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NanoDays at the St. Louis Science Center
NanoDays at the St. Louis Science Center
NanoDays at the St. Louis Science Center
NanoDays at the St. Louis Science Center
NanoDays at the St. Louis Science Center
NanoDays at the St. Louis Science Center
NanoDays at the St. Louis Science Center
NanoDays at the St. Louis Science Center
NanoDays at the St. Louis Science Center
NanoDays at the St. Louis Science Center
NanoDays at the St. Louis Science Center
NanoDays at the St. Louis Science Center
NanoDays at the St. Louis Science Center
NanoDays at the St. Louis Science Center
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NanoDays at the St. Louis Science Center

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A nationwide festival celebrating nanoscale engineering and technology.

A nationwide festival celebrating nanoscale engineering and technology.

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  • 1. The Nano Research Facility at Washington University and the Saint Louis Science Center present NanoDays™ 2010 A nationwide festival of educational programs and hands-on demonstrations about nanoscale science and engineering and its potential impact on the future.
  • 2. The Saint Louis Science Center hosts NanoDays™ and promotes the event to local and underserved school districts. Over twenty St. Louis schools participated on Friday, April 23 with assistance from the St. Louis Science Center’s Emerging Technologies Director, Christine Roman. Picture by Vikram Singh.
  • 3. Hands-on demos were provided to the Nano Research Facility via a grant and kits provided by the Nanoscale Informal Science Network (NISE). McKelvey scholar and NanoDays™ volunteer Becky Strubberg with NISE kits preparing for the morning.
  • 4. The NISE kits promoted the NRF’s goal of providing and developing hands-on Process-Oriented Guided Learning activities for K-12. NRF staff Dee Stewart (left) with Kate Nelson (right) prepare for the morning with their NISE kits.
  • 5. The NanoDays™ festival also offers networking opportunities for the NRF and local school teachers. NRF Education Manager Kristy Wendt speaks with local teachers while participating in the Nanotextiles demonstration with NRF Administrative Coordinator Dee Stewart. Picture by Vikram Singh.
  • 6. NRF staff member Kate Nelson leads the Measuring Molecules demonstration. Measuring Molecules uses balloons filled with a scent extract to introduce the concept of diffusion, molecules and size.
  • 7. NRF staff member Kate Nelson leads the Measuring Molecules demonstration. Measuring Molecules uses balloons filled with a scent extract to introduce the concept of diffusion, molecules and size.
  • 8. The Magic Sand™ demonstration led by McKelvey scholar Becky Strubberg, was popular with kids and adults. Magic sand is coated with a non-polar, hydrophobic layer that prevents it from becoming wet. Picture by Vikram Singh.
  • 9. Nano –Tex™ provided samples of their hydrophobic fabric for the Nanotextiles demonstration, which students could test with water. NRF Education Manager Kristy Wendt and NRF Administrative Coordinator Dee Stewart
  • 10. NRF User Maureen McKiernan demonstrates ferrofluids (left) with Administrative Coordinator Dee Stewart (right). The Ferrofluid demonstration teaches the concepts of nanoscale properties, colloids, and superparamagnetics.
  • 11. NRF User Maureen McKiernan and the Gravity demonstration. The Gravity demonstration uses different-sized cups of water to show how force interaction can vary with size. The size of the cup- and amount of water it holds- determines which force is more important, gravity or surface tension.
  • 12. NRF Staff Member Kate Nelson with the Scanning Probe Microscope demonstration The SPM demonstration uses magnets to model a scanning probe microscope, allowing the user to “feel” a magnetic field.
  • 13. Students participate in the NISE StretchAbility demonstration.
  • 14. A participant folds a “bucky ball” model provided by the St. Louis Science Center with help from the NRF.

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