TECNA National Survey 2012

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  • 1. www.technologycouncils.orgNational Survey ofTechnology, Policy andStrategic IssuesNovember, 2012© 2012 Technology Councils of North America. All rights reserved.
  • 2. Research Methodology and Background
  • 3. About TECNA | CompTIA | TechVoiceAbout TECNAThe Technology Councils of North America (TECNA) represents almost 50 IT and Technology tradeorganizations who, in turn, represent more than 16,000 technology-related companies in NorthAmerica. TECNA serves its members and the industry through its strong peer-to-peer network and itsregional initiatives to raise the visibility and viability of the technology industry.About CompTIACompTIA is the voice of the world’s information technology (IT) industry. Its members are thecompanies at the forefront of innovation; and the professionals responsible for maximizing the benefitsorganizations receive from their investments in technology. CompTIA is dedicated to advancing industrygrowth through its educational programs, market research, networking events, professionalcertifications, and public policy advocacy.About TechVoiceTechVoice is a newly-formed partnership of the Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA), theTechnology Councils of North America (TECNA), and participating regional technology associations.Collectively, we represent thousands of technology companies across the country employing millions ofworkers. We are dedicated to empowering and mobilizing the grassroots tech community to impactlegislative and regulatory issues important to growth, innovation and job creation.
  • 4. About This ResearchThe data for this quantitative study was collected via an online survey conducted during October 2012. A totalof 1,082 senior (C-level) U.S. IT and business executives belonging to one of the regional technologyassociations affiliated with the Technology Councils of North America (TECNA) participated in the survey.The margin of sampling error at the 95% confidence level for the overall results is +/- 3.0 percentage points.Sampling error is larger for subgroups of the data.As with any survey, sampling error is only one source of possible error. While non-sampling error cannot beaccurately calculated, precautionary steps were taken in all phases of the survey design, collection andprocessing of the data to minimize its influence.The study was conducted in conjunction with the Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA).CompTIA is a member of the Marketing Research Association (MRA) and conforms to its guidelines for surveybest practices and research ethics. Any questions about the research methodology or data collection can bedirected to research@comptia.org.
  • 5. Profile of Survey RespondentsIndustry Sector Number of Employees43% Information technology (IT) or 34% Less than 10 telecommunications 15% 10 to 249% Professional services (non IT) 18% 25 to 996% Healthcare/Medical 15% 100 to 4996% Financial/Banking/Insurance 3% 500 to 9996% Media/Publishing/Entertainment 15% 1,000 or more employees5% Education4% Advanced manufacturing (non IT sector)4% Life sciences3% Environmental or energy technology2% Retail/Wholesale Job Level1% Government (federal, state, local)1% AMTUC (Agriculture, Mining, Transportation, 100% C-Level or Higher or Utilities, Construction) Equivalent0% Hospitality/Food/Beverage Source: TECNA Base: 1,082 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 6. Geographic Segmentation Categories This report contains a number comparisons among geographic regions. The following groupings are based on standard U.S. Census Bureau categorizations.Northeast (n=267) South (n=234) Connecticut Technology Council  Council for Entrepreneurial Development (CED) Mass Technology Leadership Council (MassTLC)  Louisiana Technology Council New Hampshire High Tech Council  Metroplex Technology Business Council (MTBC) New Jersey Technology Council  North Carolina Technology Association New York Technology Council  Northern Virginia Technology Council Philadelphia Alliance for Capital and Technologies  Technology Association of Georgia Pittsburgh Technology Council West (n=298)Midwest (n=279)  Arizona Technology Council Illinois Technology Association (ITA)  Technology Association of Oregon Northeast Ohio Software Association  Utah Technology Council Minnesota High Tech Association  Washington Technology Industry Association Technology Association of Iowa Wisconsin Technology Council
  • 7. Section 1: Business Sentiment
  • 8. Business Sentiment Expected to Improve Modestly Over the Next Six Months Rating on a 100-point scale | 100=highest | 0=Lowest 71.6 64.9 66.4 62.1 52.9 46.3 Rating Today Projected Rating U.S. Economy Tech Sector My Company Rating Rating Rating Source: TECNA Base: 1,079 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 9. Business Sentiment Segmentation: Industry Sector Ratings Rating on a 100-point scale | 100=highest | 0=Lowest 68 64 65 65 62 58 Information Technology 47 46 45 Sector Other Tech Sectors Other SectorsU.S. Economy Rating Sector RatingCompany Rating Tech My Source: TECNA Base: 1,079 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 10. Business Sentiment Segmentation: Regional Ratings Rating on a 100-point scale | 100=highest | 0=Lowest 63 64 66 67 68 61 62 61 Northeast Midwest 46 46 46 47 South WestU.S. Economy Rating Sector Rating Company Rating Tech My Source: TECNA Base: 1,079 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 11. Business Sentiment Segmentation: Company Size Ratings Ratings Rating on a 100-point scale | 100=highest | 0=Lowest 69 70 68 61 63 63 62 62 Micro Firm <10 employees 45 47 47 46 Small Firm 10-99 employees Medium Firm 99-100 employees Large Firm 500+ employeesU.S. Economy Rating Sector Rating Company Rating Tech My Source: TECNA Base: 1,079 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 12. Many Businesses Plan to Increase InvestmentsTimeframe: over next 6 months Planning No Change Planning Decreases Expected Increases Staffing levels in technical positions 5% 38% 57% Investments in new products or business lines 6% 36% 59% Marketing/advertising expenditures 8% 39% 53% Technology expenditures 6% 42% 52% Staffing levels in non-technical positions 8% 42% 51% Staff training or professional development 6% 52% 42% Business travel 11% 48% 41% Capital expenditures (e.g. non technology) 10% 57% 33% Cost cutting 7% 66% 27% Source: TECNA Base: 1,077 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 13. Business Investment Segmentation: Industry Sector Ratings Percent indicating a planned increase in investment over next 6 months Information Tech Sector Other Tech Sectors Other Sectors 69% Staffing levels in technical positions 54% 47% Investments in new products 62% 60% or business lines 55% 56%Staffing levels in non-technical positions 42% 48% 57% Marketing/advertising expenditures 45% 52% 53% Technology expenditures 52% 52% Source: TECNA Base: 1,077 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 14. Business Investment Segmentation: Region and Company Size Ratings Percent indicating a planned increase in investment over next 6 monthsPlanned Increase North Midwest South WestStaffing levels in technical positions 59% 56% 54% 59%Investments in new products or business lines 59% 58% 53% 64%Marketing/advertising expenditures 57% 52% 48% 56%Technology expenditures 53% 55% 46% 54%Staffing levels in non-technical positions 51% 49% 47% 55%Planned Increase Micro Firms Small Firms Medium Firms Large FirmsStaffing levels in technical positions 49% 68% 64% 47%Investments in new products or business lines 54% 63% 65% 54%Marketing/advertising expenditures 62% 61% 44% 30%Technology expenditures 51% 56% 55% 44%Staffing levels in non-technical positions 50% 60% 55% 32% Source: TECNA Base: 1,077 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 15. Executives Express a Range of Concerns Over Threats to Growth at Their Business Timeframe: over next 6 months Stalled recovery 54% General lack of confidence/paralysis 47%Unexpected shock (e.g. spike in oil price, etc.) 36% Access to credit/capital 36% Government regulation 36% Labor prices/availability of talent 31% Weak corporate demand 32% Weak consumer demand 22% Lower margins 22% Domestic competition 19% Disruptive technologies or business models 16% Overseas competition 13% Stock market volatility 12% Input/commodity price inflation 5% Weak export market 4% Source: TECNA Base: 1,078 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 16. Section 2: Policy Positions
  • 17. Support for Tech Policy InitiativesRating Policy Proposal that May Impact Tech Sector Innovation and Growth 58% Doing more to expand access to capital for startup and high growth companies 49% Doing more to advance STEM education at the K-12 level Achieving a simplified personal and corporate tax structure, including closing corporate 47% tax loopholes 44% Making the research and development (R&D) tax credit permanent Placing career, technical and vocational education on par with traditional degree 42% programs to help expand pool of trained tech workers Expanding visa categories and H1B caps to keep foreign nationals with advanced STEM 34% skills in the U.S 24% Advancing a pro-trade agenda to expand U.S. exports of technology products 21% Creating more incentives to build out the broadband infrastructure Expanding incentives and easing regulations for commercialization of academic or 21% government applications 17% Making more spectrum available for creation of new wireless applications 16% Tax holiday for the repatriation of profits from overseas by U.S. tech companies Source: TECNA Base: 1,056 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 18. Policy Perceptions Segmentation: Regional RatingsPolicy Proposal North Midwest South WestDoing more to expand access to capital for startup and high growth 65% 57% 55% 54%companiesDoing more to advance STEM education at the K-12 level 42% 52% 50% 52%Achieving a simplified personal and corporate tax structure, including 43% 49% 46% 50%closing corporate tax loopholesMaking the research and development (R&D) tax credit permanent 48% 43% 37% 46%Placing career, technical and vocational education on par with 38% 44% 39% 46%traditional degree programs to help expand pool of trained tech workersExpanding visa categories and H1B caps to keep foreign nationals with 32% 31% 35% 38%advanced STEM skills in the U.SAdvancing a pro-trade agenda to expand U.S. exports of technology 24% 21% 24% 26%productsExpanding incentives and easing regulations for commercialization of 20% 21% 20% 23%academic or government applicationsCreating more incentives to build out the broadband infrastructure 19% 25% 22% 19%Making more spectrum available for creation of new wireless 16% 17% 17% 16%applicationsTax holiday for the repatriation of profits from overseas by U.S. tech 14% 14% 20% 17%companies Source: TECNA Base: 1,053 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 19. Rating of Preference for Degree of Government Involvement in PromotingInnovation and Growth in the Tech Sector 40% A NET 65% prefer a moderate to high level of 21% government 19% involvement 14% 6% Very Low Low Moderate High Very High Level of Level Level of Level Level of Involvement Government Involvement Involvement Source: TECNA Base: 1,054 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 20. Preference for Government Involvement Segmentation: Regional Ratings Preference for level of government involvement in promoting innovation and growth in the tech sector 43% 41% 40% 41% 37% 38% Northeast 32% Midwest 29% 30% 27% South 21% West 18%NET Low Government Involvement Moderate Government Involvement NET High Government Involvement Source: TECNA Base: 1,051 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 21. Preference for Government Involvement Segmentation: Rating of Economy Preference for level of government involvement in promoting innovation and growth in the tech sector NET Negative 48% View of U.S. 45% 45% Economy 34% 33% NET Lukewarm 29% View of U.S. 26% Economy 21% 18% NET Positive View of U.S. EconomyNET Low Government Involvement Moderate Government Involvement NET High Government Involvement Source: TECNA Base: 1,053 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 22. Policy Perceptions Segmentation: Preference for Government Involvement Level of Government Involvement in Supporting/Promoting Tech Sector High or Moderate Low orPolicy Proposal that May Impact the Tech Sector Very High Level of Very Low Involvement Involvement InvolvementDoing more to expand access to capital for startup and high growth companies 67% 59% 51%Doing more to advance STEM education at the K-12 level 53% 56% 39%Achieving a simplified personal and corporate tax structure, including closing 37% 47% 55%corporate tax loopholesMaking the research and development (R&D) tax credit permanent 51% 41% 43%Placing career, technical and vocational education on par with traditional 44% 44% 39%degree programs to help expand pool of trained tech workersExpanding visa categories and H1B caps to keep foreign nationals with 42% 37% 25%advanced STEM skills in the U.SAdvancing a pro-trade agenda to expand U.S. exports of technology products 23% 24% 25%Expanding incentives and easing regulations for commercialization of academic 29% 17% 20%or government applicationsCreating more incentives to build out the broadband infrastructure 26% 22% 17%Making more spectrum available for creation of new wireless applications 21% 14% 16%Tax holiday for the repatriation of profits from overseas by U.S. tech companies 13% 14% 20%
  • 23. Policy Perceptions: Additional NotesDoing more to expand access to capital for startup and high growth companies - Rated most important to micro-size firms (72%) and small firms (60%)Achieving a simplified personal and corporate tax structure, including closing corporatetax loopholes - Rated most important to small firms (51%), micro-size firms (48%) and medium-size firms (47%)Doing more to advance STEM education at the K-12 level - Rated most important to large firms (63%)Placing career, technical and vocational education on par with traditional degreeprograms to help expand pool of trained tech workers - Rated most important to large firms (45%)
  • 24. Rating of How State/Local GovernmentRepresented the Interests of the Tech SectorTimeframe: during past two years 39% A NET 37% rated 30% state/local government as representing the interests of the 18% tech sector well 7% 7% Represented Poor Just Well Represented Tech Interests Okay Tech Interests Very Poorly Very Well Source: TECNA Base: 1,046 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 25. How State/Local Government Represented the Interests of the Tech Sector Segmentation: Regional Ratings 42% 43% 40% 38% Northeast 36% 35% 36% 31% Midwest 30% 27% South 22% West 20% NET Well Just Okay NET Poor Timeframe: during past two years Source: TECNA Base: 1,043 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 26. How State/Local Government Represented the Interests of the Tech Sector Segmentation: Tech Sector Performance Ratings 52% 41% Believe Tech Sector Performing At or 35% Above Potential 31% 29% Believe Tech Under-Performing Potential 13% NET Well Just Okay NET Poor Timeframe: during past two years Source: TECNA Base: 974 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 27. Rating of How Federal GovernmentRepresented the Interests of the Tech SectorTimeframe: during past two years 37% 29% A NET 19% rated the federal government as representing the interests of the 17% tech sector well 15% 2% Represented Poorly Represented Well Represented Tech Interests Tech Interests Tech Interests Very Poorly Just Okay Very Well Source: TECNA Base: 512 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 28. Most Executives Recommend Their State/Region as a Good Environment for Tech Startups Definitely recommend 32% Probably recommend 31% May or may not recommend 21% Probably do not recommend 13% Definitely do not recommend 3% Source: TECNA Base: 1,048 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 29. Most Executives See a Shortage of Tech Talent Significant shortage in terms of the 22% quantity and quality of tech talent Moderate shortage 50% Equilibrium, supply roughly 16% equals demand Moderate surplus 10% Significant surplus in terms of 2% quantity and quality of tech talent Source: TECNA Base: 1,049 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 30. Tech Talent Availability Segmentation: Industry Sector RatingsRating of degree to which there is a shortage of quantity and quality of tech talent in respondent’s state/region 75% 72% Information 56% 52% Technology 50% Sector 40% Other Tech Sectors 25% 20% Other Sectors 16% Significant Moderate NET shortage shortage shortage Source: TECNA Base: 1,045 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 31. Tech Talent Availability Segmentation: Regional Ratings 76% 73% 68% 69% 59% Northeast Midwest 47% 48% 46% South West 30% 21% 21% 14% Significant Moderate NET shortage shortage shortage Source: TECNA Base: 1,046 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 32. Most Executives Believe the Tech Sector in Their State/Region Is Not Reaching Its Potential Believe Tech Sector in state/region Don’t know out-performing its potential 7% 3% Believe Tech 25% Sector in state/region performing at its potential Believe Tech Sector in state/region 66% under-performing its potential Source: TECNA Base: 1,045 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 33. Assessment of Tech Sector PotentialSegmentation: Company Size Ratings Rating of the respondent’s belief of the degree to which the tech sector in respondent’s state/region is reaching its potential, or not 70% 70% 61% 56% Micro Firm <10 employees Small Firm 10-99 employees 33% 34% Medium Firm 99-100 employees 19% 21% Large Firm 500+ employees 3% 1% 1% 4% Out-performing Performing at Under-performing its potential about its potential its potential Source: TECNA Base: 1,046 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 34. Policy Perceptions Segmentation: Preference for Government Involvement Level of Government Involvement in Supporting/Promoting Tech Sector High or Moderate Low orPolicy Proposal that May Impact the Tech Sector Very High Level of Very Low Involvement Involvement InvolvementDoing more to expand access to capital for startup and high growth companies 67% 59% 51%Doing more to advance STEM education at the K-12 level 53% 56% 39%Achieving a simplified personal and corporate tax structure, including closing 37% 47% 55%corporate tax loopholesMaking the research and development (R&D) tax credit permanent 51% 41% 43%Placing career, technical and vocational education on par with traditional 44% 44% 39%degree programs to help expand pool of trained tech workersExpanding visa categories and H1B caps to keep foreign nationals with 42% 37% 25%advanced STEM skills in the U.SAdvancing a pro-trade agenda to expand U.S. exports of technology products 23% 24% 25%Expanding incentives and easing regulations for commercialization of academic 29% 17% 20%or government applicationsCreating more incentives to build out the broadband infrastructure 26% 22% 17%Making more spectrum available for creation of new wireless applications 21% 14% 16%Tax holiday for the repatriation of profits from overseas by U.S. tech companies 13% 14% 20%
  • 35. Section 3: Technology Trends
  • 36. Ranking of Growth Potential for Segments Within the Tech Sector Information technology (IT), 44% including telecom 37% 34%Life sciences or healthcare technology 35% 9% Advanced manufacturing 10% Importance to 7% State/Region Today Environmental or energy technology 13% Change in Importance 5% Over Next 2 Years Defense / military technology 3% Source: TECNA Base: 1,042 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 37. Growth Potential Areas Within Tech Sector Segmentation: Region and Sector RatingsSector within Tech North Midwest South WestInformation technology or telecommunications 30% 33% 57% 57%Life sciences or healthcare technology 45% 46% 27% 19%Advanced manufacturing 11% 13% 3% 8%Environmental or energy technology 7% 6% 6% 9%Defense / military technology 6% 1% 6% 7% Info Tech Other Tech OtherSector within Tech Sector Sectors SectorsInformation technology or telecommunications 57% 18% 38%Life sciences or healthcare technology 28% 42% 38%Advanced manufacturing 6% 18% 9%Environmental or energy technology 5% 14% 7%Defense / military technology 4% 7% 6% Source: TECNA Base: 1,042 senior U.S. technology and business executives
  • 38. Assessment of Technologies as Contributors to Growth in State/Region Over Next Two Years 64% Big Data analytics, data mining and business intelligence 59% Mobile apps development 59% Cloud-based software development (SaaS) 59% Healthcare tech 48% Everything-as-a-service (e.g. managed help desk, networks, communications, security, etc.) 42% Wireless services 39% E-commerce or mobile commerce 38% Cloud implementation, integration or consulting services 37% Green tech 36% Mobile implementation, integration or consulting services 35% Mobile device development (Tablets, smartphones, accessories) 34% Biotech 33% Business process automation 31% Social solutions and technologies 30% Big Data storage and management 29% Cloud data centers 29% Enterprise collaboration (Video conferencing, collaboration tools) 26% Data visualization 24% Location-based services and technologies 23% Aggregation/Orchestration (bringing multiple service providers into a single point of contact) 17% Machine-to-machine learning or interaction 14% Defense tech 9% Telecom equipment
  • 39. Rating of Technology Growth Drivers Micro-Size Firms Top 5 1. Healthcare tech 2. Mobile apps development 3. Big Data analytics, data mining and business intelligence 4. Cloud-based software development (SaaS) 5. Everything-as-a-service (e.g. managed help desk, networks, communications, security, etc.) Small Firms Top 5 1. Cloud-based software development (SaaS) 2. Big Data analytics, data mining and business intelligence 3. Mobile apps development 4. Healthcare tech 5. Everything-as-a-service (e.g. managed help desk, networks, communications, security, etc.) Medium-Size Firms Top 5 1. Big Data analytics, data mining and business intelligence 2. Mobile apps development 3. Healthcare tech 4. Cloud-based software development (SaaS) 5. Everything-as-a-service (e.g. managed help desk, networks, communications, security, etc.) Large Firms Top 5 1. Big Data analytics, data mining and business intelligence 2. Healthcare tech 3. Cloud-based software development (SaaS) 4. Mobile apps development 5. Everything-as-a-service (e.g. managed help desk, networks, communications, security, etc.)
  • 40. Rating of Technology Growth Drivers Northeast Top 5 1. Healthcare tech 2. Big Data analytics, data mining and business intelligence 3. Mobile apps development 4. Cloud-based software development (SaaS) 5. Everything-as-a-service (e.g. managed help desk, networks, communications, security, etc.) Midwest Top 5 1. Big Data analytics, data mining and business intelligence 2. Cloud-based software development (SaaS) 3. Healthcare tech 4. Mobile apps development 5. Wireless services South Top 5 1. Big Data analytics, data mining and business intelligence 2. Healthcare tech 3. Mobile apps development 4. Cloud-based software development (SaaS) 5. Everything-as-a-service (e.g. managed help desk, networks, communications, security, etc.) West Top 5 1. Big Data analytics, data mining and business intelligence 2. Mobile apps development 3. Cloud-based software development (SaaS) 4. Healthcare tech 5. Everything-as-a-service (e.g. managed help desk, networks, communications, security, etc.)