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EU-Contract Project
EU-Contract Project
EU-Contract Project
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EU-Contract Project

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Contract based Systems Engineering Methods for …

Contract based Systems Engineering Methods for
Verifiable Cross-Organisational Networked Business Applications

Published in: Technology, Business
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  • 1. Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 2. Contract based Systems Engineering Methods for Veri able Cross-Organisational Networked Business Applications Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 3. The Project Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 4. IST-CONTRACT Project Parameters 3 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 5. IST-CONTRACT Project Parameters  IST Framework 6 STREP  Area: Digital Business Project Ecosystems  Funded from the 5th Call IST  Costs:  Focus:  Total Cost: 2,509,156 Euro  Contracts for Distributed  Req. Cont: 1,850,000 Euro Applications Engineering  Dates:  Contracts as a basis for formal veri cation  Start: 1st Sept 2006  e-business applications  End: 31st May 2009  Project ID: FP6-034418 3 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 6. IST-CONTRACT Project Partners 4 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 7. IST-CONTRACT Project Partners  Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya  Fujitsu EST Gmbh  Czech Technical University of Prague  King's College London  Imperial College London  3scale Networks S. L.  CertiCon A. S.  Lostwax Media Ltd.  Y‘All B. V. 4 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 8. Why Contracts? Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 9. The problem: Engineering applications in Cross Organisational Service Oriented Computing environments 6 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 10. The problem: Engineering applications in Cross Organisational Service Oriented Computing environments  The behaviour of a software application depends upon:  Code, Execution Context (environment), Inputs  In a multi-organisational Distributed Business Application application:  No-one has access to all the code  No-one has access to all the execution context  (Possibly) no-one has access to all inputs  Question: How do you predict the potential run-time behaviour of such applications? 6 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 11. Project Core Idea 7 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 12. Project Core Idea  Normal Veri cation approaches for software will not work without full source code access. In Contract: Instead of predicting actions w.r.t code, predict actions w.r.t obligations, rights, permissions in Contracts  Impacts:  Short term: application design tool  Longer term: formal verification of distributed business applications 7 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 13. Where are the Contracts? 8 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 14. Where are the Contracts?  Contracts:  Are the explicit, tangible representation of service interdependencies  Make explicit the obligations of each of the parties in the transactions  Make explicit what each system can expect from another  Bind together:  The electronic interaction (web services) with  The business obligation with  Prediction as to whether the system will function to get the job done 8 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 15. Project Results Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 16. What does the Project Deliver? 10 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 17. What does the Project Deliver?  Contract Framework – formal theoretical framework for distributed business application modelling based on the interchange of (electronic) contracts  Contracting Language – speci cations of how the actors should interact electronically and how they should communicate  Contract Execution Environment for Web services – to create and execute contract-mediated business interactions  Verification, Monitoring and Analysis tools – to analyze and inspect deployed systems 10 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 18. What does the Project Deliver?  Contract Framework – formal theoretical framework for distributed business application modelling based on the interchange of (electronic) contracts  Contracting Language – speci cations of how the actors should interact electronically and how they should communicate  Contract Execution Environment for Web services – to create and execute contract-mediated business interactions  Verification, Monitoring and Analysis tools – to analyze and inspect deployed systems 11 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 19. What does the Project Deliver?  Contract Framework – formal theoretical framework for distributed business application modelling based on the interchange of (electronic) contracts  Contracting Language – speci cations of how the actors should interact electronically and how they should communicate  Contract Execution Environment for Web services – to create and execute contract-mediated business interactions  Verification, Monitoring and Analysis tools – to analyze and inspect deployed systems 11 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 20. Overall Contract Framework 12 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 21. Overall Contract Framework 12 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 22. Contract Framework: novel features 13 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 23. Contract Framework: novel features  Compatible with, and superset of, WS-Agreement 13 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 24. Contract Framework: novel features  Compatible with, and superset of, WS-Agreement  Representation of applications based on state-of-the-art research on Normative Systems 13 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 25. Contract Framework: novel features  Compatible with, and superset of, WS-Agreement  Representation of applications based on state-of-the-art research on Normative Systems 13 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 26. Contract Framework: novel features  Compatible with, and superset of, WS-Agreement  Representation of applications based on state-of-the-art research on Normative Systems  Considers arbitrary contract-related states, not just violation or success, to avoid possible future violations 13 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 27. Contract Framework: novel features  Compatible with, and superset of, WS-Agreement  Representation of applications based on state-of-the-art research on Normative Systems  Considers arbitrary contract-related states, not just violation or success, to avoid possible future violations  Being extended to cope with complex, partially observable environments  Architecture itself de ned in a contractual way 13 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 28. What does the Project Deliver?  Contract Framework – formal theoretical framework for distributed business application modelling based on the interchange of (electronic) contracts  Contracting Language – speci cations of how the actors should interact electronically and how they should communicate  Contract Execution Environment for Web services – to create and execute contract-mediated business interactions  Verification, Monitoring and Analysis tools – to analyze and inspect deployed systems 14 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 29. What does the Project Deliver?  Contract Framework – formal theoretical framework for distributed business application modelling based on the interchange of (electronic) contracts  Contracting Language – speci cations of how the actors should interact electronically and how they should communicate  Contract Execution Environment for Web services – to create and execute contract-mediated business interactions  Verification, Monitoring and Analysis tools – to analyze and inspect deployed systems 14 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 30. New Electronic Contracting Language 15 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 31. New Electronic Contracting Language ‣ Language based in latest Normative Systems research ‣ Includes semantic-rich service-to-service interaction, based on intentions and commitments ‣ This allows the de nition of formal semantics  ease veri cation ‣ Language covers all levels of communication ‣ Not only centered in the expression of electronic contracts ‣ A language to express statements about contracts ‣ Protocols for contract handling ‣ Includes connection with domain (context) models and ontologies ‣ Language allows for full contracts and contract templates 15 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 32. Contracting Language Communication Model 16 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 33. Contracting Language Communication Model Interaction st Context Layer context: Reque S2 Protocol e handling: S1 Agre Interaction Protocol Layer Message envelope + intentionality: from service S1 to service S2 … Contractual Message Layer Request[cancel(contract C1)] Ontology Statements / actions related to contracts: Message Content Layer cancel(contract C1) A contract: Contract Layer “the workshop is obliged to repair the car in 2 days” Domain Domain terms: car, workshop, repair Ontology Domain Ontology Layer 16 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 34. Electronic Contracts: components 17 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 35. Electronic Contracts: components 17 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 36. Electronic Contract: example <ISTContract> ContractName="AftercareContract" StartingDate="2007-01-01T00:00:00+01:00" EndingDate="2008-01-01T00:00:00+01:00" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:noNamespaceSchemaLocation="http://www.ist-contract.org/schemas/ISTContract.xsd"> <Contextualization> ... </Contextualization> <Definitions> ... </Definitions> <Clauses> ... </Clauses> </ISTContract> 18 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 37. Electronic Contract: example <ISTContract> ContractName="AftercareContract" <ContractParties> StartingDate="2007-01-01T00:00:00+01:00" <Agent AgentName="KLM"> EndingDate="2008-01-01T00:00:00+01:00" < AgentReference>http://www.ist-contract.org:8080/services/KLM xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" </AgentReference> xsi:noNamespaceSchemaLocation="http://www.ist-contract.org/schemas/ISTContract.xsd"> <Contextualization> <AgentDescription>Royal Dutch Airlines</AgentDescription> ... </Agent> </Contextualization> … <Definitions> </ContractParties> ... … </Definitions> <RoleEnactmentList> <Clauses> <RoleEnactmentElement AgentName="KLM" ... RoleName=“Operator"/> </Clauses> … </ISTContract> </RoleEnactmentList> 18 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 38. Electronic Contract: example <ISTContract> <Clause> ContractName="AftercareContract" … <ContractParties> StartingDate="2007-01-01T00:00:00+01:00" <ExplorationCondition> <Agent AgentName="KLM"> <BooleanExpression> EndingDate="2008-01-01T00:00:00+01:00" Before(2007-07-1T15:30:30+01:00) < AgentReference>http://www.ist-contract.org:8080/services/KLM xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" </BooleanExpression> </AgentReference> xsi:noNamespaceSchemaLocation="http://www.ist-contract.org/schemas/ISTContract.xsd"> <Contextualization> </ExplorationCondition> Dutch Airlines</AgentDescription> <AgentDescription>Royal ... <DeonticStatement> </Agent> <Modality><OBLIGATION></Modality> </Contextualization> … <Who> <RoleName>Operator</RoleName> </Who> <Definitions> </ContractParties> <What> ... … <ActionExpression> </Definitions> <RoleEnactmentList> PayForEngine(amount, engine, Operator, EngineManufacturer) <Clauses> <RoleEnactmentElement AgentName="KLM" </ActionExpression> ... </What> RoleName=“Operator"/> </Clauses> …</DeonticStatement> </ISTContract> </Clause> </RoleEnactmentList> 18 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 39. What does the Project Deliver?  Contract Framework – formal theoretical framework for distributed business application modelling based on the interchange of (electronic) contracts  Contracting Language – speci cations of how the actors should interact electronically and how they should communicate  Contract Execution Environment for Web services – to create and execute contract-mediated business interactions  Verification, Monitoring and Analysis tools – to analyze and inspect deployed systems 19 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 40. What does the Project Deliver?  Contract Framework – formal theoretical framework for distributed business application modelling based on the interchange of (electronic) contracts  Contracting Language – speci cations of how the actors should interact electronically and how they should communicate  Contract Execution Environment for Web services – to create and execute contract-mediated business interactions  Verification, Monitoring and Analysis tools – to analyze and inspect deployed systems 19 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 41. Example of deployment 20 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 42. Example of deployment 20 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 43. Example of deployment bookSeller bookBuyer Sensor Sensor Contract Repository Notary (Observer Contract + manager Monitor) Analyzer 21 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 44. Example of deployment bookSeller bookBuyer Sensor Sensor Contract Repository Notary (Observer Contract + manager Monitor) Analyzer 21 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 45. What does the Project Deliver?  Contract Framework – formal theoretical framework for distributed business application modelling based on the interchange of (electronic) contracts  Contracting Language – speci cations of how the actors should interact electronically and how they should communicate  Contract Execution Environment for Web services – to create and execute contract-mediated business interactions  Verification, Monitoring and Analysis tools – to analyze and inspect deployed systems 22 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 46. What does the Project Deliver?  Contract Framework – formal theoretical framework for distributed business application modelling based on the interchange of (electronic) contracts  Contracting Language – speci cations of how the actors should interact electronically and how they should communicate  Contract Execution Environment for Web services – to create and execute contract-mediated business interactions  Verification, Monitoring and Analysis tools – to analyze and inspect deployed systems 22 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 47. Verification Tool 23 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 48. Verification Tool  Off-line tool implements verification mechanisms for contract-governed systems. 23 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 49. Verification Tool  Off-line tool implements verification mechanisms for contract-governed systems.  Capable to verify system behaviours through notions of compliance/violations of intended behaviours. 23 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 50. Verification Tool  Off-line tool implements verification mechanisms for contract-governed systems.  Capable to verify system behaviours through notions of compliance/violations of intended behaviours.  Based in the formal framework and the contract language semantics. 23 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 51. Verification Tool  Off-line tool implements verification mechanisms for contract-governed systems.  Capable to verify system behaviours through notions of compliance/violations of intended behaviours.  Based in the formal framework and the contract language semantics.  Ability to check systems with large state spaces 23 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 52. Verification Tool  Off-line tool implements verification mechanisms for contract-governed systems.  Capable to verify system behaviours through notions of compliance/violations of intended behaviours.  Based in the formal framework and the contract language semantics.  Ability to check systems with large state spaces  Capable to generate counterexamples when dangerous or conflicting situations are detected 23 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 53. Verification Tool  Off-line tool implements verification mechanisms for contract-governed systems.  Capable to verify system behaviours through notions of compliance/violations of intended behaviours.  Based in the formal framework and the contract language semantics.  Ability to check systems with large state spaces  Capable to generate counterexamples when dangerous or conflicting situations are detected  User friendly GUI 23 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 54. Verification Tool components/process 24 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 55. Verification Tool components/process 24 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 56. Service Monitoring Tool 25 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 57. Service Monitoring Tool  Checks conformance of an individual service execution to specification (contracts) at runtime. 25 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 58. Service Monitoring Tool  Checks conformance of an individual service execution to specification (contracts) at runtime.  Specifically, monitors compliance/violations of obligations of contract clauses which serve as warning to the service. 25 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 59. Service Monitoring Tool  Checks conformance of an individual service execution to specification (contracts) at runtime.  Specifically, monitors compliance/violations of obligations of contract clauses which serve as warning to the service.  Capable to monitor service behaviours over large state spaces. 25 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 60. Service Monitoring Tool  Checks conformance of an individual service execution to specification (contracts) at runtime.  Specifically, monitors compliance/violations of obligations of contract clauses which serve as warning to the service.  Capable to monitor service behaviours over large state spaces.  Shown useful for monitoring multiple, long running contracts in parallel 25 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 61. Service Monitoring Process 26 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 62. Service Monitoring Process 26 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 63. Global Monitoring Tool 27 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 64. Global Monitoring Tool  Global Monitors detect and report on violations and fulfilment of contract clauses, specially those specifying complex behaviours of contract party agents. 27 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 65. Global Monitoring Tool  Global Monitors detect and report on violations and fulfilment of contract clauses, specially those specifying complex behaviours of contract party agents.  Disjunctions and conjunctions of circumstances 27 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 66. Global Monitoring Tool  Global Monitors detect and report on violations and fulfilment of contract clauses, specially those specifying complex behaviours of contract party agents.  Disjunctions and conjunctions of circumstances  Synchronisation of multiple agents’ actions 27 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 67. Global Monitoring Tool  Global Monitors detect and report on violations and fulfilment of contract clauses, specially those specifying complex behaviours of contract party agents.  Disjunctions and conjunctions of circumstances  Synchronisation of multiple agents’ actions  Accurate monitoring ensures enforcement mechanisms (sanctions) are only applied when appropriate.. 27 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 68. Global Monitoring Tool  Global Monitors detect and report on violations and fulfilment of contract clauses, specially those specifying complex behaviours of contract party agents.  Disjunctions and conjunctions of circumstances  Synchronisation of multiple agents’ actions  Accurate monitoring ensures enforcement mechanisms (sanctions) are only applied when appropriate..  Gives confidence to contract parties that the whole business interaction will evolve as expected. 27 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 69. Global Monitor process 28 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 70. Global Monitor process  Gets inputs from the Observers 28 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 71. Global Monitor process  Gets inputs from the Observers  Tracks the status of each clause of the running contract: 28 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 72. Global Monitor process  Gets inputs from the Observers  Tracks the status of each clause of the running contract:  A is pre-activation 28 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 73. Global Monitor process  Gets inputs from the Observers  Tracks the status of each clause of the running contract:  A is pre-activation  B is activated but not fulfilled 28 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 74. Global Monitor process  Gets inputs from the Observers  Tracks the status of each clause of the running contract:  A is pre-activation  B is activated but not fulfilled  C is fulfilled 28 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 75. Global Monitor process  Gets inputs from the Observers  Tracks the status of each clause of the running contract:  A is pre-activation  B is activated but not fulfilled  C is fulfilled  If in state B but cannot move to state C (because of deadline expiring), then have violated clause deliver (Seller, Buyer, Goods)‫‏‬ deadline: T + 3 days observer: OrderObserver A B C order (Buyer, Seller, Goods, T)‫‏‬ deadline: N/A observer: OrderObserver 28 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 76. Contract Editor 29 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 77. Contract Editor  Editor to compose contract templates and instances according to the Contracting Language 29 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 78. Contract Editor  Editor to compose contract templates and instances according to the Contracting Language  Functions over contracts and contract templates: 29 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 79. Contract Editor  Editor to compose contract templates and instances according to the Contracting Language  Functions over contracts and contract templates:  storage 29 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 80. Contract Editor  Editor to compose contract templates and instances according to the Contracting Language  Functions over contracts and contract templates:  storage  retrieval 29 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 81. Contract Editor  Editor to compose contract templates and instances according to the Contracting Language  Functions over contracts and contract templates:  storage  retrieval  modification 29 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 82. Contract Editor  Editor to compose contract templates and instances according to the Contracting Language  Functions over contracts and contract templates:  storage  retrieval  modification  deletion 29 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 83. Contract Editor  Editor to compose contract templates and instances according to the Contracting Language  Functions over contracts and contract templates:  storage  retrieval  modification  deletion  Publishing of templates and instances into a contract environment by means of the Contract Store 29 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 84. Contract Analyser 30 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 85. Contract Analyser  Enables the administrator to inspect the runtime state and behaviour of a contract-based system 30 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 86. Contract Analyser  Enables the administrator to inspect the runtime state and behaviour of a contract-based system  Collects information from several sources and presents them in an integrated view 30 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 87. Contract Analyser  Enables the administrator to inspect the runtime state and behaviour of a contract-based system  Collects information from several sources and presents them in an integrated view  contracts deployed in the system and their status 30 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 88. Contract Analyser  Enables the administrator to inspect the runtime state and behaviour of a contract-based system  Collects information from several sources and presents them in an integrated view  contracts deployed in the system and their status  contract-related actions performed in the system 30 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 89. Contract Analyser  Enables the administrator to inspect the runtime state and behaviour of a contract-based system  Collects information from several sources and presents them in an integrated view  contracts deployed in the system and their status  contract-related actions performed in the system  communication between contract parties 30 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 90. Contract Analyser  Enables the administrator to inspect the runtime state and behaviour of a contract-based system  Collects information from several sources and presents them in an integrated view  contracts deployed in the system and their status  contract-related actions performed in the system  communication between contract parties  contract-fulfilment state 30 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 91. Contract Analyser – Information Sources 31 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 92. Contract Analyser – Information Sources 31 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 93. [Here CTU video on Contract cycle and analysis] Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 94. Practical Scenarios Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 95. Project Practical Scenarios 34 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 96. Project Practical Scenarios  Modular Certification Testing  Car Insurance Brokerage  Provided by CertiCon  Provided by Y’All  Example: European Computer  Car insurance damage Driving license claims – contracting between insurers, garages  Aerospace Aftermarket and the client  Provided by Lost Wax  Aerospace engine aftermarket planning and management 34 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 97. 1. Modular Certification Testing 35 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 98. 1. Modular Certification Testing Developed by CertiCon A. S. for multi level heterogeneous licensing environments  WASET is an information system run by CertiCon to support administration of the process Used for computer literacy testing ECDL (European Computer Driving Licence) in cooperation with Czech Society for Cybernetics and Informatics (CSKI) – national ECDL licensee.  CertiCon A.S. provides business and IT support for CSKI via WASET system 35 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 99. 1. Modular Certi cation Testing 36 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 100. 1. Modular Certi cation Testing National licensee Elementary Service Providers National licensee  Provides certi cation Test Rooms Testers Test room  Provides equipped test room  Certi ed by national licensee Tester  Supervises test session Test Centres  Certi ed by national licensee Test Center  Certi ed national licensee  Organize test session  Sells testing to candidate Candidate 36 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 101. 1. Modular Certi cation Testing Test Rooms Testers Test Centres Candidate 37 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 102. 1. Modular Certi cation Testing Test Rooms Testers Test Centres Candidate 37 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 103. 1. Modular Certi cation Testing Scenario for CONTRACT project focuses on subset of contracts Test Rooms Testers  Certification Test Contract • Parties – Accredited Test Center Test Centres – Certi cation Candidate  Test Room rental Contract • Parties – Accredited Test Center Candidate – Accredited Test Room Operator 37 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 104. 1. Modular Certi cation Testing 38 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 105. 1. Modular Certi cation Testing 38 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 106. 2. Aerospace Aftermarket 39 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 107. 2. Aerospace Aftermarket 39 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 108. 2. Aerospace Aftermarket Aerogility tool: What-if? Scenarios & Business Simulations Aerogility Aftermarket Model 40 11/23/08 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 109. 2. Aerospace Aftermarket Aerogility tool: What-if? Scenarios & Business Simulations WHAT IF SCENARIOS Aerogility  Explore new policies Aftermarket Model  Identify innovations  Experiment with configurations COMPARE THROUGH SIMULATIONS DECISION  Assess decision impact SUPPORT  Work through decision options  Challenge assumptions BENCHMARK WITH METRICS  Validate Profit and KPI goals  Financial benchmarking  Assess investment business cases 40 11/23/08 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 110. 2. Aerospace Aftermarket Currently Aerogility: CONTRACT project enhances Aerogility: Leading to an adaptive future: 41 11/23/08 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 111. 2. Aerospace Aftermarket Currently Aerogility: MODEL …understand the balance of resources, evaluate options, decisions, run what-ifs CONTRACT project enhances Aerogility: MONITOR …integrate operational data and processes, monitor the Aftermarket for decision support Leading to an adaptive future: MANAGE …drive existing systems and processes with adaptive intelligent software 41 11/23/08 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 112. 2. Aerospace Aftermarket 42 11/23/08 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 113. 2. Aerospace Aftermarket • Benefits of including CONTRACT technology in Aerogility: • Detecting upcoming conflicting obligations. • Aid managers decision-making through better information: • What is the impact of resolving an issue - are conflicts being deferred leading to future difficulties? • Have we some leverage in one contract that would prevent us breaking another? • How can future iterations of a contract be modified to better suit our business? 42 11/23/08 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 114. 3. Car Insurance Market 43 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 115. 3. Car Insurance Market 43 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 116. 3. Car Insurance Market Repair contract – Sequence chart 44 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 117. 3. Car Insurance Market Repair contract – Sequence chart Customer IC D RC S Report damage Assess & delegate Repair intake Request proposals Send proposal Judge proposals & select RC Deliver car Get car & repair Judge invoice Send invoice Get invoice, pay, handle invoice with Send invoice consumer Pick up car Deliver car 44 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 118. 3. Car Insurance Market Benefits for industry 45 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 119. 3. Car Insurance Market Benefits for industry  Claim-handling process improved: • Saves money • More efficient 45 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 120. 3. Car Insurance Market Benefits for industry  Claim-handling process improved: • Saves money • More efficient  Automated negotiations between ICs and RCs: • Higher quality • Less dependent on human intervention • Wider variety of repair options • Higher customer satisfaction 45 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 121. Summary Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 122. CONTRACT in a NUTSHELL 47 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 123. CONTRACT in a NUTSHELL  There is a need for mechanisms that ease the engineering of applications in Cross Organisational Service Oriented Computing environments”  Contracts are the explicit, tangible representation of service interdependencies  Idea: formal verification over contracts, obligations etc. rather than over internal code is the way to build sound distributed applications in service oriented environments.  CONTRACT has created concrete methods and tools which enable the use of contracts, obligations and agreements in order to structure the design and execution of sound applications in Digital Business environments 47 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 124. 48 Wednesday, September 9, 2009
  • 125. www.ist-contract.org This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License To view a copy of thislicense, visit : http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to 48 Creative Commons, 543 Howard Street, 5thFloor, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA. Wednesday, September 9, 2009.

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