The Business of Women's Health
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The Business of Women's Health

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If you have a health care product, service or you're an innovator in health care today, you'll want to market to women - they are the Chief Health Officers today. Kelley Connors, MPH

If you have a health care product, service or you're an innovator in health care today, you'll want to market to women - they are the Chief Health Officers today. Kelley Connors, MPH

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  • With one-third of consumers using social media for seeking or sharing medical information, 41 percent say tools like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and online forums influence their choice of a specific hospital, medical facility or doctor. In a survey of more than a thousand consumers, more than two-fifths of individuals said social media did affect their choice of a provider or organization. Forty-five percent said it would affect their decision to get a second opinion; 34 percent said it would influence their decision about taking a certain medication and 32 percent said it would affect their choice of a health insurance plan.  The power of  social media for health  organizations is in listening and engaging with consumers on their terms. Health organizations have an opportunity to use social media as a way to better listen, participate in discussions and engage with consumers in ways that extend their interaction beyond a clinical encounter. Savvy adopters are viewing social media as a business strategy, not just a marketing tool." social media presence is about educating, engaging, growing your audience, improving outcomes, improving compliance and  potentially improving the bottom line of your practice
  • This information came out a year before last week’s PwC study. With all the focus on cutting edge technology to save lives, this statistic is interesting from a communications perspective. With one-third of consumers using social media for seeking or sharing medical information, 41 percent say tools like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and online forums influence their choice of a specific hospital, medical facility or doctor, according to Tuesday's  report  from consulting firm PwC.
  • In a survey of more than a thousand consumers, more than two-fifths of individuals said social media did affect their choice of a provider or organization. Forty-five percent said it would affect their decision to get a second opinion; 34 percent said it would influence their decision about taking a certain medication and 32 percent said it would affect their choice of a health insurance plan. 
  • n 2X rate becoming business owners vs men
  • For social media to be effective, it needs to do more than just increase awareness, it needs to help patients do something, like schedule an appointment or provide personalized health information that the patient can do something with. Midlife women’s health is big…its about menopause symptom relief, new research into living the second half of our life, and supporting us as caregivers.
  • Get blogHer survey results, top three for women on social media; facebook, twitter, Pinterest.
  • Medline makes pink gloves – a commodity product. They created brand advocates by sponsoring the pink glove dance. The Pink Glove Dance features more than 200 employees at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center in Portland, OR. The video has become an internet sensation with more than 13 million views to date. As a result, last year we created a sequel  featuring more than 4,000 healthcare workers and breast cancer survivors from San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge to New York’s Times Square and many sites in between.
  • As part of our consulting business we have nurtured an on-line community of women by collaborating with women’s health advocacy groups like Healthy Women who is here with us, and our partners Our collaboratoin with blogging also include being part of the Blogger Advisory Council. We also post our blogs on women’s health sites such as Vibrant Nation and EmpowHER. In over three years, and withnot a lot of publicity, we have over 20,000 downloads of our radio shows, and over 2500 women on-line on our Linked In site which also attracts women like us – in the business of health care.
  • We developed the No Smoking Room with a grant from Pfizer to prevent smoking in young girls. This was facilitated with an advocacy relationship formed with Girls Inc.
  • Segmentation studies dovetail with social media listening.
  • n the U.S., women are more active than men when it comes to socializing on the Internet. According to comScore Plan Metrix, nearly 56 percent of adult women say they use the Internet to stay in touch with people, compared to 46 percent of adult men. And, on a global scale, ‘social’ categories like Social Networking, Instant Messenger (IM), and Email represent the largest drivers of women’s use of the Web. Time spent on these sites by women also outweighs time spent by their male counterparts in every global region. Caregivers are one group that is significantly more likely than others to use social network sites for health-related pursuits: 28% of caregivers who use social networks sites say they follow friends’ health updates, compared with 21% of other social network site users. Twenty percent of caregivers who use social network sites say they have gathered health information on such a site, compared with 12% of other users. people living with one or more chronic conditions and those living with disability 5  are significantly more likely than other social network site users to gather health information on these sites. Twenty percent of social network site users living with chronic conditions do so, compared with 12% of social network site users who report no chronic conditions. Twenty-three percent of social network site users living with disability get health information on these sites, compared with 13% of those who report no disability.    
  • Social Networking’s reach is highest among women in North America, with 9 out of 10 female Internet users visiting a social network site in April 2010.
  • Once you know which social networks are relevant to your audience, you need to identify what words they’re likely to use in conversations. Create a list of keywords to listen for, including your brand, products, events, personnel and any topics relevant to your customers. You may also want to include your competitors and industry influencers as listening keywords.
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  • A response strategy would have definitely helped the Komen Foundation assuming top leadership had been in sync with their supporters. Unfortuneatley, the way it played out, the Komen supporters were left wondering what the brand really stood for. And, social media helped to reveal the leadership’s voice, and women across the generations and from grassroots to feminists played together to dismantle the corporate façade that was Susan B Komen.

The Business of Women's Health Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Social Media Influencers,Advocates and Agents of Change in Women’s HealthWorld Congress on the Business of Women’s Health Boston, MA
  • 2. Social Media is a Business Strategy
  • 3. 81 percent of healthcare consumersconsider a hospital with an active onlinepresence to be more "cutting edge,” June 2011, YouGov Healthcare
  • 4. Just to confirm….• 66% of women don’t believe health care marketers understand them• 75% of caregivers are women• 65% of people using social media are women• 80% of women online search for health• 32% of people use social media to choose provider or org. (April 2012, PwC, 1,000 surveyed)Sources: comScore, Neilsen, Harris Interactive, Marketing to Women by Marti Barletta
  • 5. Midlife Women’s Health Matters - 95%+ of health care decisions for themselves, their family and parents - 50+ healthiest, wealthiest and most active women ever - Females 55+ is the fastest growing Facebook segment - 700 medicines in pharma’s pipeline, many related to effects of aging Post WHI - Women seeking solutions for healthy aging, many seek quality of life solutions Sources: National Women’s Health Resource Center, Pharma.org
  • 6. How to Build Your Brand WITH (Midlife) Women Inspiration InfluenceHer Goal Education Advocacy Adoption Attraction AttentionOutcome One to one Many to many
  • 7. Advocates & InfluencersWant to express their opinionsThey have something important to sayYour direct connection to womenSeek media attention for cloutShare their stories, and other’s tooInspire others
  • 8. “We are losing trust in the government,politicians, the media and manycorporations. But as it turns out, we trusteach other.” Elisa Camahort Paige, Co-Founder, BlogHer
  • 9. Real Women on Health
  • 10. The power of social media is listening and engaging with consumers on their terms
  • 11. It’s easier than ever for women to share collectivewisdom and subtle secrets
  • 12. How Women Rule
  • 13. Where Women Rule
  • 14. How Age Affects SM use
  • 15. Leverage On-line BuzzChoose Your Technology
  • 16. Listening
  • 17. Create a response strategy
  • 18. Key take-aways1. Remember what women want: information, socialization andfun. Midlife women love to laugh, and want to make a difference!3.Let women talk themselves into loving you. Use messageboards, blogs. Invite them to participate in a consumer panel.5.Make social media a business strategy, and don’t use socialmedia in a “pinch” when you need women’s support. Make it abusiness strategy.
  • 19. Contact Kelley Connors, MPH President, KC Health Founder, Real Women on Health Email: Kelley@kc-health.com Web: http://www.kc-health.com Twitter: @kelconnors