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Understanding foodservice operations
 

Understanding foodservice operations

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    Understanding foodservice operations Understanding foodservice operations Presentation Transcript

    • Chapter 2
    •  Restaurants- the most familiar segment of the foodservice industry ◦ Full-service restaurants  Employ servers to take the customer’s order and bring the meals out  Can span a range of fine dining to casual  Fine dining has elegantly prepared food, linen napkins and tablecloths, fine china, highly trained wait staff  Fine dining has the highest quality of food  Popular with special occasions, most expensive  Casual dining offers simple foods in less formal surroundings, serve a wide variety of cuisines, moderate menu prices
    •  Restaurants continued ◦ Quick-Service restaurants  Quick service is also known as Fast Food  Offers speed, convenience, reasonable prices  Customers typically place orders at counter and serve themselves  Before the 1950’s the quick-service industry was very small, it now accounts for 38% of all dollars spent on dining out  Offer limited menus, efficiency is the key to success  McDonald’s, Subway, KFC
    •  Hotels ◦ Travelers need lodging as well as food to eat ◦ Small motels offer vending machines, continental breakfasts ◦ Larger hotels offer a wide variety of dining options  Restaurants, room service, banquet facilities and ballrooms for catering
    •  Clubs- ◦ Clubs often provide their members with activities as well as food. ◦ Country clubs offer golfing, tennis, etc plus fine cuisine and excellent service for their member’s membership fees
    •  Catering- provides food and service for groups, often at another facility that normally does not serve foods ◦ Catering at those locations is called off-premise catering ◦ Chefs of catering companies must be extremely organized ◦ Demand for catering has risen in recent years  Weddings, anniversaries, reunions, proms, etc.
    •  Institutional Foodservice- supplies meals for businesses and organizations Employers want to provide food to eat so employees do not have to leave the premises ◦ Corporations (google), schools, universities, hospitals, stadiums, prisons, travel, military, nursing homes
    •  Sole Proprietorship- ◦ a business in which one person owns and often operates the business. Responsibilities are that of the owner only Partnerships- ◦ a business in which ownership is shared by two or more people. Responsibilities are often divided, partnerships end when one or more people leave the business Corporations- ◦ most businesses, made of many investors. Ownership is divided by the investors, has rights and responsibilities as a real person
    •  An entrepreneur is someone who organizes a business and assumes the risk for it ◦ Chef-entrepreneurs are chefs who own their own restaurants