Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Space
Adventur
e
Second Grade
Kelly Renee Pace
How Much Would You Weigh
On Mars?
Have you ever wondered how much you would weigh on another
planet? Find out by multiplyi...
Space
Crossword

Visit the Kid’s Astronomy website to learn more
about our Solar System. When you are done
browsing, use w...
Patterns in
space

Test your prediction
and algebraic
thinking skills by
playing this pattern
game on the Nasa
Kid’s Club ...
Model of the
Solar System

Build a model of the solar system using string, clothes pins,
yellow construction paper for the...
Phases of
the Moon
we have been studying the
phases of the moon. Click
on the link below. Enter the
month and year of your...
Planet for
sale
Pretend you are a space real
estate agent and are trying to
persuade people to come buy a
home on one of t...
The sun and
Four Seasons

I n class we r ead “The Sun”
by Paulet t e Bour geois.
Visit t he link below t o
lear n mor e ab...
Shapes in
Space
Brush up on your geometry by
playing this fun and educational
Shapes in Space game. Click on the
link belo...
Poetry in
Space

I n class, we r ead t he
st or y St ar Seeker : A
J our ney t o Out er Space.
Based on what we have
r ead...
TEKS

How Much Would You Weigh On Mars?
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

(3.4) Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student re...
Patterns in Space
•

•
•
•
•

TEKS

(1.4) Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student uses repeating patt...
Phases of the Moon
•
•
•
•

TEKS

(8) Earth and space. The student knows that there are recognizable patterns in the natur...
The Sun and Four Seasons
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

TEKS

(13) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students a...
Poetry in Space
•
•
•

TEKS

(18) Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feeling...
For my project menu, I did a thematic space unit for second
grade.
The activities on the home page at tiered by planet col...
Space project menu
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Space project menu

60

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
60
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Space project menu"

  1. 1. Space Adventur e Second Grade Kelly Renee Pace
  2. 2. How Much Would You Weigh On Mars? Have you ever wondered how much you would weigh on another planet? Find out by multiplying your weight on Earth by the planet’s gravitation factor relative to Earth. Don’t know what that means? Well here is an example: the gravity of Mercury is 38% of Earth's gravity. To calculate your weight on Mercury, multiply your weight by 0.38. Record your weights to the nearest whole number and create a bar graph using the whole numbers on the corresponding worksheet. Show your work on the back or on a separate sheet of paper. Turn in when complete.
  3. 3. Space Crossword Visit the Kid’s Astronomy website to learn more about our Solar System. When you are done browsing, use what you know to fill out the corresponding crossword puzzle sheet. Turn in when complete.
  4. 4. Patterns in space Test your prediction and algebraic thinking skills by playing this pattern game on the Nasa Kid’s Club site. Click on the link below and enjoy. “What Comes Next? ” Game
  5. 5. Model of the Solar System Build a model of the solar system using string, clothes pins, yellow construction paper for the sun, and print out pictures of the planets found on the internet. Attach the sun image to one end of the display using a clothes pin. Then clip the planets onto the clothesline one at a time, using the following measurements. Note: each measurement is the distance from the planet before it, not the sun, so don’t be alarmed if your model seems too big! Models will be hung around the classroom! Mercury .5” Venus .75” Mars 1” Earth 1.5” Jupiter 5.75” Saturn 9.5” Uranus 19” Neptune 30” Pluto 39.5”
  6. 6. Phases of the Moon we have been studying the phases of the moon. Click on the link below. Enter the month and year of your birth and find out what the moon looked like on your birthday. On the corresponding RECORD SHEET, color and label the different phases of the moon, as well as your birthday moon. Turn in when complete. Moon Connection
  7. 7. Planet for sale Pretend you are a space real estate agent and are trying to persuade people to come buy a home on one of the planets. R esearch a planet of your choice, and come up with a newspaper advertisement describing your planet; let people know why your planet is the best and why they should move there. Be sure to decorate your ad and include a picture of your planet. This can be done on construction paper. You may use books in the library or approved internet resources. Turn in when complete. •
  8. 8. The sun and Four Seasons I n class we r ead “The Sun” by Paulet t e Bour geois. Visit t he link below t o lear n mor e about how t he sun ef f ect s t he f our seasons. When you ar e done, f old a piece of const r uct ion paper int o f our s and illust r at e and wr it e a sent ence about each of t he f our seasons in t he squar es. On t he back br ainst or m r easons why t he sun is impor t ant . Tur n in when complet e.
  9. 9. Shapes in Space Brush up on your geometry by playing this fun and educational Shapes in Space game. Click on the link below and enjoy! Blast Off
  10. 10. Poetry in Space I n class, we r ead t he st or y St ar Seeker : A J our ney t o Out er Space. Based on what we have r ead, const r uct your own shor t poem about out er space. Make sur e t o include sensor y det ails. Use t he cor r esponding Poet r y in Space wor ksheet t o wr it e your poem. When you ar e done, t ur n it in t o t he t eacher .
  11. 11. TEKS How Much Would You Weigh On Mars? • • • • • • • (3.4) Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student recognizes and solves problems in multiplication and division situations. The student is expected to: (C) use models to solve division problems and use number sentences to record the solutions. (3.5) Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student estimates to determine reasonable results. The student is expected to: (A) round whole numbers to the nearest ten or hundred to approximate reasonable results in problem situations (3.13) Probability and statistics. The student solves problems by collecting, organizing, displaying, and interpreting sets of data. The student is expected to: (A) collect, organize, record, and display data in pictographs and bar graphs where each picture or cell might represent more than one piece of data; (B) interpret information from pictographs and bar graphs Space Crossword • • • • (5) Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. (4) Information acquisition. The student uses a variety of strategies to acquire information from electronic resources, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to: (A) apply keyword searches to acquire information; and (B) select appropriate strategies to navigate and access information for research and resource sharing.
  12. 12. Patterns in Space • • • • • TEKS (1.4) Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student uses repeating patterns and additive patterns to make predictions. The student is expected to identify, describe, and extend concrete and pictorial patterns in order to make predictions and solve problems. (1.5) Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student recognizes patterns in numbers and operations. The student is expected to: (A) use patterns to skip count by twos, fives, and tens; (7) Solving problems. The student uses appropriate computer-based productivity tools to create and modify solutions to problems. The student is expected to: (A) use software programs with audio, video, and graphics to enhance learning experiences; Model of the Solar System • • • (8) Earth and space. The student knows there are recognizable patterns in the natural world and among objects in the sky. The student is expected to: (C) construct models that demonstrate the relationship of the Sun, Earth, and Moon, including orbits and positions; and (D) identify the planets in Earth's solar system and their position in relation to the Sun.
  13. 13. Phases of the Moon • • • • TEKS (8) Earth and space. The student knows that there are recognizable patterns in the natural world and among objects in the sky. The student is expected to: (D) observe, describe, and record patterns of objects in the sky, including the appearance of the Moon. (8) Solving problems. The student uses research skills and electronic communication, with appropriate supervision, to create new knowledge. The student is expected to: (B) use electronic tools and research skills to build a knowledge base regarding a topic, task, or assignment. Planet for Sale • • • • • • • • • • (19) Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to: (A) write brief compositions about topics of interest to the student; (A) understand and use the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking: (i) verbs (past, present, and future); (ii) nouns (singular/plural, common/proper); (iii) adjectives (e.g., descriptive: green, tall); (iv) adverbs (e.g., time: before, next); (v) prepositions and prepositional phrases; (vi) pronouns (e.g., I, me); and (vii) time-order transition words;
  14. 14. The Sun and Four Seasons • • • • • • • TEKS (13) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to: (A) identify the details or facts that support the main idea; (B) draw conclusions from the facts presented in text and support those assertions with textual evidence; (8) Earth and space. The student knows there are recognizable patterns in the natural world and among objects in the sky. The student is expected to: (A) observe, measure, record, and compare day-to-day weather changes in different locations at the same time that include air temperature, wind direction, and precipitation; (B) describe and illustrate the Sun as a star composed of gases that provides light and heat energy for the water cycle; Shapes in Space • • • • (2.7) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student uses attributes to identify two- and three-dimensional geometric figures. The student compares and contrasts two- and three-dimensional geometric figures or both. The student is expected to: (A) describe attributes (the number of vertices, faces, edges, sides) of two- and three-dimensional geometric figures such as circles, polygons, spheres, cones, cylinders, prisms, and pyramids, etc.; (B) use attributes to describe how 2 two-dimensional figures or 2 three-dimensional geometric figures are alike or different; (A) use software programs with audio, video, and graphics to enhance learning experiences;
  15. 15. Poetry in Space • • • TEKS (18) Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to: (B) write short poems that convey sensory details. (8) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to respond to and use rhythm, rhyme, and alliteration in poetry.
  16. 16. For my project menu, I did a thematic space unit for second grade. The activities on the home page at tiered by planet columns. The first column is for my advanced learners., the second column is for my on target learners, and the third column is for my novice learners. However, students may take on any activity they wish. This project menu is intended for students who have completed their school work and/or have free time. They can also access this at home and complete activities when they have finished their homework. Students must complete at least three activities.
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×