Behaviorism
Kelly Crebbin
Key People
• John B. Watson
• Ivan Pavlov
• B.F. Skinner
• E.L Thorndike
• Bandura
• Tulman
Classical Conditioning
• Key People:
• Ivan Pavlov
• John B. Watson
– Pavlov would ring a bell and give dogs food. After
m...
Pavlov’s Conditioning
Operant Conditioning
– Skinner
– Used to modify behavior, positive or negative
reinforcement is used to have subjects comp...
Social Learning Theory
– Bandura
– Summarizes that people learn from each other.
“Reciprocal Determinism” peoples behavior...
What the teacher does…
• Classical Conditioning
– Example: In secondary school when it is time to switch
classes a bell ri...
What the student does…
• Classical Conditioning
– When students get loud and I ring a bell they
know that they should quie...
What I think…
• This theory works well with my teaching
strategies.
• I believe that students are conditioned by
their sur...
Sources:
• https://wikispaces.psu.edu/download/attachments/40
050309/Operant%20Conditioning.png?version=2&mod
ificationDat...
Crebbin learning theory
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Crebbin learning theory

  1. 1. Behaviorism Kelly Crebbin
  2. 2. Key People • John B. Watson • Ivan Pavlov • B.F. Skinner • E.L Thorndike • Bandura • Tulman
  3. 3. Classical Conditioning • Key People: • Ivan Pavlov • John B. Watson – Pavlov would ring a bell and give dogs food. After multiple times he would ring the bell without food and the dogs would salivate. Associating the bell with food. – Watson related this conditioning to humans. Introducing a baby to a fear of rats and concluded that humans can be gain phobias from classical conditioning.
  4. 4. Pavlov’s Conditioning
  5. 5. Operant Conditioning – Skinner – Used to modify behavior, positive or negative reinforcement is used to have subjects comply the way the instructor wants. When reinforced the behavior will either continue (positive) or end (negative).
  6. 6. Social Learning Theory – Bandura – Summarizes that people learn from each other. “Reciprocal Determinism” peoples behaviors are caused by the world and others behaviors. – In between behaviorist and cognitive learning theories. – Attention, memory, and motivation
  7. 7. What the teacher does… • Classical Conditioning – Example: In secondary school when it is time to switch classes a bell rings throughout the school. Without thought students know that it is time to change classes. They are conditioned. • Operant Conditioning – Example: As a teacher, I would offer rewards to students who volunteered and in the future all student would volunteer knowing that they will receive something. On the other side when students act out in class and you call home or send them to the principal, these negative reinforcements prevent them from acting out again.
  8. 8. What the student does… • Classical Conditioning – When students get loud and I ring a bell they know that they should quiet down. • Social Learning Theory – Students are surrounded by the same kids everyday and they begin picking up habits and traits from them.
  9. 9. What I think… • This theory works well with my teaching strategies. • I believe that students are conditioned by their surroundings. Everything that they grow up doing shapes their lives.
  10. 10. Sources: • https://wikispaces.psu.edu/download/attachments/40 050309/Operant%20Conditioning.png?version=2&mod ificationDate=1275023794000&api=v2 • http://www.learning-theories.com/social-learning- theory-bandura.html • http://www.learning-theories.com/behaviorism.html • http://www.learning-theories.com/classical- conditioning-pavlov.html • http://www.mywoofgang.com/images/PavlovDogWith Bell.GIF
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