Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
English curriculum studies 1 - Lecture 2
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

English curriculum studies 1 - Lecture 2

782

Published on

Models of English teaching: Pedagogical approaches

Models of English teaching: Pedagogical approaches

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
782
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. English Curriculum Studies 1 CLB018 / CLP408
    Lecture 2
    Models of English teaching:
    Pedagogical approaches
    Kelli McGraw
  • 2. Write a statement in one sentence beginning: ‘The aims and purposes of secondary English (Years 8–12) are …’
    Consider:
    whothe learners are
    whatthey should learn
    and how.
    (tip: making brief notes justifying your statement will prepare you to complete Part A of Assignment 1)
  • 3. Metalanguage for this topic
    Theorising:
    Paradigm
    Discourse
    Pedagogy
    Capital
    Curriculum issues:
    • Literacy practices
    • 4. Multimodality
    • 5. Learning outcomes
    • 6. Literature vs. Texts
    Perhaps the greatest barrier to a paradigmshift is the reality of paradigm paralysis: the inability or refusal to see beyond the current models of thinking.
    Discourse = An institutionalised way of thinking, a social boundary defining what can be said about a specific topic.
  • 7. More Metalanguage...
    “Discourses[‘unwritten rules about how something can be discussed’] do not offer neutral descriptions of the world. They actively shape the world in favour of certain viewpoints.” (Moon, 1992 ‘Literary Terms: A practical glossary’ p.36)
    Models of English teaching:
    Which discourses do you draw on?
  • 8. Shifts in language and literature teaching: then and now
  • 9. But...let’s not get stuck in binary oppositions! Read more this week:
    Charged with Meaning:
    Chapter 1 – what else is English ‘charged with’?
    Chapter 2 – ‘Post-Dartmouth’ in Australia (= 1966-2009)
    Chapter 3 – The Growth Model
    Bushell reading (on BB):
  • But...you’re already messing with my metalanguage!
    A: Identifying the significant schools of thought is the important part.
    Bushellused these labels:
    ‘Skills’, ‘Cultural Heritage’, ‘Personal Growth’, ‘Socio-cultural’ and ‘Critical Cultural’
     Can you match these with the discourses outlined previously?
  • 14. www.polyvore.com
    What kind of English teacher do you want to be?
  • 15. Our Homework
    The homework task for this week was to bring in a bag filled with FIVE artefacts that you think symbolise the kind of English teacher you want to be.
    What did you choose?
    Which discourses can you identify in your choices?
    Do you think you are ‘old fashioned’ in your approach after learning more about the history of how the English curriculum has developed?
    What have you discovered about what you value?
  • 16. Finally, have you...
    Checked out Blackboard for CLB018?
    Obtained the text ‘Charged with Meaning’?
    Printed/saved the Bushell reading?
    Checked out our unit blog?
    http://englishteachinginoz.wordpress.com/
    Joined twitter (and ‘tweeted’)?

×