The Challenges of Blended Learning in a Canadian College Setting

  • 304 views
Uploaded on

A research study finds interesting results about student use and preference of blended learning in a Canadian postsecondary setting.

A research study finds interesting results about student use and preference of blended learning in a Canadian postsecondary setting.

More in: Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
304
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. THE CHALLENGES OF BLENDED LEARNING IN A CANADIAN COLLEGE SETTING http://www.wiredlearningconsultants.com/
  • 2. WHAT DO YOU THINK?
  • 3. LITERATURE ON BLENDED LEARNING
    • Blended learning :
    • emerging delivery method for postsecondary education
    • potential to provide rich learning experiences and environments
    • provide students with essential 21st century skills
    • Garrison & Vaughan, 2008;
    • So & Bonk, 2010
    • Gives students:
    • some control over their learning pace and timing
    • choice, flexibility, and self-directedness in their learning
    • Cranton, 1992; Cross, 1981; Knowles, Holton, & Swanson, 2005; McIntosh & Varoglu, 2005.
  • 4. LITERATURE ON BLENDED LEARNING
    • blended or online learning is not widely applied by institutions nor readily accepted by students and faculty in North America .
    • a critical response to 1:1 laptop initiatives points out that the use of technology in education has focused more on replacing existing modes of learning versus transforming them.
  • 5. STUDY DETAILS
    • investigated the outcomes of two college course delivered in western Canada
    • traditionally a laptop, classroom-based program
    • course presented in a blended learning format
    • lessons were partially in class and out of class
    • tools used: LMS, blogs, wiki, online resources, communication
  • 6. METHODOLOGY
    • Case study
    • 46 college students
    • marketing diploma
    • 4 th and last semester
    • Data Collected
    • online survey (QuestionPro): end of term survey; quant and qual data; frequencies, descriptive and crosstab stats @SPSS; open text themes reviewed
    • LMS statistics (log in and hits); individual and aggregated stats; visual analytics (SNAPP)
    • grades: final and online communication; descriptive stats
    • Research objectives
    • to examine the interaction of students with learning, information and communication tools
    • to discover student perceptions of and recommendations for blended learning environments
    • to determine the impact of blended learning on student productivity and grades
  • 7. RESULTS N=31 Criteria Details % Age range 18-22 70.97 Student status Full-time college student 83.87 School term 4 th and final, 2 year marketing diploma Hours/week attend school
    • < 10
    • 11-20
    • 21-30
    • >31
    • 13.79
    • 44.83
    • 24.14
    • 17.2
    Hours/week study 1 - 10 majority Hours work Part-time, 11 – 20 hours 70.97 Perceived technology skills Good to expert Majority Readiness for blended Yes 56.67
  • 8. RESULTS Learner Trait Frequency Percentage Hands-on learner 20 20.41% Visual learner 16 16.33% Social learner 15 15.31% Independent learner 7 7.14% Extraverted 9 9.18% Communicator 8 8.16% Thinker/reflector 8 8.16% Introverted 5 5.10% Reader 5 5.10% Auditory learner 5 5.10%
  • 9. RESULTS Criteria Details % Taken previous blended or online
    • No
    • 1
    • 3 - 5
    • 64.52
    • 19.35
    • 16.13
    LMS tools previously used
    • Assignment drop box
    • Discussion board
    • Email messaging
    • 20.93
    • 18.60
    • 18.60
    Final Grade 46 to 86% Average = 71.77% Grade for blogs and online discussion 0 to 9/10 Average 5.14/10 Time spent of 2 required hours for online segment
    • 0 hours
    • I – 2 hours
    • 22.58
    • 51.64
    Blended took more time No 70% Take another blended course
    • Yes
    • No
    • Don’t know
    • 37.93
    • 51.72
    • 10.35
  • 10. RESULTS Response Percentage Low quality 28.57% Medium quality 25.00% Neither low nor high quality 14.29% Good quality 21.43% High quality 10.71% Response Percentage Less 53.57% About the same 28.57% More 17.86%
  • 11. RESULTS
    • data crosstabluations to determine significant relationships between data variables
    • SPSS using chi-square tests
    • significant values were less than .05
    • significant findings outlined in conclusions, next
  • 12. CONCLUSIONS
    • dichotomy between participants’ perception and rating of the blended learning course (50/50)
    • not understand blended and online learning as a delivery mode ; newness of a delivery mode
    • online discussion board was underutilized
    • interacting online was not a preference for some student
    • students did not see a need for online communication
  • 13. CONCLUSIONS
    • Reasons for resistance :
      • timing of the course in their program
      • personal learning style
      • lack of blended learning experience
      • might have preferred a more traditional style of delivering classes
      • confused on what should be included in a blended course and its design
  • 14. CONCLUSIONS
    • Nearly half of the participants
      • saw the blended course as favourable
      • would take another blended course
      • learn about the same or more in a blended course compared to traditional
      • found it useful, good quality
      • took less study time, and
      • should be developed as a future mode of delivery
  • 15. RECOMMENDATIONS
    • blended learning not preferred by all students
    • give students choice when using learning technologies and engaging online
    • intentional design: draw on the strengths of learning in physical and virtual classroom
    • more social and hands-on learners might need richer assignments (explore, discuss, question and create) with technologies in more structured ways both in class and after class
    • understand the learner, their context and past learning experience