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Safe Streets Warrior Whitney: PhotoVoice for Windermere-Warrior Corridor
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Safe Streets Warrior Whitney: PhotoVoice for Windermere-Warrior Corridor

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A photo-voice description of the health, well-being and safety concerns posed by streets at and leading to the intersection of Windermere and Warrior roads in Winter Garden, Orange County, Florida.

A photo-voice description of the health, well-being and safety concerns posed by streets at and leading to the intersection of Windermere and Warrior roads in Winter Garden, Orange County, Florida.

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  • 1. Windermere-Warrior Corridor Existing Conditions
  • 2. The Corridor
  • 3. The Corridor Great Land Uses
  • 4. The Corridor The land uses support families, students, community and active living. Swim school and pool Daycare YMCA City park Church at YMCA Church at daycare County soccer park Residential subdivision And more that are nearby: Great Land Uses
  • 5. A People-Rich Area
  • 6. A People-Rich Area YMCA Youth Sports
  • 7. A People-Rich Area Westfield Residents
  • 8. A People-Rich Area Children’s Lighthouse Image from www.childrenslighthousepof.com
  • 9. A People-Rich Area YMCA
  • 10. A People-Rich Area Warrior Park and Nearby Trail
  • 11. A People-Rich Area Southwest Aquatics and The Gift of Swimming Image from www.giftofswimming.org Swimmers cross-train on land
  • 12. A People-Rich Area West Orange Soccer Park
  • 13. A People-Rich Area
  • 14. A People-Rich Area
  • 15. First, a note. The people in the images on the following pages are simply doing what any of us should be able to do safely: go for a bike ride, take our kid to a swim lesson, jog along the sidewalk, watch a soccer game, enjoy the park, walk to school and so on. The people in the images could be any of us. The Problem In fact, as walkability expert Dan Burden points out, even when we drive to a destination, we start and end the trip as a pedestrian. And being a pedestrian – in its most basic form, walking – is the first thing human beings want to learn to do, and the last thing we want to give up. The people in the images are all of us.
  • 16. The Problem The probability of a pedestrian being killed if hit by a car going 40 mph is 85 percent. Reduce that speed to 20 mph, and the probability of being killed is only 5 percent. The table above, from the USDOT Federal Highway Administration’s 2009 report, Speed Concepts: Informational Guide, describes the relationship between a vehicle’s speed and the likelihood of a pedestrian death in the event of a collision. Table 1. Probability of pedestrian death resulting from various vehicle impact speeds. Vehicle speed (mph) Probability of pedestrian fatality (%)* 20 5 30 45 40 85 * Source: Ref (3); ** Source: Ref (4)
  • 17. The Problem Speed Limit, Speed and Conflicts
  • 18. The Problem Speed Limit, Speed and Conflicts
  • 19. The Problem Speed Limit, Speed and Conflicts
  • 20. The Problem Speed Limit, Speed and Conflicts
  • 21. The Problem Speed Limit, Speed and Conflicts
  • 22. The Problem Speed and Ineffective Crosswalk Approaching this crosswalk between the daycare and the swim school, the posted speed limit is a dangerous 35mph. The crosswalk sits in the shadow of a large tree most of the day, making it nearly invisible to drivers despite the neon yellow sign. Approaching from the other side at certain times of day, glare from the sun also makes it hard to see. The crosswalk markings are hardly visible. Vehicles have been observed failing to yield to pedestrians. Very young children cross here.
  • 23. The Problem Speed and Ineffective Crosswalk
  • 24. The Problem Speed and Ineffective Crosswalk
  • 25. The Problem Speed and Ineffective Crosswalks Where driveways cross sidewalks, such as the driveway into the soccer park in the image to the right, markings or other design elements are needed to ensure motorists know to expect pedestrians. This problem seems to contribute to drivers assuming they can block the sidewalk, such as in the image below: the driver parked his truck and trailer here while waiting for a special event to end. This forced a pedestrian to push her baby stroller around the trailer, which put her and her baby within three feet of traffic moving at an estimated 35 to 40 mph.
  • 26. The Problem Speed and Lack of Crosswalks
  • 27. The Problem Speed and Lack of Crosswalks
  • 28. The Problem Speed and Lack of Crosswalks
  • 29. The Problem Speed and Lack of Crosswalks
  • 30. The Problem Speed and Lack of Crosswalks
  • 31. The Problem Speed and Lack of Crosswalks
  • 32. The Problem Speed, Lack of Crosswalks and Lack of Sidewalks
  • 33. The Problem Lack of Parking
  • 34. The Problem Lack of Parking
  • 35. The Problem Lack of Parking
  • 36. The Problem Lack of Parking
  • 37. The Problem Lack of Parking
  • 38. The Problem Lack of Parking
  • 39. The Problem A Note about Parking The land uses along the Windermere-Warrior corridor draw people from throughout the region. They are great land uses and are true assets to the community. The parking issues documented herein that are affecting these land uses aren’t the “fault” of the operators. In fact, all of the operators provide off-street parking and have made efforts to manage the parking issues. Rather, the problem was borne of previous land-use planning and transportation planning decisions not being in sync with each other. We have an opportunity to correct this problem before someone gets hurt.
  • 40. The Problem Intersection Width and Turning Radii
  • 41. The Problem Intersection Width and Turning Radii
  • 42. Video of “rolling stop.” (Press play button if enabled.) Just one video of what likely amounts to dozens of rolling stops per day. Rolling stops – especially at such speed - put all roadway users at risk, including people in cars, on foot and on bikes. Note the sound of a child in the background. The Problem Intersection Turning Radii
  • 43. The wide intersection encourages speeding and “rolling stops.” See the potential conflict points of a four-way intersection below. Keeping speeds under control with tighter turning radii will help reduce the chance of serious injury in the event of a crash. Decreasing crossing widths will reduce the amount of time a pedestrian is exposed to the potential conflicts. The Problem Intersection Width Conflicts at a 4-Way Intersection
  • 44. Due to the proximity of the high school and other land uses that support students and families, there are a lot of young, inexperienced drivers along this corridor. Vehicles have been seen along this corridor swerving off the paved roadway momentarily, speeding and being driven by distracted drivers, mature and young alike. The Problem Young Drivers
    • National Teen Driving Statistics
    • 16-year-olds have higher crash rates than drivers of any other age.
    • Drivers ages 15-20 accounted for 12% of all drivers involved in fatal crashes in 2008 and 14% of all drivers involved in police-reported crashes.
    • Hand-held cellphone use was highest among 16- to 24-year-olds (8% in 2008, down from 9% in 2007).
    • 37% of male drivers ages 15-20 who were involved in fatal crashes were speeding at the time.
    • In 2006 (latest data available) crashes involving 15- to 17-year-olds cost more than $34 billion nationwide in medical treatment, property damage and other costs, according to an AAA analysis.
    • 31% of drivers ages 15-20 who were killed in motor vehicle crashes had been drinking some amount of alcohol; 25% were alcohol-impaired, meaning they had a blood alcohol content of 0.08 grams per deciliter or higher.
    • Statistics show that 16- and 17-year-old driver death rates increase with each additional passenger (IIHS).
    • Source: Rocky Mountain Insurance Information Association
    16-year-olds have higher crash rates than drivers of any other age. Hand-held cellphone use is highest among 16- to 24-year-olds. Given this increased risk and the people-rich land uses of the Windermere-Warrior corridor, we have a duty to ensure the roadway design maximizes safety for all street users and elicits safe, calm driving by motorists of all ages.
  • 45. The Problem It’s Not Just Hypothetical According to the 2011 Dangerous by Design national report, the Orlando-Kissimmee area is the most deadly for pedestrians of all major metro areas in the U.S. From 2000 through 2009, vehicles in our metro area killed 667 people – including children - who were pedestrians at the time. Fatalities within 60 miles of Windermere Rd. From www.t4america.org
  • 46. The Problem A Tragedy Waiting to Happen?
  • 47. The Problem A Tragedy Waiting to Happen? Imagine … if the action suggested in the images to the left had occurred when and where the people in the images to the right were doing what they’re doing: being out enjoying their community, biking to work, attending daycare, or taking part in some outdoor activity.
  • 48. Potential Solutions
    • Reduce Vehicle Speeds
    • Add and Enhance Crosswalks
    • Improve the Parking Situation
    • Fix the Intersection
    • Continue Sidewalk Programs
    • Educate and Enforce
    • Engage the Community
    • Identify and Secure Funding
  • 49. Potential Solutions Reduce Vehicle Speeds *The author hasn’t used a radar gun along this corridor, but uses a radar gun in her profession to estimate vehicle speeds. Also, along this corridor, the author has been IN vehicles going faster than the speed limit. Moreover, information in the National Cooperative Highway Research Program‘s Report 504: Design Speed, Operating Speed, and Posted Speed Practices supports the idea that top-percentile speeds generally exceed posted speed limits.
    • Why Reduce Vehicle Speeds?
    • Reducing vehicle speeds brings multiple safety benefits:
    • Lower speeds reduce the likelihood of a crash in the first place, as the braking distance for a car is shorter, giving the driver more time to react.
    • It increases the likelihood a driver will yield to a pedestrian as required.
    • If there is a crash, it decreases the chances of the person on foot or bike being severely injured or killed; it also decreases the risk of serious injury to the driver.
    • Start by Lowering the Posted Speed Limit
    • The posted speed limit is 35 mph; vehicles have been observed going faster.* This is a deadly speed and isn’t appropriate given the land uses and presence of people. Vehicles should be traveling at no more than 20 mph through this area that is full of children, students, workers, athletes, residents and all the people who make our community a great place.
    Many communities throughout the country are adopting lower speed limits and implementing ‘20 is Plenty’ campaigns, such as this one from Colorado. This is an appropriate effort for people-rich areas.
  • 50. Potential Solutions Reduce Vehicle Speeds * Source: National Cooperative Highway Research Program Report 504: Design Speed, Operating Speed, and Posted Speed Practices. Available at: http://contextsensitivesolutions.org/content/reading/design-speed/resources/design-speed-operating/
    • Retrofit the Street to Elicit the Proper Vehicle Speeds
    • Posting a lower speed limit is only part of the solution. Drivers don’t base their speed on posted speed limits, but rather on what feels comfortable given the street design, including lane widths, surface texture, field of view, curves, landscaping and other roadway elements.*
    • The street needs to be retrofit to elicit calm, safe driving at more appropriate speeds.
    • Keep vehicle travel lanes narrow. The wider the lane, the more likely vehicles are to speed.
    • Add street trees and other buffers between walkways and vehicle lanes, such as bike lanes, landscaping and planter strips. This will not only offer a great buffer between cars and people, but also helps create vertical edges that will help slow vehicle speeds.
    • Identify and implement other appropriate design tools, such as replacing the pavement with brick, which slows vehicles, creates a sense of place and is durable and long-lasting.
    • Add on-street parking, which helps to lower vehicle speeds, acts as a buffer between cars and people and will help alleviate the parking problem.
    • Educate and enforce.
    Drivers don’t base their speed on posted speed limits, but rather on what feels comfortable given the street design. Thus, we need to retrofit the street to elicit calm, safe driving.
  • 51. Potential Solutions Reduce Vehicle Speeds Keep Lanes Narrow Vehicle travel lanes should be kept narrow. In some places along the corridor, they are narrower than 9 feet, which is good. But between Westfield housing and Warrior Park (below left), where pedestrian use is high at times, vehicle travel lanes are 11 feet each with a 12-foot center lane. This encourages too-fast vehicle speeds. A short-term approach is to simply “move the paint.” Eliminate the center lane and narrow the travel lanes to nine or ten feet each. Paint thick, strong edge lines, which will help visually narrow the road, such as below in Boise, ID. Image courtesy of Dan Burden, WALC Institute
  • 52. Potential Solutions Reduce Vehicle Speeds Add Street Trees and Other Buffers Street trees along Warrior Rd., left, not only help to calm traffic and create a nice aesthetic, but also provide an important buffer between pedestrians and cars. Trees like these and other appropriate species should be planted all along the Windermere-Warrior corridor between the sidewalks and the roadway.
  • 53. Potential Solutions Reduce Vehicle Speeds Over time, why shouldn’t the Windermere-Warrior corridor have wide sidewalks, a bikeway, street trees, and narrow vehicle lanes like this neighborhood in Vancouver, BC? Image courtesy of Dan Burden, WALC Institute
  • 54. Potential Solutions Reduce Vehicle Speeds Consider brick for the surface of the street, which not only helps create a strong sense of place, but also keeps vehicle speeds low. This picture is from Winter Park, FL. Brick paving also has been done well by our neighbors in Windermere, Sanford, Baldwin Park and Thornton Park. Image courtesy of Dan Burden, WALC Institute
  • 55. Potential Solutions Add and Enhance Crosswalks
    • Mid-block crosswalks in this area must be highly visible. They are needed in many locations along the corridor, including at least:
    • Between Westfield housing and Warrior Park/the trail
    • Between Children’s Lighthouse and Southwest Aquatics, but away from the driveways and out from under the tree
    • Between the north side of the YMCA parking lot and shoulder-of-road parking on the east side of Windermere, but away from the intersection with Marshall Farms Rd., unless that is made a stop for motorists
    • Between the north side of the YMCA fields and shoulder-of-road parking on the east side of Windermere
    • Between the south side of the YMCA fields and shoulder-of-road parking on the east side of Windermere
    • At the very least, all crossings should have longitudinal markings that are 10 feet deep, to help drivers see them on approach (below.) These markings are a minimum, though. See images on the following page for more options.
    Image courtesy of the Oregon Dept. of Transportation
  • 56. Potential Solutions Add and Enhance Crosswalks Consider table-top crosswalks to ensure vehicles slow and yield. Add color. Consider texture. Add enhanced signage. Images courtesy of Dan Burden, WALC Institute
  • 57. Potential Solutions Improve the Parking Situation Open a Gate One solution that can be achieved quickly is to foster an agreement between the county and the YMCA to open a gate between the northern end of the West Orange Soccer Park overflow lot and the southern end of the YMCA fields. This would help reduce the need for families attending Y events to park along or to cross Windermere. Alternatively, the county could add a gate at the northern end of its overflow lot that opens onto the sidewalk, which is very close to the southern point of entry to the Y fields. The gate should be wide and welcoming and should be publicized so that parents know it exists and that they’re allowed to park in the county’s overflow lot.
  • 58. Potential Solutions Improve the Parking Situation Add On-Street Parking On-street parking would help alleviate parking pressure. It also would help to calm traffic, keep vehicle speeds low and, depending on where it’s placed, reduce the number of people crossing Windermere. In the images, red lines mark locations where parking storage is needed, while yellow lines mark locations where parking storage may not be needed but on-street parking still is desirable for its traffic-calming effects. Some of the locations marked would have stormwater managements issues. A note: approaching the intersection from the east on Warrior, there is a dedicated right-turn lane that seems unnecessary given the traffic volumes and seems to contribute to high-speed turns through the intersection. That lane could be replaced with on-street parking by simply “moving the paint,” in the short-term, and via a redesign in the longer-term. Warrior Park to Warrior Rd. Near the daycare and swim school Near the YMCA and county park Replace unneeded turn lane with on-street parking
  • 59. Potential Solutions Head-out angled parking is the safest type of on-street parking available. When pulling out, drivers can see oncoming traffic, including bikes (right, in Seattle). Also, passengers are directed away from traffic when they open the car door, which is important to families with young children or anyone needing extra help (below right). Due to stormwater management issues along Windermere, on-street parking may be tricky. In Bradenton, FL (below), limited right-of-way led to a combination of parking types. Improve the Parking Situation Images below and upper right, courtesy Dan Burden, WALC Institute. Image lower right, Sarah Bowman, WALC Institute.
  • 60. Potential Solutions Fix the Intersection The intersection is overly wide, has excessive turning radii, has crosswalks as wide as 58 feet and encourages high-speed vehicle turns and “rolling stops.” (Note: since this image was taken by Google Earth, the City of Winter Garden has added sidewalk extensions and crosswalk markings.)
  • 61. Potential Solutions Fix the Intersection Narrow the Intersection Narrow the lanes and the crossings and decrease the turning radii. In the short-term, this can be done by “moving the paint” and installing temporary channelizing devices (below). A longer-term solution could be to add curb extensions (right) or install a modern roundabout (see next page.) Images courtesy of Dan Burden, WALC Institute Source: the MUTCD page by OSHA, www.dol.gov
  • 62. Potential Solutions Fix the Intersection
    • Consider a Modern Roundabout
    • Model a modern roundabout for the intersection of Windermere and Warrior. A single-lane roundabout can carry traffic volumes up to 22,000 daily trips and can be navigated by school buses. The benefits of roundabouts are numerous and, when properly designed, they:
    • eliminate the need for cars to make left turns which are particularly dangerous for pedestrians and bicyclists
    • hold vehicle speeds to 15 to 20 mph
    • can reduce injury crashes by 76 percent
    • can reduce fatal crashes by 90 percent. (See http://www.iihs.org/research/topics/roundabouts.htm)
    • can increase capacity by 30 percent by keeping vehicles moving.
    • A roundabout at Windermere and Warrior would create a strong sense of place and indicate to drivers that they are entering a people-rich area. A roundabout could potentially prevent a senseless traged.
    • Right: The Town of Windermere has installed roundabouts through its town center and near Windermere Elementary School. They seem to be working well.
    Roundabouts can reduce injury crashes by 76 percent and fatal crashes by 90 percent. (Source: Insurance Institute for Highway Safety) In this case, a roundabout could help prevent a senseless tragedy. Image from the Orlando Sentinel, www.orlandosentinel.com
  • 63. Potential Solutions Fix the Intersection More on Roundabouts To accommodate school buses, the roundabout can have a non-landscaped outer ring, called an apron, that allows larger vehicles to “ride the apron” as they turn. If a roundabout doesn’t fit the location, a mini circle (right) can be considered to help calm traffic. Roundabouts and mini circles present a new type of traffic pattern for many people, so an educational effort likely would be appropriate. Images courtesy of Dan Burden, WALC Institute
  • 64. Potential Solutions Continue Sidewalk Programs The City of Winter Garden has been responsive to residents’ requests for completing sidewalks and has done a good job of maintaining existing sidewalks. The city’s current plans include filling in a major sidewalk gap along Warrior. But sidewalks also are needed (1) along the east side of Windermere south of Warrior, running the entire length of the city park, and (2) possibly along the east of Windermere between Southwest Aquatics and the Y. Both of these efforts could be done in conjunction with adding on-street parking and fixing the intersection. All new or enhanced sidewalks and crossings should comply with “universal design” principles and the Americans with Disabilities Act.
  • 65. Potential Solutions Educate and Enforce Educate roadway users about the presence of pedestrians, the importance of driving attentively, and the new speed limit. Enforce the new speed limit, stop signs and yielding to pedestrians. Build a reputation for strong enforcement along this corridor. Right: signage tells drivers the area is intentionally traffic-calmed. Below left: community education and enforcement in St. Louis, MO, where community members also passed out flyers to passersby with educational messages about walkability. Center: the Winter Garden Police Department’s Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving team. Right: signage reminds drivers they are in a people-rich area. Image from www.wgpd.com
  • 66. Potential Solutions Engage the Community Engage the corridor’s users, stakeholders and residents in a visioning process. Support the community in identifying problems and deciding upon solutions. Help build a coalition that will lead efforts to enhance and improve the corridor. Identify partners that may not be direct stakeholders, but could offer resources, information or support, such as Safe Kids Orlando and the Winter Park Health Foundation.
  • 67. Potential Solutions Identify and Secure Funding
    • A combination of private, public, local and non-local funding sources should be pursued. A starter list could include:
    •  
    • U.S. EPA’s Building Blocks for Sustainable Communities. Note: grants for technical assistance are available. One approaching deadline for a grant through Livability Solutions is Nov. 22 . Info: http://livabilitysolutions.org/?p=1
    • Safe Routes to School. Info: www.saferoutesinfo.org
    • YMCA of the USA Healthier Communities Initiative. Info: http://www.ymca.net/healthier-communities/
    • City of Winter Garden
    • Westfield Lakes Homeowners’ Association
    • Other corridor stakeholders, including the churches, daycare, swim school, Orange County Public Schools and the parks and recreation department
    • Orange County agencies addressing community planning, traffic, and air pollution
    • Hospitals focusing on children and injury prevention, such as Arnold Palmer Children’s Hospital and Health Central
    • Health organizations focusing on disease prevention, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    • Foundations supporting health and wellness, such as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
    • Health insurance providers and affiliated foundations focused on reducing healthcare costs, such as United Healthcare, CIGNA, Blue Cross Blue Shield and others
    • National organizations focused on supporting the ability of people to “age in place,” such as AARP’s Livable Communities program
    • And more!
    Source: www.saferoutesinfo.org
  • 68. Envision It Think about it. See it. Let’s envision our future. Will our community be a place … or just a space to pass through? Following are examples of how other communities have envisioned the future of their neighborhoods.
  • 69. Envision It Think about it. See it. Existing conditions Image courtesy the WALC Institute
  • 70. Envision It Think about it. See it. Vision for a better street - phase one Image courtesy the WALC Institute
  • 71. Envision It Think about it. See it. Vision for a better street – phase two Image courtesy the WALC Institute
  • 72. Envision It Think about it. See it. Existing conditions Image courtesy the WALC Institute
  • 73. Envision It Think about it. See it. Vision for a better street Image courtesy the WALC Institute and TDC Design Studio
  • 74. Envision It Think about it. See it. A street transformation Images courtesy the WALC Institute, TDC Design Studio and Vitality City by Blue Zones | Healthways
  • 75. Envision It Think about it. See it. A street transformation Images courtesy the WALC Institute, TDC Design Studio and Vitality City by Blue Zones | Healthways
  • 76. Envision It Think about it. See it. A street transformation Images courtesy the WALC Institute, TDC Design Studio and Vitality City by Blue Zones | Healthways
  • 77. Envision It Think about it. See it. A street transformation Images courtesy the WALC Institute, TDC Design Studio and Vitality City by Blue Zones | Healthways
  • 78. Envision It Think about it. See it. A street transformation Images courtesy the WALC Institute, TDC Design Studio and Vitality City by Blue Zones | Healthways
  • 79. Get Involved
    • Let your elected leaders and municipal know what you would like to see on these streets.
    • Call, write or email.
    • Your city representative’s contact information is at http ://www.cwgdn.com/cityhall/mayor / .
    • The county representative for this area is S. Scott Boyd. His Facebook page is “Orange County Government – Commissioner Scott Boyd,” his district email address is [email_address] and his phone number is (407) 836-7350.
    • Municipal staff often are also our neighbors and share our concerns. As staff, they may be empowered to improve safety for all roadway users.
      • In Winter Garden:
      • City Manager Mike Bollhoefer, [email_address] , (407) 656-4111
      • Engineering Asst. Director of Operations Mike Kelley, [email_address] , (407) 656-4111
      • Director of Public Services Don Cochran, [email_address] , (407) 656-4111
      • Chief of Police George Brennan, [email_address] , (407) 656-4111
      • Community Development Director Tim Wilson, [email_address] , (407) 656-4111
      • Senior Planner Laura Smith, [email_address] , (407) 656-4111
      • Parks and Recreation Director Jay Conn, [email_address] , (407) 656-4111
      • In Orange County:
      • Public Works Deputy Director Joe Kunkel, [email_address] , (407) 836-7900
      • Public Works Transportation Planning, Division Manager Renzo Nastasi, [email_address] , (407) 836-8070
      • Planning Division Manager Susan Caswell, [email_address] , (407) 836-5600
      • Planning Division Urban Design Section, Jim Ward, [email_address] , (407) 836-5600
      • Public Works Engineering, Sidewalk Program, Cathy Evangelo, [email_address] , (407) 836-8034
      • MetroPlan Orlando:
      • Executive Director Harold Barley, [email_address] , (407) 481-5672 ext. 313
      • Mighk Wilson, Smart Growth Planner, [email_address] , (407) 481-5672 ext. 318
  • 80. Contact us. Safe Streets Warrior Whitney Like “Safe Streets Warrior Whitney” on Facebook to stay informed, engage in the dialogue and share your thoughts. [email_address] Thank you!