Kelsey Elizabeth Ellefson
INDIANA UNIVERSITY: MAY 2010 : BAJ
KEELLEFS@GMAIL.COM : 312/623.5350
GAME
ZOMBIE
BECAUSE GAMING
...
KELSEY ELIZABETH ELLEFSON
	 	 	 	 Keellefs@gmail.com | 312/623.5350| Twitter: KelseyEllefson
            	 	 	 	 	 	 	
Wor...
I am defined by the following.
INSPIRE PLAY WORK
What inspires me on a daily, weekly,
monthly basis that continues to
piqu...
INSPIRE
FROM
ALBUM ARTWORK CONTEST
EXTENDED DEADLINE Jan. 19, 2010 - 7 PM
SUBMISSION GUIDELINES Designers may submit more than one...
Often times, during my stint as an Arts
writer, I found myself taking a simple
100 word write-up and turning it into
a fea...
Little 500 is the premier weekend
for athletic competition, scholar-
ship, and underage drinking that
leads to high-arrest...
A significant experience during
my time in college was when
I took a class called “Media in
Latin America: From Moguls to
...
WORK
AUSTIN 2009
November 18-20, 2009
FAILURE IS NOT AN OPTION®
INSTITUTE
JOHN BROWN
Author of
Making the Most
of Understa...
My first advertising agency experience was interning on the new business
development team for Leo Burnett/Arc Worldwide at...
I developed and planned a cross-
promotional event between the An-
nual Zombie March in Bloomington,
IN, and GameZombie.tv...
I also worked on the Boots North
America account during my summer
PR internship in NYC. Boot was
a brand who only had rele...
REFERENCES
Michael Girts
Senior Account Executive, Leo Burnett & Arc Worldwide
804/514.9106
michael.girts@leoburnett.com
M...
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My story

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a narrative of the serendipitous accident that led me into the world of advertising. Five internships, daily newsprint, and 1000's of photos later... I'm still unemployed.

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  1. 1. Kelsey Elizabeth Ellefson INDIANA UNIVERSITY: MAY 2010 : BAJ KEELLEFS@GMAIL.COM : 312/623.5350 GAME ZOMBIE BECAUSE GAMING IS NOT FOR THE WEAK-HEARTED DISENGAGED? HOW TO MAKE CAR INSURANCE RELEVANT TO MILLENNIALS VISUAL STORYTELLING INSPIRES SEARS BRAND BRAND RESTORING AN ICONIC GEN-XINTUITION-LED, RESEARCHED BACKED INSIGHT FOR TIMBERLAND BRAND NOENGLISH FOR SEVEN WEEKS LISTEN MORE, SPEAK LESS INDIANA DAILY STUDENT YOUNG JOURNALIST BRIDGES GAP BETWEEN PHOTO & TEXT HOPE FOR THE BESTFINDING AN OPPORTUNITY FOR A 501(C)(3) NON PROFIT
  2. 2. KELSEY ELIZABETH ELLEFSON Keellefs@gmail.com | 312/623.5350| Twitter: KelseyEllefson Work Leo Burnett Chicago, IL New Business Intern (June 2010-August 2010) Updated client/brand list for the Global Fact Database for LB/Arc Chicago offices, assisted in 10+new business pitches for agency, as well as led planning and strategic brief for Timblerland pitch for internship project. Part research, part intuition exposed new emotional insight for brand that leveraged Gen-X Dads as new consumers. The Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University Indianapolis, IN Communications Intern (Jan. 2010-June 2010) Serving as the target audience, I crafted original copy and strategy as a part of a larger marketing plan to attract new students to the Nation’s premier Bachelors degree in Philanthropic Studies. Agency 7 Bloomington, IN Account Executive (Sept. 2009-Dec. 2009) Revealed new insight on “gamers” by conducting surveys and interviews in gaming-centric courses offered through Indiana University to drive new campaigns and insights for client, GameZombie.This led to directing strategy and management for three innovative cross-media campaigns. The HOPE Foundation Bloomington IN Marketing/Communications Intern (Oct. 2008-Jan. 2010) Led research for AY 2008-2009 Title I funding for inner-city public schools in U.S. My findings revealed financial opportunities to fund professional development programs for school districts in 10 states. Coburn Communication NewYork, NY Publicity Beauty Intern (June 2009-Aug. 2009) Created a ‘brand experience’ for a long-lead pitch to national fashion editorial magazines for the launch of Forever Mariah Carey Perfume. Assisted in short-lead pitch calls for Boots North America,Animal Planet, and Elizabeth Arden celebrity fragrances. Verameat Design NewYork NY Design Intern, Personal Assistant (June 2009-Aug. 2009) Collected retail consumer shopping behavior and insight to help the designer tailor new design roll-outs for retail markets in NYC and Chicago. Play The Indiana Daily Student Bloomington, IN Photographer, Editor,Writer, Graphic Designer (Jan. 2008-May 2010) Specialized in visual narrative journalism exposing niche cultures in student and local community. Rendered final decisions for all visual mediums for daily newsprint seen by 20K+ students. National Student Advertising Competition Bloomington IN Creative Brand Strategist for State Farm Insurance Campaign (Sept. 2009-May 2010) Campaign allowed me to explore how to engage the disengaged, the Millennials. Indiana Memorial Union Board Advertising Committee Bloomington IN Creative Designer (Sept. 2009-May 2010) Used an open dialogue, rather than a hard copy creative brief on projects to create visuals for campus events. Student Ambassador for IU School of Journalism Santiago, Chile Online media contributor (June 2009) Exposed to international media trends and consumer youth insights outside of the U.S. Middlebury College Language Schools Middlebury,VT Italian Language Student at Summer intensive program(June 2007-August 2007) Seven weeks, not a word of English spoken, became a great listener. Education Indiana University Bloomington, IN – May 2010 Bachelor of Arts in Journalism & second major in Political Science Skills Proficient in Adobe Creative Suite 5,Web HTML, MS Office Programs and Mac OSX
  3. 3. I am defined by the following. INSPIRE PLAY WORK What inspires me on a daily, weekly, monthly basis that continues to pique my curiosity and purpose in this world. The things that I’ve done in the past that brought me joy and help me explore new creative applications for my present work. The things that I’ve worked for that have lead me to the communications field.
  4. 4. INSPIRE
  5. 5. FROM ALBUM ARTWORK CONTEST EXTENDED DEADLINE Jan. 19, 2010 - 7 PM SUBMISSION GUIDELINES Designers may submit more than one design in JPEG format, 300 DPI resolution, must include “Live From Bloomington2010”or“LFB2010” and submitted online to lfb@indiana.edu Bloom ington 25 25 What’s Up, Doc? Healthcare Reform Panel Whittenberger Auditorium Monday, October 26, 2009, 7 PM Free and open to the public Sponsors: Indiana University’s Straight No Chaser Holiday Concert @ the IU Auditorium Friday, Dec. 12 8 pm (Doors open @ 7pm) $12 for students $15 for general admission (Buy tickets at the IU Auditorium Box Office or ticketmaster.com) Karaoke Food Georgian RoomGeorgian Room in the Unionin the Union NIGHT!NIGHT! And other fun activites to help the stress before finals! KARAOKEKARAOKE 8:00 pm8:00 pm December 12December 12 Friday night before finals Formoreinfo: 812-855-5445 www.artmuseum.iu.edu IU Art Museum Be Inspired admission is always free A  T, – TourGrand The Also showing: African Currency: Hoe Blades, Bracelets, and More Special Exhibitions Close on December 21! Inspired by the IU Art Museum’s LightTotem Friday, December 12 and Saturday, December 13, 7:30 p.m. Experience the music of McClellan, Saint-Saëns, Whitacre, and others in a free, 30-minute multi- sensory performance on the entrance courtyard of the IU Art Museum. Reception in the Art Museum’s Solley Atrium will follow the performance each evening. D R E A M I N G D A R K N E S S S P E C I A L P E R F O R M A N C E IN Jazz Fables ConCert series When 5:30 to 8 p.m. today Where Bear’s Place back room, 1316 E. Third St. More inFo The coveris$6. Theshow features The Mahluli/ McCutchen Quintet withFareed Mahluli (saxes), Keith McCutchen (piano), special guest Bennett Higgins (saxes), Jeremy Allen (bass)andJasonTiemann(drums). MusiCology ColloquiuM series When 12:30 p.m. Friday Where Jacobs School of Music, Room M267 More inFo Professor Kristina Muxfeldt is giving the lecture “Franz Schubert and the Culture of Viennese Censorship: Alfonso und Estrella.” blooMington PlayWrights ProJeCt’s “sex/Death” When10p.m.todaythrough SaturdayandMondaytoWednesday Where BloomingtonPlaywrights Project,107W.NinthSt. More inFo As part of BPP’s Dark Alley Series, this year’s “Sex/ Death” features 10 short plays discussing subjects like homicide, infidelity and sexual fantasies. Tickets are $5. iu Press holiDay book sale When 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today Where Georgian Room, Indiana Memorial Union More inFo IU Press is selling more than 300 titles. Cash, checks and major credit cards are all accepted, but quantities are limited and all sales are final. Indiana weather. Let’s face it – we are all used to it by now. But I, quite frankly, am getting sick of it. Unprecedented rain, ice storms and snow have all weathered this campus in De- cember alone and we, as stu- dents, are left to deal with it. So far this se- mester, the weather alone has personally claimed three of my notebooks, a textbook and my usual positive disposition to make it to class on time. In trying to make it through the next two harrowing weeks, I’ve decided I must prepare my- self for the inevitable: the weath- er. But where could I find func- tionality, clever designs and practicality all wrapped up into one affordable accessory to com- bat the adverse weather condi- tions here? Simply stated: LeSportSac. The iconic accessories com- pany has provided original art- work and simple designs for their audiences for more than 35 years. Chief Creative Direc- tor Muriel Favaro attributes the brand’s successes to its collabo- ration with noteworthy design- ers and up-and-coming graph- ic artists. “One of the reasons for LeSportSac’s growth is that we have never strayed from the es- sence of the brand-accessible, functional, stylish products,” she said in an e-mail interview. “In addition, we have collaborated with fantastic, creative partners from Stella McCartney to var- ious artists to keep the look of LeSportsac products fashion-for- ward.” The company’s visual appe- tite for the latest designs has al- lowed it to introduce a new “Art- ist-in-Residence” every fashion season. This season, LeSportSac collaborated with BFree, the vi- sual work of graphic illustrator Merijn Hos. Hos’ work is comprised of simple characters and shapes coupled with bold colors to add a dramatic contrast to the pat- terns for the bags. Hos said in- cluded with every LeSportSac bag purchased from the BFree collection is a fabric hang tag with a brief biography of the art- ist. With bright prints and prac- ticality, how exactly could one accessory company persuade a greater female population on a college campus to purchase their product? By creating a simple, iden- tifiable logo that serves as pip- ing for their nylon accessories, LeSportSac has little to do in terms of advertising to success- fully communicate its product to a larger audience. What makes LeSportSac a unique accessory is its ability to combine artwork and self-ex- pression all housed into one vi- sual medium: a handbag. With innovative designs and a rich fashion tradition, one must ask, “Well, why would col- lege students want to buy these? Couldn’t portable pieces of art run hard on a student’s budget?” LeSportSac bags will not run you the price of a Fendi “Spy” bag, a Long Champ “Le Pliage” bag or even a generic JanSport backpack. LeSportSac offers a variety of affordable accesso- ries ranging from as little as $18 to as much as $128 for an extra- large weekender bag. Price points aside, LeSport- sac offers itself up as a great al- ternative to the mundane choice in school bags. With more than 48 patterns and designs released during a season, more opportu- nities can be given to your own distinctive LeSportSac bag. Because all of the LeSportS- ac bags are readily available in nylon, they offer the perfect pro- tection against Indiana weath- er. Ladies, I’m speaking to you, whether your seasonal affective disorder is setting in, you have seen the Herman B Wells Li- brary more than your boyfriend in the last week or you need a re- tail fix – consider LeSportSac. This week, in honor of Christmastime, I have decided to put together a list of my fa- vorite Christmas movies. I will ad- mit that I am not a huge fan of Christ- mas, and my favorite holi- day is actually Thanksgiving (come on, all you have to do is eat). But after watching one of these movies, I am ready to sit around, sing Christ- mas carols and eat a Christmas goose. Also, there’s really nothing better than one of these movies and a cup of hot cocoa on the couch while the snow falls out- side. Ah, if only in my dreams... 1. “Love Actually”: This movie is actually one of my fa- vorites of all time. It is not real- ly a movie about Christmas, just one set in the Christmas season. Still, there’s something about it, and I feel like the holiday sea- son does not really start until I watch it. I know, I know, this next part is really sappy, but it restores my belief in love. The part where the guy who is in love with Kiera Knightly holds up signs telling her how much he loves her – I cry like a baby every time. 2. “It’s a Wonderful Life”: I am always reminded of the Christmases of old when I watch this movie. When I was much younger, this movie was a holiday tradition for my fam- ily. We would pop this movie in on Christmas Eve, read “The Night Before Christmas,” go to bed and wake up in the morn- ing with presents stacked to the ceiling. This is one of those movies that reminds you just how much you really mean to the people around you, and you instantly feel how much they really mean to you. That is what Christmas is all about, right? 3. “White Christmas”: Two soldiers come home from World War II, fall in love with two sis- ters and save a failing inn in the snowy hills of Vermont. Throw in a devastatingly handsome Bing Crosby and that classic tune “White Christmas,” and you’ve got Christmas gold. 4. “A Christmas Story”: Leg lamps, BB guns and frozen tongues – what about this equa- tion doesn’t say, “Christmas in northern Indiana?” Every scene is memorable, along with that classic line, “You’ll shoot your eye out.” Ah, the Christmas spirit. 5. “Elf”: Will Ferrell in tights acting like he has the maturity and intelligence of a 5-year-old screams Christmas. The film starts with Ferrell jour- neying from the North Pole in search of his real father. It ends with him falling in love with a pretty department store elf and having a little elf baby, except they are all actually humans. Holiday spirit abounds in this movie, along with the part that literally makes me pee my pants a little bit whenever I watch it: Ferrell hurling himself on the Christmas tree from across the room and completely decimat- ing the thing. I hope you all are doing your best to get in the Christmas spirit. Personally, I was so ex- cited about the snow last week- end that I could not go back to sleep after I woke up at 8 a.m. Saturday and looked out my window. Take a study break and watch your favorite Christmas movie. Good luck with finals and happy holidays. arounD the arts Claire Burke is a senior majoring in journalism. MilDly entertaining My Top Five Christmas Movies kelsey ellefson is a junior majoring in journalism and political science. le “hit” bag Portable pieces of art Chris PiCkrell | iDs ’tis the season Conductor Stephen W. Pratt presents the Wind Ensemble to the crowd Wednesday evening at the IU Auditorium. The Annual Chimes of Christmas featured performances by the Wind Ensemble, the Singing Hoosiers, the Vocal Jazz Ensemble and the IU Trombone Choir. PLAY By Zina KumoK zkumok@indiana.edu From YouTube music videos featuring will.i.am and Scarlett Johansson to an almost 850,000-member Facebook group, Barack Obama’s campaign is exploring new territory. But the Democratic nominee took a new step in early Oc- tober when he bought ad space in 18 Xbox 360 online games, specifically targeting young male voters. The ads will run until Monday in 10 swing states, includ- ing Indiana. Polls show Obama and John McCain in a close race in Indiana. While his strategy has targeted young voters from its in- ception, reaching out to college-age males, the smallest vot- ing demographic, represents a new avenue of campaigning. Department of Political Science Professor Russell Hanson said because senior citizens typically make up a plurality of voters, sometimes candidates focus little attention on reach- ing out to a usually inactive crowd. “It says that he believes these are the ways one reach- es younger voters, who happen to be young males,” Han- son said. “He’s exploring new ways of communicating with young voters who can’t be reached by traditional outlets. He’s adapted to a new political environment.” EA spokeswoman Mariam Sughayer said Massive Inc., the firm responsible for creating the ads, offered to sell space to the McCain campaign, but it declined the invitation. Han- son proposed several reasons for the Republican nominee’s refusal. “I think in some ways it means they underestimate the potential,” Hanson said. “They don’t think there are many younger voters that will support them. The investment in ad- vertising wouldn’t be worthwhile. The McCain campaign is much shorter on resources. It would be a waste of money for them. They could reach older voters who are much more sympathetic.” Associate Professor of Communication and Culture Jon- athan Simons said Obama’s foray into the gaming industry symbolizes his “Change” slogan, as his tactics revolutionize the way candidates target voters. “You could say that is symbolically what is forward-look- ing and what is change,” Simons said. “Some could say it is gimmicky, superficial, and have reason for not feeling it is a good symbol of making real change. If it’s just about a gim- mick, then it’s not a substantial change. But you can read it either way.” Obama’s latest move solidifies him as the candidate more popular among 18- to 30-year-old voters. A study released this week by Harvard University’s Insti- tute of Politics shows Obama maintains a 26 percent advan- tage against McCain for this demographic. Despite Obama’s role as a pop culture figure, Simons said his grassroots cam- paign can also take credit if he ends up winning the presi- dency. “I think (reaching out to younger voters) is going to end up a big story of the campaign when it’s done, when peo- ple have worked out how many new and young voters have turned out to the polls,” Simons said. “If that’s the case, it’s going to have as much to do with on-the-ground organiza- tions that the Obama campaign got together as it does with popular culture, getting people out to vote who otherwise wouldn’t have voted may make the difference.” IU College Democrats President Anna Strand said young people gravitate toward Obama because he acknowledges them as a vital group of citizens necessary for his aim to win the White House. His new-media style serves as the next step in campaigning, she said. “I don’t consider it being revolutionary, as just being smart,” Strand said. “I think it has set a major tone for the rest of campaigns here on out. It isn’t just about negative tele- vision advertisements. It’s about being interactive with peo- ple in their day to day life.” ARTS 9 i n d i a n a d a i l y s t u d e n t | t h u r s d a y , O c t O b e r 3 0 , 2 0 0 8 editOrs Visit us Online caitlin Johnston cljohnst@indiana.edu erin Wright wrighte@indiana.edu check out www.idsnews.com ‘Partisantheatrics’toshowcasenewbrandofhumor By Tyler James Perry tjperry@indiana.edu Talk about crossing par- ty lines: a new play hints at the possibility of Barack Obama and Sarah Palin having an affair. The Bloomington Playwrights Project presents “Partisan Theat- rics [or] Will Our Apple Fall Far from the Bush?” The play is in- tended to examine the silliness of electoral politics. “Unlike ‘Saturday Night Live,’ which only parodies the politicians involved, we go after everything,” said Gabe Gloden, managing director of the Bloom- ington Playwrights Project. “We include political organizing, vot- ing and registration, and the gen- eral public’s perceptions of the whole campaign.” Partisan Theatrics is actually a series of short plays written by playwrights who spoof elector- al politics. The play is part of the Dark Alley Series, which is late- night programming aimed at edg- ier audiences. Could it be edgy enough to have a scene showing an affair between Obama and Palin? “There is a piece that hints at that possibility,” Gloden said. “The playwright, Nick Moore, has done a great job spoofing the concept of celebrity and synthe- sis of popular culture as seen in People magazine and Us Weekly and politics.” Gloden said he hopes the au- dience will appreciate the content of their play and that the reaction will be a good one. “It’s all done very tongue-in- cheek, so I hope it’s laughter,” he said. Gloden knows some people might not appreciate the idea, but he thinks audiences disenchanted with the political system will ap- preciate the play. “It’s important to note that we try not to side with a particular candidate or show a bias in any way,” he said. “We simply find electoral politics to be incredibly funny.” Michael Carey, the show’s producer, further exemplifies the desire to poke fun at everyone. “We have a group of play- wrights that includes Southern- ers, New Yorkers, a Los Angele- no and our own wonderful local writers,” Carey said. “Their writ- ing is sharp and funny; their poli- tics are as varied as their geogra- phy. This show isn’t going to let anyone slide, no matter who’s up or down in the polls.” Senior Anna Strand, president of IU College Democrats, said she thinks it could be construed as distasteful, though she stressed that she is just speaking for her- self and not the organization. “I have a great appreciation for art, but I don’t know enough about the play to have an opinion on it,” Strand said. She said she might be interest- ed in seeing the play based on the premise. “It sounds like an interesting premise–it would depend on the way it’s handled,” she said. “For the most part, that kind of ideal is kind of distasteful and not based in reality.” Strand said she doesn’t be- lieve the political process is ri- diculous – just some of the peo- ple involved. “I do not believe that this po- litical process is ridiculous in any regard,” she said. “Unfortunate- ly, there are actors in it who make questions that are distasteful.” Junior Chelsea Kane, chair- woman of IU College Republi- cans, hasn’t heard much about the play but doesn’t see much of an issue with it. “I’m a fairly open-minded per- son. I believe art is art,” she said. “We give a lot of license to actors to interpret things that might not happen in real life. Sarah Palin probably doesn’t approve, as she’s a married woman, and Barack Obama probably doesn’t approve, because he’s a married man.” Kane said the Obama-Palin scene is reason enough for her to go see the show. “I think that politics are the perfect thing to be mocked and the perfect thing to be laughed at,” Kane said. “They spend mil- lions and millions of dollars pro- moting larger than life candidates. Politics are not only entertaining, but they are important.” Gloden said he hopes “Parti- san Theatrics” will be seen as an intelligent satire. “We take a no-holds-barred, anything-goes approach to com- edy, but we do so with intelli- gence, I hope,” he said. partisan theatrics [or] will our apple fall far from Bush? When 10 p.m., Nov. 3-5 Where Bloomington Playwrights Project Price Tickets are $5, available at the door. Political games Spoof plays series hints to Obama, Palin love affair IllustratIon by Kelsey ellefson | iDs Xbox 360 online features Obama campaign ads O n any given weekday, four musicians gather together at a small studio space in the IU Jacobs School of Music. Around the endless circular maze of the Music Annex, music pours out from every studio space, hallway and class- room. The sounds individually sing the praises of the instruments, while collec- tively creating a chaotic palate for the ears within the 88-year-old music school. On the rst oor, past the long hall- way of instrument storage lockers, there is a solemn-looking wooden door with a discreet name plate. Behind the aged, yellow nameplate is a studio that serves as a practice space for the Kuttner String Quartet. GREAT HONOR The Kuttner quartet, one of the most prestigious musical ensembles in the school, is named in honor of conductor and violinist Michael Kuttner, a distin- guished IU professor from 1972 to 1975. The quartet is currently selecting its second piece for its winter recital, and each musician carefully critiques the possible pieces. “It’s too fast,” second violist Bella Hristova said. The quartet was in the middle of read- ing through Mendelssohn’s Opus No. 44 when their animated playing came to a halt. “Should we move on to the next movement?” Hristova added. The string quartet is comprised of a rst violin, second violin, viola and cel- lo. Though minimal in size, the quartet is powerful in sound. The half-circle for- mation of the string players allows for a unied sound that doesn’t play favorit- ism to any individual section. The quar- tet offers an intimate sound that cannot be matched by any other ensemble. The Kuttner quartet members include Rose Armbrust, Bella Hristova, Danbi Um and Yotam Baruch. Korean native Um is the rst violinist for the group. Hristova, from Bulgaria, is the second violinist in the quartet. Um and Hristo- va are both pursuing an Artist Diploma in violin. Armbrust, the quartet’s violist, is from Wheaton, Ill., and is pursuing her graduate degree in viola under the direc- tion of Jacobs faculty memberAtarArad. Um, Hristova andArmbrust previous- ly worked together at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia and actively sought out a cellist to join their three- piece ensemble. Baruch, originally from QUARTET The event is the rst part of the organization’s “Break- ing Records ... Building Lives” campaign, and it aims not only to recruit volunteers, but also to raise awareness for the organi- zation, said Kathy Delaney-Wil- lett, director of outreach and en- rollment. “I really wanted something fun and noticeable,” she said, which is why she took the theme of the campaign literally. Obviously, breaking a record isn’t easy, Delaney-Willett said. The current record for largest game of telephone is 1,300, she said. Guinness World Records has set various parameters for the event. For instance, there must be two ofcial witnesses during the course of the event and there must be complete silence. No participant is able to leave un- til the event is nished and the event must be taped, Delaney- Willett said. The game will begin when the ofcial sentence is whis- pered to the rst person who then writes it down and hands it to an ofcial witness. The mes- sage can be skewed along the way, but what matters for the books is the number of partici- pants, she said. But the game is only one small part of the event, Delaney- Willett said. “To us it’s a representation of the game rather than the game itself,” she said. The reason 1,400 participants are needed is not only to exceed the current record, but to repre- sent the 1,400 children the or- ganization hopes to serve, said Megan Oldham, the marketing intern for BBBS. So far, the organization has gathered about half the num- ber of participants and is still spreading the word about the event, Oldham said. In addition to the 50 or more kids signed up for the event are various groups from IU, such as those in the greek system and even auditorium ushers, Del- aney-Willett said. BBBS relies mostly on do- nors and volunteers, and be- GUINNESS WORLD RECORD: LARGEST GAME OF ‘TELEPHONE’ WHEN Registration: noon to 1:30 p.m. Saturday; Game starts at 2 p.m. Saturday WHERE University Gymnasium, located at 10th Street and the Indiana 45/46 Bypass MORE INFO Big Brothers Big Sisters of South Central Indiana is organizing this community outreach event and hopes to draw in the 1,400 participants needed to break the world record. SEE TELEPHONE, PAGE 5 SEE KUTTNER, PAGE 5 BY KELSEY ELLEFSON | keellefs@indiana.edu COURTNEY DECKARD | IDS Clockwise, cellist Yotam Baruch, violinist Bella Hristora, violinist Danbi Um and violist Rose Armbrust, of the Kuttner Quartet practice Wednesday evening in professor Atar Arad's studio. The Kuttner Quartet changes annually and is composed of the top string players in the Jacobs School of Music. Kuttner String Quartet perfects legacy at IU STORY For a preview about this weekend’s ballet with music by the Kuttner String Quartet, see Arts, page 9. 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  6. 6. Often times, during my stint as an Arts writer, I found myself taking a simple 100 word write-up and turning it into a feature story. Narrative journalism was a way for me to take a person’s experience and make it something that an entire campus could take part in. The article at the right was a feature on a string quartet made up of the top string musicians in the nationally- recognized Jacobs School of Music.The story’s focus was not on the prestige of the group, or pieces they selected to play at their next concert, but the collaborative nature of a string quartet. These four members, each had a unique voice in the article, but came together to support one another in a harmonious sound throughout the whole feature.There was really a wonderful sense of camaraderie and dependency that I was able to convey in my article. I’ve dodged secret service members, snuck in front of front row-barricades at concerts, and even rode around in a cop car--all legally. Since my sophomore year of college, I have used photojournalism to get exposure to new cultures, experiences, and people that most would never see. I approach each assignment with a sense of curiosity. I believe an effective photo not only improves a written story, but can bet- ter communicate an emotion and moment that will never be fully captured in copy. I apply this to my work because I recognize that creatively minded people may not respond to an 8.5”x 11” sheet of paper. 1 2 Notes on a minor scale. Do you want to take my picture?w w w .i d s n e w s .c o m INDIANA DAILY STUDENTF R E E • 1 2 P A G E SV O L U M E 1 4 2 • I S S U E 1 0 9 F R I D A Y , O C T O B E R 9 , 2 0 0 9 O n any given weekday, four musicians gather together at a small studio space in the IU Jacobs School of Music. Around the endless circular maze of the Music Annex, music pours out from every studio space, hallway and class- room. The sounds individually sing the praises of the instruments, while collec- tively creating a chaotic palate for the ears within the 88-year-old music school. On the rst oor, past the long hall- way of instrument storage lockers, there is a solemn-looking wooden door with a discreet name plate. Behind the aged, yellow nameplate is a studio that serves as a practice space for the Kuttner String Quartet. GREAT HONOR The Kuttner quartet, one of the most prestigious musical ensembles in the school, is named in honor of conductor and violinist Michael Kuttner, a distin- guished IU professor from 1972 to 1975. The quartet is currently selecting its second piece for its winter recital, and each musician carefully critiques the possible pieces. “It’s too fast,” second violist Bella Hristova said. The quartet was in the middle of read- ing through Mendelssohn’s Opus No. 44 when their animated playing came to a halt. “Should we move on to the next movement?” Hristova added. The string quartet is comprised of a rst violin, second violin, viola and cel- lo. Though minimal in size, the quartet is powerful in sound. The half-circle for- mation of the string players allows for a unied sound that doesn’t play favorit- ism to any individual section. The quar- tet offers an intimate sound that cannot be matched by any other ensemble. The Kuttner quartet members include Rose Armbrust, Bella Hristova, Danbi Um and Yotam Baruch. Korean native Um is the rst violinist for the group. Hristova, from Bulgaria, is the second violinist in the quartet. Um and Hristo- va are both pursuing an Artist Diploma in violin. Armbrust, the quartet’s violist, is from Wheaton, Ill., and is pursuing her graduate degree in viola under the direc- tion of Jacobs faculty memberAtarArad. Um, Hristova andArmbrust previous- ly worked together at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia and actively sought out a cellist to join their three- piece ensemble. Baruch, originally from Quintessential QUARTETBY RACHEL KRASNOW rkrasnow@indiana.edu World-famous magician Da- vid Coppereld will mix his wit and talent to create magic and fantasy at 5:30 and 8:30 p.m. Sunday at the IU Auditorium. Coppereld, winner of 21 Emmy awards and record- breaking ticket sales, is on an international tour. He will per- form “An Intimate Evening of Grand Illusion” for IU students and local residents. Coppereld has been prac- ticing magic professionally since he was 12 years old and performs more than 550 shows per year, according to his Web site, www.dcoppereld.com. The Indiana Daily Student asked him about his tricks, in- uences and achievements. Here is what he had to say: IDS: WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO START PRACTICING MAGIC? Coppereld: I became in- terested in magic at an ear- ly age. Though I did ventrilo- quism rst with my dummy, “Ven” – I know, not the most original of names – at a very early age, and quickly moved on to magic, which I did much better. I rst learned a card trick from my grandfather when I was seven involving four aces. Unfortunately, my grandfather passed away before he ever got to see me do it public. When I perform that magic, it’s a spe- cial tribute to his memory. IDS: WHO HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST INFLUENCES? Coppereld: My inu- ences, unlike what most peo- ple think, came largely outside of the eld of magic. Although magic greats like (Harry) Keller or the Frenchman Rob- ert-Houdin (who Houdini got his name from) were certainly great for the profession, it was Copperfield reveals‘intimate’ magictricks SEE COPPERFIELD, PAGE 5 BY ISABEL MANAHAN imanahan@indiana.edu Big Brothers Big Sisters of South Central Indiana will try to solve its need for volunteers in an unconventional manner – by attempting to break a world re- cord. This Saturday at the Uni- versity Gym, the organization hopes to gather at least 1,400 participants for the largest game of telephone ever played. The event is the rst part of the organization’s “Break- ing Records ... Building Lives” campaign, and it aims not only to recruit volunteers, but also to raise awareness for the organi- zation, said Kathy Delaney-Wil- lett, director of outreach and en- rollment. “I really wanted something fun and noticeable,” she said, which is why she took the theme of the campaign literally. Obviously, breaking a record isn’t easy, Delaney-Willett said. The current record for largest game of telephone is 1,300, she said. Guinness World Records has set various parameters for the event. For instance, there must be two ofcial witnesses during the course of the event and there must be complete silence. No participant is able to leave un- til the event is nished and the event must be taped, Delaney- Willett said. The game will begin when the ofcial sentence is whis- pered to the rst person who then writes it down and hands it to an ofcial witness. The mes- sage can be skewed along the way, but what matters for the books is the number of partici- pants, she said. But the game is only one small part of the event, Delaney- Willett said. “To us it’s a representation of the game rather than the game itself,” she said. The reason 1,400 participants are needed is not only to exceed the current record, but to repre- sent the 1,400 children the or- ganization hopes to serve, said Megan Oldham, the marketing intern for BBBS. So far, the organization has gathered about half the num- ber of participants and is still spreading the word about the event, Oldham said. In addition to the 50 or more kids signed up for the event are various groups from IU, such as those in the greek system and even auditorium ushers, Del- aney-Willett said. BBBS relies mostly on do- nors and volunteers, and be- BBBS to compete for world record 1,400 needed for world’s largest ‘telephone’ game GUINNESS WORLD RECORD: LARGEST GAME OF ‘TELEPHONE’ WHEN Registration: noon to 1:30 p.m. Saturday; Game starts at 2 p.m. Saturday WHERE University Gymnasium, located at 10th Street and the Indiana 45/46 Bypass MORE INFO Big Brothers Big Sisters of South Central Indiana is organizing this community outreach event and hopes to draw in the 1,400 participants needed to break the world record. SEE TELEPHONE, PAGE 5 SEE KUTTNER, PAGE 5 BY MOLLY JOHNSON mopjohns@indiana.edu Zeta Tau Alpha kicks off IU Homecoming with singing, danc- ing men. “It’s a male talent show,” ju- nior Jen Fulena of Zeta said. “The show is going to be really fun; the crowd will be really involved. We are really excited to see our hard work pay off.” The annual variety show, Big Man on Campus, will be at 7 p.m. Friday in the IU Auditorium. Tickets cost $10 and can be pur- chased at the Auditorium or Zeta. This year’s theme is “Teaming Up to Tackle Breast Cancer.” Twenty-three fraternity mem- bers will show off their talent to compete for the title of “Big Man on Campus.” The talent will range from vocal performances to mag- ic shows, said senior John Smo- len, a BMOC competitor from Phi Kappa Psi. The event is Zeta’s annual phi- lanthropy and is celebrating its 10th year. All proceeds from the event benet breast cancer re- search. Last year, Zeta members raised more $175,000, dispers- ing funds among breast cancer re- search at IU medical centers, the Vera Bradley Foundation, Su- san G. Komen and the American Cancer Society, according to the BMOC Web site. “Our ultimate goal is to try to donate more than we did last year, but considering the economic sit- uation, we just want to donate as much as we can,” Fulena said. This is a ground-breaking year for Zeta as they fund IU’s team of breast oncologists and the rst- ever Zeta Conference, an infor- mational forum for top breast can- cer researchers and benefactors to discuss progress in the eld. Zeta will donate more than $100,000 in the next four years to it. “With the conference, the BY KYLE ABRELL skabrell@indiana.edu Gaining condence in strides, the IU men’s and women’s cross country teams are vaulting themselves both into the national rankings and earning Big Ten accolades. The Hoosier men skyrock- eted to No. 17 in USTFCCCA national rankings this week af- ter beating ranked opponents Iona and North Carolina State at the Paul Short Invitational last weekend. The women are also gaining coaches’ votes in the polls, receiving eight this week, and are looking to crack the top 30. Also, for the third week in a row, a Hoosier has nabbed Big Ten Player of the Week hon- ors. This time, a pair of Hoo- siers, for the second time in IU’s history, earned the award. Senior Wendi Robinson collected the award for the women’s team this week after her fourth place nish at the Paul Short Invitational. It was the rst time a Hoosier wom- an had taken home the honor since Jessica Gall on Sept. 21, 2004. “Its one of those things where its nice to see that the hard work I’ve put it got rec- ognition,” Robinson said. Joining Robinson this week was freshman Andy Bay- er, whose third-place perfor- mance paced the IU men to a rst place title at the meet. The only other time Indiana has had both a male and female runner earn the honor was dur- ing that same week in 2004 when former Hoosier Sean Jefferson coupled with Gall. “I felt really good about it,” Bayer said. “It reects all of us training really well to- gether and it worked out really well. I don’t think we want to change a whole lot, but we’re still looking for more to shoot for this year. We’re not taking anything for granted. We have work to do but we’ll take it from here.” Previously, sophomore An- drew Poore had received Big Ten Player of the Week for his second-place nish at the In- diana Intercollegiates on Sept. 18. The rst week of the sea- son, freshman Zach Mayhew also took home the award as a result of his rst collegiate race, where he nished rst at the Indiana Open. 23 vie for title of ‘Big Man on Campus’ CROSS COUNTRY Team racks up honors, enters national spotlight SEE BMOC, PAGE 5 SEE CROSS COUNTRY, PAGE 5 BY KELSEY ELLEFSON | keellefs@indiana.edu COURTNEY DECKARD | IDS Clockwise, cellist Yotam Baruch, violinist Bella Hristora, violinist Danbi Um and violist Rose Armbrust, of the Kuttner Quartet practice Wednesday evening in professor Atar Arad's studio. The Kuttner Quartet changes annually and is composed of the top string players in the Jacobs School of Music. IDS FILE PHOTO Dressed as various pop culture icons, contestants perform during Big Man on Campus on Oct. 17, 2008, at the IU Auditorium. The breast cancer fundraising event beat its previous record, bringing in over $175,000 last year. BMOC will take place at 7 p.m. Friday. Kuttner String Quartet perfects legacy at IU For a story about ‘Real World’ auditions in Indianapolis this weekend, check out page 3 STORY For a preview about this weekend’s ballet with music by the Kuttner String Quartet, see Arts, page 9. 3 4 By Zina KumoK zkumok@indiana.edu From YouTube music videos featuring will.i.am and Scarlett Johansson to an almost 850,000-member Facebook group, Barack Obama’s campaign is exploring new territory. But the Democratic nominee took a new step in early Oc- tober when he bought ad space in 18 Xbox 360 online games, specifically targeting young male voters. The ads will run until Monday in 10 swing states, includ- ing Indiana. Polls show Obama and John McCain in a close race in Indiana. While his strategy has targeted young voters from its in- ception, reaching out to college-age males, the smallest vot- ing demographic, represents a new avenue of campaigning. Department of Political Science Professor Russell Hanson said because senior citizens typically make up a plurality of voters, sometimes candidates focus little attention on reach- ing out to a usually inactive crowd. “It says that he believes these are the ways one reach- es younger voters, who happen to be young males,” Han- son said. “He’s exploring new ways of communicating with young voters who can’t be reached by traditional outlets. He’s adapted to a new political environment.” EA spokeswoman Mariam Sughayer said Massive Inc., the firm responsible for creating the ads, offered to sell space to the McCain campaign, but it declined the invitation. Han- son proposed several reasons for the Republican nominee’s refusal. “I think in some ways it means they underestimate the potential,” Hanson said. “They don’t think there are many younger voters that will support them. The investment in ad- vertising wouldn’t be worthwhile. The McCain campaign is much shorter on resources. It would be a waste of money for them. They could reach older voters who are much more sympathetic.” Associate Professor of Communication and Culture Jon- athan Simons said Obama’s foray into the gaming industry symbolizes his “Change” slogan, as his tactics revolutionize the way candidates target voters. “You could say that is symbolically what is forward-look- ing and what is change,” Simons said. “Some could say it is gimmicky, superficial, and have reason for not feeling it is a good symbol of making real change. If it’s just about a gim- mick, then it’s not a substantial change. But you can read it either way.” Obama’s latest move solidifies him as the candidate more popular among 18- to 30-year-old voters. A study released this week by Harvard University’s Insti- tute of Politics shows Obama maintains a 26 percent advan- tage against McCain for this demographic. Despite Obama’s role as a pop culture figure, Simons said his grassroots cam- paign can also take credit if he ends up winning the presi- dency. “I think (reaching out to younger voters) is going to end up a big story of the campaign when it’s done, when peo- ple have worked out how many new and young voters have turned out to the polls,” Simons said. “If that’s the case, it’s going to have as much to do with on-the-ground organiza- tions that the Obama campaign got together as it does with popular culture, getting people out to vote who otherwise wouldn’t have voted may make the difference.” IU College Democrats President Anna Strand said young people gravitate toward Obama because he acknowledges them as a vital group of citizens necessary for his aim to win the White House. His new-media style serves as the next step in campaigning, she said. “I don’t consider it being revolutionary, as just being smart,” Strand said. “I think it has set a major tone for the rest of campaigns here on out. It isn’t just about negative tele- vision advertisements. It’s about being interactive with peo- ple in their day to day life.” ARTS 9 i n d i a n a d a i l y s t u d e n t | t h u r s d a y , O c t O b e r 3 0 , 2 0 0 8 editOrs Visit us Online caitlin Johnston cljohnst@indiana.edu erin Wright wrighte@indiana.edu check out www.idsnews.com ‘Partisantheatrics’toshowcasenewbrandofhumor By Tyler James Perry tjperry@indiana.edu Talk about crossing par- ty lines: a new play hints at the possibility of Barack Obama and Sarah Palin having an affair. The Bloomington Playwrights Project presents “Partisan Theat- rics [or] Will Our Apple Fall Far from the Bush?” The play is in- tended to examine the silliness of electoral politics. “Unlike ‘Saturday Night Live,’ which only parodies the politicians involved, we go after everything,” said Gabe Gloden, managing director of the Bloom- ington Playwrights Project. “We include political organizing, vot- ing and registration, and the gen- eral public’s perceptions of the whole campaign.” Partisan Theatrics is actually a series of short plays written by playwrights who spoof elector- al politics. The play is part of the Dark Alley Series, which is late- night programming aimed at edg- ier audiences. Could it be edgy enough to have a scene showing an affair between Obama and Palin? “There is a piece that hints at that possibility,” Gloden said. “The playwright, Nick Moore, has done a great job spoofing the concept of celebrity and synthe- sis of popular culture as seen in People magazine and Us Weekly and politics.” Gloden said he hopes the au- dience will appreciate the content of their play and that the reaction will be a good one. “It’s all done very tongue-in- cheek, so I hope it’s laughter,” he said. Gloden knows some people might not appreciate the idea, but he thinks audiences disenchanted with the political system will ap- preciate the play. “It’s important to note that we try not to side with a particular candidate or show a bias in any way,” he said. “We simply find electoral politics to be incredibly funny.” Michael Carey, the show’s producer, further exemplifies the desire to poke fun at everyone. “We have a group of play- wrights that includes Southern- ers, New Yorkers, a Los Angele- no and our own wonderful local writers,” Carey said. “Their writ- ing is sharp and funny; their poli- tics are as varied as their geogra- phy. This show isn’t going to let anyone slide, no matter who’s up or down in the polls.” Senior Anna Strand, president of IU College Democrats, said she thinks it could be construed as distasteful, though she stressed that she is just speaking for her- self and not the organization. “I have a great appreciation for art, but I don’t know enough about the play to have an opinion on it,” Strand said. She said she might be interest- ed in seeing the play based on the premise. “It sounds like an interesting premise–it would depend on the way it’s handled,” she said. “For the most part, that kind of ideal is kind of distasteful and not based in reality.” Strand said she doesn’t be- lieve the political process is ri- diculous – just some of the peo- ple involved. “I do not believe that this po- litical process is ridiculous in any regard,” she said. “Unfortunate- ly, there are actors in it who make questions that are distasteful.” Junior Chelsea Kane, chair- woman of IU College Republi- cans, hasn’t heard much about the play but doesn’t see much of an issue with it. “I’m a fairly open-minded per- son. I believe art is art,” she said. “We give a lot of license to actors to interpret things that might not happen in real life. Sarah Palin probably doesn’t approve, as she’s a married woman, and Barack Obama probably doesn’t approve, because he’s a married man.” Kane said the Obama-Palin scene is reason enough for her to go see the show. “I think that politics are the perfect thing to be mocked and the perfect thing to be laughed at,” Kane said. “They spend mil- lions and millions of dollars pro- moting larger than life candidates. Politics are not only entertaining, but they are important.” Gloden said he hopes “Parti- san Theatrics” will be seen as an intelligent satire. “We take a no-holds-barred, anything-goes approach to com- edy, but we do so with intelli- gence, I hope,” he said. partisan theatrics [or] will our apple fall far from Bush? When 10 p.m., Nov. 3-5 Where Bloomington Playwrights Project Price Tickets are $5, available at the door. Political games Spoof plays series hints to Obama, Palin love affair IllustratIon by Kelsey ellefson | iDs Xbox 360 online features Obama campaign ads You have the next four hours to create something striking and compelling for an audience of 20K students.This was my life for almost two years as a page designer for the Indiana Daily Student. My experi- ence taught me to be quick on my feet, open to change, and communicate with a team of designers. My design for “Political Games” helped illustrate an opinion- editorial on President Obama’s campaign strategy to use endorsements in video games. I kept my design simple and recognizable using an X-Box controller as my inspiration. I believe that sometimes the most thoughtful design is the most simple one. Applying this to advertis- ing, I like to expose brands at their core, simple truth. I got schooled in Adobe. As a result of a long-lead pitch from a boutique PR agency in NewYork and a rainstorm that nearly destroyed all of my textbooks junior year of college, I wrote a op-ed article on LeSportSac bags. Putting the product to use, I understood first-hand the appeal of buying the brand. Not shying away from being a consumer, allowed me to better communicate the effectiveness of the product and understand in real-world situations how a brand can improve the lives of it’s consumers. Even if it was simply a graphic tote bag that protected my economics textbook from the next rainstorm on campus. All press is good press. By Lauren Schaefer leschaef@indiana.edu The rain continued to pour outside the Bluebird Night- club Tuesday night, but the toys kept pouring inside for the an- U.S. Marine Corps’ charity, and Amos Lee, The Delta Spirit and the Gabe Dixon Band headlined the concert. Each artist brought a distinct performance. The Gabe Dixon Band opened the show with a short set rec por its for pla bel dru Jazz Fables ConCert series When 5:30 to 8 p.m. today Where Bear’s Place back room, 1316 E. Third St. More inFo The cover is $6. The show features The Mahluli/ McCutchen Quintet with Fareed Mahluli (saxes), Keith McCutchen (piano), special guest Bennett Higgins (saxes), Jeremy Allen (bass) and Jason Tiemann (drums). MusiCology ColloquiuM series When 12:30 p.m. Friday Where Jacobs School of Music, Room M267 More inFo Professor Kristina Muxfeldt is giving the lecture “Franz Schubert and the Culture of Viennese Censorship: Alfonso und Estrella.” blooMington PlayWrights ProJeCt’s “sex/Death” When 10p.m.todaythrough SaturdayandMondaytoWednesday Where Bloomington Playwrights Project, 107 W. Ninth St. More inFo As part of BPP’s Da De dis infi Tic iu bo W W Me Mo mo che all lim Indiana weather. Let’s face it – we are all used to it by now. But I, quite frankly, am getting sick of it. Unprecedented rain, ice storms and snow have all weathered this campus in De- cember alone and we, as stu- dents, are left to deal with it. So far this se- mester, the weather alone has personally claimed three of my notebooks, a textbook and my usual positive disposition to make it to class on time. In trying to make it through the next two harrowing weeks, I’ve decided I must prepare my- self for the inevitable: the weath- er. But where could I find func- tionality, clever designs and practicality all wrapped up into one affordable accessory to com- bat the adverse weather condi- tions here? Simply stated: LeSportSac. The iconic accessories com- pany has provided original art- work and simple designs for their audiences for more than 35 years. Chief Creative Direc- tor Muriel Favaro attributes the brand’s successes to its collabo- ration with noteworthy design- ers and up-and-coming graph- ic artists. have never strayed from the es- sence of the brand-accessible, functional, stylish products,” she said in an e-mail interview. “In addition, we have collaborated with fantastic, creative partners from Stella McCartney to var- ious artists to keep the look of LeSportsac products fashion-for- ward.” The company’s visual appe- tite for the latest designs has al- lowed it to introduce a new “Art- ist-in-Residence” every fashion season. This season, LeSportSac collaborated with BFree, the vi- sual work of graphic illustrator Merijn Hos. Hos’ work is comprised of simple characters and shapes coupled with bold colors to add a dramatic contrast to the pat- terns for the bags. Hos said in- cluded with every LeSportSac bag purchased from the BFree collection is a fabric hang tag with a brief biography of the art- ist. With bright prints and prac- ticality, how exactly could one accessory company persuade a greater female population on a college campus to purchase their product? By creating a simple, iden- tifiable logo that serves as pip- ing for their nylon accessories, LeSportSac has little to do in a la uni com pre sua a ri mu leg Co run you bag bag bac var rie to a lar sac ter in s 48 dur nit dis ac nyl tec er. wh dis see bra a r o u n D t h e a r t s kelsey ellefson is a junior majoring in journalism and political science. l e “ h i t ” b a g Portable pieces of ’tis the season Conductor Stephen W. Pratt presents the Wind Ensemble to the crowd Wednesday evening at the IU Auditorium. The Annual Chimes of Christmas featured performances by the Wind Ensemble, the Singing Hoosiers, the Vocal Jazz Ensemble and the IU Trombone Choir. From top: Dave Matthews, for- mer President Bill Clinton, and hip-hop artistTalib Kweli.
  7. 7. Little 500 is the premier weekend for athletic competition, scholar- ship, and underage drinking that leads to high-arrest counts. College debauchery aside, it is a wonderful tradition at IU, all centered around a bike race. My entire semester as a photo editor, with a staff of 45+ photographers, was a preparation for the main event: Little 500.After picking a crew of the top seven photographers on my staff, we dispersed amongst the crowds and infield track to capture every turn, every cheer, and most important, every crash. Piling through 10,000 frames was arduous, but I learned how to cut through the unnecessary information and pick the most appropriate photos that told the visual story for the weekend. I apply this to my work today whenever I feel overwhelmed by Mintel reports, case studies, or lengthy spreadsheet documents of statistics.There is a truth and a story in the sea of data, it’s a matter of finding patience and at times, courage, to pick the right informa- tion out. My Senior year of college, I joined our college chapter of the National Student Advertising Competition.As exciting as it was to find other students who had similar interests in advertising, I wanted to use this opportunity to explore strategic planning in a campaign. Like any good planner I researched our target audience, prepared and analyzed a survey, and gave a thoughtful verbal creative brief for my creative team. They went COMPLETELY OFF BRIEF. But, I learned to live with it, and move forward. In fact, I used the knowledge I amassed on our target audience to help the creative team tailor their cam- paign tactics to be more strategic. For example, an idea for a cross-country promotion was being developed and I suggested that we entice our audiences through combining viral video uploads, internship opportunities, and “check-ins” to drive traffic back to our proposed micro-site. By engaging the consumer audience in the tools they used on a daily basis, it breathed new opportuni- ties for conversation and modernized State Farms approach to advertising. 5 6 Little 500:The Greatest CollegeWeekend. We’ve got your back. 7 8 I’ve always respected creatives, but after my experience as a graphic designer for Union Board, I’ve realized that my strengths lie elsewhere.The musicians application that I designed for the 25th anniversary for UB’s yearly philan- thropic entertainment event,“Live From Bloomington” was decent--at best. It was a significant improvement from the 1995 word document flyer that served as its predecessor. I found that meeting with the director of the event helped me understand how to go about creat- ing a design that would appeal to the local college music scene. I took to the streets, talked to buskers, coffeehouse musicians, and a few scenesters who helped me take an outdated application to the next level: a roadmap for a musical opportunity. Live from Bloomington After designing a few items for Union Board, I no longer had to ask for assignments, but rather, I was specifically requested for them.The lesson that I learned from this was simple, never be full of yourself. This is especilly true in advertising because there is always room to learn more insight, to be better storyteller, and never settle for less.As flattering as it was to be sought after as a designer, I felt that I always wanted feedback from other designers, or Union Board members before passing along my design for final approval. I embrace advertising as a collaborative and vibrant process, no piece of work can be effective if it is carried out single-handedly by one person. Design on a dime. DEADLINE OCTOBER21 2009 LiLi LIVE FROM BLOOMINGTON 2010 MUSICIAN’S APPLICATION What’s Up, Doc? Healthcare Reform Panel Whittenberger Auditorium Monday, October 26, 2009, 7 PM Free and open to the public Sponsors:
  8. 8. A significant experience during my time in college was when I took a class called “Media in Latin America: From Moguls to Mass Media.”The class included a trip to Santiago, Chile, were I took a lot of photos, visited national news publications, and got food poisoning. My most memorable experience was not a tour of CNN Chile(although very entertaining). Exploring the local street markets, going to the cafes, and staying out till 4 AM living, breathing, and becoming apart of another culture were the most memorable. I learned to be a cultural chameleon and embrace new adventure, while in South America. Being adept to change, whether in a new country, learning a new language, or to the needs of a client is important in advertising. 10 I played an international game of telephone with Brazilian Businessmen. No English spoken here. 9 11 I enjoyed the creative freedom of this class project at left, but loved the research for the target audience. Urban culture has blurred the lines between high-end fashion, art, and utility.An emerging trend are col- lectors of these portable pieces of art, the sneakerhead.Yet, often times it’s a “boy’s club” at the most elite sneaker shops, and street culture magazines.The magazine that I con- cepted, appropriately titled,“Fresh,” served as an empowering voice for an underrepresented audience, female sneaker heads. Scouring blogs, small online shops, and personal insight led to new discoveries about an entire community that has never really had a voice in popular urban culture. I used this assignment to celebrate a woman’s role in a male- dominated marketplace. This is not a boy’s club. Tucked away in the quiet foothills of the Ad- irondack mountains inVT is Middlebury College. Every summer, they host college students who have a passion for learning foreign languages. For nearly two months, I thew myself into an inten- sive study of the Italian language. I was not able to communicate with friends on facebook, watch English-spoken media, or make public phone calls in English--I’m not kidding. I signed a pledge to not speak English, and in return I got a reward of learning a new language and having more patience than any 18-year-old I had met at the time. I still think about my experience at Middle- bury to this day when I feel trapped by the fine details of work.At the end of the day if I stop and listen more to myself or to others, the answer is there, it’s just lost in communication. Continue to work...
  9. 9. WORK AUSTIN 2009 November 18-20, 2009 FAILURE IS NOT AN OPTION® INSTITUTE JOHN BROWN Author of Making the Most of Understanding by Design TODD WHITAKER Author of What Great Teachers Do Differently ALAN BLANKSTEIN President of the HOPE Foundation and author of Failure Is Not an Option® KEN O’CONNOR Author of How to Grade For Learning, K-12 The Next Step in Engaging Your Entire Learning Community ABOUT FAILURE IS NOT AN OPTION® INSTITUTES Failure Is Not an Option® three day institutes provide the structure, processes, and time for teams to build a common understanding of how to apply the information from renowned presenters to their school or district. Utilizing one or more of the Six Principles of Failure Is Not an Option® provides for “next step actions” to implement back home. PARTICIPANTS WILL RETURN FROM THE EVENT WITH Best practical research to sustain your learning community and your Students’ achievement Next-day strategies for closing the achievement gap Motivation and inspiration to face tough situations Frameworks for action FOR MORE INFORMATION: Fill out and return the attached order form to the HOPE Foundation by fax or mail, or contact Lani Snug at 812.355.6000 ext. 245 or email lsnug@hopefoundation.org TOPICS INCLUDE • Failure Is Not an Option...Success IS the Only Option • What Great Educatiors Do Differently • How to Grade for Learning • Understanding by Design: Teaching & Assessment Strategies to Maximize Learning in the Classroom • Response to Intervention (RtI) • Improving Learning Outcomes for English Language Learners HOPE institutes qualify for continuing Professional development credit in most states. Visit www. hopefoundation.org for more information. TEAM PROCESSING TIME Facilitated processing time is built into the Institute agenda. Your team will connect cutting-edge research to your long-term goals. You will have an opportunity to share with and learn from your colleagues about what is working. GET CREDIT Courageous Leadership Academy (CLA) builds consistency within and between schools by creating a “Professional Learning Community of HOPE” among leadership teams that examine and improve instructional practices in a truly collaborative culture. The CLA uses best practice professional development standards, as defined by the National Staff Development Council. TRUCTURE UTCOMES 1/2 day Leadership/Principals’ session on lateral eadership and how to support a professional learning community. District Steering Committee needs assessment and planning meeting 4 Full day sessions for School Leadership Teams in which collaborative capacity building activities are modeled by HOPE faculty School Leadership Teams complete job embedded homework assignments with their staffs. Collaboration and knowledge building are built through eam to team and peer to peer debriefing of Re-entry plans and lessons learned from completed assignments Periodic meetings with the district steering committee are held to assess progress and adjust future sessions to assure success mprove Instruction: Teachers learn to work collabora ively to measure and study instruction; create and mplement and monitor interventions, in a continous mprovement cycle. acilitate Change: School leadership team members are esponsibile for transferring knowledge to colleagues and facilitating the implementation of new practices Develop professional development plans: Build capacity chool wide for instructional improvement. By using protocols to study current instructional practices, teacher determine the most appropriate successful practices or instructional interventions. Teams learn how to design professional development plans to support new nstructional practices based on data analysis and SMART goals that are aligned with your school mprovement plan. Make Student Success the Only Option Where there is HOPE, Failure Is Not an Option® www.hopefoundation.org Call 1-800-627-0232 or email pds@hopefoundation.org and ask for a Professional Development Consultant CLA Results: Wichita Public Schools (Wichita, KS) • Met 36 of 42 Adequate Yearly Progress subgroup targets • Narrowed the achievement gap between Caucasian and African-American students • Met AYP for all students in reading and math • Met goals in participation, attendance, and graduation (exceeding state’s graduation target) •15 schools in the district achieved AYP that did not in 2006 *12 of which participated in HOPE’s Courageous Leadership Academy CLACourageousLeadership Academy CLA PROCESS The academy is designed as a 1 to 3 year developmental program for maximum impact, with each year consisting of at least four (4) Academy sessions for School Leader- ship Teams. Each session utilizes the Six Principles of Fail- ure Is Not an Option® as a system organizer for continu- ous improvement. The Academy accommodates up to 80 participants (13-15 schools) per cohort from across the district (Principal plus teacher leaders from each school). HOPE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  10. 10. My first advertising agency experience was interning on the new business development team for Leo Burnett/Arc Worldwide at their Chicago offices. I was responsible for leading competitive audits for over 10 client pitches dur- ing my summer internship, as well as maintaining the Global Fact Database for the Chicago office whenever we acquired new brands or clients. On any given day, I could go from speaking to a third shift custodians to the President of the company. I found a passion for a career in advertising after sticking out a tornado warning, several all-nighters, and lapses of sanity. I kept coming back everyday because of my insatiable curiosity about advertising, which still persists with me today. 2 With big pencils come big ideas. 1 The creative brief I crafted for a new campaign proposal forTimberland (apart of a intern project at Leo Burnett) launched a whole new demographic of consum- ers for the brand. I wanted to leverage the iconic work boots thatTimberland has stood behind, but quickly found that the modern worker had a very definition of work.Through research, I found a compelling insight into the modern father, the desperate balancing act between work and play. I called upon Daddy bloggers and The Dangerous Book for Boys to inspire my creative team who created a beautiful campaign that capitalized on the utility of the boots for the modern father. I felt like “Tom” my Gen Xer father who I developed as a character profile for the campaign, because my creative team would ask me well “WWTD” (what would Tom do?). I became a Gen-X Dad. My agency practicuum course for my senior year in college put me in a leadership position over a team of eight.Through this experience I got a crash course on several aspects of advertising, the most tangible was maintaining client relationships.As much as I try to identify with creatives through my planning process, I want people to be confident in the brands they choose to buy. It’s important to understand the client and their perspective on effective advertis- ing and who they consider their consumer. I set up weekly meetings with our client, an online viral video website, to always keep its leadership team in check with the work we did as an agency, as well as staying current with consumer trends because they made up their target audience, mostly male online gamers. A taste of the account,digital,social,media, planning,and creative side. 43 At the close of my Senior year of college, I interned atThe Center On Phi- lanthropy at Indiana University in Indianapolis. Serving as a leading academic research center for philanthropies, I was tasked to help the communications team with a marketing plan for the nation’s first undergraduate degree in Philanthropric studies. I served as an advocate for the consumer, because I was the liberal-arts student they were trying to attract to the degree. I edited several pieces, gave feedback, and developed programs to jumpstart a publicity campaign on campus for the new degree. The nations first undergraduate degree in Philanthropic Studies.
  11. 11. I developed and planned a cross- promotional event between the An- nual Zombie March in Bloomington, IN, and GameZombie.tv. Our clients wanted to have a greater follow- ing offline to help efforts online, so we sent them out amongst the living dead-ZOMBIES. Before-hand, my agency team developed press releases for local media coverage, and spoke to local business owners to negotiate giveaways for a “Zombie Survival Kit.” During the night of the march, video footage was shot, the survival kits were passed out, includ- ing a note that mentioned where the living dead could watch the captured footage of the event, GameZombie’s website.Taking a local event, infus- ing it with a strictly online venture, resulted in increased traffic to the clients website. This event was like a scene out of Michael Jackson’s“Thriller”musicvideo,and it worked. 8 I had a great education and I wanted to be apart of an organization who worked towards education reform in the US.The Hope Foundation has created a successful program to re-culture and sustain student success in public school districts across the country. I had to wear several hats for this small non-profit organization, but found it rewarding knowing that my research onTitle-1 funding was applied to a marketing campaign to focus specifically on in- ner city schools districts to enhance overall school, teacher, and student achievement. Harnessing optimism and potential through education. 7 I packed up my things, moved to NYC and lived without air-conditioning for 2 months, all for a summer internship at a boutique PR agency. Our agency worked closely with Elizabeth Arden on their celebrity fragrances accounts. I assisted on a long-lead editorial pitch for the launch of a perfume for Mariah Carey’s fragrance,“Forever.” I met with the top editors from beauty & lifestyle magazines to communicate the strengths of the new product, the floral notes of the fragrances, and to offer the occa- sional beverage (I was an intern). I also assisted on the live-taping of BET’s 106th & Park for the reveal of the new perfume. My experience in PR helped me understand how we as consum- ers receive thousands of messages daily and how critical it is to effectively break through the clutter to resonant with an audience, even if it’s in uncon- ventional ways. PR is not as glamorous as Samantha Jones makes it out to be Before 6  WELCOME ADDRESS BY: LaSHAWN ROUTÉ CHATMON Executive Director of BAYCES  PRESENTATIONS BY: LINDA DARLING- HAMMOND President, International Center for Leadership in Education JAN ROBERTSON Director of the London Centre for Leadership in Learning at the Institute of Education, London University ALAN BLANKSTEIN Author of Failure Is Not an Option ® ; co-editor and contributor to The Soul of Educational Leadership ERNEST MORRELL Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at UCLA SILVIA DERUVO California Comprehensive Center Special Education Resources Development Specialist SIR JOHN JONES Professor at University of Liverpool in the United Kingdom San Jose, CA October 14 -17, 2008  BROUGHT TO YOU IN COLLABORATION WITH:  Bay Area Coalition for Equitable Schools (BAYCES)  San Francisco School Alliance  California PTA  Principal Leadership Institute at UC Berkeley  St. Mary’s College  ABOUT THE SAN JOSE INSTITUTE This Institute will focus on the best practices worldwide for engaging all learners and creating and sustaining learning communities based on the Failure Is Not an Option ® process. Teams will learn how to apply data, effectively build collaborative teams, and develop systems for improving teaching and learning. Special attention will be spent on building leadership capacity - within and across schools - to engage students and achieve long-term success. Leading educational experts will review how high-performing schools effectively promote and utilize collaborative teaming and instructional leadership to sustain student achievement.  DON’T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN HOW TO:  Build leadership capacity and develop teacher leaders  Create project-based learning to meet the hip-hop generation  Utilize response to intervention for special learners  Use evidence-based coaching  Develop professional learning communities  TOPICS AT THE SAN JOSE INSTITUTE WILL INCLUDE:  Teacher education and school leadership development  Building sustainable leadership capacity  Implementing the Failure Is Not an Option ® process to create a high- performing school culture  Connecting communities and cultures to form highly engaging pedagogies  Utilizing Response to Intervention strategies to succeed with all learners  Curriculum design and development You will experience an intensive 3 ½ day Institute that builds frameworks, strategies, and processes for continuous improvement and the building of leadership capacity.  PARTICIPANTS WILL RETURN FROM THE EVENT WITH:  Motivation and inspiration  Research and best practices for closing the achievement gap  A collaborative team focused on teaching and learning  Next day strategies and frameworks for action  TEAM PROCESSING TIME Facilitated processing time is built into the Institute agenda. Your team will connect cutting-edge research to your long-term goals. This gathering is designed to encourage interactions between you and other committed educational leaders. You will have an opportunity to share with and learn from your colleagues about what is working.  TO REGISTER OR FOR MORE INFORMATION: Fill out and return the attached order form to the HOPE Foundation by fax or mail, or contact Skip Daley at 812.355.6000 ext. 222 or email sdaley@hopefoundation.org. Failure Is Not an Option® : Best Practices Institute Special Offer For: BAYCES The Next Step in Engaging your Entire Learning Community AUSTIN 2009 November 18-20, 2009 FAILURE IS NOT AN OPTION® INSTITUTE JOHN BROWN Author of Making the Most of Understanding by Design TODD WHITAKER Author of What Great Teachers Do Differently ALAN BLANKSTEIN President of the HOPE Foundation and author of Failure Is Not an Option® KEN O’CONNOR Author of How to Grade For Learning, K-12 The Next Step in Engaging Your Entire Learning Community ABOUT FAILURE IS NOT AN OPTION® INSTITUTES Failure Is Not an Option® three day institutes provide the structure, processes, and time for teams to build a common understanding of how to apply the information from renowned presenters to their school or district. Utilizing one or more of the Six Principles of Failure Is Not an Option® provides for “next step actions” to implement back home. PARTICIPANTS WILL RETURN FROM THE EVENT WITH Best practical research to sustain your learning community and your Students’ achievement Next-day strategies for closing the achievement gap Motivation and inspiration to face tough situations Frameworks for action FOR MORE INFORMATION: Fill out and return the attached order form to the HOPE Foundation by fax or mail, or contact Lani Snug at 812.355.6000 ext. 245 or email lsnug@hopefoundation.org TOPICS INCLUDE • Failure Is Not an Option...Success IS the Only Option • What Great Educatiors Do Differently • How to Grade for Learning • Understanding by Design: Teaching & Assessment Strategies to Maximize Learning in the Classroom • Response to Intervention (RtI) • Improving Learning Outcomes for English Language Learners HOPE institutes qualify for continuing Professional development credit in most states. Visit www. hopefoundation.org for more information. TEAM PROCESSING TIME Facilitated processing time is built into the Institute agenda. Your team will connect cutting-edge research to your long-term goals. You will have an opportunity to share with and learn from your colleagues about what is working. GET CREDIT The old flyers for various Profes- sional Development institutes were outdated and created on Microsoft word.The information was unclear and cluttered on the page. I was asked to modern- ize and simplify the flyers, while still maintaining a sense of the original layout. After Although the information and layout could not be drastically changed, I was able to simplify and re-purpose the flyer.The striking imagery at the top of the flyer catches a viewers eyes, as well as making it clear “when” and “where” the events would be held.This flyer was dispersed nationwide to over 12,000 K-12 educators and school districts. 5
  12. 12. I also worked on the Boots North America account during my summer PR internship in NYC. Boot was a brand who only had relevancy overseas, not statewide. However, it had an advantage because it was sold at one our nations major retail- ers,Target, but needed to obtain press credentials. to legitimize the products effectiveness. The majority of my time was spent short-lead pitching, cold-calling, and sending packages to editors, bloggers, and companies across the United States. Being persistent, holding my ground, and creating momentum behind a brand is something that I learned that summer and still carry with me today. 10 I became an expert in cold-calling coast to coast. 9 11 I have sold to hipsters, Grandma’s, body builders, and the occasional little kid. My former bosses designs were playful enough to attract new customers, but the expensive price tags often left many people as casual observers of her work. My solution was easy, start out with a friendly hello, maybe a compli- ment, or ask someone a question. Starting a conversation with a question, not only allowed me to get a glimpse into a prospective buyers life, but it help me identify how I could market the appropriate piece of jewelry to fit the needs of their life. I didn’t want the designs of my boss to be worn only sparingly, but daily. Selling at Renegade here in Chicago and in BK, helped me see how different markets respond to products and how to craft a message to each consumer and buyer of Verameat. Shameless endorsement: http://verameat.com/ I could sell a ketchup popsicle to a woman in white gloves. Vampire Love. Working as a personal assistant/ design intern for a NewYork jew- elry designer opened my eyes to a curious world of an individual who marched to the beat of her own drum. Keeping her in line with what was going on in the world, did help her escape the often fatal curse of the poor, starving artist. I saw that the vampire craze was on the rise in NYC in 2009 because of the release of theTwilight films, so I suggested to my boss, to incorporate a mixed design from a pair of wax vampire teeth that were laying around her studio with a previous ring design. As a result, theVampire Love ring was born, or let loose on the prowl for it’s next unsuspecting twi-hard fan or eclectic jewelry collector. The end.
  13. 13. REFERENCES Michael Girts Senior Account Executive, Leo Burnett & Arc Worldwide 804/514.9106 michael.girts@leoburnett.com Matthew Wormington Outreach Recruiting Manager, Leo Burnett & Arc Worldwide 312/220.6501 matthew.wormington@leoburnett.com Patrick Palmer ExecutiveVice President Global Brand Planning Director, Leo Burnett & Arc Worldwide patrick. palmer@leoburnett.com Kevin Richey Senior Account Planner, Leo Burnett & Arc Worldwide 312/220.5722 kevin.richey@leoburnett.com Hashim Hathaway Publicist, Author Solutions 260/348.2734 hrhathaway@gmail.com Vera Balyura Owner,Verameat Jewelry & Design 917/353.3885 verameatjewelry@gmail.com Craig Wood Senior Lecturer, Indiana University 812/856.2828 woodcp@indiana.edu “All the CredentialsThat's Fit to Print”

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