Blast Off Presentation Daniel

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Blast Off Presentation Daniel

  1. 1. Rocket propellant LES By Daniel
  2. 2. Liquid Rocket engines A liquid rocket engine has a tank for the liquid propellant and a oxidizer tank so the propellant will combust in a vacuum. There is also a nozzle to provide maximum thrust
  3. 3. The propellants • • • • • Hydrogen and oxygen (H2+1/2O2) Methylhydrazine (H2NN(CH3)2) N-dodecane (C12H26) Ethanol (C2H5OH) These are the 4 propellants that we will be studying
  4. 4. Methylhydrazine • This Propellant is a hypergolic propellant, this means that it reacts upon contact. Methylhydrazine produces 12.04Kj/g of propellant.
  5. 5. Hydrogen • Hydrogen is used as a cryogenic propellant, in combination with oxygen. This means it is cooled to a liquid before firing. Hydrogen produces 14.22Kj/g of energy.
  6. 6. Ethanol • Ethanol is a easier to produce and is less dangerous than other propellants. However it produces very little thrust. For each gram of ethanol, you get 9.042Kj of energy.
  7. 7. N-dodecane • N-dodecane is similar to kerosene. It has a high flashpoint so it is the safest of the 4 fuels in toxicity, flammability reactivity. It also provides the highest thrust of the 4 with 16.24Kj/g.
  8. 8. My choice • Considering the safety, environmental impact, and of course the thrust; I would recommend a multistage rocket with a hydrogen first stage, and a N-dodecane 2nd stage. The hydrogen will offer greenhouse gas free thrust, and outside the atsmosphere, N-dodecane will offer safe powerful thrust in a near 0 friction environment.
  9. 9. bibliography • http://www.sciencedaily.com/articles/m/multistage_rocket.htm • http://library.thinkquest.org/03oct/02144/propulsion/propellents/ hypergolic.htm • http://www.princeton.edu/~achaney/tmve/wiki100k/docs/Hypergo lic_propellant.html • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dodecane • http://www.braeunig.us/space/propel.htm • http://oehha.ca.gov/prop65/law/pdf_zip/MethylhydrazineNSRL.pdf • http://www.aerospace.org/2013/07/31/green-propulsion-trendsand-perspectives/ • en.wikipedia.org • http://www.daviddarling.info/images/liquid_engine.jpg • www.ec21.com

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