Climbing the Literacy       Ladder  A novel idea for literature extensions
Table of Contents What are literature    ladders?   Why are they useful    tools?   What is on the rungs of    informat...
What are literature ladders? Literature ladders were  originally described by Dr.  Annette Lamb, a professor  at Indiana ...
What are literature ladders? The goal of literature ladders is to transform  reading from a passive practice to an enrich...
Concept Diagram        6 - Theme        5 – Character Study        4 – Novel vs. Movie        3 – Historical Context  ...
Today’s Literacy Traditionally, literacy has been associated with the ability to read words on paper.   Books   Newspap...
Fulfilling the definition “Literature ladders challenge students to think beyond the text and connect it to their lives a...
Why are they useful tools? Literature ladders…   Help students to build background knowledge.   Add depth and breadth t...
What is on the rungs of              information? Author & Illustrator          Interdisciplinary   Homepages          ...
What type of extension activities         are included? Now that you have your rungs of information, how do you determine...
Activity Ideas Technology based activities      Judgment tasks   Wikis                          Self-knowledge tasks  ...
Creative Activities   Limited only by your imagination                      • Multi-genre  connections                    ...
What does the final product look             like? It’s your literature     Here are a few  ladder, so the final     exa...
How do I create my own? Choose a book! Cast a wide net   Begin exploring all the web has to offer.    • Find author and...
How do I create my own? Decide how many “rungs” will be on your ladder. Develop meaningful activities and learning exper...
Get it done!   Create your own!
Where do I get more info? Web English Teacher : Learning activities that  correspond to specific books. Literature Studi...
Works Cited http://eduscapes.com/ladders/index.htm http://webquest.sdsu.edu/taskonomy.html http://webquest.org/index.ph...
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Climbing the Literature Ladder

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How to create literature ladders with examples.

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  • Rungs can be varied – these are not set in stone! Topics may tie into each other or be totally separate. For example, the character may reflect the author or someone from history.
  • Climbing the Literature Ladder

    1. 1. Climbing the Literacy Ladder A novel idea for literature extensions
    2. 2. Table of Contents What are literature ladders? Why are they useful tools? What is on the rungs of information? What types of extension activities are included? What does the final product look like? How do I make my own? Where do I get more information?
    3. 3. What are literature ladders? Literature ladders were originally described by Dr. Annette Lamb, a professor at Indiana University- Indianapolis. They were innovated to be engaging and active learning objects that use book-technology Dr. Annette Lamb connections to extend learning.
    4. 4. What are literature ladders? The goal of literature ladders is to transform reading from a passive practice to an enriched, multi-dimensional experience. Each “rung” of the “ladder” takes the reader to a new learning task.  Unlike a webquest, which leads the learner on a journey that converges into a final product, a literature ladder is a collection of divergent activities that expand ones knowledge of a book.  Like a webquest, literature ladders are not just a series of web-based experiences, but rather a collection of activities that promote higher-order thinking.
    5. 5. Concept Diagram  6 - Theme  5 – Character Study  4 – Novel vs. Movie  3 – Historical Context  2 – Setting  1 - Author
    6. 6. Today’s Literacy Traditionally, literacy has been associated with the ability to read words on paper.  Books  Newspapers  Job applications In the 1991 National Literacy Act, Congress defined literacy as:  "an individuals ability to read, write, and speak in English, and compute and solve problems at levels of proficiency necessary to function on the job and in society, to achieve ones goals, and develop ones knowledge and potential."
    7. 7. Fulfilling the definition “Literature ladders challenge students to think beyond the text and connect it to their lives and to the society in which they live.”
    8. 8. Why are they useful tools? Literature ladders…  Help students to build background knowledge.  Add depth and breadth to the book being read.  Help teachers to weave the technology content standards into their content area standards.  Allow students to make personal connections.  Can be used in traditional and online courses.  Can make interdisciplinary connections.  Generate enthusiasm for reading. In essence, they invite experience rung by rung!
    9. 9. What is on the rungs of information? Author & Illustrator  Interdisciplinary  Homepages  Subject matter sites  Interviews  Book-to-movie  Biographies  Comparison/contrast  Other works  Cast your own  How to draw  Meaning of music selections Characters  Theme-related  Biographical information  Awards  Character study  Genre Study Setting  Social Issues  Travel sites  Virtual globes  Personal Ties  Audio & visual clips  Video and Audio clips  Historical background  Modern Day connections
    10. 10. What type of extension activities are included? Now that you have your rungs of information, how do you determine what to do with the information?  Think Creativity!  Think Differentiation!  Think Multiple Intelligences!  Thinks Bloom’s taxonomy!  Think Learning Styles!  Think Making It Personal!  Think Critical Thinking!
    11. 11. Activity Ideas Technology based activities  Judgment tasks  Wikis  Self-knowledge tasks  Blogs  Journal ideas  Mind Maps  Analytical tasks Write/edit/verify a Wikipedia  Persuasion tasks article  Creative product tasks Compilation Tasks  Design tasks Mystery tasks  Journalistic tasks Retelling tasks  More journaling ideas Consensus building tasks  Literature response ideas Traditional writing assignments  Diversity activities  Short answer & extended  Finding textual evidence response questions  Ethics activities  Essays
    12. 12. Creative Activities Limited only by your imagination • Multi-genre connections • Critical thinking activities • Scrapbooks • Double-Entry Journal • Create a video/promo material • Musical interpretations • Top 10 songs on your characters iPod • Write a song that retells the story • Convert novel to a picture book •ABC books •More literature responses
    13. 13. What does the final product look like? It’s your literature  Here are a few ladder, so the final examples: product is up to you!  The Great Gatsby It can be built in  Of Mice and Men PowerPoint, Word, or  A Stranger Came Ashore on a wiki.
    14. 14. How do I create my own? Choose a book! Cast a wide net  Begin exploring all the web has to offer. • Find author and illustrator info. • Search for book info and lessons. • Identify topics and resources  Evaluate the quality of the sites you find. Consider how much time students will spend completing the literature ladder and what percentage of the grade you will allocate for their work.
    15. 15. How do I create my own? Decide how many “rungs” will be on your ladder. Develop meaningful activities and learning experiences.  Include explicit instructions on what your expectations for students are on each rung of the ladder. Implement & evaluate
    16. 16. Get it done! Create your own!
    17. 17. Where do I get more info? Web English Teacher : Learning activities that correspond to specific books. Literature Studies: primary level book studies created by gifted students using Bloom’s. Teacher Tap: provides access to practical online activities and resources. The Literacy Center: a wiki with information from some of the 2008 Literacy Center conference, including information on literature ladders.
    18. 18. Works Cited http://eduscapes.com/ladders/index.htm http://webquest.sdsu.edu/taskonomy.html http://webquest.org/index.php http://projects.edtech.sandi.net/staffdev/buildingblo cks/p-index.htm http://www.vcu.edu/cte/resources/newsletters_arch ive/oc0801.pdf

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