Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Timbs book
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Timbs book

1,132

Published on

Here is the client book I included in a pitch for Timberland

Here is the client book I included in a pitch for Timberland

Published in: Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,132
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
45
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. TIMBERLAND RFP
  • 2. HELLO nice to meet you ANDREW SELBY ACCOUNT MANAGER ALEC SYNNESTVEDT CREATIVE COPY WRITER ARIEL HAMMER CREATIVE / ART DIRECTOR DANIEL STREADBECK CREATIVE COPY WRITER KELSEY ELLEFSON PLANNER ROBERT MAIDENS RESEARCH ANALYST
  • 3. AGENDA 1 • CHALLENGE 2 • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 3 • BRAND ANALYSIS 4 • MARKET ANALYSIS 5 • THE TARGET 6 • THE IDEA 7 • THE MAIN EVENT 1
  • 4. CHALLENGE Why we are all here today • Help Timberland become relevant to a new group of consumers • Create meaningful awareness and affinity for the Timberland brand • Create unique positioning for the Timberland brand • Find consumer motivating strategic insights 2
  • 5. IDENTITY CRISIS How Timberland Lost Relevance EMBRACED BY A GROUP OF CONSUMERS THAT THE COMPANY HAD NOT TARGETED AND DID NOT UNDERSTAND: THE “URBAN CONSUMER.” “Timberland is being adopted by a consumer that we didn’t know existed relative to our target audience,” CEO Jeffrey Swartz told the Times back then, adding that your brand was all function, not fashion. TIMBERLAND LOST TOUCH WITH THE AMERICAN WORKER. During three hundred interviews conducted, respondents “Actually love the brand... and would be more than willing to buy it if the functional attributes (American National Standards) were there.” -Rob Walker, 2008. Buying In: The Secret Dialogue Between * What We Buy and Who We Are 3 The legend goes that the first “urban” buyers of Timberland boots were NYC drug dealers—guys who had to stand on the street all night and needed the best possible footwear to keep them warm and dry. Perhaps a legend all that is.
  • 6. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Timberland Timberland’s latest strategy of “Fewer but better” is concentrat- ing on Big Ideas such as the best of Timberland’s product engine, combined with integrated brand-building efforts. The strategy has unlocked an opportunity to revitalize the brand’s presence with a compelling multi-faceted campaign rooted in social media to be launched in the Fall of 2010. Timberland confronts the obstacle of reclaiming target consum- ers in a manner that underscores their authentic, durable, func- tional, practical, and aesthetic products and through focusing 4 on classic styles and originality. Timberland’s unparalleled com- mitment to building great, insight-laden product backed with emotional storytelling is a combination that will return Timber- land to profitable growth.
  • 7. RESEARCH TIMBERLAND’S PRODUCTS FALL INTO TWO PRIMARY CATEGORIES Footwear Apparel and Accessories Timberland harnesses the power of the outdoors, emphasizing durability, comfort, rugged performance and craftsmanship in their men’s products. In fact, Timberland’s percentage of revenues derived from footwear sales have steadily increased on an annual basis since 2007—from 70.0%, to 71.4%, 72.4% respectively. In today’s economy, the frequency of replacement purchases has slowed, particularly the outdoor footwear industry. By leveraging Timberland’s footwear in communica- tion, specifically the iconic yellow boot, we see an opportunity to reposition the brand as the maker of the most reliable footwear. 5
  • 8. • Feature an L.L Bean Discovery School, where consumers • Emphasize quality, value and service learn how to do outdoor activities • Myriad past ventures, including a mountain bike line • Many product videos are featured on their website and have had sponsorships with Oakley and National Geographic • Strong social presence, and sponsor an award for people • Stress their mountain gear through First Ascent line of clothing and that help preserve the outdoors use of their social media, blog and website • “Never Stop Exploring” • “Get Outside Yourself” • Strong Social media push across multiple channels • Family company focused on kayaking, biking, camping, and hiking • Marketing efforts include ever-expanding retail, • Strong social presence centered around inspiring and online and social media presence educating all about the outdoors • Target outdoor athletes and enthusiasts • Created outdoor adventure schools through their store • Created an Endurance Challenge in Beijing that with various activities drew more than 3,000 athletes in 2009 • Sales exceeded $1.4 billion in 2008 • Privately held, consumer-cooperative company • Majority is done through mail order and online sales • “Welcome to the Great Outdoors” • Famous for “Guaranteed. Period” policy, where consumers • Largest seller of ski apparel can exchange or return at any time • Strong sponsorship with Team Columbia biking team, • Small social presence that tries to connect consumers by which is #1 in the world sharing summer plans on the website or on facebook • Most known for their Bugaboo jackets • Stress is on customer service • Footwear was only 17% of their sales in 2009 • Marketing efforts include a strong blog, PR and brand COMPETITION communication and internet/print ads that attempt to boost in-store displays 6 • $1.36 billion in sales in 2007 • Donate 1% of sales of 10% of revenue to green initiatives • Fleeces, coats and rain jackets are their leading products • Mission is to make the best product without causing unnecessary harm • Marketing efforts include a strong social presence and blog, a focused PR department and work with environmental groups
  • 9. TIMBERLAND IS DIFFERENT Timberland’s Place in the Market • We appeal to a broad consumer base through a strong history born from hard work, comfort, quality, and style • We have an iconic product in our boots that truthfully is more rec- ognizable than the L.L Bean boot or the Bugaboo jacket. When people think, “quality boot,” they think Timberland • Timberland has fantastic products and ample brand equity to stand on. Most competitors leverage social media and environmental responsibility well; we can elevate Timberland above the competition by making our heritage, an advantage the competition doesn’t share with us, a contemporary characteristic. There is an opportunity for Timberland to not only embrace their iconic product, 7 but to celebrate it.
  • 10. MEET THE TARGET These are Men Who Work Hard and Play Hard Good work starts with a good pair of boots. Timberland has stood by the quality of its product to protect generations of workers from the rain, deep snow, slush and mud. The work- place once called for rugged shoes to stand up against the factory floors, construction sites, and the great outdoors. But the workplace has changed, and we see an opportunity to inspire workers to do good work that extends past their nine-to-five. These are men who work hard and play hard. Timberland can satisfy a need for Gen X dads who face new pressures to deliver good work in different ways than prior generations. Our research reveals that tension is building in workplaces across the nation as fathers press for more family time. Dads aren’t working in the same ways, places, or professions as they used to. Further, the distinction between professional and personal life is increasingly Men today are far more involved with their families than ever. difficult to make. –Manhood in America: A Cultural History. Today’s dads love spending up to 3 hours daily with their kids, but often feel that the pressure of the workplace cuts into their time to play. 8 –U.S. Department of Labor, National Study of the Changing Workforce, 2008 With 84% of Gen X dads working full-time, they can’t devote as much time as they’d like to their family, and 73% of the target felt that most of their satistifaciton comes from their home and family. –Yankelovich Partners Inc. 2005
  • 11. THE SECOND SHIFT Domestic work has become a responsibility akin to work The percentage of men who report they do most or an equal share of cooking has increased substantially since 1992, from 34% to 56%, and most of these men are Gen X dads While a significantly larger percentage of men say they are involved in cleaning responsibilities in 2008 than in 1992, women do not report any change over that period (Families and Work Institute; 01-Jan-2009) 9 So, these men still demand quality, but they need it and desire it for different reasons than they used to, and their spending reflects that: Quality and reputation is what dad looks for when buying products for their families; price is much less of a factor. (Packaged Facts; 01-Jul-2008)
  • 12. PROBLEM Money Rich, Time Poor. Shopping ranks amongst the least favorite activity for dads. Friction, and a strategic insight, arises in the conflict Gen X dads see between their second shift and their fun time. They watch TV and listen to radio more than they thumb through magazines. And when it comes to shopping behavior, Gen X dads don’t browse. They buy. Brandweek; 15-Sep-2008 These men have little time. They don’t like to shop. So, when they do decide to shop, they like to make a quality purchase that will last a long time. They are willing to pay more for a high quality product. By repositioning the purpose of the Timberland boot not only as a nine to five work boot, but also as a product that satisfies the needs of the modern father, we provide a solution for them. And, if they 10 can see Timberland as a contemporary solution, not just a historic one, we become incredibly, wonder- fully, profitably relevant.
  • 13. BRAND CONNECTION People Choose Brands that Reflect Themselves 1 • STRONG ENOUGH TO GET WORK, THEN TO PLAY Younger dads are spending over 50% more time with their children on workdays than Baby Boomer dads with children the same age Fathers of children under age 13 spend 1.94 hours per day in leisure and sports activities as they care for their children. (New Strategist; 01-Dec-2008; American Men: Who They Are and How They Live – 2008) 2 • THE SHOES HELP THE MAN MAKE HIMSELF Gen X parents are more receptive to advertising and new and unique products than their older counterparts. (Yankelovich Partners Inc.; 12-Jul-2006; The 21st Century Mom & Dad) 3 • GEN X DADS VALUE QUALITY Quality makes Timberland boots the ideal sell ...with $22,562 average spendable income, it’s within their reach (www.conference-board.org) After covering essential living expenses in North America, utilizing 11 spare cash to purchase retail has increased 5 index points since Q3 of 2009 and is at it's highest since Q3 of 2008. (05-May-2010; Global Consumer Confidence, Concerns and Spending-- A Global Nielsen Consumer Report.)
  • 14. STRONG ENOUGH The Big Idea WHO Consumer insights show that Gen X dads love to play, and they care about lasting quality HOW We’ll leverage Timberland’s quality heritage by breaking through the target’s marketing FOR LIFE Our consumer insights show that Timberland is renown for quality. resistance in a contemporary way We want to leverage this perception in a way that is compelling, disruptive, and portrays quality in a way consumers can’t ignore. Timberland strong enough for life is intriguing and cool. It’s funny. It’s powerful, and it’s convincing. True to the DNA of Timberland. 12
  • 15. THE COMMUTE on the road again 13
  • 16. HULU GAME The New TV We’ll buy the commercial rights to a season of our target’s favorite TV show on Hulu. During every PRINT commercial break, the viewer will choose between watching one of Oldie but Goodie our viral videos or playing the Timber Land video Take an every day product and make it to look like a Timberland game— a stylized, come- along with clever copy of how the featured product would work dic adventure into the better if it were Timberland made. world of the Timberland boot. What if every product was made 14 with the same craft and consideration that goes into Timberland footwear. Leaks, unheard of. Rashes, not with this comfort. Disposible, not to me. Strong enough for life.
  • 17. WEB ADS Flashy Flickering Boxes On average Gen X men spend nearly 6 hours a week surfing the web. – 05-Aug 2010 Television, Internet and mobile usage in the US -- Three Screen Report Nielsen 15
  • 18. VIRAL VIDEO SERIES Free Ninety Nine Publicity Eight to ten webisodes will explore the quality, and clever comedy, of a world where other products are created with the same care and consideration as Timberland products. 16
  • 19. Change Human Behavior • “Check points” set up at parks, events, ACTS stores... people take pictures with “checkpoints” and upload to the web. Who ever takes the most pictures, with the most “Check Points” in a set time or region wins a GRAND PRIZE! This “Act” gets people to go out connect the online experience and brand to traveling and activities… • Promoted on web, TV, FB, twitter etc... where these “check points” are set up. • Doesn’t eliminate non-smart phone owners • Connected to “social media” FB, twitter, four square etc... 17
  • 20. PACKAGING Simply Iconic • Icons highlight product strengths, and will help the product sell itself successfully • Packaging and presentation, especially icons, will make the Timberland Nutrition Facts more effective AUGMENTED REALITY Education. NOW IN 3-D! • Kiosks will be placed in the highest grossing retail locations to provide a high-impact buying experience that creates brand affinity • Timberland kiosks will reflect the brand’s cutting edge, forward-thinking philosophy and performance • They’ll educate and entertain • They’ll provide a cool factor that can’t be overlooked • They enable the product to successfully sell itself 18 • Drive customers to actually try the product for them- selves
  • 21. BRAND STORY • We’ll bring the story and history of the brand to the foreground while simplifying overall look and feel to make the experience more contemporary • Make it a destination, not just a check-point WEB CONSOLIDATION • Visuals and UI will differentiate Timberland from the competition and enrich experience All Together Now SIMPLIFYING RETAIL • Strengthen icon and search navigation to better align with the target’s existing web behavior • Utilize the powerful, iconic contour line Timber- land logo to streamline navigation • Simplify search and navigation functions to make product selection more streamlined and intuitive UNIFY WEB PRESENCE • Unify web presence so no matter what, users know they’re connecting with Timberland and they’re never lost • Unify all social media platforms to ensure con- sistent, cohesive communication 19
  • 22. WHY IT WORKS Its Science • Highlights the strengths of Timberland by taking them out of context • Appeals to target’s desires for fun and quality in a way that is both pertinent and permanent • Universal theme that translates across multiple media platforms to directly communicate with buyers and a new generation of consumers 20 • Brings the Timberland brand and purpose to the target, bringing relevance easily within reach
  • 23. MEDIA SPENDING 2010 JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC $ PER TOTAL AD $ SOCIAL MEDIA FACEBOOK JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT OCT DEC OCT OCT $60,000 SOCIAL MEDIA YOU TUBE JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT OCT DEC OCT OCT $60,000 WEB MEN’S HEALTH JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT OCT DEC OCT OCT $90,000 PRINT MEN’S HEALTH JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN AUG SEP OCT $134,970 OCT $404,910 HULU NBC (30 ROCK) JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT OCT DEC OCT $78,970 OCT $238,000 CONTINUED 21
  • 24. MEDIA SPENDING 2011 JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC $ PER TOTAL AD $ SOCIAL MEDIA FACEBOOK FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT OCT DEC OCT OCT $140,000 SOCIAL MEDIA YOU TUBE FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT OCT DEC OCT OCT $140,000 WEB MEN’S HEALTH FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT OCT DEC OCT OCT $210,000 PRINT MEN’S HEALTH FEB MAR APR MAY JUN AUG SEP OCT $134,9710 OCT $944,790 HULU NBC (30 ROCK) FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT OCT DEC OCT $78,000 OCT $546,000 GRAND TOTAL $2,833,700 22
  • 25. TIMBERLAND STRONG ENOUGH FOR LIFE

×