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A multi-generational, multi-dimensional approach  to training using Web 2.0 technology ©2010 Price Consulting Group www.th...
Did you know… <ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mmz5qYbKsvM&feature=channel_page   </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting G...
Outline <ul><li>Generations at a Glance </li></ul><ul><li>Training Impact </li></ul><ul><li>Web 2.0 technologies to use </...
What do you want to take from this session? ©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
Generations <ul><li>Silent Generation  </li></ul><ul><li>Baby Boomers </li></ul><ul><li>Generation Jones </li></ul><ul><li...
What Generation are you? <ul><li>Silent Generation / Traditionalists  (Born between 1920 - 1945) </li></ul><ul><li>Baby Bo...
Workforce by Generation ©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com  (Tulgan, 2009)
Silent Generation <ul><li>Formal recognition </li></ul><ul><li>Conforming, not risk-takers </li></ul><ul><li>Team-oriented...
Baby Boomers <ul><li>Hard work and long hours is proof of your commitment </li></ul><ul><li>Respect </li></ul><ul><li>ME-F...
Generation X <ul><li>Career advancement </li></ul><ul><li>Time off for volunteering </li></ul><ul><li>Fun, socialization <...
Generation Y <ul><li>Informal, fun workplace </li></ul><ul><li>Immediate Feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Lots of incentives, cu...
Generation Y <ul><li>Video excerpt </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com  Produced by:  Q...
Gen Y: Product of their environment <ul><li>Digital media </li></ul><ul><li>World events- Terrorism, Heroism, and Patrioti...
A storm brewing in the workplace? <ul><li>Natural </li></ul><ul><li>Critical to success </li></ul><ul><li>Accept and celeb...
Generational Work differences <ul><li>Work-life balance </li></ul><ul><li>Taking action </li></ul><ul><li>Dress Codes </li...
Generational Workplace Conflicts ©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
Generation Y is… <ul><li>(Select all that apply) </li></ul><ul><li>Sociable </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative </li></ul><ul>...
What type of training is your company offering? <ul><li>(Select all that apply) </li></ul><ul><li>Traditional </li></ul><u...
Training offered ©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
Impact to Training <ul><li>Traditionalists </li></ul><ul><li>Boomers </li></ul><ul><li>Gen X </li></ul><ul><li>Gen Y </li>...
Training Preferences Tool <ul><li>http://literacyworks.org/mi/assessment/findyourstrengths.html </li></ul><ul><li>This FRE...
Training Design for Gen Y <ul><li>Discussion forums </li></ul><ul><li>IM’s, Texting </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul><ul>...
Strategy for Training Gen Y <ul><li>Orientation </li></ul><ul><li>Coaching/mentoring </li></ul><ul><li>Peer leadership </l...
Best Practices <ul><li>Explain the impact </li></ul><ul><li>Use Blended Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Clear, detailed instruc...
Gen Y training strategies <ul><li>Just-in-time </li></ul><ul><li>Higher-order thinking and peer instruction </li></ul><ul>...
Virtual Worlds/ Second Life <ul><li>80% of active Internet users will be in virtual worlds by end of 2011  (Gartner ) </li...
Learning Innovation Meetup ©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
Second Life Capabilities in Training ©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
Second Life User Demographics ©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com  (Source: Abrams, 2009)
Who’s using Second Life? <ul><li>HP </li></ul><ul><li>IBM </li></ul><ul><li>Microsoft </li></ul><ul><li>Cisco </li></ul><u...
Social Networking <ul><li>Expand network </li></ul><ul><li>Learn and discuss in brief format </li></ul><ul><li>Fast, real-...
Is anyone “live tweeting” this presentation? <ul><li>Yes </li></ul><ul><li>No </li></ul><ul><li>#socialnetwork </li></ul><...
Blogging <ul><li>Publish ideas or discussion </li></ul><ul><li>WordPad </li></ul><ul><li>Youtube (Did you know video) </li...
Who has a blog? <ul><li>Yes </li></ul><ul><li>No </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
Are you ready for texting? <ul><li>MTF   </li></ul><ul><li>NP </li></ul><ul><li>BAU </li></ul><ul><li>PCM </li></ul><ul><l...
Tagging and Bookmarks <ul><li>Learn from others </li></ul><ul><li>Long-term reference </li></ul><ul><li>Can be public or t...
Collaborations <ul><li>Go to Meeting </li></ul><ul><li>iLinc </li></ul><ul><li>Googledocs </li></ul><ul><li>WebEx </li></u...
How does the technology impact YOU? <ul><li>More peer-to-peer collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Better knowledge transfer </...
Effective Online Universities… <ul><li>Fast </li></ul><ul><li>Media Rich </li></ul><ul><li>Easy access </li></ul>©2010 Pri...
What companies are doing <ul><li>One-on-one coffees with execs </li></ul><ul><li>Online content vs. orientation </li></ul>...
Mixed-Generation Setting <ul><li>Active Learning: experience and dialogue </li></ul><ul><li>Blended Learning: combination ...
Group Activity <ul><li>What can you learn from this generation? </li></ul><ul><li>What can you teach this generation? </li...
Venn Diagram of Learning Preferences <ul><li>Corbett, S. (2008). Targeting different generations. In  B. Hoffman (Ed.),  E...
Consider …   <ul><li>Retirement </li></ul><ul><li>New graduates </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of skills </li></ul><ul><li>Global ...
Effective Leadership <ul><li>Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Mentors </li></ul><ul><li>Open communication </li></ul><ul><li>F...
<ul><li>A 60-something graduate recently reflected: ‘We wanted what they want. We just felt we couldn’t ask.’ Herein lies ...
What are your takeaways? <ul><li>Generations at a Glance </li></ul><ul><li>Demographics </li></ul><ul><li>Training Impact ...
Thank you! What are your questions? <ul><li>Dr. Kella B. Price, SPHR, CPLP </li></ul><ul><li>www.thepriceconsultinggroup.c...
References <ul><li>Corbett, S. (2008). Targeting different generations. In  B. Hoffman (Ed.),  Encyclopedia of Educational...
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A Multi Generational, Multi Dimensional Approach To Training Using Web 2 0 Technology

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Learning objectives:
• Create awareness about the multi-generational workplace and the characteristics of each generation
• Learn how training departments can integrate Web 2.0 technology into the current training programs
• Learn techniques on how to maximize Gen Y employees' skills and meet organizational needs
Session Description: Generation Y employees will challenge the way organizations train. The addition of this generation to our workforce will change businesses and, the reality is, HOW businesses manage their employees and their talent within the organization. While WLP’s (Workplace Learning Professionals) will need to ensure that Gen Y employees have the right skills to meet strategic challenges of the organization, companies will need to explore different platforms and smaller segments to meet both the individual and organizational needs. They need to learn, but training modules will use new modalities, including twitter, blogs, and tagging. A variety of Web 2.0 technologies must be integrated into business communications with employees. This session will discuss techniques to maximize Generation Y employee's skills and meet your organizations needs. The changes to learning systems will be reviewed, and participants will learn how to change the way they communicate with their Gen-Y employees.

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  • include one or more of the following four generations: Silent Generation / Traditionalists (Born between 1920 - 1945). They are also called the Silent Generation, the War Baby Generation, or the WWII Veteran Generation. Baby Boomers (Born between 1946–1954). They are also called the &amp;quot;Me&amp;quot; Generation because their Traditionalist parents wanted to give them a good life. Generation Jones – 1955-1964. They grew up watching The Brady Bunch, not Leave It to Beaver. Their attitudes were shaped more by Watergate than JFK. They remember gas lines, not Mustangs.   Jonathan Pontell, culture expert, coined this name – for idea of a large, unknown, invisible generation. this generation has a “Jones,” or longing, for its own identity and for the world it was promised as children but never received. (http://www.enquirer.com/editions/1999/11/12/loc_who_is_generation.html) Obama is Gen Jones. Generation X (Born between 1965–1979). This generation is the children of both Traditionalists and Baby Boomers. Gen Y / Millennials (Born between 1980–2000). They are also called Generation Y, Generation ME, Generation WE, or Nexters. Echo Boomers, Millenium Generation, iGeneration, Einstein Generation and Google Generation.
  • Source: http://www.hrtools.com/insights/bruce_tulgan/generation_y_defined_the_new_young_workforce.aspx
  • 16 million in the workforce – 21% of workers
  • 76 million – 52% of workforce and most mid and upper management positions
  • 40 million plus in workforcce (26%)
  • Confident. Raised by parents believing in the importance of self-esteem, they characteristically consider themselves ready to overcome challenges and leap tall buildings. Managers who believe in “paying your dues” and coworkers who don’t think opinions are worth listening to unless they come from someone with a prerequisite number of years on the resume find this can-do attitude unsettling. Hopeful. They’re described as optimistic yet practical. They believe in the future and their role in it. They’ve read about businesses with basketball courts, stockrooms stocked with beer for employers, and companies that pay your way through school. They expect a workplace that is challenging, collaborative, creative, fun, and financially rewarding.  Goal- and achievement-oriented. Just a day after she won a totally unexpected Olympic gold medal, skater Sara Hughes was talking about her next goal—scoring a perfect 1600 on her SATs. Many Millennials arrive at their first day of work with personal goals on paper. Civic-minded. They were taught to think in terms of the greater good. They have a high rate of volunteerism. They expect companies to contribute to their communities—and to operate in ways that create a sustainable environment. Inclusive . Millennials are used to being organized in teams—and to making certain no one is left behind. They expect to earn a living in a workplace that is fair to all, where diversity is the norm—and they’ll use their collective power if they feel someone is treated unfairly. 
  • World Events: Challenger explosion, fall of the Berlin Wall, colombine shootings, OJ Simpson trial, Monica Lewinsky scandal, Y2K, anthrax scares, the SARS epidemic and the avian flu. Enron and Arthur Anderson – Mistrusting, cynicism, skepticism and pessimism Terrorism. bombing and devastation of the Murrah federal building in Oklahoma City. two Columbine High School students killed and wounded their classmates, and as school shootings became a three-year trend the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.  Focus on children and family. In the decades right before and after the turn of the Millennium, Americans moved the spotlight back onto kids and their families. That spotlight has swung like a pendulum over the last sixty years. During the post-WWII era, children were all the rage. It was a popular time to be having kids and to be a kid. Then, when the Gen-Xers were growing up, the spotlight had shifted. Latchkey kids, children of divorce, and kids with two working parents found themselves growing up on their own, in the shadow of the Baby Boom. One Gen-Xer told me, “The Boomers took so much and left us so dry.” The early 90s saw the spotlight swinging back. Las Vegas and Club Med went family . Parents and grandparents took the kids along on trips across the country and to destinations all over the globe. Eating out—once an adult thing —became a family matter. Ninety percent of fathers attended the birth of their children. The Federal Forum on Family Statistics reported that national attention to children was at an all-time high (The earlier peak was in the 1960s when the Boomers were kids.). Older parents—the average age for moms was now 27—brought more maturity to their roles as caregivers, teachers, and coaches. Scheduled, structured lives. The Millennials were the busiest generation of children we’ve ever seen in the U.S, growing up facing time pressures traditionally reserved for adults. Parents and teachers micromanaged their schedules, planning things out for them, leaving very little unstructured free time. They were signed up for soccer camp, karate club, and ballet lessons—and their parents were called into service, shuttling them from one activity to the next. Some started carrying Daytimers when they were in elementary school.  Multiculturalism. Kids grew up in the 90s and 00s with more daily interaction with other ethnicities and cultures than ever before. The most recent data from UCLA’s Higher Education Research Institute shows that interracial interaction among college freshmen has reached a record high.  Heroism. Emerging out of those acts of violence, Millennials watched the re-emergence of the American hero. Policemen, firemen, firefighters, and mayors were pictured on the front page of the newspaper, featured on TV specials, and portrayed in art and memorabilia. In the 10 months following 9/11, the word hero was heard more than it had been in the entire 10 years before.  Patriotism. During the post-Vietnam and Watergate era, patriotism was at an all-time low. Displaying the American flag, always and forever the right thing to do for members of the WWII Generation, had become less and less common—particularly among disillusioned Boomers and skeptical Xers. September 11 changed all that. Stores that carried flags sold out within 24 hours, ordered more and sold out again. Every other home and car seemed to fly the old red-white-and-blue. Businesspeople sported the stars and stripes on their lapels, and kids wore T-shirts with flags on the front, on the back, and on the shoulder. It seemed that national pride had been tested, and the overwhelming verdict was that patriotism was alive and well. The UCLA freshmen survey reported signs of renewed political interest. The percentage of students who reported discussing politics represented the “largest one-year increase since the 1992 presidential election year.” Parent advocacy . The Millennials were raised, by and large, by active, involved parents who often interceded on their behalf. Protective Boomer and Xer parents tried to ensure their children would grow up safely and be treated well. Parents challenged poor grades, negotiated with the soccer coach, visited college campuses with their charges, and even went along to Army recruiting centers. Then, too, Millennials actually like their parents. In the Generation 2001 survey, conducted by Lou Harris on behalf of Northwest Mutual Life Insurance, Mom and Dad were most often named when young people were asked whom they admired. Globalism. With penpals in Singapore and Senegal, Millennials grew up seeing things as global, connected, and open for business 24/7. Be smart—you are special. They’ve been catered to since they were tiny. Think Nickolodeon, Baby Gap, and Sports Illustrated for Kids .  Leave no one behind. They were taught to be inclusive and tolerant of other races, religions, and sexual orientations.  Connect 24/7. They learned to be interdependent—on family, friends, and teachers. More Millennials say they can live without the television than the computer. Many prefer chatting on line to talking on the phone. Achieve now! Some parents hired private agents to line up the right college; others got started choosing the right pre-school while the child was still in the womb. Serve your community. Fifty percent of high school students reported volunteering in their communities, many of their high schools requiring community service hours for graduation. On one Roper Survey, when Millennials were asked for the major cause of problems in the U.S., they answered selfishness .
  • What do we need to do to work more effectively with each other as a team ? People who grow up at different points in history have a unique experience and outlook toward life. these differences seem more pronounced than some in the past, they are in effect natural. dealing with diversity and understanding each other’s differences is critical to communication and success.
  • Generational difference #1: Work-life balance Workers in their 40s will stay late to get the job done. Workers under 30 (and even in their mid 30s) want to leave at 5p.m. but they WILL work from home They stay connected and online 16 hours a day consistently and they will mix leisure time and work duties together. Generational difference #2: Taking Action Younger workers like to test an idea or theory before implementation. They will look for online solutions and gather a lot of information before making a decision. This causes managers in their 40s and 50s to think they are not action takers. Generation difference #3: Generation Y and Dress Codes Dressing casually for workers under 30 is a very big deal. Dropping the dress code when possible is yielding amazing productivity results. Rewards/recognition People under 30 were rewarded in elementary school and beyond, regardless of accomplishments. (Everybody gets a trophy.) They expect rewards and recognitions that are not necessarily achievement based. People under 30 grew up being corrected with an explanation that they were not that far off and that the teacher-supervisor has faith in them and their abilities.
  • How are companies addressing conflict? Training Ignoring them – “pretending everyone gets along” Mediation
  • Traditionalists : Private - Reluctant to participate in a learning community because they don’t want to share too much information about themselves.   Prefer passive learning where they can take notes and watch someone lecture. Like to refer to their notes when applying knowledge. Tech-averse - Typically dislike technology. Don’t absorb information well from simulations because the recorded environment prevents them from going through the information and taking notes. Patient - Prefer to absorb content slowly and incrementally with minimal risk of failure. Like to learn and write down things in a logical sequence. Baby Boomers : Team Oriented - Embraces a team based approach to everything.   Like to assimilate information passively and take notes, but prefer videos over lectures due to their television-heavy childhood. Learn more easily when content relates to their personal life experiences. The incorporation of personal anecdotes and interactivity is important to them. Motivated when training involves activities that allow them to compete in some way. Don’t like dictatorial and rigid instruction. Generation X : Will work in teams when absolutely necessary, but would prefer to work alone.   Like to use technology as a means for access and sharing information. Entrepreneurial – Prefer to build portable skills. Only want to learn what will benefit them. Thrive on a self-directed schedule. Like to have the freedom to make choices. Prefer solving problems on their own. Informal Learners - Prefer to be engaged in their learning, instead of being passive recipients. Like to have fun while they learn and prefer an informal classroom where discussion can take place. Feedback Focused - Needs continuous, periodic feedback Gen Y : Possess a particularly strong inclination toward influencers .If they develop a meaningful connection with the instructor, they will react with zeal for the course.   Expect courses to use the most modern tools. Efficient and Effective multi-taskers: Can be seen with a TV playing in the background while simultaneously reading a book, listening to an iPod, and engaging in multiple online chats with friends. Internet-generation learners - Favors online learning because it allows them to access information whenever they need it.  Simply reading web pages is not enough; it needs to be interactive. Immediate Feedback - Expect almost instant feedback on tests and other schoolwork.  Motivated when receiving frequent feedback as learning happens. Socially Driven - The most socially connected generation. Actively get into blogging, social networking, and online communities. Collaborative - Team players with a capital “T.” Possess strong team instincts and thrive on the sense of connection they feel when they are part of a group project. Achievement Driven - Lack passion for the content itself; more interested in how it will help them achieve their goals. Possess a strong sense of entitlement. Structure Driven - Prefer structure in the classroom and are accustomed to following rules. It increases their comfort level and helps them excel. Hands-on - Prefer to engage in a fun, interactive activity that forces them to learn by doing.
  • Based on Gardner’s original 8 intelligences Helpful for learners to identify their strongest modalities for learning and ways to use these intelligences to maximize learning Helpful for trainers and educators to know how their learners learn best
  •   Implications on Training Design Discussion forums, instant messaging, blogging and emailing are not only expected in training design it is becoming an integral part of the design. These communication tools allow for collaboration . If the course or workshop is to be taught face to face, then create a mixed mode of delivery by storing supplemental exercises, assignments or information on a web site. The design can include pre or post work such as an email writing assignment, online quiz or internet research project. Keep lessons and messages short. Repeat key messages. Create modules and sub-modules to ensure that the information is delivered in bites. Allow for review and for modules to be taken out of sequence for best results. Discussions and group projects will appeal to Gen Y. Be careful to design the training so that each group member has an equal role to play. To ensure that the projects are realistic in scope, review the topic description or outline with participants before they begin working on the project. Assigning a senior manager as a mentor and a project guide will also appeal to Gen Y.
  • Orientation Engage new workers Have them make decisions/impact sooner Coaching/mentoring Managers willing to coach? Program in place to develop mentorships Peer leadership Encourage new employees Make culture fun and productive Sense of ownership Ownership and responsibility Sense of trust Meeting expectations Of organization, managers, coworkers, and themselves (Martin and Tulgan, 2006)
  • Explain the impact Simply telling someone to do something will not motivate them to success. This is especially relevant to the “What’s In It For Me” (WIIFM) Generation. This is not always a selfish quality, it just means that this generation wants to know what their impact will be on the team/organization/world. Use blended learning techniques We’re dealing with the “two-minute attention span.” (This also applies to Gen X.) While not everything in our lives can be fun and entertaining, we can increase learning retention by varying training styles. Utilize the different media to break up a training program and keep participants engaged: instructor-led presentations, eLearning, books/self-study, hands-on activities, team exercises, etc. You can also create ownership of material by having participants teach each other. Provide clear, detailed instruction Giving detailed, step-by-step instruction for a task or activity may seem time consuming. Many of us think, “They need to figure it out like I did.” However, Gen Y has never had to “ figure out” the answers the way we did. They will learn much more quickly if they are given detailed information on what, how, and by when. And quite frankly, they will probably find a better way to do it! Celebrate behavior you want repeated Keep in mind that this generation is accustomed to instant information and feedback. Provide timely praise for achievements or behavior you would like to enforce. Plan ahead so that the feedback can be immediate. “Sandwich” feedback for improvement areas: praise, criticism, praise. The improvement feedback will not get lost in the message, like it may have with previous generations. Train them to get a job somewhere else Wait, what? To this group, security comes in the realization that they are developing a diverse set of useful skills that makes them marketable. By regularly evaluating a professional development plan that outlines a variety of skills, an individual will not feel as though he or she needs to go to another company to get those skills. Train the individual, not the generation With all of this said, remember that the generation in which someone was born is not the only factor that determines his or her personality and behavior. These best practices are designed to give us a kicking-off point.  
  • Just-in-time Web-based interaction and active-learner classroom, course customized to needs of the class Immediate applicability – WHY are we learning this? Higher-order thinking and peer instruction Authentic understanding of concepts Collaborative More effective in increasing academic performance than individual or competitive learning Technology FUN and entertaining Music Games Team activities Computer simulations Casual Recognition and feedback for participation
  • Uses: Replace webinar if appropriate IBM uses for new hire orientations Networking Role Playing (ie. Sales teams to go through pitch and get feedback) Mixed Reality/Simulcasts meetings – big screen with avatars, live video feed into Second Life
  • 39% of Users from US Close to 39% from EU
  • Twitter grew 343% in users LY Facebook – 4 th most trafficked website in the world
  • MTF More to follow NP No problem BAU Business as usual PCM Please call me PTMM Please tell me more CM Call me CYE Check your e-mail SOTMG Short of time, must go F2F Face to face
  • **Personal experiences – ASK audience
  • With an effective online university set up for employee training your Y&apos;ers will feel right at home, but what are the keys to making your online university the most effective? Fast - You need to deliver material quickly in small easily digestible learning chunks that can be completed in ten minutes or less. This not only will go a long way to keeping your Y&apos;ers engaged but delivering your material in this fashion ensures higher retention of material. Media Rich - incorporate as many types of relevant media stimulus as possible, not only will they relate better to material but it will hold their attention, increase retention and transfer knowledge to on the job skills. Easy Access - Make sure your LMS is easy to log into, navigate and find required information. Its primary function is to house, track and report our online university, anything beyond that may be wasting time.
  • Nike Inc.’s stores train - game called “Sports Knowledge Underground,” which “mimics a subway system with routes to learning basic sales skills and product information.” Cold Stone Creamery - computer-based training, involving quizzes, an online video, and a game in which trainees have to put together a virtual order of ice cream against the clock. They are told how much mistakes they made in the game would have cost the company in real life. UPS - The company went so far as to create a mini town, full of streets, stop signs, fake stores and homes, UPS dropboxes and loading docks, where trainees put everything they learn into practice.  The town was designed to give new employees real world training without putting anyone in danger. Imagine the first time you have to deliver a package in the middle of a jam-packed downtown at 5 o’clock. That training facility sounds like a really great idea, right? Cisco Systems , maker of computer-networking gear, developed a computer game to teach binary math, a skill fundamental to networking. ESPN has responded to the need for Gen Y specific training by conducting open communication forums quarterly called “Clearings”. ESPN provides employees with a PDAs (or some use their personal iPhones) so that they are able to multitask with technology and fit training in when it suits their schedule. create quizzes and exercises that can be accessed by web enabled and Java capable mobile devices such as laptops, PDA’s or iPhones. Nokia – Corporate blog and wiki platforms, videocasts, podcasts, social networking platform
  • What should you do in a mixed generation setting? Engagement through active learning, coupled with effective blending, is the recommended approach. Active learning : Use a sequence of learning activities that involve some kind of experience (i.e. observing or doing) and some kind of dialogue (i.e. with others or cognitively with self). Blended Learning: Offer different ways to learn the same material as part of an overall blend. The trick is to make sure that the skills and information being taught is consistent. Incorporate a combination of learning styles that will appeal to the different generations in your audience. To engage Traditionalists, have a synchronous session with a brief lecture and post presentations online. To engage Baby Boomers, have students discuss practical examples from their backgrounds. To engage Generation X, provide a choice of assignments whenever possible. To reach Millennials, incorporate group activities, discussions and educational games into learning.
  • What can we do to make our companies the best place for all generations to work? Maximize diversity – the KSA’s of all individuals in our organization.
  • 50 percent of the American workforce will retire within seven years. The largest number of college graduates will enter the workforce in 2009. Many managers lack the skills needed to motivate and retain talented younger employees. Unable to attract young people, some industries run the risk of being unequipped to compete in the future.
  •   Technology. If your young employees&apos; computers at home are a lot faster than the ones at the office, they feel like they have a bad job. Mentors - Make sure your young people know what doing a good job actually looks like. Clear, written instructions and easy-to-understand steps given up front will save a lot of time long term. Open Communication. Younger workers are often afraid to ask questions and often prefer to try to find an online solution. value their opinions and contributions. positive spin on even the most negative feedback. The elementary and high school systems from the Generation Y experience gave very little negative feedback and used verbiage such as: “ You made a mistake, but it’s easy to get back on track.” “This is wrong, but you weren&apos;t really that far off.” Create sincere preset feedback attached to routine tasks. Add feedback to another activity or meeting.   Creativity and open thinking Make sure you don’t have a system or rule that does not have valid reason to exist. Hold them accountable by holding yourself accountable – they respect those who respect them
  • Transcript of "A Multi Generational, Multi Dimensional Approach To Training Using Web 2 0 Technology"

    1. 1. A multi-generational, multi-dimensional approach to training using Web 2.0 technology ©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com Dr. Kella B. Price, SPHR, CPLP Price Consulting Group
    2. 2. Did you know… <ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mmz5qYbKsvM&feature=channel_page </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    3. 3. Outline <ul><li>Generations at a Glance </li></ul><ul><li>Training Impact </li></ul><ul><li>Web 2.0 technologies to use </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    4. 4. What do you want to take from this session? ©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    5. 5. Generations <ul><li>Silent Generation </li></ul><ul><li>Baby Boomers </li></ul><ul><li>Generation Jones </li></ul><ul><li>Generation X </li></ul><ul><li>Generation Y </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    6. 6. What Generation are you? <ul><li>Silent Generation / Traditionalists (Born between 1920 - 1945) </li></ul><ul><li>Baby Boomers (Born between 1946–1954) </li></ul><ul><li>Generation Jones – 1955-1964 </li></ul><ul><li>Generation X (Born between 1965–1979) </li></ul><ul><li>Gen Y / Millennials (Born between 1980–2000) </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    7. 7. Workforce by Generation ©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com (Tulgan, 2009)
    8. 8. Silent Generation <ul><li>Formal recognition </li></ul><ul><li>Conforming, not risk-takers </li></ul><ul><li>Team-oriented </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~gradspkr/2000/images/schwartzkopf.jpg
    9. 9. Baby Boomers <ul><li>Hard work and long hours is proof of your commitment </li></ul><ul><li>Respect </li></ul><ul><li>ME-Focused </li></ul><ul><li>Seeking work-life Balance </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    10. 10. Generation X <ul><li>Career advancement </li></ul><ul><li>Time off for volunteering </li></ul><ul><li>Fun, socialization </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    11. 11. Generation Y <ul><li>Informal, fun workplace </li></ul><ul><li>Immediate Feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Lots of incentives, customized </li></ul><ul><li>Loyal </li></ul><ul><li>Confident </li></ul><ul><li>Hopeful </li></ul><ul><li>Goal and achievement-oriented </li></ul><ul><li>Civic-minded </li></ul><ul><li>Inclusive </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    12. 12. Generation Y <ul><li>Video excerpt </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com Produced by: QMR productions Distributed by: Business Performance Group Contact: Michael Durand 877-280-2292 [email_address]
    13. 13. Gen Y: Product of their environment <ul><li>Digital media </li></ul><ul><li>World events- Terrorism, Heroism, and Patriotism </li></ul><ul><li>Encouragement and nurturing/Advocacy </li></ul><ul><li>Structure </li></ul><ul><li>Multiculturalism </li></ul><ul><li>You are special </li></ul><ul><li>Leave no one behind </li></ul><ul><li>Connect 24/7 </li></ul><ul><li>Achieve now! </li></ul><ul><li>Serve </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    14. 14. A storm brewing in the workplace? <ul><li>Natural </li></ul><ul><li>Critical to success </li></ul><ul><li>Accept and celebrate differences </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    15. 15. Generational Work differences <ul><li>Work-life balance </li></ul><ul><li>Taking action </li></ul><ul><li>Dress Codes </li></ul><ul><li>Rewards and Recognition </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    16. 16. Generational Workplace Conflicts ©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    17. 17. Generation Y is… <ul><li>(Select all that apply) </li></ul><ul><li>Sociable </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative </li></ul><ul><li>Achievement-oriented </li></ul><ul><li>impatient </li></ul><ul><li>Self-absorbed </li></ul><ul><li>Team-oriented </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com (Corbett, 2008)
    18. 18. What type of training is your company offering? <ul><li>(Select all that apply) </li></ul><ul><li>Traditional </li></ul><ul><li>OJT </li></ul><ul><li>Mentoring </li></ul><ul><li>Online </li></ul><ul><li>Wikis </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    19. 19. Training offered ©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    20. 20. Impact to Training <ul><li>Traditionalists </li></ul><ul><li>Boomers </li></ul><ul><li>Gen X </li></ul><ul><li>Gen Y </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    21. 21. Training Preferences Tool <ul><li>http://literacyworks.org/mi/assessment/findyourstrengths.html </li></ul><ul><li>This FREE assessment by Dr. Terry Armstrong will help you identify and receive a description of your top 3 intelligences. We all possess some level of all eight intelligences, so there is no “right” profile. </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    22. 22. Training Design for Gen Y <ul><li>Discussion forums </li></ul><ul><li>IM’s, Texting </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul><ul><li>Emailing </li></ul><ul><li>Podcasts </li></ul><ul><li>Webcasts </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter, delicious </li></ul><ul><li>Second Life </li></ul><ul><li>Integrating digital media, even in traditional formats </li></ul><ul><li>Short “bits” </li></ul><ul><li>Group/Team work </li></ul><ul><li>Mentors </li></ul><ul><li>Implication/Application </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    23. 23. Strategy for Training Gen Y <ul><li>Orientation </li></ul><ul><li>Coaching/mentoring </li></ul><ul><li>Peer leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Sense of ownership </li></ul><ul><li>Meeting expectations </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    24. 24. Best Practices <ul><li>Explain the impact </li></ul><ul><li>Use Blended Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Clear, detailed instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Recognition </li></ul><ul><li>Training </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com (Source: http://www.astd.org/NR/rdonlyres/51C136F2-A36C-46EF-8846-6C279E6B4A68/0/Clarkston_1.pdf )
    25. 25. Gen Y training strategies <ul><li>Just-in-time </li></ul><ul><li>Higher-order thinking and peer instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative </li></ul><ul><li>Technology </li></ul><ul><li>FUN and entertaining </li></ul><ul><li>Recognition and Feedback </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    26. 26. Virtual Worlds/ Second Life <ul><li>80% of active Internet users will be in virtual worlds by end of 2011 (Gartner ) </li></ul><ul><li>Uses </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com (Source: Abrams, 2009)
    27. 27. Learning Innovation Meetup ©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    28. 28. Second Life Capabilities in Training ©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    29. 29. Second Life User Demographics ©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com (Source: Abrams, 2009)
    30. 30. Who’s using Second Life? <ul><li>HP </li></ul><ul><li>IBM </li></ul><ul><li>Microsoft </li></ul><ul><li>Cisco </li></ul><ul><li>Comcast </li></ul><ul><li>Intel </li></ul><ul><li>Time Warner </li></ul><ul><li>Northrup Grumman </li></ul><ul><li>Dell </li></ul><ul><li>Kraft </li></ul><ul><li>Best Buy </li></ul><ul><li>Newscorp </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com (Source: Abrams, 2009)
    31. 31. Social Networking <ul><li>Expand network </li></ul><ul><li>Learn and discuss in brief format </li></ul><ul><li>Fast, real-time </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter </li></ul><ul><li>LinkedIn </li></ul><ul><li>Facebook </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    32. 32. Is anyone “live tweeting” this presentation? <ul><li>Yes </li></ul><ul><li>No </li></ul><ul><li>#socialnetwork </li></ul><ul><li>http://twitter.com/home </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    33. 33. Blogging <ul><li>Publish ideas or discussion </li></ul><ul><li>WordPad </li></ul><ul><li>Youtube (Did you know video) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://ping.fm/FjvB3 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Wikipedia </li></ul><ul><li>Blogspot </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://srcclimbingcompanions.blogspot.com/ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www1.astd.org/blog/ </li></ul></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    34. 34. Who has a blog? <ul><li>Yes </li></ul><ul><li>No </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    35. 35. Are you ready for texting? <ul><li>MTF </li></ul><ul><li>NP </li></ul><ul><li>BAU </li></ul><ul><li>PCM </li></ul><ul><li>PTMM </li></ul><ul><li>CM </li></ul><ul><li>CYE </li></ul><ul><li>SOTMG </li></ul><ul><li>F2F </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com What can we use texting for in training?
    36. 36. Tagging and Bookmarks <ul><li>Learn from others </li></ul><ul><li>Long-term reference </li></ul><ul><li>Can be public or to a specific group </li></ul><ul><li>Use links and tags to describe </li></ul><ul><li>Reddit, technorati, delicious </li></ul><ul><li>http://delicious.com/kellaprice </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    37. 37. Collaborations <ul><li>Go to Meeting </li></ul><ul><li>iLinc </li></ul><ul><li>Googledocs </li></ul><ul><li>WebEx </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    38. 38. How does the technology impact YOU? <ul><li>More peer-to-peer collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Better knowledge transfer </li></ul><ul><li>Real-time activities and information </li></ul><ul><li>Low skills required to use </li></ul><ul><li>Low cost to implement </li></ul><ul><li>Increase training opportunities/modalities </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    39. 39. Effective Online Universities… <ul><li>Fast </li></ul><ul><li>Media Rich </li></ul><ul><li>Easy access </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    40. 40. What companies are doing <ul><li>One-on-one coffees with execs </li></ul><ul><li>Online content vs. orientation </li></ul><ul><li>Games </li></ul><ul><li>Simulations </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    41. 41. Mixed-Generation Setting <ul><li>Active Learning: experience and dialogue </li></ul><ul><li>Blended Learning: combination of activities </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    42. 42. Group Activity <ul><li>What can you learn from this generation? </li></ul><ul><li>What can you teach this generation? </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    43. 43. Venn Diagram of Learning Preferences <ul><li>Corbett, S. (2008). Targeting different generations. In  B. Hoffman (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Educational Technology. Retrieved January 28, 2009, from http://coe.sdsu.edu/eet/articles/generationtrgt/start.htm </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    44. 44. Consider … <ul><li>Retirement </li></ul><ul><li>New graduates </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of skills </li></ul><ul><li>Global competition </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    45. 45. Effective Leadership <ul><li>Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Mentors </li></ul><ul><li>Open communication </li></ul><ul><li>Feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Creativity and open thinking </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    46. 46. <ul><li>A 60-something graduate recently reflected: ‘We wanted what they want. We just felt we couldn’t ask.’ Herein lies the truth: what young workers want isn’t so different from what everyone else wants. However, young workers are asking for it. </li></ul><ul><li>--Karen Cates and Kimia Rahimi, “Mastering People Management,” Financial Times, November 19, 2001 </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    47. 47. What are your takeaways? <ul><li>Generations at a Glance </li></ul><ul><li>Demographics </li></ul><ul><li>Training Impact </li></ul><ul><li>New tools to use </li></ul><ul><li>Action items </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    48. 48. Thank you! What are your questions? <ul><li>Dr. Kella B. Price, SPHR, CPLP </li></ul><ul><li>www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>252.622.8119 </li></ul><ul><li>Price Consulting Group </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
    49. 49. References <ul><li>Corbett, S. (2008). Targeting different generations. In  B. Hoffman (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Educational Technology. Retrieved January 28, 2009, from http://coe.sdsu.edu/eet/articles/generationtrgt/start.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Gravett, L. and Robin Throckmorton. (2008). Bridging the Generation Gap: how to get Radio Babies, Boomers, Gen Xers, and Gen Yers to Work together and achieve more. Career Press: Franklin Lakes, New Jersey. </li></ul><ul><li>Howe, Neil and William Strauss. (2000). Millenials Rising: The Next Great Generation. New York: Vintage Books. </li></ul><ul><li>Karp, Hank et al. (2002). Bridging the Boomer-Xer Gap: Creating Authentic Teams for High Performance at Work. Davies-Black Publishing: Palo Alto, CA. </li></ul><ul><li>Martin, C and Bruce Tulgan. (2006). Managing the Generation Mix: From Urgency to Opportunity (2 nd Edition). HRD Press: Amherst, Massachusetts. </li></ul><ul><li>Tapscott, Don. (2009). Grown Up Digital: How the Net Generation is Changing your world. McGraw Hill: New York. </li></ul><ul><li>Tulgan, B. (2009). Generation Y Defined: The New Young Workforce. Retrieved May 8, 2009 from http://www.hrtools.com/insights/bruce_tulgan/generation_y_defined_the_new_young_workforce.aspx . </li></ul>©2010 Price Consulting Group www.thepriceconsultinggroup.com
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