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Liz Wild - Part 2

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  • Wang QINGSONGs’ Night revels of Lao Li . QINGSONG’s Night revels is a chromogenic or colour photographic on paper and measures 127cm high x 972cm long. Due to it’s length it is physically impossible to have this work permanently mounted for a number of reasons, primarily that it would not be able to be moved around the building. This display is the third time the work has been installed and on all three occasions it has been pinned. It will be installed again in November as part of the James Sourris collection exhibition at GoMA in November.
  • The work is stored rolled on a large rigid core in the rolled storage area (415mm diameter)
  • This artwork did require some minor treatment prior to being installed. As with all pinned works the previous pinning had resulted in enlargement of the pinholes, with minor tears to some. Enlarged pinholes were reinforced on the back The minor treatment that was first carried out involved closing up all the pinholes mechanically. They were then re-enforced on the verso of the work. This was done using small 10mm diameter circles of Tyvek® (75gsm, smooth finish on both sides) using Lascaux 360:498HV ® (2:1) adhesive as a heat set film. After each Tyvek®/Lascaux® re-enforcement patch was placed in position it was bonded with a heated spatula set at 70  C.
  • The work was then prepared for attachment to the roll of the mechanism. Securing tabs were adhered to the back of the photo to allow the work to be secured to the roll to ensure it did not slip during installation and also to assist in retaining tension on the rolled work so it did not become uncoiled. The work was then secured to the mechanism roll by attaching the Mylar tabs to the roll with tape.
  • This is the mechanism with the rolled work in place ready to install.
  • The work had been transferred from its storage roll onto the installation roll Double strips of paper, were wrapped around the work and secured with tape. This was done to ensure the work stayed secure and tensioned on the roll. The central rod was then placed through the centre of the roll. Screws were used to secure the hilt and plywood disk to the roll. A 50mm wide strip of Cell-air was wrapped around the lower edge of work and secured with cotton tape below the artwork to ensure there was no slip of the work. All of the above preparation work was carried out in the conservation lab. The rolled artwork and the mechanism were then taken separately to the gallery space and assembled there.
  • The top platform was threaded through the ends of the central and 2 supporting rods and secured.
  • An upper edge sightline and corner locations had been marked on the wall. The mechanism was lined up so as to run along the wall. The height of the hydraulic table was adjusted to align the top edge of the work with the sightline on the wall. When the work was aligned correctly, the mechanism was positioned along the wall to sit approximately one metre from the corner edge markings on the wall. The paper strips preventing the photo from unravelling off the roll were then removed while one person held the work to keep the roll tensioned. An additional two people assisted to support the photo and hold it on the wall. Then, approximately 1m of the work was unrolled with the mechanism stationary, it was set against the markings on the wall and then pinned.
  • It is crucial to hold the roll firmly during the process so that it does not unroll unnecessarily or slip down during the installation process.
  • The work is pinned using the same pinholes as were previously used. In this case commercially available clear headed map pins were used. This same device will be used again when the work is removed from display. It will then be re-rolled onto a larger diameter roll for storage.
  • Launched in 2006, the CCAC was developed as an initiative of the Gallery of Modern Art. The CCAC aims to become a resource for conservation of contemporary art both within Australia and throughout the region internationally. Besides research programs, the CCAC provides a professional workshop program, internships and tertiary student support, and a conservation public program.
  • MISSON Understanding properties of new materials used by artists. Managed by the Head of Conservation and conducts activities in addition to the day to day conservation duties of collection management, exhibition, loan preparation, and research and restoration of the pre 1970 collections. Based at the GoMA. Also has a professional workshop program, internships and student support, and a conservation public program
  • Transcript

    • 1. PART 2 Liz Wild Conservator, Sculpture Conservation Department, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art Illustrated Case study QAG | GoMA’s Contemporary Art Collection
    • 2. WANG Qingsong / Night revels of Lao Li 2000 / Type C photograph on paper / ed. 7/9 / Purchased 2002 with funds from James C Sourris through the Queensland Art Gallery Foundation / 127 x 972cm
    • 3. GoMA rolled storage
    • 4.
      • Treatment
      • Re-enforcement of enlarged pinholes
    • 5.
      • Securing tabs were adhered to the back of the artwork to attach the photo to the installation roll.
    • 6.  
    • 7.  
    • 8.  
    • 9. Installing QINGSONG Night revels
    • 10. Installing QINGSONG Night revels Holding roll and holding work against wall
    • 11. Installing QINGSONG Night revels, Pinning the work onto the wall
    • 12. CCAC – Centre of Conservation of Contemporary Art
      • Launched in 2006, the Centre for Contemporary Art Conservation (CCAC) was developed as an initiative of the Gallery of Modern Art. Its mission is to develop understanding of the conservation implications of contemporary art materials.
    • 13. Mission
      • Unlike traditional artist’s materials, new materials can be delicate or unstable. Understanding the chemical properties of new materials through research and analysis (and thus a material’s lifespan and degradation patterns) is critical to the development of effective conservation plans to ensure an artwork’s long term viability.
      • The CCAC is managed by the Head of Conservation and conducts activities in addition to day-to-day conservation duties of collection management, exhibition, loan preparation, and research and restoration of the pre 1970 collections. The CCAC aims to become a resource for conservation of contemporary art both within Australia and throughout the region internationally.
      • While there are conservation facilities at both Gallery sites for ongoing conservation work, CCAC activities are conducted primarily at GoMA involving the post 1970 collections.  
      • Besides research programs the CCAC provides a professional workshop program, internships and student support, and a conservation public program.
    • 14. Research projects
      • 2009 -2012: ‘Twentieth century in paint’. Three year ARC collaboration with Uni of Qld. Focusing on house paint analysis 1955-2000.
      • 2008 : ‘China!’ Painting materials in China 1980-2000. Study into materials of painters. Including Artist and scholar interviews
    • 15. Conservation internship program
      • Marie Stewart, USA
      • The Gallery in conjunction with the University of Queensland hosts PhD candidate, Gillian Osmond, who is researching the Gallery’s paintings collection, looking specifically at the use and deterioration of zinc in oil paint production in Australia.
      • QAG hosts interns from the Conservation course at the University of Melbourne and also from overseas, including the USA and Europe.
      • Eva Antonsen, Denmark
    • 16. Professional workshop program Conferences
      • 2012: Planning is underway for a 20 th Century in paint symposium as part of the ARC grant
      • 2010: An introduction to the conservation of photographic collections. A Workshop for Conservators & Preservation Technicians , p resented by AICCM and hosted by the CCAC and State Library of Queensland.
      • 2008: GoMA hosted two five-day intensive courses; New methods for cleaning paintings and New methods for cleaning painted surfaces of 3D objects. These courses were for conservators interested in new cleaning methods for painted and coated surfaces. During the courses, instructor Richard Wolbers presented participants with a general survey of the theoretical principles needed to evaluate and formulate tailored aqueous and solvent-based cleaning systems.
      • 2007: In partnership with AICCM and the State Library of Queensland. Three day conference and Public Lecture by Dr Tom Learner, research scientist Getty Research Institute USA. Publication of 270 page Contemporary Collections, AICCM National Conference pre prints edited by GoMA staff.
    • 17. Richard Wolbers Cleaning Painted surfaces workshop 2008
    • 18. Published papers
      • 2011:
      • Pagliarino, A. 2011 Complex Conversions – archiving Tony Cokes’ Pop Manifestos , in The Bulletin, AICCM (edition to be issued)
      • Pagliarino, A. 2011 Monumental and on the move , in ICOM-CC Preprints, Portugal Meeting 2011, ICOM (in editing)
      • Wild, L. 2011, Conservation and exhibition preparation of a contemporary indigenous Australian artwork: ‘Tree sculpture’ Lena Yarinkura , in ICOM-CC Ethnographic Newsletter (edition to be issued)
      • 2010:
      • Osmond, G. and Carter, A. 2010 The effect of conductivity on water solubility: cleaning a modern Chinese oil painting , in Preprints of New Insights into the Cleaning of Paintings conference, Valencia, Spain, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia and Smithsonian Institution
      • Barrett, K. and Shellard, S. 2010 Development of a prototype: a rolling mechanism to aid the installation of oversize works on paper , in Preprints of the 6 th AICCM Book, Paper and Photographic Materials Symposium, Melbourne, VIC, AICCM
      • 2008:
      • Carter, A. 2008 100% potential: painting conservation and contemporary art at the Queensland Art Gallery , in Paintings Conservation in Australia from the 19 th Century to the present: connecting the past to the future, AICCM
      • Osmond, G. 2008 The impact of Richard Wolbers , in Paintings Conservation in Australia from the 19 th Century to the present: connecting the past to the future, AICCM
      • Shellard, S. 2008 Stabilising Montien Boonma’s Trio and Flattening Dong Wei’s Snapshot: two case studies involving collaboration and adaption , in Preprints of the 5 th AICCM Book, Paper and Photographic Materials Symposium, Canberra, ACT, AICCM
      • 2007:
      • Pagliarino, A. and Osmond, G. (Editors) 2007 Contemporary Collections , AICCM Preprints of the National Conference 2007, AICCM
      • Wild L. and Pagliarino, A. 2007 Documentation of installation artworks at QAG │ GoMA in Contemporary Collections, AICCM
    • 19. Conservation public programs
      • The conservation staff continue to be involved in the Gallery’s public programs including My Gen 50+ and regular public lectures related to specific exhibitions.
    • 20. Paper presented by Liz Wild, A/Head of Conservation, Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art   ©Queensland Art Gallery, 2011   Copyright in all art work images is owned by the artists or their representatives. No part of this presentation may be reproduced without written permission from the Queensland Art Gallery and the author.   All works are in the Queensland Art Gallery Collection, unless otherwise indicated.   Artwork on slide one: ZHU Weibing and JI Wenyu / People holding flowers / 2007 / Synthetic polymer paint on resin; velour, steel wire, dacron, lodestone and cotton 400 pieces: 100 x 18 x 8cm (each) (installed dimensions variable) / The Kenneth and Yasuko Myer Collection of Contemporary Asian Art. Purchased 2008 with funds from Michael Simcha Baevski through the Queensland Art Gallery Foundation Photography of art works by Natasha Harth and Ray Fulton, Queensland Art Gallery; all other photography by Queensland Art Gallery Conservation staff.   www.qag.qld.gov.au