we should live for ourselves, but the Word teaches us that all we are and have comes from the Father who formed us for His pleasure and purposes.\n
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  • Our souls become emaciated when their pleasure is affixed to position, possessions, and power. But as we gradually and often painfully transfer our affections from the created and finite world to the uncreated and infinite Maker of the world, our souls become great and glorious.\n
  • Our souls become emaciated when their pleasure is affixed to position, possessions, and power. But as we gradually and often painfully transfer our affections from the created and finite world to the uncreated and infinite Maker of the world, our souls become great and glorious.\n
  • If our heart’s desire is fixed on something in this world, it becomes idolatrous and soul-corrupting. \n\nImage: Buddhist Temple, Thailand; Inset Image: Bedouin Muslim Woman, Oman\n
  • If our heart’s desire is fixed on something in this world, it becomes idolatrous and soul-corrupting. \n\nImage: Buddhist Temple, Thailand; Inset Image: Bedouin Muslim Woman, Oman\n
  • But if we draw our life from loving communion with the caring, radiant, majestic, and unfathomable being who formed us for Himself, our souls become noble as they grow in conformity to His character.\nWe become like our focus; in the process of beholding the glory of the Lord, we are being “transformed into the same image from glory to glory, just as from the Lord, the Spirit” (2 Cor. 3:18)\n\nImage: South Falkland Islands\n
  • God in His inner essence is a mystery beyond our comprehension; we will never know Him as He knows Himself. The great pilgrims along the way have discovered that progress from superficial to substantive apprehension of God is not so much a movement from darkness to light as it is a plummeting into the ever-increasing profundity of the cloud of unknowing.\n\nImage: The Creation of the Sun and Moon, Michelangelo, The Sistine Chapel, Rome\n
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  • As we reflect on God’s revelatory actions, we come to know Him more clearly, and this enables us to love Him more dearly, and to follow Him more nearly. God makes Himself known to us through His: world, Word, works, and ways. \n\nHis world: heavens, earth, and sea\n
  • As we reflect on God’s revelatory actions, we come to know Him more clearly, and this enables us to love Him more dearly, and to follow Him more nearly. God makes Himself known to us through His: world, Word, works, and ways. \n\nHis world: heavens, earth, and sea\n
  • As we reflect on God’s revelatory actions, we come to know Him more clearly, and this enables us to love Him more dearly, and to follow Him more nearly. God makes Himself known to us through His: world, Word, works, and ways. \n\nHis world: heavens, earth, and sea\n
  • As we reflect on God’s revelatory actions, we come to know Him more clearly, and this enables us to love Him more dearly, and to follow Him more nearly. God makes Himself known to us through His: world, Word, works, and ways. \n\nHis world: heavens, earth, and sea\n
  • As we reflect on God’s revelatory actions, we come to know Him more clearly, and this enables us to love Him more dearly, and to follow Him more nearly. God makes Himself known to us through His: world, Word, works, and ways. \n\nHis world: heavens, earth, and sea\n
  • As we reflect on God’s revelatory actions, we come to know Him more clearly, and this enables us to love Him more dearly, and to follow Him more nearly. God makes Himself known to us through His: world, Word, works, and ways. \n\nHis world: heavens, earth, and sea\n
  • As we reflect on God’s revelatory actions, we come to know Him more clearly, and this enables us to love Him more dearly, and to follow Him more nearly. God makes Himself known to us through His: world, Word, works, and ways. \n\nHis world: heavens, earth, and sea\n
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  • Colobopsis Ant, Borneo\n
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  • Hourglass Nebula\n
  • We would do well to cultivate a childlike sense of amazement and awe at the things we tend to overlook every day. Our artificial environments and busy schedules make us forget that we are surrounded by mystery and majesty.\n* Make the effort to enjoy more frequent and deliberate contact with God’s creation to develop an appreciation for the complexity, beauty, and resplendence of the heavens and the earth.\n
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  • Scripture was revealed not merely to inform us but also to transform us. There is an important place for informational reading of the Scripture and for its exegetical and topical methods of Bible study... (see next slide)\n\nChart from “Shaped by the Word” by M. Robert Mulholland Jr. contrasting two approaches to Scripture.\n
  • Scripture was revealed not merely to inform us but also to transform us. There is an important place for informational reading of the Scripture and for its exegetical and topical methods of Bible study... (see next slide)\n\nChart from “Shaped by the Word” by M. Robert Mulholland Jr. contrasting two approaches to Scripture.\n
  • Scripture was revealed not merely to inform us but also to transform us. There is an important place for informational reading of the Scripture and for its exegetical and topical methods of Bible study... (see next slide)\n\nChart from “Shaped by the Word” by M. Robert Mulholland Jr. contrasting two approaches to Scripture.\n
  • Scripture was revealed not merely to inform us but also to transform us. There is an important place for informational reading of the Scripture and for its exegetical and topical methods of Bible study... (see next slide)\n\nChart from “Shaped by the Word” by M. Robert Mulholland Jr. contrasting two approaches to Scripture.\n
  • Scripture was revealed not merely to inform us but also to transform us. There is an important place for informational reading of the Scripture and for its exegetical and topical methods of Bible study... (see next slide)\n\nChart from “Shaped by the Word” by M. Robert Mulholland Jr. contrasting two approaches to Scripture.\n
  • Scripture was revealed not merely to inform us but also to transform us. There is an important place for informational reading of the Scripture and for its exegetical and topical methods of Bible study... (see next slide)\n\nChart from “Shaped by the Word” by M. Robert Mulholland Jr. contrasting two approaches to Scripture.\n
  • Scripture was revealed not merely to inform us but also to transform us. There is an important place for informational reading of the Scripture and for its exegetical and topical methods of Bible study... (see next slide)\n\nChart from “Shaped by the Word” by M. Robert Mulholland Jr. contrasting two approaches to Scripture.\n
  • There is an important place for informational reading of Scripture and for exegetical and topical methods of Bible study. But those who approach Scripture in this way often overlook the formational approach that centers on speaking to the heart more than informing the mind. The overemphasis on one or the other can lead to the extremes of cold intellectualism or mindless enthusiasm.\n
  • There is an important place for informational reading of Scripture and for exegetical and topical methods of Bible study. But those who approach Scripture in this way often overlook the formational approach that centers on speaking to the heart more than informing the mind. The overemphasis on one or the other can lead to the extremes of cold intellectualism or mindless enthusiasm.\n
  • There is an important place for informational reading of Scripture and for exegetical and topical methods of Bible study. But those who approach Scripture in this way often overlook the formational approach that centers on speaking to the heart more than informing the mind. The overemphasis on one or the other can lead to the extremes of cold intellectualism or mindless enthusiasm.\n
  • There is an important place for informational reading of Scripture and for exegetical and topical methods of Bible study. But those who approach Scripture in this way often overlook the formational approach that centers on speaking to the heart more than informing the mind. The overemphasis on one or the other can lead to the extremes of cold intellectualism or mindless enthusiasm.\n
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  • Moses knew the Lord not only through His works but also through His ways. God’s ways concern His personal involvement in our lives and our experiences of His peace,power, provision, protection, compassion, and care.\n
  • Moses knew the Lord not only through His works but also through His ways. God’s ways concern His personal involvement in our lives and our experiences of His peace,power, provision, protection, compassion, and care.\n
  • Also encouraging you, exhorting you, and disciplining you for your good, and the way He seeks to strip you of your hope in the things of this world so that you will learn to hope only in Him.\n
  • Also encouraging you, exhorting you, and disciplining you for your good, and the way He seeks to strip you of your hope in the things of this world so that you will learn to hope only in Him.\n
  • Also encouraging you, exhorting you, and disciplining you for your good, and the way He seeks to strip you of your hope in the things of this world so that you will learn to hope only in Him.\n
  • Also encouraging you, exhorting you, and disciplining you for your good, and the way He seeks to strip you of your hope in the things of this world so that you will learn to hope only in Him.\n
  • Also encouraging you, exhorting you, and disciplining you for your good, and the way He seeks to strip you of your hope in the things of this world so that you will learn to hope only in Him.\n
  • Also encouraging you, exhorting you, and disciplining you for your good, and the way He seeks to strip you of your hope in the things of this world so that you will learn to hope only in Him.\n
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  • Also encouraging you, exhorting you, and disciplining you for your good, and the way He seeks to strip you of your hope in the things of this world so that you will learn to hope only in Him.\n
  • Reflect upon His attributes: His person, power, and perfections.\nHis unlimited power, presence, and knowledge; His holiness, justice, goodness, truthfulness, and righteousness, transcendent majesty, and dominion; and His self-existence, eternity, infinity, and immutability.\n
  • Reflect upon His attributes: His person, power, and perfections.\nHis unlimited power, presence, and knowledge; His holiness, justice, goodness, truthfulness, and righteousness, transcendent majesty, and dominion; and His self-existence, eternity, infinity, and immutability.\n
  • Reflect upon His attributes: His person, power, and perfections.\nHis unlimited power, presence, and knowledge; His holiness, justice, goodness, truthfulness, and righteousness, transcendent majesty, and dominion; and His self-existence, eternity, infinity, and immutability.\n
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  • Image: Lybian Sybil, Sistine Chapel\n
  • Introduced to the West by the Eastern desert Father John Cassian early in the fifth century, Lectio Divina \n\nImage: The Delphic Sybil, Sistine Chapel, Michelangelo\n
  • Introduced to the West by the Eastern desert Father John Cassian early in the fifth century, Lectio Divina \n\nImage: The Delphic Sybil, Sistine Chapel, Michelangelo\n
  • Introduced to the West by the Eastern desert Father John Cassian early in the fifth century, Lectio Divina \n\nImage: The Delphic Sybil, Sistine Chapel, Michelangelo\n
  • Introduced to the West by the Eastern desert Father John Cassian early in the fifth century, Lectio Divina \n\nImage: The Delphic Sybil, Sistine Chapel, Michelangelo\n
  • Image: Joel, Sistine Chapel, by Michelangelo\n
  • Image: Joel, Sistine Chapel, by Michelangelo\n
  • Image: Joel, Sistine Chapel, by Michelangelo\n
  • Image: Joel, Sistine Chapel, by Michelangelo\n
  • Image: Joel, Sistine Chapel, by Michelangelo\n
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  • As you move from reading to meditation, you are seeking to saturate and immerse yourself in the Word, to luxuriate in its living waters, and to receive the words as an intimate, personal message from God. The purpose of meditation is to penetrate the Scriptures and to let them penetrate us through the loving gaze of the heart. Mental prayer plus Heart prayer.\n\nImage: Raphael’s portrait of Michelangelo in the School of Athens\n
  • As you move from reading to meditation, you are seeking to saturate and immerse yourself in the Word, to luxuriate in its living waters, and to receive the words as an intimate, personal message from God. The purpose of meditation is to penetrate the Scriptures and to let them penetrate us through the loving gaze of the heart. Mental prayer plus Heart prayer.\n\nImage: Raphael’s portrait of Michelangelo in the School of Athens\n
  • As you move from reading to meditation, you are seeking to saturate and immerse yourself in the Word, to luxuriate in its living waters, and to receive the words as an intimate, personal message from God. The purpose of meditation is to penetrate the Scriptures and to let them penetrate us through the loving gaze of the heart. Mental prayer plus Heart prayer.\n\nImage: Raphael’s portrait of Michelangelo in the School of Athens\n
  • As you move from reading to meditation, you are seeking to saturate and immerse yourself in the Word, to luxuriate in its living waters, and to receive the words as an intimate, personal message from God. The purpose of meditation is to penetrate the Scriptures and to let them penetrate us through the loving gaze of the heart. Mental prayer plus Heart prayer.\n\nImage: Raphael’s portrait of Michelangelo in the School of Athens\n
  • As you move from reading to meditation, you are seeking to saturate and immerse yourself in the Word, to luxuriate in its living waters, and to receive the words as an intimate, personal message from God. The purpose of meditation is to penetrate the Scriptures and to let them penetrate us through the loving gaze of the heart. Mental prayer plus Heart prayer.\n\nImage: Raphael’s portrait of Michelangelo in the School of Athens\n
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  • Meditation and prayer that flows out of it bring us into communication with the living and transcendent Lord, and as such, they prepare us for contemplation. Meditative prayer should be more than an intellectual exercise; when it is accompanied by affective intention it leads to love and communion of contemplative prayer.\nTrue contemplation is a theological grace that cannot be reduced to logical, psychological, or aesthetic categories.\n\nImage: Isaiah, Sistine Chapel (La Capella Sistina e molto bene!)\n
  • Meditation and prayer that flows out of it bring us into communication with the living and transcendent Lord, and as such, they prepare us for contemplation. Meditative prayer should be more than an intellectual exercise; when it is accompanied by affective intention it leads to love and communion of contemplative prayer.\nTrue contemplation is a theological grace that cannot be reduced to logical, psychological, or aesthetic categories.\n\nImage: Isaiah, Sistine Chapel (La Capella Sistina e molto bene!)\n
  • Meditation and prayer that flows out of it bring us into communication with the living and transcendent Lord, and as such, they prepare us for contemplation. Meditative prayer should be more than an intellectual exercise; when it is accompanied by affective intention it leads to love and communion of contemplative prayer.\nTrue contemplation is a theological grace that cannot be reduced to logical, psychological, or aesthetic categories.\n\nImage: Isaiah, Sistine Chapel (La Capella Sistina e molto bene!)\n
  • Meditation and prayer that flows out of it bring us into communication with the living and transcendent Lord, and as such, they prepare us for contemplation. Meditative prayer should be more than an intellectual exercise; when it is accompanied by affective intention it leads to love and communion of contemplative prayer.\nTrue contemplation is a theological grace that cannot be reduced to logical, psychological, or aesthetic categories.\n\nImage: Isaiah, Sistine Chapel (La Capella Sistina e molto bene!)\n
  • Table of general contrasts between meditative prayer and contemplative prayer.\nWhen we enter the numinous territory of contemplation, it is best for us to stop talking and “listen to Him” in simple and loving attentiveness. In this strange and holy land we must remove the sandals of our ideas, constructs, and inclinations and quietly listen for the voice of God. Periods of contemplation can also be dark nights of faith. During these times, God may seem absent and silent, but His presence and speech is on a deeper level than what we can feel or understand. By preparing a peaceful place in the soul we learn to “rest in the LORD and wait patiently for Him.” (Ps. 37:7)\n
  • Table of general contrasts between meditative prayer and contemplative prayer.\nWhen we enter the numinous territory of contemplation, it is best for us to stop talking and “listen to Him” in simple and loving attentiveness. In this strange and holy land we must remove the sandals of our ideas, constructs, and inclinations and quietly listen for the voice of God. Periods of contemplation can also be dark nights of faith. During these times, God may seem absent and silent, but His presence and speech is on a deeper level than what we can feel or understand. By preparing a peaceful place in the soul we learn to “rest in the LORD and wait patiently for Him.” (Ps. 37:7)\n
  • Table of general contrasts between meditative prayer and contemplative prayer.\nWhen we enter the numinous territory of contemplation, it is best for us to stop talking and “listen to Him” in simple and loving attentiveness. In this strange and holy land we must remove the sandals of our ideas, constructs, and inclinations and quietly listen for the voice of God. Periods of contemplation can also be dark nights of faith. During these times, God may seem absent and silent, but His presence and speech is on a deeper level than what we can feel or understand. By preparing a peaceful place in the soul we learn to “rest in the LORD and wait patiently for Him.” (Ps. 37:7)\n
  • Table of general contrasts between meditative prayer and contemplative prayer.\nWhen we enter the numinous territory of contemplation, it is best for us to stop talking and “listen to Him” in simple and loving attentiveness. In this strange and holy land we must remove the sandals of our ideas, constructs, and inclinations and quietly listen for the voice of God. Periods of contemplation can also be dark nights of faith. During these times, God may seem absent and silent, but His presence and speech is on a deeper level than what we can feel or understand. By preparing a peaceful place in the soul we learn to “rest in the LORD and wait patiently for Him.” (Ps. 37:7)\n
  • Table of general contrasts between meditative prayer and contemplative prayer.\nWhen we enter the numinous territory of contemplation, it is best for us to stop talking and “listen to Him” in simple and loving attentiveness. In this strange and holy land we must remove the sandals of our ideas, constructs, and inclinations and quietly listen for the voice of God. Periods of contemplation can also be dark nights of faith. During these times, God may seem absent and silent, but His presence and speech is on a deeper level than what we can feel or understand. By preparing a peaceful place in the soul we learn to “rest in the LORD and wait patiently for Him.” (Ps. 37:7)\n
  • Table of general contrasts between meditative prayer and contemplative prayer.\nWhen we enter the numinous territory of contemplation, it is best for us to stop talking and “listen to Him” in simple and loving attentiveness. In this strange and holy land we must remove the sandals of our ideas, constructs, and inclinations and quietly listen for the voice of God. Periods of contemplation can also be dark nights of faith. During these times, God may seem absent and silent, but His presence and speech is on a deeper level than what we can feel or understand. By preparing a peaceful place in the soul we learn to “rest in the LORD and wait patiently for Him.” (Ps. 37:7)\n
  • Table of general contrasts between meditative prayer and contemplative prayer.\nWhen we enter the numinous territory of contemplation, it is best for us to stop talking and “listen to Him” in simple and loving attentiveness. In this strange and holy land we must remove the sandals of our ideas, constructs, and inclinations and quietly listen for the voice of God. Periods of contemplation can also be dark nights of faith. During these times, God may seem absent and silent, but His presence and speech is on a deeper level than what we can feel or understand. By preparing a peaceful place in the soul we learn to “rest in the LORD and wait patiently for Him.” (Ps. 37:7)\n
  • Table of general contrasts between meditative prayer and contemplative prayer.\nWhen we enter the numinous territory of contemplation, it is best for us to stop talking and “listen to Him” in simple and loving attentiveness. In this strange and holy land we must remove the sandals of our ideas, constructs, and inclinations and quietly listen for the voice of God. Periods of contemplation can also be dark nights of faith. During these times, God may seem absent and silent, but His presence and speech is on a deeper level than what we can feel or understand. By preparing a peaceful place in the soul we learn to “rest in the LORD and wait patiently for Him.” (Ps. 37:7)\n
  • Table of general contrasts between meditative prayer and contemplative prayer.\nWhen we enter the numinous territory of contemplation, it is best for us to stop talking and “listen to Him” in simple and loving attentiveness. In this strange and holy land we must remove the sandals of our ideas, constructs, and inclinations and quietly listen for the voice of God. Periods of contemplation can also be dark nights of faith. During these times, God may seem absent and silent, but His presence and speech is on a deeper level than what we can feel or understand. By preparing a peaceful place in the soul we learn to “rest in the LORD and wait patiently for Him.” (Ps. 37:7)\n
  • Table of general contrasts between meditative prayer and contemplative prayer.\nWhen we enter the numinous territory of contemplation, it is best for us to stop talking and “listen to Him” in simple and loving attentiveness. In this strange and holy land we must remove the sandals of our ideas, constructs, and inclinations and quietly listen for the voice of God. Periods of contemplation can also be dark nights of faith. During these times, God may seem absent and silent, but His presence and speech is on a deeper level than what we can feel or understand. By preparing a peaceful place in the soul we learn to “rest in the LORD and wait patiently for Him.” (Ps. 37:7)\n
  • Table of general contrasts between meditative prayer and contemplative prayer.\nWhen we enter the numinous territory of contemplation, it is best for us to stop talking and “listen to Him” in simple and loving attentiveness. In this strange and holy land we must remove the sandals of our ideas, constructs, and inclinations and quietly listen for the voice of God. Periods of contemplation can also be dark nights of faith. During these times, God may seem absent and silent, but His presence and speech is on a deeper level than what we can feel or understand. By preparing a peaceful place in the soul we learn to “rest in the LORD and wait patiently for Him.” (Ps. 37:7)\n
  • Table of general contrasts between meditative prayer and contemplative prayer.\nWhen we enter the numinous territory of contemplation, it is best for us to stop talking and “listen to Him” in simple and loving attentiveness. In this strange and holy land we must remove the sandals of our ideas, constructs, and inclinations and quietly listen for the voice of God. Periods of contemplation can also be dark nights of faith. During these times, God may seem absent and silent, but His presence and speech is on a deeper level than what we can feel or understand. By preparing a peaceful place in the soul we learn to “rest in the LORD and wait patiently for Him.” (Ps. 37:7)\n
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  • The Creation of Adam, Michelangelo, The Sistine Chapel, Rome\n
  • Our problem is that the world is too much with us- it is visible, tangible, intrusive, compelling, and clamorous. But as long as we are in love with the world, we cannot fall in love with God. It takes no effort to walk by sight, but to walk by faith (Hb.11:11) requires the painful choice of renunciation.\n
  • Our problem is that the world is too much with us- it is visible, tangible, intrusive, compelling, and clamorous. But as long as we are in love with the world, we cannot fall in love with God. It takes no effort to walk by sight, but to walk by faith (Hb.11:11) requires the painful choice of renunciation.\n
  • Our problem is that the world is too much with us- it is visible, tangible, intrusive, compelling, and clamorous. But as long as we are in love with the world, we cannot fall in love with God. It takes no effort to walk by sight, but to walk by faith (Hb.11:11) requires the painful choice of renunciation.\n
  • Our problem is that the world is too much with us- it is visible, tangible, intrusive, compelling, and clamorous. But as long as we are in love with the world, we cannot fall in love with God. It takes no effort to walk by sight, but to walk by faith (Hb.11:11) requires the painful choice of renunciation.\n
  • Our problem is that the world is too much with us- it is visible, tangible, intrusive, compelling, and clamorous. But as long as we are in love with the world, we cannot fall in love with God. It takes no effort to walk by sight, but to walk by faith (Hb.11:11) requires the painful choice of renunciation.\n
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  • Devotional spirituality is like a delicate grapevine that flourishes only when it is planted in the right soil and carefully cultivated in a good climate. Unless it is nurtured, it will wither through neglect and fail to bear fruit. The fruit of spiritual passion can be threatened by natural enemies.\n
  • 1. Unresolved areas of disobedience: Resisting the prodding of God in an area of your life may seem subtle, but it can be a more serious grievance to the heart of God than we suppose. It is good to invite the Holy Spirit to reveal any barriers in our relationship with God or people that have been erected by sinful attitudes and actions. When these become evident, deal with them quickly and trust in the power of God’s forgiveness through the blood of Christ.\n2. Complacency: Without holy desire we will succumb to the sin of spiritual acedia or indifference, apathy, and boredom. People who lose the sharp edge of intention and calling can slip into a morass of listlessness and feelings of failure. We must often ask God for the grace of acute desire so that we will hunger and thirst for Him.\n3. Erosion in spiritual disciplines: Complacency can cause or be caused by a failure to train and remain disciplined in the spiritual life. Several biblical figures, including King Asa (2Chron. 14-16), illustrate the problem of starting well in the first half of life and finishing poorly in the last half. When spiritual disciplines begin to erode, spiritual passion declines as well.\n4. External obedience: Many people are more concerned about conformity to rules, moral behavior, and duty than they are about loving Jesus. External obedience without inward affection falls short of the biblical vision of obeying God from the heart (Jer.31:33; Ro.6:17; Eph.6:6)\n
  • 1. Unresolved areas of disobedience: Resisting the prodding of God in an area of your life may seem subtle, but it can be a more serious grievance to the heart of God than we suppose. It is good to invite the Holy Spirit to reveal any barriers in our relationship with God or people that have been erected by sinful attitudes and actions. When these become evident, deal with them quickly and trust in the power of God’s forgiveness through the blood of Christ.\n2. Complacency: Without holy desire we will succumb to the sin of spiritual acedia or indifference, apathy, and boredom. People who lose the sharp edge of intention and calling can slip into a morass of listlessness and feelings of failure. We must often ask God for the grace of acute desire so that we will hunger and thirst for Him.\n3. Erosion in spiritual disciplines: Complacency can cause or be caused by a failure to train and remain disciplined in the spiritual life. Several biblical figures, including King Asa (2Chron. 14-16), illustrate the problem of starting well in the first half of life and finishing poorly in the last half. When spiritual disciplines begin to erode, spiritual passion declines as well.\n4. External obedience: Many people are more concerned about conformity to rules, moral behavior, and duty than they are about loving Jesus. External obedience without inward affection falls short of the biblical vision of obeying God from the heart (Jer.31:33; Ro.6:17; Eph.6:6)\n
  • 1. Unresolved areas of disobedience: Resisting the prodding of God in an area of your life may seem subtle, but it can be a more serious grievance to the heart of God than we suppose. It is good to invite the Holy Spirit to reveal any barriers in our relationship with God or people that have been erected by sinful attitudes and actions. When these become evident, deal with them quickly and trust in the power of God’s forgiveness through the blood of Christ.\n2. Complacency: Without holy desire we will succumb to the sin of spiritual acedia or indifference, apathy, and boredom. People who lose the sharp edge of intention and calling can slip into a morass of listlessness and feelings of failure. We must often ask God for the grace of acute desire so that we will hunger and thirst for Him.\n3. Erosion in spiritual disciplines: Complacency can cause or be caused by a failure to train and remain disciplined in the spiritual life. Several biblical figures, including King Asa (2Chron. 14-16), illustrate the problem of starting well in the first half of life and finishing poorly in the last half. When spiritual disciplines begin to erode, spiritual passion declines as well.\n4. External obedience: Many people are more concerned about conformity to rules, moral behavior, and duty than they are about loving Jesus. External obedience without inward affection falls short of the biblical vision of obeying God from the heart (Jer.31:33; Ro.6:17; Eph.6:6)\n
  • 1. Unresolved areas of disobedience: Resisting the prodding of God in an area of your life may seem subtle, but it can be a more serious grievance to the heart of God than we suppose. It is good to invite the Holy Spirit to reveal any barriers in our relationship with God or people that have been erected by sinful attitudes and actions. When these become evident, deal with them quickly and trust in the power of God’s forgiveness through the blood of Christ.\n2. Complacency: Without holy desire we will succumb to the sin of spiritual acedia or indifference, apathy, and boredom. People who lose the sharp edge of intention and calling can slip into a morass of listlessness and feelings of failure. We must often ask God for the grace of acute desire so that we will hunger and thirst for Him.\n3. Erosion in spiritual disciplines: Complacency can cause or be caused by a failure to train and remain disciplined in the spiritual life. Several biblical figures, including King Asa (2Chron. 14-16), illustrate the problem of starting well in the first half of life and finishing poorly in the last half. When spiritual disciplines begin to erode, spiritual passion declines as well.\n4. External obedience: Many people are more concerned about conformity to rules, moral behavior, and duty than they are about loving Jesus. External obedience without inward affection falls short of the biblical vision of obeying God from the heart (Jer.31:33; Ro.6:17; Eph.6:6)\n
  • 5. Loving truth more than Christ: Some students of the Word have come to love the content of truth in the Bible more than the Source of that truth. Biblical theology and systematic theology are worthy pursuits, but not when they become substitutes for the pursuit of knowing and becoming like Jesus.\n6. Elevating service and ministry above Christ: It is easier to define ourselves by what we accomplish than by our new identity in Christ. For some people, the Christian life consists more of fellowship, service to those in need, witnessing, and worship than of becoming intimate with Jesus. This leads to the problem of ministry without the manifest presence of God.\n7. Greater commitment to institutions than to Christ: It is easy for churches, denominations, or other organizations to occupy more of our time and attention than does devotion to Jesus. There is a constant danger of getting more passionate about causes than about Christ.\n8. A merely functional relationship: Many people are more interested in what Jesus can do for them than who He is. We may initially come to Him hoping that he will help us with our career, marriage, children, or health, but if we do not grow beyond this gifts-above-the=Giver mentality, we will never develop spiritual passion.\n
  • 5. Loving truth more than Christ: Some students of the Word have come to love the content of truth in the Bible more than the Source of that truth. Biblical theology and systematic theology are worthy pursuits, but not when they become substitutes for the pursuit of knowing and becoming like Jesus.\n6. Elevating service and ministry above Christ: It is easier to define ourselves by what we accomplish than by our new identity in Christ. For some people, the Christian life consists more of fellowship, service to those in need, witnessing, and worship than of becoming intimate with Jesus. This leads to the problem of ministry without the manifest presence of God.\n7. Greater commitment to institutions than to Christ: It is easy for churches, denominations, or other organizations to occupy more of our time and attention than does devotion to Jesus. There is a constant danger of getting more passionate about causes than about Christ.\n8. A merely functional relationship: Many people are more interested in what Jesus can do for them than who He is. We may initially come to Him hoping that he will help us with our career, marriage, children, or health, but if we do not grow beyond this gifts-above-the=Giver mentality, we will never develop spiritual passion.\n
  • 5. Loving truth more than Christ: Some students of the Word have come to love the content of truth in the Bible more than the Source of that truth. Biblical theology and systematic theology are worthy pursuits, but not when they become substitutes for the pursuit of knowing and becoming like Jesus.\n6. Elevating service and ministry above Christ: It is easier to define ourselves by what we accomplish than by our new identity in Christ. For some people, the Christian life consists more of fellowship, service to those in need, witnessing, and worship than of becoming intimate with Jesus. This leads to the problem of ministry without the manifest presence of God.\n7. Greater commitment to institutions than to Christ: It is easy for churches, denominations, or other organizations to occupy more of our time and attention than does devotion to Jesus. There is a constant danger of getting more passionate about causes than about Christ.\n8. A merely functional relationship: Many people are more interested in what Jesus can do for them than who He is. We may initially come to Him hoping that he will help us with our career, marriage, children, or health, but if we do not grow beyond this gifts-above-the=Giver mentality, we will never develop spiritual passion.\n
  • 5. Loving truth more than Christ: Some students of the Word have come to love the content of truth in the Bible more than the Source of that truth. Biblical theology and systematic theology are worthy pursuits, but not when they become substitutes for the pursuit of knowing and becoming like Jesus.\n6. Elevating service and ministry above Christ: It is easier to define ourselves by what we accomplish than by our new identity in Christ. For some people, the Christian life consists more of fellowship, service to those in need, witnessing, and worship than of becoming intimate with Jesus. This leads to the problem of ministry without the manifest presence of God.\n7. Greater commitment to institutions than to Christ: It is easy for churches, denominations, or other organizations to occupy more of our time and attention than does devotion to Jesus. There is a constant danger of getting more passionate about causes than about Christ.\n8. A merely functional relationship: Many people are more interested in what Jesus can do for them than who He is. We may initially come to Him hoping that he will help us with our career, marriage, children, or health, but if we do not grow beyond this gifts-above-the=Giver mentality, we will never develop spiritual passion.\n
  • 1. Growing awareness of God as a person: God is an intensely personal and relational Being, and it is an insult for us to treat Him as though He were a power or a principle. Some of us find it easier to be comfortable with abstract principles and ideas than with people and intimacy. Good things like the Bible, theology, ministry, and church can become substitutes for loving Him. As a countermeasure, it is good to ask God for the grace of increased passion for His Son so that, by the power of the Spirit, we will come to love Him as the Father loves Him.\n2. Sitting at Jesus’ feet: When we make consistent time for reading, meditation, prayer, and contemplation, we place ourselves at the feet of Jesus and enjoy His presence. By making ourselves available and receptive to Him, we learn the wisdom of spending more time being a friend of Jesus than a friend of others.\n3. Imitating the Master: Our identification with Jesus in His death, burial, resurrection, and ascension has made us new creatures before God (2Cor.5:17). This divinely wrought identification makes it possible for us to imitate Jesus and “follow in His steps” (1Pe.2:21). If we love the Master, we will want to be like Him in His character, humility, compassion, love, joy, peace, and dependence on the Father’s will.\n
  • 1. Growing awareness of God as a person: God is an intensely personal and relational Being, and it is an insult for us to treat Him as though He were a power or a principle. Some of us find it easier to be comfortable with abstract principles and ideas than with people and intimacy. Good things like the Bible, theology, ministry, and church can become substitutes for loving Him. As a countermeasure, it is good to ask God for the grace of increased passion for His Son so that, by the power of the Spirit, we will come to love Him as the Father loves Him.\n2. Sitting at Jesus’ feet: When we make consistent time for reading, meditation, prayer, and contemplation, we place ourselves at the feet of Jesus and enjoy His presence. By making ourselves available and receptive to Him, we learn the wisdom of spending more time being a friend of Jesus than a friend of others.\n3. Imitating the Master: Our identification with Jesus in His death, burial, resurrection, and ascension has made us new creatures before God (2Cor.5:17). This divinely wrought identification makes it possible for us to imitate Jesus and “follow in His steps” (1Pe.2:21). If we love the Master, we will want to be like Him in His character, humility, compassion, love, joy, peace, and dependence on the Father’s will.\n
  • 1. Growing awareness of God as a person: God is an intensely personal and relational Being, and it is an insult for us to treat Him as though He were a power or a principle. Some of us find it easier to be comfortable with abstract principles and ideas than with people and intimacy. Good things like the Bible, theology, ministry, and church can become substitutes for loving Him. As a countermeasure, it is good to ask God for the grace of increased passion for His Son so that, by the power of the Spirit, we will come to love Him as the Father loves Him.\n2. Sitting at Jesus’ feet: When we make consistent time for reading, meditation, prayer, and contemplation, we place ourselves at the feet of Jesus and enjoy His presence. By making ourselves available and receptive to Him, we learn the wisdom of spending more time being a friend of Jesus than a friend of others.\n3. Imitating the Master: Our identification with Jesus in His death, burial, resurrection, and ascension has made us new creatures before God (2Cor.5:17). This divinely wrought identification makes it possible for us to imitate Jesus and “follow in His steps” (1Pe.2:21). If we love the Master, we will want to be like Him in His character, humility, compassion, love, joy, peace, and dependence on the Father’s will.\n
  • 4. Cultivating spiritual affections: Regardless of our natural temperaments, it is important for us to develop true affections (desire, longing, zeal, craving, hunger) for God. The rich emotional life of the psalmists (see Ps. 27:4; 42:1-3; 63:1-8; 145:1-21) reveals a desire for God above all else and a willingness to cling to Him during times of aridity. Like them, we must aspire to a love that is beyond us (Eph.3:17-19).\n5. Increasing appreciation for the goodness of God: The distractions of the world make it difficult for us to develop a growing appreciation for our relationship with God. We forget that we can enjoy communion with Someone who is infinitely better than the objects of our most powerful natural desires. We must pray for the grace of gratitude and amazement at the unqualified goodness of God’s “kindness toward us in Christ Jesus” (Eph.2:7)\n6. Focused intention: What do you want (or want to want) more than anything else? God is pleased when we pursue Him with a hear that is intent on knowing and loving Him. He “begins His influence by working is us that we may have the will, and he complete it by working with us when we have the will” wrote Augustine. As our wills become more simplified and centered on becoming like Jesus, our love for Him will grow.\n7. Willingness to let God break our outward self: “Unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit. he who loves his life loses it, and he who hates his life in this world will keep it to life eternal” (John 12:24-25). The alabaster vial of the self-life must be broken (Mk.14:3) to release the perfume of the new self in Christ. If we wish to manifest the fragrance of Christ, we must allow God to bring us, in His time and way, to the painful place of brokenness on the cross of self-abandonment to Him.\n
  • 4. Cultivating spiritual affections: Regardless of our natural temperaments, it is important for us to develop true affections (desire, longing, zeal, craving, hunger) for God. The rich emotional life of the psalmists (see Ps. 27:4; 42:1-3; 63:1-8; 145:1-21) reveals a desire for God above all else and a willingness to cling to Him during times of aridity. Like them, we must aspire to a love that is beyond us (Eph.3:17-19).\n5. Increasing appreciation for the goodness of God: The distractions of the world make it difficult for us to develop a growing appreciation for our relationship with God. We forget that we can enjoy communion with Someone who is infinitely better than the objects of our most powerful natural desires. We must pray for the grace of gratitude and amazement at the unqualified goodness of God’s “kindness toward us in Christ Jesus” (Eph.2:7)\n6. Focused intention: What do you want (or want to want) more than anything else? God is pleased when we pursue Him with a hear that is intent on knowing and loving Him. He “begins His influence by working is us that we may have the will, and he complete it by working with us when we have the will” wrote Augustine. As our wills become more simplified and centered on becoming like Jesus, our love for Him will grow.\n7. Willingness to let God break our outward self: “Unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit. he who loves his life loses it, and he who hates his life in this world will keep it to life eternal” (John 12:24-25). The alabaster vial of the self-life must be broken (Mk.14:3) to release the perfume of the new self in Christ. If we wish to manifest the fragrance of Christ, we must allow God to bring us, in His time and way, to the painful place of brokenness on the cross of self-abandonment to Him.\n
  • 4. Cultivating spiritual affections: Regardless of our natural temperaments, it is important for us to develop true affections (desire, longing, zeal, craving, hunger) for God. The rich emotional life of the psalmists (see Ps. 27:4; 42:1-3; 63:1-8; 145:1-21) reveals a desire for God above all else and a willingness to cling to Him during times of aridity. Like them, we must aspire to a love that is beyond us (Eph.3:17-19).\n5. Increasing appreciation for the goodness of God: The distractions of the world make it difficult for us to develop a growing appreciation for our relationship with God. We forget that we can enjoy communion with Someone who is infinitely better than the objects of our most powerful natural desires. We must pray for the grace of gratitude and amazement at the unqualified goodness of God’s “kindness toward us in Christ Jesus” (Eph.2:7)\n6. Focused intention: What do you want (or want to want) more than anything else? God is pleased when we pursue Him with a hear that is intent on knowing and loving Him. He “begins His influence by working is us that we may have the will, and he complete it by working with us when we have the will” wrote Augustine. As our wills become more simplified and centered on becoming like Jesus, our love for Him will grow.\n7. Willingness to let God break our outward self: “Unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit. he who loves his life loses it, and he who hates his life in this world will keep it to life eternal” (John 12:24-25). The alabaster vial of the self-life must be broken (Mk.14:3) to release the perfume of the new self in Christ. If we wish to manifest the fragrance of Christ, we must allow God to bring us, in His time and way, to the painful place of brokenness on the cross of self-abandonment to Him.\n
  • 4. Cultivating spiritual affections: Regardless of our natural temperaments, it is important for us to develop true affections (desire, longing, zeal, craving, hunger) for God. The rich emotional life of the psalmists (see Ps. 27:4; 42:1-3; 63:1-8; 145:1-21) reveals a desire for God above all else and a willingness to cling to Him during times of aridity. Like them, we must aspire to a love that is beyond us (Eph.3:17-19).\n5. Increasing appreciation for the goodness of God: The distractions of the world make it difficult for us to develop a growing appreciation for our relationship with God. We forget that we can enjoy communion with Someone who is infinitely better than the objects of our most powerful natural desires. We must pray for the grace of gratitude and amazement at the unqualified goodness of God’s “kindness toward us in Christ Jesus” (Eph.2:7)\n6. Focused intention: What do you want (or want to want) more than anything else? God is pleased when we pursue Him with a hear that is intent on knowing and loving Him. He “begins His influence by working is us that we may have the will, and he complete it by working with us when we have the will” wrote Augustine. As our wills become more simplified and centered on becoming like Jesus, our love for Him will grow.\n7. Willingness to let God break our outward self: “Unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit. he who loves his life loses it, and he who hates his life in this world will keep it to life eternal” (John 12:24-25). The alabaster vial of the self-life must be broken (Mk.14:3) to release the perfume of the new self in Christ. If we wish to manifest the fragrance of Christ, we must allow God to bring us, in His time and way, to the painful place of brokenness on the cross of self-abandonment to Him.\n
  • 8. Desiring to please God more than impress people: If we want to be like Christ, we must embrace His governing goal to be pleasing to the Father (Jn.8:29; Hb. 10:7). The enemy of this glorious goal is the completing quest for human approval (Jn. 5:41; 44; 12:43; Gal. 1:10). We cannot have it both ways; we will either play to an Audience of One or to an audience of many. But in the end, only God’s opinion will matter.\n9. Treasuring God: Dallas Willard observes in The Divine Conspiracy that God “treasures those whom He has created, planned for, longed for, sorrowed over, redeemed, and befriended.” Just as God has treasured us, so He wants us to respond by treasuring Him above all else. “We love, because He first loved us” (1Jn.4:19). The more we realize how God loved and valued us, the greater our capacity to love and value Him. “You, my Joy!”\n10. Maturing in trust: As believers, we trust Christ for our eternal destiny, but most of us find it difficult to trust Him in our daily practice. As long as we pursue sinful strategies of seeking satisfaction on our own terms, our confidence will be misplaced. We must learn to trust Jesus enough to place our confidence in His power, not our performance.\n
  • 8. Desiring to please God more than impress people: If we want to be like Christ, we must embrace His governing goal to be pleasing to the Father (Jn.8:29; Hb. 10:7). The enemy of this glorious goal is the completing quest for human approval (Jn. 5:41; 44; 12:43; Gal. 1:10). We cannot have it both ways; we will either play to an Audience of One or to an audience of many. But in the end, only God’s opinion will matter.\n9. Treasuring God: Dallas Willard observes in The Divine Conspiracy that God “treasures those whom He has created, planned for, longed for, sorrowed over, redeemed, and befriended.” Just as God has treasured us, so He wants us to respond by treasuring Him above all else. “We love, because He first loved us” (1Jn.4:19). The more we realize how God loved and valued us, the greater our capacity to love and value Him. “You, my Joy!”\n10. Maturing in trust: As believers, we trust Christ for our eternal destiny, but most of us find it difficult to trust Him in our daily practice. As long as we pursue sinful strategies of seeking satisfaction on our own terms, our confidence will be misplaced. We must learn to trust Jesus enough to place our confidence in His power, not our performance.\n
  • 8. Desiring to please God more than impress people: If we want to be like Christ, we must embrace His governing goal to be pleasing to the Father (Jn.8:29; Hb. 10:7). The enemy of this glorious goal is the completing quest for human approval (Jn. 5:41; 44; 12:43; Gal. 1:10). We cannot have it both ways; we will either play to an Audience of One or to an audience of many. But in the end, only God’s opinion will matter.\n9. Treasuring God: Dallas Willard observes in The Divine Conspiracy that God “treasures those whom He has created, planned for, longed for, sorrowed over, redeemed, and befriended.” Just as God has treasured us, so He wants us to respond by treasuring Him above all else. “We love, because He first loved us” (1Jn.4:19). The more we realize how God loved and valued us, the greater our capacity to love and value Him. “You, my Joy!”\n10. Maturing in trust: As believers, we trust Christ for our eternal destiny, but most of us find it difficult to trust Him in our daily practice. As long as we pursue sinful strategies of seeking satisfaction on our own terms, our confidence will be misplaced. We must learn to trust Jesus enough to place our confidence in His power, not our performance.\n
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  • Devotional Spirituality

    1. 1. Devotional Spirituality Falling in Love with God Dr. Kenneth Boa and Bill Ibsen
    2. 2. Overview
    3. 3. Overview• Our Image of God
    4. 4. Overview• Our Image of God• The Practice of Sacred Reading
    5. 5. Overview• Our Image of God• The Practice of Sacred Reading• Falling in Love with God
    6. 6. The Goal of Devotional Spirituality
    7. 7. The Goal of Devotional Spirituality “But we all, with unveiled face beholding as in a mirror the glory of the Lord,
    8. 8. The Goal of Devotional Spirituality “But we all, with unveiled face beholding as in a mirror the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from glory to glory, just as from the Lord, the Spirit.” 2 Cor. 3:18
    9. 9. “There is but one God, the Father, fromwhom are all things and we exist through Him” (1 Cor. 8:6)
    10. 10. “What comes into our minds
    11. 11. “What comes into our minds when we think about God
    12. 12. “What comes into our minds when we think about Godis the most important thing about us.”
    13. 13. “What comes into our minds when we think about Godis the most important thing about us.” A.W. Tozer, The Knowledge of the Holy
    14. 14. “The worthand excellency of a soul
    15. 15. “The worthand excellency of a soul is to be measured by the object of its love.” Henry Scougal, The Life of God in the Soul of Man
    16. 16. We gradually come to resemble what we worship
    17. 17. We gradually come to resemble what we worship
    18. 18. We gradually come to resemble what we worship
    19. 19. We gradually come to resemble what we worship
    20. 20. Our Image of God
    21. 21. God is:
    22. 22. God is:Transcendent SovereignOmnipresent
    23. 23. God is:Transcendent Sovereign HolyOmnipresent Omniscient Indivisible Simple
    24. 24. God is:Transcendent Sovereign Unknowable HolyOmnipresent Speaking Omniscient Severe Indivisible Simple Loving Immanent
    25. 25. God Makes Himself Known Through His:
    26. 26. God Makes Himself Known Through His: * World
    27. 27. God Makes Himself Known Through His: * World
    28. 28. God Makes Himself Known Through His: * World
    29. 29. God Makes Himself Known Through His: * World
    30. 30. God Makes Himself Known Through His: * World * Word
    31. 31. God Makes Himself Known Through His: * World * Word * Works
    32. 32. God Makes Himself Known Through His: * World * Word * Works * Ways
    33. 33. Loving God through His World
    34. 34. Loving God through His World• Meditate on His created order
    35. 35. Loving God through His World• Meditate on His created order • It points beyond itself to its Creator
    36. 36. Loving God through His World• Meditate on His created order • It points beyond itself to its Creator • His unfathomable beauty, brilliance, genius, creativity, and power
    37. 37. “O Lord, how many are Your works!In wisdom You have made them all;
    38. 38. “O Lord, how many are Your works!In wisdom You have made them all; the earth is full of Your possessions” (Ps. 104:24)
    39. 39. Creationabounds with resplendent wonders onevery order of magnitude
    40. 40. “The heavens are telling of the glory ofGod; and their expanse is declaring the work of His hands.” (Ps. 19:1)
    41. 41. We are surroundedby mystery and majesty
    42. 42. Loving God through His Word
    43. 43. Loving God through His Word
    44. 44. Loving God through His Word “Open my eyes,that I may behold wonderful things from Your law” (Ps.119:18)
    45. 45. Informational Reading Formational ReadingSeeks to cover as much as possible Focuses on small portions A linear process An in-depth process Seeks to master the text Allows the text to master us The text as an object to use The text as a subject that shapes usAnalytical, critical, and judgmental Humble, submissive, willing, loving approach approach Problem-solving mentality Openness to mystery
    46. 46. Informational Reading Formational ReadingSeeks to cover as much as possible Focuses on small portions A linear process An in-depth process Seeks to master the text Allows the text to master us The text as an object to use The text as a subject that shapes usAnalytical, critical, and judgmental Humble, submissive, willing, loving approach approach Problem-solving mentality Openness to mystery
    47. 47. Informational Reading Formational ReadingSeeks to cover as much as possible Focuses on small portions A linear process An in-depth process Seeks to master the text Allows the text to master us The text as an object to use The text as a subject that shapes usAnalytical, critical, and judgmental Humble, submissive, willing, loving approach approach Problem-solving mentality Openness to mystery
    48. 48. Informational Reading Formational ReadingSeeks to cover as much as possible Focuses on small portions A linear process An in-depth process Seeks to master the text Allows the text to master us The text as an object to use The text as a subject that shapes usAnalytical, critical, and judgmental Humble, submissive, willing, loving approach approach Problem-solving mentality Openness to mystery
    49. 49. Informational Reading Formational ReadingSeeks to cover as much as possible Focuses on small portions A linear process An in-depth process Seeks to master the text Allows the text to master us The text as an object to use The text as a subject that shapes usAnalytical, critical, and judgmental Humble, submissive, willing, loving approach approach Problem-solving mentality Openness to mystery
    50. 50. Informational Reading Formational ReadingSeeks to cover as much as possible Focuses on small portions A linear process An in-depth process Seeks to master the text Allows the text to master us The text as an object to use The text as a subject that shapes usAnalytical, critical, and judgmental Humble, submissive, willing, loving approach approach Problem-solving mentality Openness to mystery
    51. 51. Informational Reading Formational ReadingSeeks to cover as much as possible Focuses on small portions A linear process An in-depth process Seeks to master the text Allows the text to master us The text as an object to use The text as a subject that shapes usAnalytical, critical, and judgmental Humble, submissive, willing, loving approach approach Problem-solving mentality Openness to mystery
    52. 52. Devotional Spirituality Emphasis
    53. 53. Devotional Spirituality Emphasis Speaking to the Heart
    54. 54. Devotional Spirituality EmphasisInforming the Speaking Mind to the Heart
    55. 55. Devotional Spirituality Emphasis Informing the Speaking Mind to the Heart ColdIntellectualism
    56. 56. Devotional Spirituality Emphasis Informing the Speaking Mind to the Heart Cold MindlessIntellectualism Enthusiasm
    57. 57. Loving God through His Works
    58. 58. Loving God through His Works “Say to God,‘How awesome are Your works!’
    59. 59. Loving God through His Works “Say to God,‘How awesome are Your works!’ Come and see the works of God Who is awesome in His deeds toward the sons of men. (Ps. 66:3, 5)
    60. 60. Recollection and Renewal
    61. 61. Recollection and Renewal “I shall remember the deeds of the Lord;
    62. 62. Recollection and Renewal “I shall remember the deeds of the Lord; Surely I will remember Your wonders of old. I will meditate on all Your work And muse on Your deeds.” (Ps. 77:11-12)
    63. 63. Review and Reflect Upon:
    64. 64. Review and Reflect Upon: • God’s historical acts of
    65. 65. Review and Reflect Upon: • God’s historical acts of • Provision
    66. 66. Review and Reflect Upon: • God’s historical acts of • Provision • Redemption
    67. 67. Review and Reflect Upon: • God’s historical acts of • Provision • Redemption • Protection
    68. 68. Give Prayerful Consideration of:
    69. 69. Give Prayerful Consideration of:• God’s mighty works of
    70. 70. Give Prayerful Consideration of:• God’s mighty works of • Creation
    71. 71. Give Prayerful Consideration of:• God’s mighty works of • Creation • Redemption
    72. 72. Give Prayerful Consideration of:• God’s mighty works of • Creation • Redemption • Consummation
    73. 73. Loving God through His Ways
    74. 74. Loving God through His Ways “He made known His ways to Moses,
    75. 75. Loving God through His Ways “He made known His ways to Moses, His acts to the sons of Israel” (Ps. 103:7)
    76. 76. Grateful Reflection
    77. 77. Grateful Reflection• “I will tell of what He has done for my soul”
    78. 78. Grateful Reflection• “I will tell of what He has done for my soul” • Answering you
    79. 79. Grateful Reflection• “I will tell of what He has done for my soul” • Answering you • Drawing you
    80. 80. Grateful Reflection• “I will tell of what He has done for my soul” • Answering you • Drawing you • Carrying you
    81. 81. Grateful Reflection• “I will tell of what He has done for my soul” • Answering you • Drawing you • Carrying you • Providing for you
    82. 82. Grateful Reflection• “I will tell of what He has done for my soul” • Answering you • Drawing you • Carrying you • Providing for you • Comforting you
    83. 83. Grateful Reflection• “I will tell of what He has done for my soul” • Encouraging you
    84. 84. Grateful Reflection• “I will tell of what He has done for my soul” • Encouraging you • Exhorting you
    85. 85. Grateful Reflection• “I will tell of what He has done for my soul” • Encouraging you • Exhorting you • Disciplining you
    86. 86. Grateful Reflection• “I will tell of what He has done for my soul” • Encouraging you • Exhorting you • Disciplining you • Stripping you of hope in the things of this world
    87. 87. Reflection Upon His Attributes
    88. 88. Reflection Upon His Attributes • His Person
    89. 89. Reflection Upon His Attributes • His Person • His Powers
    90. 90. Reflection Upon His Attributes • His Person • His Powers • His Perfections
    91. 91. God AloneRepresents:
    92. 92. God AloneRepresents: • The True
    93. 93. God AloneRepresents: • The True • The Good
    94. 94. God AloneRepresents: • The True • The Good • The Beautiful
    95. 95. The Practice of Sacred Reading
    96. 96. 4 Movements of Lectio Divina “Sacred Reading”:
    97. 97. 4 Movements of Lectio Divina “Sacred Reading”: • Reading
    98. 98. 4 Movements of Lectio Divina “Sacred Reading”: • Reading • Meditation
    99. 99. 4 Movements of Lectio Divina “Sacred Reading”: • Reading • Meditation • Prayer
    100. 100. 4 Movements of Lectio Divina “Sacred Reading”: • Reading • Meditation • Prayer • Contemplation
    101. 101. Spiritual Reading (Lectio)
    102. 102. Spiritual Reading (Lectio) • Formational, not informational
    103. 103. Spiritual Reading (Lectio) • Formational, not informational • Voluntary immersion
    104. 104. Spiritual Reading (Lectio) • Formational, not informational • Voluntary immersion • Seeks to receive
    105. 105. Spiritual Reading (Lectio) • Formational, not informational • Voluntary immersion • Seeks to receive • Seeks to respond
    106. 106. Spiritual Reading (Lectio) • Formational, not informational • Voluntary immersion • Seeks to receive • Seeks to respond • Melds revelation with experience
    107. 107. “Blessed Lord,
    108. 108. “Blessed Lord, who hast caused all holy Scriptures
    109. 109. “Blessed Lord, who hast caused all holy Scriptures to be written for our learning;
    110. 110. “Blessed Lord, who hast caused all holy Scriptures to be written for our learning; Grant that we may in such wise
    111. 111. “Blessed Lord, who hast caused all holy Scriptures to be written for our learning; Grant that we may in such wise hear them
    112. 112. “Blessed Lord, who hast caused all holy Scriptures to be written for our learning; Grant that we may in such wise hear them read,
    113. 113. “Blessed Lord, who hast caused all holy Scriptures to be written for our learning; Grant that we may in such wise hear them read, mark,
    114. 114. “Blessed Lord, who hast caused all holy Scriptures to be written for our learning; Grant that we may in such wise hear them read, mark, learn,
    115. 115. “Blessed Lord, who hast caused all holy Scriptures to be written for our learning; Grant that we may in such wise hear them read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest them...” 1928 Book of Common Prayer
    116. 116. Meditation (Meditatio)
    117. 117. Meditation (Meditatio)* Seek to saturate andimmerse
    118. 118. Meditation (Meditatio)* Seek to saturate andimmerse* Receive God’spersonal message
    119. 119. Meditation (Meditatio)* Seek to saturate andimmerse* Receive God’spersonal message* Penetrate Scriptures
    120. 120. Meditation (Meditatio)* Seek to saturate andimmerse* Receive God’spersonal message* Penetrate Scriptures* Scriptures penetrateheart
    121. 121. Meditation (Meditatio)* Seek to saturate andimmerse* Receive God’spersonal message* Penetrate Scriptures* Scriptures penetrateheart* Mental + Heart Prayer
    122. 122. Prayer (Oratio)
    123. 123. Prayer (Oratio) • Interiorizing what God has spoken in Meditatio
    124. 124. Prayer (Oratio) • Interiorizing what God has spoken in Meditatio • Response of the heart
    125. 125. Prayer (Oratio) • Interiorizing what God has spoken in Meditatio • Response of the heart • Sweet/Consoling or Painful/Revealing
    126. 126. Contemplation(Contemplatio)
    127. 127. Contemplation (Contemplatio)* Contemplation andmeditation are different
    128. 128. Contemplation (Contemplatio)* Contemplation andmeditation are different* Its language is silence
    129. 129. Contemplation (Contemplatio)* Contemplation andmeditation are different* Its language is silence* Its action is receptivity
    130. 130. Contemplation (Contemplatio)* Contemplation andmeditation are different* Its language is silence* Its action is receptivity* It is a theologicalgrace, not a formula
    131. 131. Meditative Prayer Contemplative Prayer Speech Silence Activity Receptivity Discursive thought Loss of mental images and concepts Vocal and mental prayer Wordless prayer and interior stillnessNatural faculties of reason and Mysterious darkening of the natural imagination faculties Affective feelings Loss of feelings Reading and reflection Inability to meditate Doing Being Seeking Receiving Talking to Jesus Entering into the prayer of Jesus
    132. 132. Meditative Prayer Contemplative Prayer Speech Silence Activity Receptivity Discursive thought Loss of mental images and concepts Vocal and mental prayer Wordless prayer and interior stillnessNatural faculties of reason and Mysterious darkening of the natural imagination faculties Affective feelings Loss of feelings Reading and reflection Inability to meditate Doing Being Seeking Receiving Talking to Jesus Entering into the prayer of Jesus
    133. 133. Meditative Prayer Contemplative Prayer Speech Silence Activity Receptivity Discursive thought Loss of mental images and concepts Vocal and mental prayer Wordless prayer and interior stillnessNatural faculties of reason and Mysterious darkening of the natural imagination faculties Affective feelings Loss of feelings Reading and reflection Inability to meditate Doing Being Seeking Receiving Talking to Jesus Entering into the prayer of Jesus
    134. 134. Meditative Prayer Contemplative Prayer Speech Silence Activity Receptivity Discursive thought Loss of mental images and concepts Vocal and mental prayer Wordless prayer and interior stillnessNatural faculties of reason and Mysterious darkening of the natural imagination faculties Affective feelings Loss of feelings Reading and reflection Inability to meditate Doing Being Seeking Receiving Talking to Jesus Entering into the prayer of Jesus
    135. 135. Meditative Prayer Contemplative Prayer Speech Silence Activity Receptivity Discursive thought Loss of mental images and concepts Vocal and mental prayer Wordless prayer and interior stillnessNatural faculties of reason and Mysterious darkening of the natural imagination faculties Affective feelings Loss of feelings Reading and reflection Inability to meditate Doing Being Seeking Receiving Talking to Jesus Entering into the prayer of Jesus
    136. 136. Meditative Prayer Contemplative Prayer Speech Silence Activity Receptivity Discursive thought Loss of mental images and concepts Vocal and mental prayer Wordless prayer and interior stillnessNatural faculties of reason and Mysterious darkening of the natural imagination faculties Affective feelings Loss of feelings Reading and reflection Inability to meditate Doing Being Seeking Receiving Talking to Jesus Entering into the prayer of Jesus
    137. 137. Meditative Prayer Contemplative Prayer Speech Silence Activity Receptivity Discursive thought Loss of mental images and concepts Vocal and mental prayer Wordless prayer and interior stillnessNatural faculties of reason and Mysterious darkening of the natural imagination faculties Affective feelings Loss of feelings Reading and reflection Inability to meditate Doing Being Seeking Receiving Talking to Jesus Entering into the prayer of Jesus
    138. 138. Meditative Prayer Contemplative Prayer Speech Silence Activity Receptivity Discursive thought Loss of mental images and concepts Vocal and mental prayer Wordless prayer and interior stillnessNatural faculties of reason and Mysterious darkening of the natural imagination faculties Affective feelings Loss of feelings Reading and reflection Inability to meditate Doing Being Seeking Receiving Talking to Jesus Entering into the prayer of Jesus
    139. 139. Meditative Prayer Contemplative Prayer Speech Silence Activity Receptivity Discursive thought Loss of mental images and concepts Vocal and mental prayer Wordless prayer and interior stillnessNatural faculties of reason and Mysterious darkening of the natural imagination faculties Affective feelings Loss of feelings Reading and reflection Inability to meditate Doing Being Seeking Receiving Talking to Jesus Entering into the prayer of Jesus
    140. 140. Meditative Prayer Contemplative Prayer Speech Silence Activity Receptivity Discursive thought Loss of mental images and concepts Vocal and mental prayer Wordless prayer and interior stillnessNatural faculties of reason and Mysterious darkening of the natural imagination faculties Affective feelings Loss of feelings Reading and reflection Inability to meditate Doing Being Seeking Receiving Talking to Jesus Entering into the prayer of Jesus
    141. 141. Meditative Prayer Contemplative Prayer Speech Silence Activity Receptivity Discursive thought Loss of mental images and concepts Vocal and mental prayer Wordless prayer and interior stillnessNatural faculties of reason and Mysterious darkening of the natural imagination faculties Affective feelings Loss of feelings Reading and reflection Inability to meditate Doing Being Seeking Receiving Talking to Jesus Entering into the prayer of Jesus
    142. 142. Lectio Meditatio Oratio Contemplati o Read Meditate Pray Abide Lips Mind Heart Spirit Seek Find Knock Open Food Chew Savor Fill
    143. 143. Lectio Meditatio Oratio Contemplati o Read Meditate Pray Abide Lips Mind Heart Spirit Seek Find Knock Open Food Chew Savor Fill
    144. 144. Lectio Meditatio Oratio Contemplati o Read Meditate Pray Abide Lips Mind Heart Spirit Seek Find Knock Open Food Chew Savor Fill
    145. 145. Lectio Meditatio Oratio Contemplati o Read Meditate Pray Abide Lips Mind Heart Spirit Seek Find Knock Open Food Chew Savor Fill
    146. 146. Lectio Meditatio Oratio Contemplati o Read Meditate Pray Abide Lips Mind Heart Spirit Seek Find Knock Open Food Chew Savor Fill
    147. 147. Falling in Love with God
    148. 148. The World Is too Much with Us
    149. 149. The World Is too Much with Us • Visible
    150. 150. The World Is too Much with Us • Visible •Tangible
    151. 151. The World Is too Much with Us • Visible •Tangible • Intrusive
    152. 152. The World Is too Much with Us • Visible •Tangible • Intrusive • Compelling
    153. 153. The World Is too Much with Us • Visible •Tangible • Intrusive • Compelling • Clamorous
    154. 154. God Is Our Highest Good
    155. 155. God Is Our Highest Good• Renunciation
    156. 156. God Is Our Highest Good• Renunciation • Apprehending my spiritual poverty rather than a commitment to material poverty
    157. 157. God Is Our Highest Good• Renunciation • Apprehending my spiritual poverty rather than a commitment to material poverty • Lest the gifts of God replace the place of God
    158. 158. God Is Our Highest Good• Renunciation • Apprehending my spiritual poverty rather than a commitment to material poverty • Lest the gifts of God replace the place of God • Wanting things from Him rather than wanting Him alone
    159. 159. The more we want to want Him
    160. 160. The more we want to want Him the more we desire to desire Him
    161. 161. The more we want to want Him the more we desire to desire Him the more we will be satisfied
    162. 162. Implications of Incarnation
    163. 163. Implications of Incarnation • Jesus is the supreme example among all religions of God’s character
    164. 164. Implications of Incarnation • Jesus is the supreme example among all religions of God’s character • God revealed the folly of religion of merit
    165. 165. Implications of Incarnation • Jesus is the supreme example among all religions of God’s character • God revealed the folly of religion of merit • Incarnation reveals the lie behind self- reliance
    166. 166. Implications of Incarnation • Jesus is the supreme example among all religions of God’s character • God revealed the folly of religion of merit • Incarnation reveals the lie behind self- reliance • Jesus’ lordship gives Him the right to rule my life
    167. 167. Know Him
    168. 168. Love HimKnow Him
    169. 169. Obey HimLove HimKnow Him
    170. 170. Worship HimObey Him Love Him Know Him
    171. 171. Devotional Spirituality:Cultivating a Passion for Christ
    172. 172. Enemies of Spiritual Passion
    173. 173. Enemies of Spiritual Passion• Unresolved areas of disobedience
    174. 174. Enemies of Spiritual Passion• Unresolved areas of disobedience• Complacency
    175. 175. Enemies of Spiritual Passion• Unresolved areas of disobedience• Complacency• Erosion in spiritual disciplines
    176. 176. Enemies of Spiritual Passion• Unresolved areas of disobedience• Complacency• Erosion in spiritual disciplines• External obedience
    177. 177. Enemies of Spiritual Passion
    178. 178. Enemies of Spiritual Passion• Loving truth more than Christ
    179. 179. Enemies of Spiritual Passion• Loving truth more than Christ• Elevating service and ministry above Christ
    180. 180. Enemies of Spiritual Passion• Loving truth more than Christ• Elevating service and ministry above Christ• Greater commitment to institutions than to Christ
    181. 181. Enemies of Spiritual Passion• Loving truth more than Christ• Elevating service and ministry above Christ• Greater commitment to institutions than to Christ• A merely functional relationship
    182. 182. Sources of Spiritual Passion
    183. 183. Sources of Spiritual Passion• Growing awareness of God as a person
    184. 184. Sources of Spiritual Passion• Growing awareness of God as a person• Sitting at Jesus’ feet
    185. 185. Sources of Spiritual Passion• Growing awareness of God as a person• Sitting at Jesus’ feet• Imitating the Master
    186. 186. Sources of Spiritual Passion
    187. 187. Sources of Spiritual Passion• Cultivating spiritual affections
    188. 188. Sources of Spiritual Passion• Cultivating spiritual affections• Increasing appreciation for the goodness of God
    189. 189. Sources of Spiritual Passion• Cultivating spiritual affections• Increasing appreciation for the goodness of God• Focused intention
    190. 190. Sources of Spiritual Passion• Cultivating spiritual affections• Increasing appreciation for the goodness of God• Focused intention• Willingness to let God break our outward self
    191. 191. Sources of Spiritual Passion
    192. 192. Sources of Spiritual Passion• Desiring to please God more than impress people
    193. 193. Sources of Spiritual Passion• Desiring to please God more than impress people•Treasuring God
    194. 194. Sources of Spiritual Passion• Desiring to please God more than impress people•Treasuring God• Maturing in trust
    195. 195. “It is only with the heart that one cansee rightly;
    196. 196. “It is only with the heart that one cansee rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.” Antione de Saint-Exupery “The Little Prince”
    197. 197. + Degrees of Intimacy - of Intimacy Spectrum
    198. 198. Creation - Degrees of Intimacy Spectrum of Intimacy +
    199. 199. Creation - Clay Degrees of Intimacy Spectrum of Intimacy +
    200. 200. Creation - Clay Degrees of IntimacyVine Branches Spectrum of Intimacy +
    201. 201. Creation - Clay Degrees of IntimacyVine Branches Spectrum Sheep of Intimacy +
    202. 202. Creation - Clay Degrees of IntimacyVine Branches Spectrum Sheep of Servant/ Slave Intimacy +
    203. 203. Creation - Clay Degrees of IntimacyVine Branches Spectrum Sheep of Servant/ Slave Intimacy Adopted Child +
    204. 204. Creation - Clay Degrees of IntimacyVine Branches Spectrum Sheep of Servant/ Slave Intimacy Adopted Child Friend +
    205. 205. Creation - Clay Degrees of IntimacyVine Branches Spectrum Sheep of Servant/ Slave Intimacy Adopted Child Friend Lover +
    206. 206. Creation - Clay Degrees of IntimacyVine Branches Spectrum Sheep of Servant/ Slave Intimacy Adopted Child Friend Lover +
    207. 207. Creation God as - Clay Transcendent Degrees of IntimacyVine Branches Spectrum Sheep of Servant/ Slave Intimacy Adopted Child Friend Lover +
    208. 208. Creation God as - Clay Transcendent Degrees of IntimacyVine Branches Spectrum Sheep of Servant/ Slave Intimacy Adopted Child Friend God as Lover Immanent +
    209. 209. Creation God as - Clay Transcendent Degrees of Intimacy VineBranches Spectrum Sheep ofServant/ Slave IntimacyAdopted Child Friend God as Lover Immanent +
    210. 210. Creation God as - Clay Transcendent Degrees of Intimacy Vine Branches SpectrumWe are Sheep of Servant/all these Slave Intimacy Adopted Child Friend God as Lover Immanent +
    211. 211. Creation God as - Clay Transcendent Degrees of Intimacy Vine Branches SpectrumWe are Sheep of Servant/all these Slave Intimacy Adopted Child Friend God as Lover Immanent +
    212. 212. The End
    213. 213. Reflections Ministries Resources
    214. 214. Reflections Ministries ResourcesReflections - A free monthly teaching letter
    215. 215. Reflections Ministries ResourcesReflections - A free monthly teaching letterReflectionsMinistries.org website - DailyGrowth email and free text and audio resources
    216. 216. KENBOA.ORG KenBoa.org ken_boa Kenneth Boa

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