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COU Keynote COU Keynote Presentation Transcript

  • ORGANIZATIONAL FACTORS IN ONLINE HIGHER ED Keith Hampson, PhD
  • ASPIRATIONS OF ONLINE HIGHER ED
    • Greater access/higher participation rates
    • Personalized/customized learning
    • Compelling rich media
    • Institutional/public/student savings
    • Active/engaged style of learning
    • Social interaction/social media
    • Interaction between learners, globally
  • ACCEPTANCE?
    • Enrollment growth
    • Educational legitimacy
    • Prestige Institutions
  • LIMITS TO INNOVATION? Time / Investment Value New Model Established Model (“Paving the cow paths”)
  • OBSTACLES TO INNOVATION? INSTRUCTIONAL FACTORS TECHNOLOGICAL FACTORS ORGANIZATIONAL FACTORS CURRENT FOCUS Incentives * Roles * Financial
  • ASPIRATIONS OF ONLINE HIGHER ED
    • Greater access/higher participation rates
    • Personalized/customized learning
    • Compelling “rich media”
    • Institutional/public/student savings
    • Increasingly active/engaged style of learning
    • Social interaction/social media
    • Global interaction between learners
  • CASE 1: RICH MEDIA
    • Format
      • Animation, Video, Audio, Graphics
    • Application
      • Simulations, Serious Games, Illustrations, Narrative
    • Benefits
      • Compelling
      • Self-directed learning
      • Scalable
  • CLASSROOM MODEL OF COURSE DEVELOPMENT Role 1 Role 2 Role 3 Role 4 *Instructor plays all roles Instructor
    • Limited skill sets
    • Insufficient incentives
      • Stipends
      • Research-teaching conflict
    Interaction Design Instructional Design Programming Graphics Instructor CLASSROOM MODEL OF COURSE DEVELOPMENT *Instructor plays all roles
  • CLASSROOM MODEL OF COURSE DEVELOPMENT
    • Service Departments
      • Little impact on traditional roles and responsibilities
      • “ Service” Departments
        • As needed/wanted/required
        • Culture/Power imbalance
    • Learning Management Systems
      • Designed to enable one-person operations
  • RICH MEDIA: LIMITED ECONOMIES OF SCALE Fixed Cost Per Unit Units Produced 25k vs. 250k
  • PREDICTABLE RESULTS
    • Limited Economies of Scale + Limited Skill Sets
      • Inconsistent design
      • Limited volume of content
      • Limited quality
      • Text-based
    • Although . . . Easy and Fast
  • RICH MEDIA
    • OER (Open Educational Resources)
      • MIT/OCW
      • Connexions
      • Merlot
    • Potential Benefits
      • Greater choice
      • Collective effort (“wisdom of crowds”)
  • RICH MEDIA: OER “ Now this may seem like a silly (or even stupid) thing to say so carefully. Of course two vectors are equal if they are equal for each corresponding entry! Well, this is not as silly as it appears. We will see a few occasions later where the obvious definition is not the right one. And besides, in doing mathematics we need to be very careful about making all the necessary definitions and making them unambiguous. And we’ve done that here.” Based on traditional (cottage) model of course
  • RICH MEDIA: OER
    • “ An economic model”
      • . . . content is paid for by someone else
    • “ I don’t understand . . . Tell me again how the people who work on open source materials are feeding themselves and their families? Tell me how they take the money they’ve earned through hard work and reinvested it in coffee, automobiles, riding the bus, buying medical care, consuming food, etc . . . I know! People who support open source need to provide all of their services for free too, so the people earning nothing making free materials can meet their own needs. And then we can all go to heaven and have lollipops and pet goats. Utopia. Yay!”
      • Letter to the Editor, Chronicle of Higher Ed, 2008
  • CASE 2: SOCIAL MEDIA / WEB 2.0
    • “ Online interaction and conversation between people”
      • User-Generated Content
      • Bypasses institutions
    • Blogging (WordPress)
    • Microblogging (Twitter, Bebo)
    • Social networking (FaceBook)
    • Wiki (Wikipedia)
    • Media (Flickr)
    15 billion (May 27, 2010)
  • SOCIAL MEDIA FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
    • Student as author/contributor
    • Peer2Peer: Socially engaging experience
    • As needed; Just-in-time
    • Personalized
    • Collective wisdom
    • Recognition that most learning is informal
    • Facilitates access to diverse resource mix
    • Not “producer-consumer” model
  • SOCIAL MEDIA FOR HIGHER EDUCATION “ [Universities] could . . . work towards new kinds of accreditation that allow those engaged in informal learning to validate their learning by tapping into universities’ institutional capital.” Demos UK, 2009 The Edgeless University: Why Universities Must Embrace Technology
  • SOCIAL MEDIA FOR HIGHER EDUCATION 1
    • Organizational Role Reversal/Identity Crisis
      • Motivation?
        • Why would universities – whose value is based on the knowledge they acquire and produce – want to evaluate and legitimize knowledge from other, competing sources of knowledge?
  • SOCIAL MEDIA FOR HIGHER EDUCATION 2 PRODUCERS OF KNOWLEDGE CONSUMERS OF KNOWLEDGE EVALUATION OF KNOWLEDGE
  • GROWTH OF “WORKAROUNDS”
    • Vendor solutions
      • Embanet, Straighterline
    • Alternative organizational models
      • Athabasca U; Royal Roads
      • University of the People
      • Peer2Peer University
      • Informal Communities (PMBA)
    • Proprietary schools
      • Built “from ground-up” for online education
      • Scalable (increasingly low per-unit costs)
  • BOTTOM LINE
    • Tendency to ignore organizational factors
    • Significant improvement in the value of online learning will require new organizational models
  • ORGANIZATIONAL FACTORS IN ONLINE HIGHER EDUCATION Keith Hampson, PhD [email_address]