Cultural Immersion: Early Tech Adopters

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Both secondary and primary research drove this immersion into early tech adopting and otherwise geek culture.

Both secondary and primary research drove this immersion into early tech adopting and otherwise geek culture.

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  • A majority of American adults now own smartphones and mobile usage is as high as its ever been. Analysts predict that mobile wallets are inevitable, the wave of the future; but the current reality is that awareness is not translating to use. So how can we change that? To answer that question, I conducted both secondary and primary research. I learned about the mobile payment marketplace – from its bright future to its current struggles.I looked into the current Android market and examined how the NFC barrier plays into ISIS’s future. And lastly I delved into the tech landscape and drew insights around the people, trends, and culture that make up this world. In terms of primary research, I conducted four hour-long interviews with young influencers in the tech community that helped shape this presentation.
  • Analysts and journalists nearly across the board predict that mobile wallets are an inevitable next step in the mobile landscape. These are just a few quotes pulled from various resources that speak to that fact.
  • We know that the biggest competitors for ISIS are Square, Google Wallet, and Level-Up. While all somewhat similar, each has its own niche. Square is highly focused on small businesses – from making credit card payment easily accessible to building an Etsy-like marketplace to bring small businesses to the masses. Google Wallet is focused on users that buy into the Google ecosystem. One of its best features is its integration with the Google Play store. For Level Up, it’s more about local deals. So its best for those users that want a loyalty program and the ability to discover deals in their immediate area. In terms of other start-ups like Clinkle, Dwolla, and Lemon, their strength is that their still small enough to be nimble. Clinkle, though much is still to be learned about it, is an up and coming competitor to keep in mind, as it recently completed a $25 million round of funding from the likes of several big names.
  • For all of these major players, however, the current reality is that awareness is not translating to usage. While 41% of US smartphone users are highly aware that they can use their phone as a payment device, only 16% have ever done so.
  • While the industry and those who write about it are preoccupied with the technology roll-out and who will “win” the mobile payments race, consumers are focused on a few key concerns: 45% are concerned about the security of mobile payments, 37% are worried about privacy, and 37% simply think that their current method of payment is convenient enough.
  • Current users of mobile wallets are reluctant to switch phone, wireless carrier, or bank to enable mobile payments. Non-users are even more unwilling, with just 7% saying they were willing to switch phones in order to make mobile payments. As much as we might want to lure iPhone users away with the promise of cool and useful NFC technology, the reality is that iPhone users are extremely brand loyal. 80% of current iPhone owners owned a previous iPhone, and nearly 60% of iPhone owners show very high levels of satisfaction.In fact, some 25% of Android owners say that they would prefer to have iOS, so the challenge becomes ‘how do we keep Android users on-board?’ when switching is easier than ever with increased iPhone availability? Is NFC enticement enough?
  • Android isn’t winning on merit alone. Their success isn’t really about the objectively great Nexus 4 or Galaxy SIII, but about the marginal phones like the LG Motion and Samsung Captivate. They’re priced to move, and that they are.Pew Research data makes it clear, the less money you have the more likely you are to opt for an Android phone over something more expensive. And it isn’t just income – other socioeconomic factors that correlate heavily with income also show Android leanings. A full 12-percent more black and Hispanic smartphone owners are choosing Android over Apple.
  • These people generally fall into one of two groups. They are either vehemently anti-Apple and want to buck the trend set by the mainstream, or they are former iPhone users who have grown disenchanted with Apple’s present movement and future. Much like The Hacker, the contrarians who have left Apple seek the freedom that Android offers. They love the fact that they can customize their phone to fit their lives. They believe that “Today, if you ‘think different’ you’re looking at Android”
  • For this group, it boils down to choice, choice, choice. They’re similar to the contrarians, but are not anti-Apple. Rather, they believe that a phone should give its sole user a vote on how their device works, and want to be able to tweak their phone so that it’s excellent for them, rather than good for most. Android offers the ability to pick from the features which matter most to you, while some believe that Apple’s one size fits all policy stifles innovationMuch of Android’s strength stems from its open nature, which allows third parties to do what they want with the platform On the flip side, though, this leads to fragmentation, which each of the developers I spoke to frowned upon when it came to Android.
  • So you might be thinking, “hacking.” That’s a negative word. And to the popular press, it often is. To them, “hacker” means someone who breaks into computers. But in the tech community, it simply means a good programmer. Today’s hackers are trying to take back the definition: in essence, a “hack” is a good creative solution to a technical problem. In today’s culture, we need people that can think about all of our problems in a new way – and that is precisely the essence of what it means to be a hacker.
  • Start-ups are at the tipping point of culture
  • The hacker generation is made up, primarily, of millennials. We all know a lot about millennials – but what really matters in this setting? 72% of them have a real desire to create things that people love. What comes of this is that they live in a maker culture. Empowered by technology and fueled by sense of self, they are driven to make real change in what they see as a failing system. They believe in innovation. Not only do they want to ‘make’, but also ‘customize’ and ‘personalize. It’s not about what’s good for everyone, it’s about what’s great for me.60% of them note that hacking is part of what defines their generation and over half believe that you can google ‘how to be the CEO of a start-up’. For them, this definition extends beyond themselves. They want to build communities of like-minded people and are constantly building more ways to do so. In this setting, it’s about what you know, not what you have. They love to show what they know and share that knowledge with others. 72% say “Life is like an app – I’m always in beta”. They’re always changing and are open to change in the world around them. Perhaps most importantly, for them, experience is the new social currency.
  • 80 million people in the U.S. alone2.5x more likely to be early adopters13% fit the profile of a “gadget guru” Successful, wired yet free-spirited, confident and at easeGreatest device ownership and often push and contribute to contentMale dominated with above average income and skew singleThere is an emerging group of millennial women who are adopting aspects of geek culture and looking to be trendsetters in tech adoption
  • For them, the tech community is a passion and a culture. It is made up of problem solvers, of efficient and creative people who want to make a change in the world because they realize that today, software is omnipresent and that from this fact alone, they truly can make change in the world.
  • They might seem like frat house radicals, but this is only because they’re not introverted losers. There has been a shift of coding from “Dilbert niche” to a lucrative, enjoyable, mainstream career. This rising group is much more sociable, likes to go out and have fun, and is likely to work in start-up culture.
  • They look up to a wide-range of people, from aspirational tech idols like Elon Musk and Marissa Mayer, to geek icons like Joss Whedon and Felicia Day. In terms of role models, their looking to people like Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger, who founded Instagram after spending a few years in start-up culture. Young women, likewise, are getting inspired by people like Belinda Parmar who are aiming to make technology more appealing and accessible to women and end the stereotyping and patronization that runs rampant in the community.
  • For them, brands are like badges, an extension of who they are and how they want others to perceive them.They look to iconic brands that share their same values. At the same time, they’re evolving as consumers and want their favorite brands to evolve with them.
  • For them brands are like media.
  • Hunter is 24 and spent most of his life in Portland before moving to San Francisco at 21. He’s a self-taught developer who’s always had a thing for tech; now he’s working at a small start-up. To keep up with his more educated peers, Hunter follows all the usual publications through Google Reader (RIP) and attends Hackathons regularly. Not that they’re a chore: they’re great for networking and making new like-minded friends. What he loves most about the hacking scene is that he’s able to work on hard problems. Sure, the money’s in “First-World Problem” solving, but Hunter wants to make change and he believes software can truly do that. Hunter loves the Bay Area. He’s known for hitting up the food trucks and trying the new hotspots for local craft beer. He nerds out over music, following Pitchfork and more underground blogs like Potholes and GMAD. At the same time, he loves more stereotypically geeky things like comics and video games. He grew up playing Street Fighter, but now he wears Ray-Bans and drinks PBR. He doesn’t fit neatly into one box.
  • Alex is 25 and living in LA. She graduated with a BFA in design from UT-Austin and is working at a digital agency as an interactive producer.  She considers herself a trendsetter and is known among her friends as tech-savvy, but she doesn’t let it rule her life. You’ll find her reading Mashable and Fast Co online;but she doesn’t use Google Calendar, she keeps a classic Moleskine instead.  In her downtime, she spends too much time creating the best animated GIFs of Benedict Cumberbatch (BBC’s Sherlock) and the 11th Dr. Who, which she frequently features on her Tumblr page. Her blog also showcases her stylish side (where her usual “arm candy” includes a Jawbone UP) and her eye for design (self-described “vintage modern”). She reads Pitchfork “on the reg” to keep up with new releases and her favorite bands like Classixx and Chvrches, and she lives for festivals like Coachella and SXSW – where you’ll find her documenting the good times with a charmingly unpredictable analogue camera, no shortcuts here!
  • But early adoption isn’t restricted by ageWith less importance attached to early adopters helping to remove product glitches and widespread acceptance of ‘beta’ culture with rolling updates, early adoption is open to more than just the tech eliteGeneration CThey thrive on creation, curation, connection, and community. The behaviors of Gen C have less to do with the year they were born and more to do with their attitude and mindset. For example, while 80% of people under 35 are Gen C, only 65% of Gen C is under 35.
  • Greg has a desktop at work, a laptop at home, a netbook for travel, an Android smartphone and just last week he bought an iPad. He time shifts all his TV viewing using DVRs and enjoys watching Blu-ray movies at home. He’s also 55 years old.  He has worked in and around computers for 30 years – 15 of those online. He’s perfectly capable of uploading pictures of his grandkids to Flickr, thank you very much.  Despite his age, he’s perfectly comfortable with most technology and is insulted when his generation is painted as tech novices who might want to “get on board with” modern technology.  For him, the purchase process is more thoughtful. He buys tech for a specific use, as opposed to being motivated by being the first in the know.  In fact, he’s much like the rest of his generation. Baby Boomers are too often described as Luddites when they could be better depicted as active users and shapers of technology. They represent 25% of the population, but they consume 40% [in total dollars spent] of it. Greg wants you to know that ‘you marketers’ seem to clump everyone aged 50+ into this “old people” mindset. But he, at 55, is no more like a 72 year old than he is a 22 year old.
  • Dana’s kids, aged 4 and 7, are her full-time job. With them, everything is ‘go, go, go,’ so she’s always looking for tips, tricks, and technology that will make her job easier and serve a distinct purpose in her day-to-day life. She truly believes that technology can make her a better mother. She loves social media, much like many moms today. In fact, moms are spending more time online than they do in front of the TV, and they’re doing so more now than they did pre-parenthood. Over 50% of moms used social networks to gather info in 2012, up from 29% just three years prior. Lifehacking is a trend that is important to Dana. She, like many other moms, looks to Pinterest regularly for this sort of information. In fact, moms overall are 61% more likely to visit Pinterest than the average American. She also follows several “mommy blogs,” which have gained steam in the last few years. Today, 1 in 3 bloggers are moms, and 52% of bloggers are parents with kids under 18.Dana is constantly connected and always on. She’s attached to her smartphone, averaging more than 6 hours of use per day. While 25% of her apps are for her children, she’s no stranger to apps for herself. From mobile banking and mobile shopping to the usual suspects of texting and social media, Dana is truly a 21st century mom.
  • With perceptive issues that need to be overcome, a lot of education needs to happen. Whether its 3rd party referrals or talking about it in advertising. Beyond that, how do we convince them more tactically that this is secure
  • With perceptive issues that need to be overcome, a lot of education needs to happen. Whether its 3rd party referrals or talking about it in advertising. Beyond that, how do we convince them more tactically that this is secure
  • Better alternative to credit card, how can we build that out

Transcript

  • 1. THE EARLY TECH ADOPTER ATTITUDINAL TARGETING FOR ISIS 1
  • 2. BACKGROUND A majority of American adults now own smartphones and mobile usage is as high as its ever been. Analysts predict that mobile wallets are inevitable, the wave of the future; but the current reality is that awareness is not translating to use. How can we change that? Secondary Research • Learned about the mobile payment marketplace – from its bright future to its current struggles • Looked into the current Android market and examined how the NFC barrier plays into ISIS‟s future • Delved into the tech landscape and drew insights around the people, trends, and culture that make up this world Primary Research • Conducted four hour-long interviews with young influencers in the tech community 2
  • 3. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY THE MOBILE PAYMENT MARKETPLACE The race is far from over While each of the major players certainly has their niche, the overall race for mobile payment supremacy is wide open. Many of these companies and other consultancies have tried to target defined segments of potential users, but none has truly broken through yet. Consumer concerns trump competition The marketplace is crowded, with new start-ups entering the space seemingly everyday. While the industry and those who write about it are preoccupied with who will win the tech roll-out race, consumers are more concerned with things like security and privacy. The NFC barrier Isis faces a unique challenge in the NFC barrier. When it comes down to it, iPhone users are 50% more likely than Android users to be early adopters. These early adopting trendsetters are the brand ambassadors Isis needs. 3
  • 4. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY THE HACKING CULTURE Geek is Chic Today, being a nerd is something of a badge of honor. Geek culture is everywhere, it‟s diverse, it‟s valuable, and it‟s a brand. The New Rock Stars The kids who grew up reading comic books and playing video games are now the driving force behind broad and valuable swaths of popular culture and technology. These are the new celebrities. The Hacking Generation As start-up and geek culture have seen a meteoric rise in popularity, a new generation of techies have emerged. This generation of hackers represents one of ISIS‟s biggest opportunities. 4
  • 5. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OUR TARGETAUDIENCE Pushing Boundaries These millennials have redefined the tech landscape. They have different relationships with brands, have pushed convention in all facets of culture, and they‟re more knowledgeable and empowered than ever before. Age is but a Number While this group is our hotspot target, inclination toward ISIS and Android have less to do with the year they were born and more to do with their attitude and mindset. It‟s All About Utility Frivolous apps can be fun, but are often short-lived. When it comes down to sustained use, our target is looking for utility. They want things that will improve their lives, make things easier, and serve a true purpose in their daily life. 5
  • 6. WHAT TO EXPECT The Mobile Payment Marketplace Talking Android The Hacker‟s World The Hacker Generation Who Else Fits the Profile? Implications 1 2 3 4 5 6 6
  • 7. WHAT TO EXPECT The Mobile Payment Marketplace Talking Android The Hacker‟s World The Hacker Generation Who Else Fits the Profile? Implications 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  • 8. “Within five years, 50% of smartphone users will be using their phones and mobile wallets as their preferred method for payments.” “The global value of proximity payments, both NFC and mobile bar code transactions, will reach $296 billion by 2017.” “In the US, proximity mobile payments will top $1 billion in 2013 before expanding rapidly to reach an estimated $58 billion by 2017.” Analysts predict that mobile wallets are inevitable, the wave of the future “In 2011, there were 7 million NFC-enabled phones; by 2015, this number will grow to 203 million.” 8
  • 9. THE PLAYERS Square Google Wallet Level Up Other Challengers for small businesses for local deal-seekers part of an ecosystem nimble start-ups 9
  • 10. THE PLAYERS RT‟d by Square to nearly 130,000 followers 10
  • 11. BUT THIS IS THE CURRENT REALITY Awareness isn‟t translating to usage 41% of US smartphone users are highly aware that they can use their phone as a payment device but only 16% have ever done so AccentureSource: 11
  • 12. BIGGEST HURDLES 45% 37% 37% Consumers are focused on a few key concerns: concerned about security think their current method is convenient enough worried about privacy AccentureSource: 12
  • 13. WHAT WE‟VE LEARNED 37% THE MOBILE PAYMENT MARKETPLACE • The overall race for mobile payment supremacy is wide open and far from over. Each of ISIS‟s competitors has its niche, but none has truly broken through yet. • Consumers are less focused on individual brands and more concerned with things like security and privacy. These concerns need to be quelled before the projected bright future can take hold. 13
  • 14. WHAT TO EXPECT The Mobile Payment Marketplace Talking Android The Hacker‟s World The Hacker Generation Who Else Fits the Profile? Implications 1 2 3 4 5 6 14
  • 15. ANDROID & ISIS 45% 37% 37% People are reluctant to switch phones, carriers, or banks Just 7% of non-users are willing to switch phones in order to make mobile payments. iPhone users are extremely brand loyal: 80% have owned a previous iPhone How do we keep Android users on board? 25% of Android owners would prefer to have iOS Accenture, ComScore, MintelSources : 15
  • 16. THE CURRENT MARKET 45% 37% 37% In the tale of two smartphones, Android users are… Androi d 53% iOS 36% Other 11% Smartphone Market Share 24% 41% 37% 36% 39% 23% Android Apple 37% 50% 58% 67% 43% 57% 64% 72% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Mobile Banking Maps Search Weather Share of Users Engaged by Activity Android iPhone • 10% more likely to be men • 17% more likely to live in the suburbs • 80% more likely to only have a high school diploma • 29% more likely to prefer saving their money • 71% more likely to say they tend to follow rather than lead $100k+ $50-100k <$50k Annual HHI Share by Platform ComScore, Hunch, MintelSources 16
  • 17. WHO‟S REALLY USING ANDROID? 45% 37% In looking at the current Android market, three major groups of consumers stood out: 1. The Thrifters 2. The Contrarians 3. The Hackers 17
  • 18. THE THRIFTER 45% 37% The less money you have, The more likely you are to choose Android Widespread success not due to objectively great phones, but the marginal phones that are priced to move Correlated socioeconomic factors also show Android leanings 18
  • 19. THE CONTRARIAN 45% 37% Think Different. “Today, if you „think different,‟ you‟re looking at Android.” -Guy Kawasaki, former Apple Fanboy There is a segment of former Apple users who have grown disenchanted with Apple‟s present path and future Others want to buck the trend and believe that Android is simply better than Apple THE NEXT BIG THING IS ALREADY HERE. 19
  • 20. THE HACKER 45% 37% It boils down to choice, choice, choice Why wouldn’t a phone give its sole user a vote on how their device works? Android offers the ability to pick from the features which matter most to you, while some believe that Apple‟s one size fits all policy stifles innovation Much of Android‟s strength stems from its open nature, which allows third parties to do what they want with the platform 20
  • 21. HACKING IS NO LONGERABAD WORD Hack (n.): A good creative solution to a technical problem Hacker (n.): Someone who thinks about problems, technical and not, in a new way MTV InsightsSource: 21
  • 22. WHAT WE‟VE LEARNED 37% TALKINGANDROID • Isis faces a unique challenge in the NFC barrier. People are reluctant to switch phones, carriers, or banks to access mobile wallets, and many early adopters still prefer iOS. • Android users are more likely to be male, have lower household income, be less educated, and interestingly, be followers rather than leaders. • Three types of consumers are likely to purchase Android phones: the thrifters, the contrarians, and the hackers. Contrary to popular opinion, „hacker‟ is not a negative word. 22
  • 23. WHAT TO EXPECT The Mobile Payment Marketplace Talking Android The Hacker‟s World The Hacker Generation Who Else Fits the Profile? Implications 1 2 3 4 5 6 23
  • 24. 24
  • 25. Today, being a nerd is a badge of honor 25
  • 26. Today, being a nerd is a badge of honor Geek culture is everywhere, it‟s diverse, it‟s valuable and it‟s a brand… 26
  • 27. 27
  • 28. 28
  • 29. Start-ups are at the tipping point of culture – especially for millennials, who dreamt up many of today‟s most successful start-ups. 29
  • 30. WHAT WE‟VE LEARNED 37% THE HACKERS‟WORLD • Geek culture is everywhere, it‟s diverse, it‟s valuable, and it‟s a brand. • Kids who grew up reading comic books and playing video games are now the driving forces behind valuable swaths of pop culture and technology. These are the new rockstars. 30
  • 31. WHAT TO EXPECT The Mobile Payment Marketplace Talking Android The Hacker‟s World The Hacker Generation Who Else Fits the Profile? Implications 1 2 3 4 5 6 31
  • 32. THEYARE MILLENNIALS 60% “Hacking is part of what defines my generation” 72% “I have a real desire to create things other people love” 72% “Life is like an app; I‟m always in „beta‟” Experience = Social Currency Everything PersonalizedBuilding Communities MTV InsightsSource: 32
  • 33. SIZING UP THE AUDIENCE 45% 37% There are 80 million millennials in the U.S. alone These millennials are 2.5x more likely to be early adopters 13% of millennials fit the profile of a gadget guru Skew male and single with HHI ≥ $100,000 Successful, wire d yet free- spirited, confide nt but at-ease Greatest device ownership, ofte n push and contribute to content Boston Consulting GroupSource: 33
  • 34. 34
  • 35. The Hacker Generation‟s impact on technology 35
  • 36. The Hacker Generation‟s impact on technology Hacking can change the world 36
  • 37. The Hacker Generation‟s place in culture From pocket protectors to PBR 37
  • 38. IDOLS & INSPIRATIONS 45% 37% Elon Musk Joss Whedon Kevin Systrom & Mike Krieger Belinda Parmar Marissa Mayer Felicia Day 38
  • 39. RELATIONSHIP WITH BRANDS 45% 37% 39
  • 40. RELATIONSHIP WITH BRANDS 45% 37%Functional, Emotional, & Participative Benefits Price The New Definition of Brand Value Σ= 40
  • 41. RELATIONSHIP WITH BRANDS 45% 37% Brands as badges, as extensions of self Ray-Ban Remix Nike: Fuel Band 41
  • 42. RELATIONSHIP WITH BRANDS 45% 37% Tell me a story, don‟t show me a logo Oreo: Daily Twist Dove: Real Beauty Sketches 42
  • 43. RELATIONSHIP WITH BRANDS 45% 37% We have different values, and we hope you do too. Honest Tea: The Honest Store TOMS: One for One 43
  • 44. MEET HUNTER 45% 37% Age: 24 Hometown: Portland Currently City: San Francisco • Self-taught developer who‟s always had a thing for tech; now he works at a start-up • Strives to “code for good” – sure, the money‟s in First-World Problem solving, but he wants to make change and knows he can do that through software • He might wear Ray-Bans and drink craft beer, but he still loves the more stereotypically geeky things like comics and video games. • Hunter doesn‟t fit neatly into one box 44
  • 45. MEET KAT 45% 37% Age: 25 Hometown: Dallas Currently City: LA • Works at a digital agency as an interactive producer • She‟s a tech-savvy trendsetter, but doesn‟t let it rule her life. • Blogs about everything she loves – nerdy obsessions and all – for the Tumblr world to see • Reads Pitchfork “on the reg” and lives for festival season 45
  • 46. WHAT WE‟VE LEARNED 37% THE HACKER GENERATION • As start-up and geek culture have seen a meteoric rise in popularity, a new generation of techies have emerged. This generation of hackers represents one of ISIS‟s biggest opportunities. • The Hacker Generation has redefined the tech landscape and rewritten the rules for interacting with brands. 46
  • 47. WHAT TO EXPECT The Mobile Payment Marketplace Talking Android The Hacker‟s World The Hacker Generation Who Else Fits the Profile? Implications 1 2 3 4 5 6 47
  • 48. WHO ELSE FITS THE PROFILE? 37% The hacker generation might be the primary target, But there are a couple other groups to note. Oldies but goodies These two other targets are the Graying Geeks and the Digital Moms • Driven by utility rather than being motivated by being the first „in the know‟ • They are fast followers, if not early-adopters themselves, and like to discover trends (set by the hacker generation) on their own 48
  • 49. EARLYADOPTERSARE NOT JUST THE DIGERATI 37% But in reality, early adoption is not restricted by age. It‟s has more to do with their attitude and mindset than the year they were born. Meet “Generation C”: They thrive on creation, curation, connection, and community. while 80% of people under 35 are Gen C, only 65% of “Gen C” is under 35. 90% of tech companies target 10% of the population: the young, socially mobile digerati -John Gerzema, BrandAsset Consulting Think with GoogleSource: 49
  • 50. MEET GREG: THE GRAYING GEEK 37%We were the ones who had to know how to use escape codes to get our printers to work and sometimes wound up building our own PCs. - Lary Magid Tech Journalist & Baby Boomer • Greg has a desktop at work, a laptop at home, a netbook for travel, an Android smartphone and just last week he bought an iPad; He‟s also 55 years old • He‟s comfortable with most technology and is insulted when his generation is painted as tech novices who might want to “get on board” with modern tech • For him, the purchase process is more thoughtful: He buys tech for a specific use, as opposed to being motivated by being the first in the know • At 55, Greg is no more like a 72 year old than he is a 22 year old BIG SPENDERS: Baby boomers represent 25% of the population, but they consume 40% [in total dollars spent] of it. 50
  • 51. MEET DANA: THE DIGITAL MOM 37% • Dana‟s kids are her full-time job and keep her on the go; she‟s always looking for tips, tricks, and tech that will make her life easier • Like many moms today, she loves social media – even more than TV. Over 50% of moms used social to gather information in 2012 (+21% from 2009) • Lifehacking is a trend she‟s always watching, usually on Pinterest or one of the several “mommy blogs” she follows • Dana is constantly connected and attached to her smartphone – averaging more than 6 hours of use per day. She is truly a 21st century mom who believes that technology can help her be a better mother Moms with kids under 13 recommend brands, products, and services to other moms at least monthly 51
  • 52. WHAT WE‟VE LEARNED 37% WHO ELSE FITS THE PROFILE? • Our target is defined by a mindset, more than an age. • When it comes down to sustained use, each of our targets is looking for utility. They want things that will improve their lives, make things easier, and serve a true purpose in their daily life. 52
  • 53. LET‟S REVIEW The Mobile Payment Marketplace Talking Android The Hacker‟s World The Hacker Generation Who Else Fits the Profile? Implications 1 2 3 4 5 6 With the race still wide open, Consumers are focused on a few key concerns like security and privacy. Isis faces a unique challenge in the NFC barrier. Today, being a nerd is a badge of honor. Geek culture is everywhere, it‟s diverse, it‟s valuable, and it‟s a brand. The Hacker Generation has redefined the tech landscape and rewritten the rules for interacting with brands. Our target is defined by a mindset, more than an age. 53
  • 54. WHAT TO EXPECT The Mobile Payment Marketplace Talking Android The Hacker‟s World The Hacker Generation Who Else Fits the Profile? Implications 1 2 3 4 5 6 54
  • 55. So what does this mean for ISIS? 1. Test-Drivers Research has shown that once consumers make their first mobile payment, they are much more likely to become converts. So how do we get them to try it that first time? Is it about incentives? Or can we create something interactive so that our target can engage with the product in a hands-on way? 2. Problems of Perception Privacy and security are issues of perception. To overcome such perceptive issues, a lot of education needs to happen, whether its 3rd party referrals or talking about it in advertising. Once we convince the earliest adopters that security and privacy are not an issue for ISIS, the rest will follow; how can we do this? Beyond 3rd party referrals and explicitly talking about it in traditional advertising, how do we convince them more tactically that ISIS is secure? 55
  • 56. So what does this mean for ISIS? 3. Follow the Leader We know that our target places more weight on the recommendations of the tastemakers and their peers more than they do brands, with Android users being 71% more likely than iPhone users to say they follow rather than lead. So how do we get ISIS in the hands of influencers? And how do we turn them into brand ambassadors? Additionally, how can we drive ISIS to be the leader in this space, to set the trends that these known followers will follow? 4. Technology as Culture We know that geek and start-up culture are permeating the pop culture space and becoming wide-reaching, diverse, and valuable brands. Are there facets of this culture that we can capitalize on? Events we can participate in? Beyond injecting ourselves into geek culture, how can we actually earn some credibility or thought leadership in this area? 56
  • 57. So what does this mean for ISIS? 5. A New Social Mindset Communities are very important to our target, and it goes beyond just a network of friends. They‟re constantly creating new ways to be social, often planning events and meet-ups with likeminded people, both friends and strangers. So how can we leverage this evolved social mindset? 6. Attitudes Over Age We know that our target has much more to do with a mindset than an age. So how can we be inclusive of these older consumers who still thrive as early adopters? Can we use behavioral targeting to reach each group where they spend the most time? Utilize different retailers, but similar messaging, to attract both the younger and older early adopters? 57
  • 58. So what does this mean for ISIS? 7. Utility is King We know that each of our targets is highly driven by utility. So what extensions can ISIS explore to make their mobile wallet even more appealing as a utility for this discriminating audience? How do we make ISIS the better alternative to credit cards, what can we do in terms of utility to build that out? 8. Icon Loyalists Our target – specifically the hacker generation and digital moms – are very brand loyal. The hackers, in particular, look at brands as a badge of what they care about and often look to iconic brands as an extension of themselves. Are there partnerships with iconic brands that ISIS can explore? How can we make ISIS an iconic brand itself? 58
  • 59. THANK YOU! 59