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Technologyskills2010

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2010 ALA Conference presentation. YALSA program.

2010 ALA Conference presentation. YALSA program.


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  • Value: creating the ultimate social network for YOs,
  • Teenagers who are at high risk of failing school and often live in impoverished settings are noted in the research literature as “at-risk teens.” Conditions associated with being at- risk include coming from poor families with ethnic and linguistic minority backgrounds, having parents who are not high school graduates, and having negative self-perceptions” Druian, G., & Butler, J. A. (1987). Effective schooling practices and at-risk youth: What the research shows. Retrieved September 10, 2004, from www.nwrel.org/scpd/sirs.1.topsyn1.html
  • Teenagers who are at high risk of failing school and often live in impoverished settings are noted in the research literature as “at-risk teens.” Conditions associated with being at- risk include coming from poor families with ethnic and linguistic minority backgrounds, having parents who are not high school graduates, and having negative self-perceptions” (Druian & Butler, 1987).
  • Day”(2002) conducted a study of middle school students at risk of failure who were given the opportunity to work in a “technology lab.” He found that based on this experience, students felt more motivated to learn, received better grades, and accepted more responsibility for their work in the lab environment. Additionally, Page (2002) found that computer-based instruction can increase the self-esteem of at-risk youth. Concludes that strategies that use technology to teach “real world applications that support research, design, analysis and communication” will support at-risk students.
  • Page, M. S. (2002). Technology-enriched classrooms: Effects on students of low-socioeconomic status. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 34(4), 389–409. Day”(2002) conducted a study of middle school students at risk of failure who were given the opportunity to work in a “technology lab.” He found that based on this experience, students felt more motivated to learn, received better grades, and accepted more responsibility for their work in the lab environment. Additionally, Page (2002) found that computer-based instruction can increase the self-esteem of at-risk youth. Concludes that strategies that use technology to teach “real world applications that support research, design, analysis and communication” will support at-risk students.
  • Many of these strategies along with individualized and self-paced instruction, appear across the literature about at-risk youth Waxman, H. C., Padron, Y. N., & Arnold, K. A. (2001). Effective instructional practice for students placed at risk of failure. In G.D. Borman, S.C. Stringfield, and R.E. Slavin (Eds.), Title I: Compensatory education at the crossroads. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.
  • Partnerships, resources, and advocacy Setting: Partnership between CML & Sherriff Began with standard library services of book clubs, author visits, writing programs and literature-based programs. Sherriff department wanted more technology based programs as YOs had lack of computer skills etc, also wanted non-traditional ways to pique interest in reading, creative outlet etc. There were many best practices and programs at CML for teens that already served this need, Sherriff’s department wanted to inplement a modified version of said programs with the YOs, a partnership was created
  • Setting: Partnership between CML & Sherriff Began with standard library services of book clubs, author visits, writing programs and literature-based programs. Sherriff department wanted more technology based programs as YOs had lack of computer skills etc, also wanted non-traditional ways to pique interest in reading, creative outlet etc. CML already had excellent teen programs in place within libraries, library adjusted and facilitated programs to incarcerated teens.
  • Libraries have resources, have programs that already address needs of at-risk population, have trained staff, can use these resources with incarcerated teens.
  • Even before the recession young adults are routinely under represented in terms of library budget, programming, collection development, specialized staff, and outreach. The at-risk population garners even less attention as they are typically low performing in sports and academics, two areas where high performing teens can find almost unlimited support.
  • Use programs that are already developed and modify, or use programs that are already developed from other library systems. Connect the tech program with existing jail programs, i.e. Podcasting for a book report, typing up a resume, creating a commercial for the library etc. Do pre/ post evaluations for all technology programs Utilize digital product when advocating for services for the at-risk teen population
  • -winter 2009 issue of YALS -a partnership with Global Kids, Youth Venture, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation -held workshops on TSL where they planned their venture. Their venture was to be a sustainable project to build a healthier communityheld workshops on TSL where they planned their venture. Their venture was to be a sustainable project to build a healthier community chose roles, worked with a budget, participated in team building exercises -culminated into a PPT presentation they gave on the island to have their venture funded -chose to write songs about homelessness to raise awareness about the issue. They recorded the songs and were going to make it into a CD
  • -partnership with Madison Public Library, CML, JN, GK, and Dane County Correctional Facility --used digital media to tell their stories with a focus on critical choices they’ve made throughout their lives -GarageBand, Flip cameras, Xtranormal, Voicethread, blogging on Ning, bitstrips - http://blip.tv/file/3191785 (timeline)
  • Angela’s Programs
  • Transcript

    • 1. Technology Services for Incarcerated Teens Angela Craig [email_address] Kelly Czarnecki techedlibrarian@gmail.com
    • 2. Why are technology skills important for incarcerated teens? How can a library best serve this population? Best practices. What value does the library gain from serving this population ?
    • 3. Why are technology skills important for incarcerated teens?
    • 4.
      • Teenagers who are at-risk:
      • High risk of failing school
      • Living in impoverished settings
      • Have parents who are not high school graduates
      • Come from poor families with ethnic and linguistic minority backgrounds
      • Have a negative self-perception
      Druian, G., & Butler, J. A. (1987). Effective schooling practices and at-risk youth: What the research shows . Retrieved May 10, 2010, from www.nwrel.org/scpd/sirs.1.topsyn1.html
    • 5.
      • Incarcerated Teens:
      • Are behind their peers
      • Limited access to technology
      • Limited guidance when using technology
      • Limited skills and options when they are released
    • 6.
      • Benefits of technology use for incarcerated teens:
      • Teach real world applications
      • Support research, design, analysis, and communication skills
      • Motivate teens to learn in a constructive manner
      • Develop personal skills, such as collaboration and team work
    • 7. By using technology with at-risk teens, students felt more motivated to learn, received better grades, and accepted more responsibility for their work. Additionally, research found that computer-based instruction can increase the self-esteem of at-risk youth . Page, M. S. (2002). Technology-enriched classrooms: Effects on students of low-socioeconomic status . Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 34(4), 389–409.
    • 8. Five practices that have been shown in field studies to improve the education of at-risk students: Cognitively-guided instruction Culturally responsive teaching Technology-enriched instruction Cooperative learning Instructional conversation Waxman, H. C., Padron, Y. N., & Arnold, K. A. (2001). Effective instructional practice for students placed at risk of failure. In G.D. Borman, S.C. Stringfield, and R.E. Slavin (Eds.), Title I: Compensatory education at the crossroads. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.
    • 9. How can a library best serve this population? Partnerships Resources Advocacy
    • 10. Partnerships
    • 11. Resources Successful Charlotte Mecklenburg Library programs for teens Successful evaluation of programs Books, computers, digital cameras, computers, flip cameras, etc Trained staff to facilitated the programs
    • 12. Advocacy Show policy makers the importance of providing a place within library services for incarcerated teens. Use examples of digital products and pre/post evaluations to show what youth have accomplished. Always connect the product to real life applications.
    • 13.  
    • 14. Best Practices
    • 15.
      • Teen Tech Week 2009: Press Play @ Your Library
      • Purpose of YALSA’s Teen Tech Week
      • Why we celebrate TTW at the Jail
      • Activities we do at the Jail to participate in TTW
    • 16. Dream It Do It @ Your Library D.I.D.I. provides seed funding (up to $1000 US) and the support youth need to launch their own social entrepreneurial projects. The D.I.D.I. Initiative supports young people to launch their own sustainable ventures either within or outside of Teen Second Life that create lasting benefit to their communities.
    • 17. uCreate – the Edge Project
    • 18. Bitstrips comics
    • 19. Bitstrips comics
    • 20.
      • Podcasting
      • Wii Gaming
      • Resume writing
      • Library commercial
      • Flip cameras
    • 21.
      • Other Technology Activities at Jail North:
      • Watch current events on television (Obama’s inaugural address)
      • View the web site of authors that visiting or currently reading
      • Create stop-motion animation movies
      • Have phone conferences with YA authors (Paul Volponi, Terry Trueman, etc.)
      • Teen fathers made puppet shows for their kids and then filmed them
      • Use Scratch (http://scratch.mit.edu) for animation
      Self-portrait using Scratch
    • 22. What value does the library gain from serving this population?
    • 23. By its nature, libraries as an institution are committed to serving patrons, no matter what their circumstances. Libraries help create the ultimate social network for Youth Offenders. If facilitated well, there is little to no additional monetary cost to libraries. By serving incarcerated teens libraries generate community good will, and model leadership behavior for other organizations.
    • 24. Angela Craig [email_address] Kelly Czarnecki techedlibrarian@gmail.com