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  • 1. CONTENT & COMPETITION IN ONLINE HIGHER ED Keith Hampson, PhD Digital Education Strategies, The Chang School
  • 2. ONLINE HIGHER ED (CIRCA 1999)
    • Greater access/higher participation rates
    • Personalized/customized learning
    • Compelling rich media
    • Institutional/public/student savings
    • Social interaction
    • Interaction between learners, globally
    • “ Wish List”
    • Somewhat Less Inspiring
    "Thirty years from now the big university campuses will be relics. Universities won’t survive. It is as large a change as when we first got the printed book. Peter Drucker, Claremont Graduate School
  • 3. JUST PAVING THE COW PATHS? Time / Investment Value New model? Current Online Model S-Curve e.g. instructional models e.g. technologies Classroom
  • 4. ORGANIZATIONAL FACTORS AND INNOVATION
    • Current Focus
      • Technology Factors
      • Instructional Factors
    • Alternative Focus
      • Organizational Factors
        • Incentives
        • Roles/Div. of Labour
        • Finance
        • Competition
    • E.g. NCAT
  • 5. ORGANIZATIONAL FACTORS AND INNOVATION
    • Obstacles to innovation
    • Drivers of innovation
  • 6. CASE STUDY: RICH MEDIA
    • Format
      • Animation, Video, Audio, Graphics
    • Application
      • Simulations, Serious Games, Illustrations, Narrative
    • Benefits
      • Compelling
      • Self-directed learning
      • Scalable
  • 7. CASE STUDY: RICH MEDIA
    • Instructor plays all roles
    • Limitations
      • Skill sets
      • Incentives
        • Stipends
        • Teaching vs. Research
    • Classroom/Online Model
    • Features
  • 8. CASE STUDY: RICH MEDIA
    • Limited disruption of classroom model
    • “ Service” model
      • As needed/wanted
      • Culture/Power factor
    • LMS: Reflects/Reinforces
    • Service Dept. Model
    • Features
  • 9. CASE STUDY: RICH MEDIA Fixed Cost Per Unit Units Produced 25k vs. 250k+
  • 10. PREDICTABLE RESULTS
    • Limited Economies of Scale + Limited Skill Sets
      • Inconsistent design
      • Limited volume of content
      • Limited quality
      • Text-based
    • Although . . . Easy and Fast
  • 11. ORGANIZATIONAL FACTORS
    • Obstacles to innovation
    • Drivers of innovation
  • 12. COMPETITION IN HIGHER ED Measure inputs Limited information Surrogates of quality
  • 13. COMPETITION (OF A SORT)
    • Rising demand
    • Strong regulatory protection
    • Limited substitute goods
    • Limited competition by design
    Five Forces, Michael Porter
  • 14. ONLINE: EMERGING (TRUE) COMPETITION
    • Growth (and the growth imperative) of non-traditional and proprietary online universities
    • Discriminating/demanding adult student market
    • Critical mass of providers (i.e. real choice)
    • Regulations and economics driving greater transferability/student mobility
    • Growth of informal solutions
      • PMBA
      • P2P University
  • 15. LACK OF DIFFERENTIATION IN ONLINE ED
    • “ The number of online programs and institutional offerings are growing at a rapid pace, educated consumers are more knowledgeable and discriminating, and institutions are targeting a broader audience that may be uncertain if not skeptical about the value proposition of online higher education . . . In such a market landscape, the need for a distinguishable position in the market is critical. However, in most cases, we’re just not seeing it.”
    Richard Garrett, Eduventures
  • 16. CONTENT AND COMPETITION Tangible (and thus marketable) Demo 1
  • 17. CONTENT AND COMPETITION Manageable 2
  • 18. CONTENT AND COMPETITION Mission-focused 3
  • 19. OPEN CONTENT: SOLUTION?
  • 20. OPEN CONTENT: QUALITY? Text “ Now this may seem like a silly (or even stupid) thing to say so carefully. Of course two vectors are equal if they are equal for each corresponding entry! Well, this is not as silly as it appears. We will see a few occasions later where the obvious definition is not the right one. And besides, in doing mathematics we need to be very careful about making all the necessary definitions and making them unambiguous. And we’ve done that here.”
  • 21. OPEN CONTENT: SUSTAINABILITY? “ I don’t understand … tell me again how the people who work on open source materials are feeding themselves and their families? Tell me how they take the money they’ve earned through hard work and reinvested it in coffee, automobiles, riding the bus, buying medical care, consuming food, etc … People who support open source need to provide all of their services for free too, so the people earning nothing making free materials can meet their own needs. And then we can all go to heaven and have lollipops and pet goats. Utopia. Yay. Economic children of the world…please grow the hell up.” Letter to Editor, Chronicle of Higher Ed, 2009
  • 22. SUMMARY
    • Organizational factors
      • Ignored
      • Driver and obstacle to innovation
    • Content / Rich Media
      • Current model limited by organizational factors
      • May emerge as means of establishing a competitive difference
  • 23. CONTENT & COMPETITION IN ONLINE HIGHER ED Keith Hampson, PhD Digital Education Strategies, The Chang School