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  • 1. European CommissionInformation Society and Media DELIVERABLEProject Acronym: HABITATSGrant Agreement number: CIP- ICT-PSP-2009-3-250455Project Title: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habitats D-4.2.2 HABITATS INSPIRE Networking ArchitectureDocument identifier: D 4.2.2Date: July 28th, 2011Nature: REPORTDissemination level: PUWP Lead Partner: HSRSRevision Final Project co-funded by the European Commission within the ICT Policy Support Programme Dissemination LevelPU Public XRE Restricted to a group specified by the consortium (including the Commission Services)CO Confidential, only for members of the consortium (including the Commission Services)This project is partially funded under the ICT Policy Support Programme as part of the Competitiveness andInnovation Framework Programme by the European Commission http://ec.europa.eu/ict_pspThis document reflects only the authors views and the European Community is not liable for any use that mightbe made of the information contained herein. © HABITATS Consortium, 2010
  • 2. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INSPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D-4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas Abstract: This document defines the generic architecture for the HABITATS project, but also include individual pilot applications and Reference Laboratory. The Architecture definition use RM-ODP methodology. The document is updating of first version of D4.2.1 and it was updated on the base of pilot works during period from Month 9 to Month 15. On the base of pilot user cases, generic user cases are defined. Architecture is defined as platform independent. Key Words: INSPIRE, Networking Architecture , RM ODP, Metadata, Data models, Reference Laboratory, Pilots implementationAuthors: Karel Charvat HSRS Gregorio Urquía Osorio TRAGSATEC Lisa Maurer TUG Peteris Bruns IMCS John O’Flaherty MAC Andrea Scianna Madonie Filip Hajek, Marek Mlcousek, Jan Bojko FMI -2-
  • 3. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INSPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D-4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas Revision History Revision Date Author Organization Description 2010-09-14 K.Charvat HSRS Table of Contents 2010-09-21 K.Charvat HSRS TOC, responsibilities 2011-01-31 K.Charvat HSRS Draft version 2011-02-10 G.Urquia TRAGSATEC Revision, detail modifications, comments 2011-02-10 K. Charvat HSRS Update of documents, user scenarios, generic scenarios, and single viewpoints 2011-02-15 L.Maurer TUG Comments 2011-02-17 K. Charvat HSRS Revision 2011-03-03 A.Sierra TRAGSA Format Revision V1.0 2011-07-15 K. Charvat HSRS Document updating and including contribution from partners V1.1 2011-07-21 K. Charvat HSRS Integration of contribution from MAC, IMCS and TRAGSATEC V1.2 2011-07-25 K. Charvat HSRS Update of introduction V1.3 2011-07-25 A. Sierra TRAGSA Format revision Final 2011-07-28 All Final revisionDocument Change Record Issue Date Author Item Reason for Change -3-
  • 4. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INSPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D-4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas Project Officer: Krister Olson European Commission DG Information Society and Media Project Officer Address: DG INFSO – E06 Office: EUFO – 01/177 L – 2920 LUXEMBOURG Phone: +(352) 43 0134332 Fax: +(352) E-mail: Krister.olson@ec.europa.eu Project Manager: Mariano Navarro Address: C/ Julián Camarillo, 6b, 28037, Madrid, Spain Phone: + 34 91 322 65 21 Fax: + 34 91 322 63 23 E-mail: mnc@tragsa.es -4-
  • 5. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas TABLE OF CONTENTS1. INTRODUCTION ..............................................................................................................................................7 1.1. TERMS ..........................................................................................................................................................7 1.2. ABBREVIATIONS ............................................................................................................................................82. METHODOLOGY .............................................................................................................................................9 2.1. BASIC PRINCIPLES OF RM ODP METHODOLOGY AND ITS APPLICATION FOR HABITATS .....................................9 2.2. GENERIC AND PILOT DESIGN .........................................................................................................................113. ENTERPRISE VIEWPOINT – USER SCENARIOS, USE CASES AND BUSINESS MODELLING....12 3.1. PILOT DEFINITION ........................................................................................................................................12 3.2. WILD SALMON MONITORING .......................................................................................................................12 3.3. LA PALMA PROTECTED MARINE AREA ........................................................................................................16 3.4. NATURAL RESERVE .....................................................................................................................................18 3.5. HIKING TRIP PLANNER.................................................................................................................................20 3.6. SHEEP AND GOAT HERDING MANAGEMENT ................................................................................................22 3.7. ECONOMICAL ACTIVITY AT MARINE COASTAL BENTHIC HABITATS ..............................................................25 3.8. NATIONAL FOREST PROGRAMME.................................................................................................................27 3.8.1. Cross pilot use cases ...........................................................................................................................34 3.9. PILOT ACTORS .............................................................................................................................................38 3.10. GENERIC ACTORS AND USERS .....................................................................................................................39 3.11. ACTORS ACTIVITIES. .................................................................................................................................41 3.12. GENERIC USE CASES ...................................................................................................................................434. INFORMATION VIEWPOINT – WHICH DATA AND HOW WILL BE SHARED ..............................50 4.1. DATA TYPES USED IN HABITATS ARCHITECTURE AND HOW THE DATA ARE ACCESSED .................................50 4.2. INFORMATION LIFE-CYCLE ...........................................................................................................................51 4.2.1. Reference data .....................................................................................................................................51 4.2.2. Satellite imagery ..................................................................................................................................52 4.2.3. In-situ observation ...............................................................................................................................52 4.2.4. Terrain measurement...........................................................................................................................53 4.2.5. User edited data ..................................................................................................................................54 4.2.6. User derived data ................................................................................................................................54 4.3. DATA AND METADATA MODELS ...................................................................................................................55 4.3.1. Metadata ..............................................................................................................................................55 4.4. SEA REGIONS ...........................................................................................................................................57 4.5. BIO-GEOGRAPHICAL REGIONS ...........................................................................................................57 4.6. HABITATS AND BIOTOPES....................................................................................................................57 4.7. SPECIES DISTRIBUTION ........................................................................................................................58 4.7.1. Data models .........................................................................................................................................58 4.7.2. Feature catalogues for sea regions .....................................................................................................59 4.8. DATA HARMONISATION ...............................................................................................................................60 4.8.1. COORDINATE TRANSFORMATION .................................................................................................60 4.8.2. FORMAT TRANSFORMATION ..........................................................................................................60 4.8.3. SCHEMA TRANSFORMATION ..........................................................................................................60 4.9. USED DATA SETS ..........................................................................................................................................61 4.9.1. Reference laboratory data sets ............................................................................................................61 4.9.2. Wild Salmon Monitoring .....................................................................................................................67 4.9.3. LA PALMA PROTECTED MARINE AREA .........................................................................................69 4.9.4. NATURAL RESERVE ..........................................................................................................................70 4.9.5. HIKING TRIP PLANNER and SHEEP AND GOAT HERDING MANAGEMENT .........................71 4.9.6. ECONOMICAL ACTIVITY AT MARINE COASTAL BENTHIC HABITATS ......................................72 4.9.7. NATIONAL FOREST PROGRAMME .................................................................................................735. COMPUTATIONAL VIEWPOINT-LOGICAL ARCHITECTURE .........................................................76 5.1. CONCERNS ...................................................................................................................................................76 5.1.1. FILE SYSTEM .....................................................................................................................................76 5
  • 6. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas 5.1.2. RDBMS ................................................................................................................................................76 5.1.3. Sensor connector .................................................................................................................................77 5.1.4. ACES infrastructure ............................................................................................................................78 5.1.5. Web Map server ...................................................................................................................................79 5.1.6. Metadata server ...................................................................................................................................80 5.1.7. WPS .....................................................................................................................................................81 5.1.8. Sensors server ......................................................................................................................................81 5.1.9. Geographical extensions for RBDSM ..................................................................................................81 5.1.10. Web Based GIS Analytical Tools .......................................................................................................81 5.1.11. Registry management ........................................................................................................................82 5.1.12. Authorisation/Authentication.............................................................................................................82 5.1.13. View ...................................................................................................................................................84 5.1.14. WFS Gazetteer ...................................................................................................................................85 5.1.15. Data services .....................................................................................................................................85 5.1.16. Transformation ..................................................................................................................................86 5.1.17. Analysis .............................................................................................................................................87 5.1.18. Monitoring .........................................................................................................................................87 5.1.19. External services ...............................................................................................................................88 5.1.20. Geo-portal BUS .................................................................................................................................88 5.1.21. Applications .......................................................................................................................................88 5.1.22. Applets ...............................................................................................................................................88 5.1.23. Servlets ..............................................................................................................................................89 5.1.24. Portlets ..............................................................................................................................................89 5.1.25. WMC ..................................................................................................................................................90 5.1.26. RSS/GeoRSS ......................................................................................................................................91 5.1.27. KML/KMZ .........................................................................................................................................91 5.1.28. iFrame ...............................................................................................................................................92 5.1.29. DIV ....................................................................................................................................................92 5.1.30. Augment reality .................................................................................................................................92 5.1.31. CMS ...................................................................................................................................................93 5.1.32. Social Networks and Media ...............................................................................................................93 5.1.33. Workflow management ......................................................................................................................93 5.2. PILOTS COMPUTATIONAL VIEW ....................................................................................................................94 5.2.1. WILD SALMON MONITORING .........................................................................................................94 5.2.2. LA PALMA PROTECTED MARINE ARE ...........................................................................................94 5.2.3. AUGMENTED REALITY - NATURAL RESERVE...............................................................................95 5.2.4. HIKING TRIP PLANNER and SHEEP AND GOAT HERDING MANAGEMENT .............................95 5.2.5. ECONOMICAL ACTIVITY AT MARINE COASTAL BENTHIC HABITATS ......................................95 5.2.6. NATIONAL FOREST PROGRAMME .................................................................................................956. ENGINEERING VIEWPOINT- DISTRIBUTION OF INFRASTRUCTURE ..........................................97 6.1. RELATION OF PILOT IMPLEMENTATION AND REFERENCE LABORATORY .......................................................97 6.2. DESIGN FOR REFERENCE LABORATORY .......................................................................................................987. TECHNOLOGY VIEWPOINT – INFRASTRUCTURE MAPPING .................................................. - 100 - 7.1. EXAMPLES OF POSSIBLE COMPONENTS FOR IMPLEMENTATION ............................................................. - 100 - 7.2. REFERENCE LABORATORY IMPLEMENTATION ....................................................................................... - 102 - 7.3. PILOTS ARCHITECTURE ......................................................................................................................... - 111 - 7.3.1. WILD SALMON MONITORING .................................................................................................. - 111 - 7.3.2. LA PALMA PROTECTED MARINE AREA .................................................................................. - 112 - 7.3.3. NATURAL RESERVE ................................................................................................................... - 114 - 7.3.4. HIKING TRIP PLANNER and SHEEP AND GOAT HERDING MANAGEMENT ...................... - 115 - 7.3.5. ECONOMICAL ACTIVITY AT MARINE COASTAL BENTHIC HABITATS ............................... - 116 - 7.3.6. NATIONAL FOREST PROGRAMME .......................................................................................... - 116 -8. CONCLUSION .......................................................................................................................................... - 119 -9. REFERENCES .......................................................................................................................................... - 120 - 6
  • 7. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas1. INTRODUCTIONThe objective of Task 4.2 is to define generic architecture (platform neutral) and also architecture forpilot solutions. Important part basic set of networking services which are an extension of existingINSPIRE services, for the management, discovery, sharing, processing and publishing of spatialplanning data by public and commercial sector, NGOs, citizens, private sector, education and science,and all those who play an important role in biodiversity and see region protection and alsoexploitation.The objective of this task is to define such architecture for SDI, which will allow effectivemanagement of sensitive areas, support for tourism, education and research in this areas, and alsopromotion of these regions. HABITATS defines the tools and interfaces by which the different partieswill be able to manage, discovery, share and reuse spatial data.This D4.2.2 document provides final version of HABITATS networking and data sharing architecture,and suggests its possible logical components, but also possibilities, how provide practicalimplementation of this logical components. This architecture is based on user needs and is validated byusers on the base of concrete implementations. The starting point and requirements can be found in theHABITATS deliverable D4.1, but document is mainly based on D4.2.1. Initial architecture designfrom D4.2.1 was modified in interaction with users to develop concrete pilot cases and led to the finalarchitecture design. First version of the document was updated on the base on user response. In thisprocess local technical expert’s plaid an important role, who and contributed to the testing ofprinciples and of the architecture and cooperate on design of concrete local implementation. For thisthe Living Lab methodology was used.1.1. TERMS• infrastructure for spatial information – metadata, spatial data sets and spatial data services;network services and technologies; agreements on sharing, access and use; and coordination andmonitoring mechanisms, processes and procedures, established, operated or made available inaccordance with this Directive; [INSPIRE Directive]• INSPIRE application schema – application schema specified in an INSPIRE data specification• INSPIRE data specification – harmonized data product specification for a theme adopted as anImplementing Rule• metadata – information describing spatial data sets and spatial data services and making it possibleto discover, inventory and use them [INSPIRE Directive]• spatial data – data with a direct or indirect reference to a specific location or geographic area[INSPIRE Directive]• spatial data set – identifiable collection of spatial data [INSPIRE Directive]• spatial object – abstract representation of a real-world phenomenon related to a specific location orgeographical area [INSPIRE Directive]• feature – abstraction of real world phenomena [ISO 19101]• feature catalogue – catalogue(s) containing definitions and descriptions of the spatial object types,their attributes and associated components occurring in one or more spatial data sets, together with anyoperations that may be applied [ISO 19110 – modified]• discovery services – search for spatial data sets and services on the basis of the content of thecorresponding metadata and to display the content of the metadata [INSPIRE Directive]• view services – services to display, navigate, zoom in/out, pan, or overlay viewable spatial datasets and to display legend information and any relevant content of metadata [INSPIRE Directive]• download services – services to copy of spatial data sets, or parts of such sets, to be downloadedand, where practicable, accessed directly [INSPIRE Directive] 7
  • 8. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas• transformation services – services enabling spatial data sets to be transformed with a view toachieving interoperability [INSPIRE Directive]• services allowing – spatial data services to be invoked [INSPIRE Directive]1.2. ABBREVIATIONS • INSPIRE – Infrastructure for Spatial Information in Europe • ISO – International Organisation for Standardisation • SDI – Spatial Data Infrastructure • WMS – Web Service Map • WFS – Web Feature Map • WCS – Web Coverage Map • WFS – G - Web Service Map Gazetteer • WMC – Web Map Context • WPS – Web Processing Services • CS – W - Catalogue Service Web • CNIG – National Centre of Geographic Data of Spain • URM – Uniform Resource Management • OGC – Open Geospatial Consortium • SOA – Service Oriented Architecture • CMS – content management systems • SOS – Sensor Observation Services • SAS – Sensors Alert Services • SES – Sensors Event Services • SEIS – Shared Environmental Information System • HTML – HyperText Markup Language • API – Application Programming Interface • ESA – European Space Agency • GMES – Global Monitoring for Environment and Security • GEOSS - Global Earth Observation System of Systems • EU – European Union • EC – European Commission • URI – Uniform Resource Identifier • KML – Keyhole Markup Language • GML – Geography Markup Language • RM-ODP - Reference Model of Open Distributed ProcessingINSPIRE – INfrastructure for SPatial InfoRmation in Europe • ISO – International Organisation for Standardisation 8
  • 9. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas2. METHODOLOGYAs was already described in D4.1, architecture design is realised on the base of a Reference Model ofOpen Distributed Processing (RM-ODP) (ISO/IEC 10746-1). This model is the architecture referencemodel used also within ISO/TC 211 “Geographic Information – Reference model” [ISO 19101:2002],and on Open Geospatial Consortium Reference Model (ORM).The use of RM-ODP will give us two opportunities: • To define the basic design of the solution as platform neutral and to support different local implementation. This is important, because the objective of the document D4.2 is not to describe one unique technology solution, but to give general models, which could be used by different organisation across Europe. These models are then demonstrated on selected pilot cases that are part of the project, in order to demonstrate the feasibility of such solution • To build on positive experiences of previous European research projects, as this methodology is used by most European (mainly research) projects and some recommendations already exist. A previous analysis (D4.1) demonstrates that the basic principles for INSPIRE, GEOSS and GMES projects are very similar and that some basic building blocks could easily be re-used in different applications. Our objective is to extend these models to make them more oriented towards actual user needs.The architecture design provides an overall conceptual framework for building geo-processingservices for biodiversity, sea region protection and for effective management and utilisation ofsensitive areas The RM-ODP framework will have to be integrated with the Model DrivenArchitecture (MDA) approach, which allows to define the system through an abstract schema,independent from implementation tools and techniques.2.1. BASIC PRINCIPLES OF RM ODP METHODOLOGY AND ITS APPLICATION FOR HABITATSThe RM-ODP divides all process of architecture design into five generic and complementary steps,which are called viewpoints on the system and its environment. This viewpoints are:• The enterprise viewpoint, which focuses on the purpose, scope and policies for the system. It describes the business requirements and how to meet them. It is based on user scenarios and user cases• The information viewpoint, focuses on the semantics of the information and the information processing performed. It describes the information managed by the system and the structure and content type of the supporting data. This viewpoint is related to WP3, where data and metadata models are defined. The Information viewpoint extends these models and analyses also necessary operation• The computational viewpoint provides functional decomposition of the system into objects which interact at interfaces. It describes the functionality provided by the system and its functional decomposition.• The engineering viewpoint focuses on the mechanisms and functions required to support distributed interactions between objects in the system. It describes the distribution of processing performed by the system to manage the information and provide the functionality.• The technology viewpoint focuses on the choice of technology of the system. It describes the technologies chosen to provide the processing, functionality and presentation of information. In 9
  • 10. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas principle only this viewpoint is platform dependent. In our architecture design in this first document we will analyse potential components for implementation. In the second version of the document delivered in Month 15 concrete tools for single pilots will be defined.For the architecture design of HABITATS we adapted RM ODP methodology to guarantee realadoption of user needs and to give real possibilities of an user involvement into the design process.The design process will be done iteratively with this as the first version, so all views will be modifiedon the basis of user validation and user experiences. It is necessary to take into consideration, that inmany cases users are not familiar with newest technologies and also have no experience in the designof distributed systems. Another important aspect is also, that we don’t design one concrete solution,but a number of relatively independent services. In order to allow reuse of some components we havedefined among pilots what common generic functions are that fulfil the requirements of differentscenarios and what specific solution dependent components are. In the first version of the design, wewill focus mainly on generic functionality, in the second version, we will try to add more pilot specificfunctions.The relation of all these five viewpoints could be described by the following scheme:The Enterprise viewpoint of the architecture design is focused on the analysis of pilot scenarios andthe definition of a limited numbers of generic use cases, which are implemented to support basisfunctionalities required by more scenarios, but also supporting the process of data and metadataharmonisation based on outputs from WP3.The Information viewpoint is focused on basic data and metadata sets, which could be shared amongdifferent scenarios and also will be focused on data and metadata related to HABITATS and INSPIREspecification. It is also focused on common infrastructure being accessible trough ReferenCeLaboratoryThe Computational viewpoint is focused on generic components, which could be reused for morescenarios and which will be some basic parts of the infrastructure. Already here we extend the basic 10
  • 11. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasprinciples of INSPIRE, GMES and GEOSS and add some new functionalities related to datamanagement and updating.The Engineering viewpoint defines a generic scheme, which can be reused for all pilotimplementations and which could be modified for different scenarios. Also this viewpoint is platformindependent.The Technical viewpoint defines basic architecture modifications for single scenarios and suggestspotential technical implementation. This solution is really basic definition and will give more option ofimplementation. Concrete implementation will be modified during the implementation and validationprocess.2.2. GENERIC AND PILOT DESIGNAn important part of the methodology is to divide design of generic architecture and pilot dependentarchitecture. On the basis of user requirements, generic use cases will be defined and generics serviceswill be designed for these generic use cases, which will be reusable for different pilot solutions. On thebasis of these generic services pilot applications will be defined, which will be composed from genericservices. Generic services will be available for developers so they can implement specific userapplications using these generic services. Important is, that these applications can reuse existingcomponents. Such a model was used in the past in the c@r project and also is used currently in theGENESIS project.For the development of applications it will be possible to:• Orchestrate existing services using some workflow management of language as BPEL• Integrate existing services and components using standard programming tools 11
  • 12. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas3. ENTERPRISE VIEWPOINT – USER SCENARIOS, USE CASES AND BUSINESS MODELLING3.1. PILOT DEFINITIONAccording to the HABITATS user-driven approach to standardisation, the full impact of results will besparked off by the pilot service scenarios and their ability to attract new participants to thecommunities of adoption. Each pilot is therefore built on a) existing concrete services currently carried out by project partners, b) potentials of data access through network services and c) enhancement through usage scenarios developed by user communities, in order to meet the three criteria of relevance, openness and responsiveness.The pilots fall into the three forward-looking categories described above as follows:• Management of natural resources o Wild Salmon Monitoring (IE) o La Palma Protected Marine Area (ES)• Eco-tourism o Hiking Trip Planner (IT) o Natural Reserve (ES)• Economic activities o Sheep and Goat Herd Management (IT) o Economical activity at marine coastal benthic habitats (LV)• National policy o Czech National Forest Programme (CZ)Each of these validation pilots relies on trans-regional and trans-European data sharing between pilotsettings within INSPIRE networks present in the project, and with collaborating members of theHABITATS User Communities.3.2. WILD SALMON MONITORINGPartner: MACLocation: Ireland; replicable in other Member StatesService and user scenario:Ireland has best practice in Salmon Conservation and Management – so the processes and data-structures used in Ireland have pan-European significance for INSPIRE, and so are very relevant forthe HABITATS project, and should also help to promote Irish fishing across Europe. 12
  • 13. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasInland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) have taken over responsibility for coordinating the monitoring andconservation of wild salmon in Ireland. MAC is working with the IFI National Salmon MonitoringProgramme, Salmon Scientific Standing Committee, and other involved agencies such as the IrishMarine Institute (MI) to develop a Salmon Conservation Limits portal, to pilot the use of theHABITATS INSPIRE metadata profile, and bottom-up social validation process to improvepresentation, accessibility and use of the data that is being collected, and get better buy-in by allstakeholders (particularly scientists, anglers, and angling related businesses) to be aware of,understand and engage in the salmon conservation procedures, regulations and catch limitations thatare set each year. This will provide better intelligence to researchers, fishermen and decision makerson salmon conservation, so that they can better manage the wild-salmon resource in a sustainablemanner and help prevent the extinction of wild salmon in rivers on the North Atlantic coast of Europe.Once operational in Ireland the process will be scaled up in collaboration with the FP7 SALSEA-Merge project which is investigating the migration and distribution of salmon in the North-EastAtlantic, working with the North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organisation (NASCO).To explore use of the HABITATS approach, the initial Irish Salmon CL pilot is focusing on onespecific area and community (such as a catchment or sub-catchment), where users can link to thevarious data for that area, including a range of static data (such as catch regulations, WFD fish data,water quality etc) as well as more dynamic data partially generated by users themselves there (e.g. byonline listing of their catches etc). Part (or a tributary) of the river Nore in the South-East of Irelandcould be a good pilot site, as discussions with the community of active local groups and stakeholdersthere are proving to be quite positive. However the final pilot location is to be made by the IFI in thecoming weeks.In line with IFI policy, the Salmon CL Portal will have special focus on the involvement and feedbackfrom tourist (mainly foreign) anglers, local angling-related businesses and awareness/education ofusers for the social validation aspects of HABITATS. User feedback so far indicates that this couldsupplement and link to the many existing local angling groups and sites, to pilot a bottom-up andconsultative approach that IFI could subsequently use in other contexts in Ireland and across Europe(with NASCO and SALSEA-Merge).IFI are currently undertaking internal deliberations with their staff for their inputs and support of theSalmon CL Portal and to agree its initial community/location-focus. Once it goes active, the externalstakeholders, including scientists, anglers and angling-related businesses will be brought into theprocess through the HABITATS validation process on the Salmon CL portal.From an IFI business perspective this is a very worthwhile pilot that introduces IFI’s staff to the wholeINSPIRE process, and also allows them and other government and public agencies to explore use ofsocial networking to involve communities of users, improve and promote fishing, and ultimately helpconserve and manage the vital wild salmon stocks.Use of environmental data:Wild salmon data that is being collected by the IFI and other public agencies such as the MarineInstitute will be made accessible through the Salmon CL Portal to provide better intelligence toresearchers, fishermen and decision makers on salmon conservation, so that they can better participatein the management of the wild-salmon resource in a sustainable manner and help prevent theextinction of wild salmon in rivers on the North Atlantic coast of Europe.By merging genetic and ecological investigations, to advance understanding of stock specificmigration and distribution patterns and overall ecology of the marine life of Atlantic salmon and gainan insight into the factors resulting in recent increases in marine mortality. Textual and map-based datafrom the project as it progresses is available on their website under the following headings: 13
  • 14. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • Background • Ecological Studies • Genetic Identification Methodology • Migration Modelling • Marine Surveys • Documents • Genetic Stock IdentificationThe SALSEA Group are developing 2 major databases that will be issued as a unit in the same format: • Genetic database – the big one. Brand new work – very valuable as it allows salmon to be traced back to their rivers of origin. Keen to keep these aspects of the database private. • Sea database – based on WGNAPES (ICES). Much simpler – smaller database. Less sensitive. Sea-going fish data. Maintained in the Faroh’s by the same people who developed the original WGNAPEs database.Stakeholders involved:The SALSEA Group has extensive data bases, and is currently developing 2 new ones. It is onlyrecently that they have accepted the value of INSPIRE and its principles, but now fully accept that allof their data should be INSPIRE compliant.Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI), and the Irish Marine Institute (MI) collect and own the data, butcollaborate with other Agencies and the North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organisation (NASCO).The service being piloted is packaging and providing that data as better intelligence to researchers,fishermen and decision makers on salmon conservation. The main stakeholders (IFI and MI) arecurrently benefiting from the project in getting a clearer appreciation of INSPIRE requirements and thepotential of social networking to engage all of the other stakeholders.Once operational, the Salmon CL pilot will 1. Provide better communication, consultation and involvement of all stakeholders in the process of specifying fishing conservation measures in Ireland and beyond. 2. Make formulation of the Irish Wild Salmon Fishing Regulations more participatory and interactive by involving all relevant actors proactively in the process, 3. Make the datasets open and widely available (and INSPIRE complaint), 4. Enable users (such as anglers and scientists) to provide feedback on how to make the data more useful for them.However the key and very clear long-term objective is the sustainable management, conservation andexploitation of the wild salmon stocks.Users involvedThe Pilot Service will enable Citizens, including researchers, anglers, fishermen, fishing-relatedbusinesses and public agencies (policy and regulations decision makers) to be involved, for futureexploitation of the Salmon CL Portal and HABITAT’s results.Policy / Business ModelThe data collection is part of the Irish National Policy in line with its NASCO, International Councilfor the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) and EU Habitats Directive obligations.. Currently the data ismainly documented rather provided online. The HABITATS pilot is making it available as an onlineservice. 14
  • 15. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasCooperation/ data sharing: • La Palma Protected Marine Area (ES) • Economical activity at marine coastal benthic habitats (LV) • FAO • HSRS • IMCSUse casesUse case Wild Salmon Fishing Conservation in IrelandActors Fishermen, Anglers, Angling Researchers, Decision Makers, other actors related to the salmon fishing industry in Ireland.Task To provide participatory input to the early stages of the formulation of the Irish wild salmon fishing conservation measures by involving all relevant actors interactively in the data monitoring process, making their databases more open and widely available (and INSPIRE complaint), and enable users to engage and provide feedback on how to make the data and related services more useful for them. For instance, anglers could provide real-time rod-catch data using a smart phone application – where catch and release fishing is allowed on rivers.Assumptions That the proprietary databases can be made INSPIRE-compliant using the HABITATS Metadata profile to be accessible on the Irish Spatial Data Exchange (ISDE) using the HABITATS Reference Laboratory tools and portal. So far, of the 4 HABITATS themes, the Habitats and Biotopes, and Species Distribution appear to be most relevant using the HABITATS metadata profiles (from D3.2.1) and the IFI scientist’s salmon conservation process best practice classification and naming schemas.Description The Irish Standing Scientific Committee (SSC) on the status of Irish Salmon Stocks (or Salmon Advisory Group) scientifically analyses all data on wild salmon in Ireland and issues recommendations every December on the conservation of salmon stocks in each of the 148 Irish salmon fishing rivers for the coming year. This is a statutory based process that has a major direct impact on anglers, commercial fishermen and fishing-related businesses such as guest houses, hotels and lodges, associated with each of these individual rivers. From discussions with the various stakeholders it has become clear that the decision makers are concerned that a social validation pilot could end up doing more harm than good in this very sensitive, legal and highly political process. So the Salmon CL Portal pilot will aim to involve users in the collection and monitoring of the data at the early stages to informally feed into the formal statutory process. This allows the HABITATS social validation approach to be piloted with the wider process of wild salmon monitoring and conservation that feeds into the SSC, without upsetting its legal process. But in a broader context it also provides a useful model and experience to make the regulation process more participative in the future, and for use by the National Inland Fisheries Forum that is being established in Ireland and to tie in with IFI’s outreach work to the wider community, especially schools and school-children later on. The IFI could also use the HABITATS social validation / INSPIRE open data access approach, with a similar social networking methodology to address other environmental issues, such as addressing Invasive Species and water research coordination in Ireland.Comments The aim is to use the HABITATS INSPIRE Social Validation approach to transform the data and modes of operation of this community from being mainly “information 15
  • 16. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas push” to be being a lot more “User pull” by making the data open and usable online based on INSPIRE principles, open standards, and social networks to validate the utility and acceptability of the data. This will enable the development of services based on economies of scale using spatial information that adheres to a standard format that is widely adopted. This fits well into the HABITATS “Management of Natural Resource Management” cluster, and will engage Citizens (fishermen, anglers, fishing-related business, researchers and administrators/decision-makers) to be involved, for future sustainable operation.Use case Wild Salmon Monitoring and Management InternationallyActors Researchers, and Decision MakersTask The International SALSEA Group through collaboration in the FP7 SALSEA- Merge project is investigating and recording in 2 major databases, the migration and distribution of salmon in the North-East Atlantic. The Use Case is to make their extensive data open and accessible using INSPIRE principles. Based on their existing best-practice, this group is likely to impact on the proposed salmon-related data, metadata and services that will be input to the INSPIRE TWGs.Assumptions As the SALSEA Group wish to focus all of their efforts on their scientific work until the end of the SALSEA Merge project, it will be late 2011 before they will allow their data to be made available to a HABITATS pilot. They also wish to see how the Irish National pilot gets on and reuse its learning and approach.Description This group uses the widely used best-practice ICES WGNAPES database structure. WGNAPES is a permanent Group that will continue after the SALSEA-Merge project ends in 2011. ICES/WGNAPES is an Internal database composed of National databases. With some fields added for SALSEA-Merge and the Genetic database. So it is good practice and a permanent working group which should lead to very useful inputs to the 4 HABITATS INSPIRE themes.Comments This case with SALSEA-Merge is complex, and touches on the potentially high commercial value of the genetic databases, which is the reason for the reticence of the scientists involved in opening up their information to be INSPIRE compliant. On the other hand, interfacing INSPIRE-compliant databases with commercial services might be the most effective means for them to profit from their research. These issues will be further explored when MAC is able to more actively engage with the SALSEA-Merge stakeholders, after their current project work ends.3.3. LA PALMA PROTECTED MARINE AREAPartner: TRAGSATECLocation: The pilot takes place in the La Palma Protected Marine Reserve in the Canary Islands.Service and user scenario:Protected Marine Areas (PMA) are areas where it is intended to maintain a high environmental qualityin order to protect and even regenerate the flora and fauna in the area. For the development of thispilot, the La Palma’s Protected Marine Reserve (Canary Islands) in the Atlantic Sea has been chosen.The island of La Palma is suffering from a peculiar environmental sea degradation due to the coastplantations (basically banana plantations).The objective of this pilot is to develop a system based on ICT to automatically control theenvironment. The system will get data based on indicators from the coast area of the PMA, then 16
  • 17. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasprocess them, analysed them and make them available so the authorities can take the best decisions.Data can be obtained through the use of sensors or, like in the case of the flora and fauna data, withhuman intervention.When using sensors and in order to make it simple for our purpose, the coast area of this PMA hasbeen divided into two sub-areas that will be defined as open sea (not more than 600 m from the coast)and border sea. With the same criteria, indicators that we will take into account will be: biologicalparameters or physical-chemical parameters and only the three among the most relevant ones will betaken for each one of the sub-areas.This division allows us to apply to each of the sub-areas the correct indicators since for example thereis no need to measure pesticides on the open sea. Here there are the indicators that will be measuredfor each of the sub-areas.When human intervention is necessary, the use of images and voice recognition systems will bestudied. All these data will be georeferenced in cartographic maps.Use of environmental data:If we want the public administration to accomplish environmental rules and regulations concerningwater, they must know the quality of it and investigate which activities are the main factors in waterdegradation. With the data obtained from this pilot, environmental information related to the quality ofthe water in the coast should be accessible to the authorities in order to help them to take correctdecisions concerning the environment.Some of these rules and regulations are the 2008/56/CE DIRECTIVE of JUNE 17th, 2008 where theenvironmental management policy for marine areas is mandatory for the member states.Stakeholders involved:The main stakeholder involved in the development of this pilot is TRAGSATEC. Some othercollaborators are companies manufacturing sensors and developing voice.Users involved:In the development of the pilot the users are the La Palma Protected Marine Reserve but in futureexploitation any Public Administration could be involved.Policy / business model:Coherent with TRAGSA role towards the Spanish Government.Cooperation/ data sharing:• Wild Salmon Monitoring (IE)• Economical activity at marine coastal benthic habitats (LV)• FAO• HSRS• IMCSUse casesUse case Indicators calculation and reportingScenario La Palma Protected Marine Area (ES)Actors • La Palma Public Administration 17
  • 18. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • TragsaTask To analyse sensor measurements, and to calculate indicators on everyday basis to measure the quality of the sea. To publish this information.Assumptions Sensor data will be made available using standardised interfaces and will be accessible by analytical toolsDescription The data captured from sensors will be analysed on a regular basis and reports about quality of the sea will be prepared. The results of this analysis will be stored in form of tables, graphs, etc.Comments The analysis and indicators will be used by other use casesUse case Visualisation of resultsScenario La Palma Protected Marine Area (ES)Actors • La Palma Public Administration • Tragsa • Citizens, ScientistsTask Visualise reference data, sensors measurement and calculated indicatorsAssumptions Visualisation will help to make different types of data available in a user friendly form to support visualisation both on computers but also on mobile devicesDescription The system will support selection of data, maps and indicators and support visualisation in right formComments On the basis of user access rights different possibilities of visualisation will be available for users3.4. NATURAL RESERVEPartner: TRAGSATECLocation: This pilot is going to be developed for a small area in Madrid (Spain), El Campo del Moro,but the strength of the pilot is that if a standardization of the data and metadata modelling for this kindof environmental tourism is defined, some other standards will appear for the specific hardware that isneeded for its representation, and the idea of environmental tourism could equally be developed in thewhole Europe.Service and user scenario:The objective within a Nature Restricted Areas (NRA), as the European Nature 2000 Network definesit, is the survival of species in danger of extinction, contributing at the same time to soften the impactof human activities. They are the instrument to nature conservation in the European Union.For the development of this pilot obviously it is not possible to choose a NRA, but for the purposes ofthis pilot an interesting place has been chosen in Madrid.The objective of this pilot is to develop a system that, using real nature information and addingmetadata to real images (texts, images, sounds, etc.), allows improving environmental tourism with a 18
  • 19. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasreal nature observation. Introducing interpretation information and augmented reality we willparticularly protect fragile areas.The base information will be:• Cartographic information for long distance scenes (landscape)• Topographic information for short distance scenes (some trees, flowers, rocks…)On top of this cartographic/topographic information there are a lot of metadata that could begeoreferenced, as for example:• Nature data: species, flora and fauna, names,• Historic data: reconstruction of ruins, dates and facts• Landscape: name of villages, mountains, etc.Use of environmental data:Environmental information can be used in a wide range of areas apart from environmental educationor nature interpretation, it can also be used for historical or cultural heritage, evaluation of newedification impact, etc.Stakeholders involved:The main company involved in the development of this pilot is TRAGSATEC. Some othercollaborators are hardware manufacturing companies. The National Heritage of Spain is the mainstakeholder for this pilot.Users involved:In the development of the pilot the users are the Public Administration and tourists.Policy / business model:Coherent with TRAGSA role towards the Spanish Government.Cooperation/ data sharing:• Hiking Trip Planner (IT)• Sheep and Goat Herd Management (IT)• Czech National Forest Programme (CZ)• FAO• HSRS• IMCSUse casesUse case Using augmented reality for educational, research and awareness purposesScenario Natural Reserve (ES)Actors • Public Administration • Tragsatec 19
  • 20. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • Citizens, Scientists, StudentsTask Using augmented reality tools in terrain to combine reality with mapped objects or with artificial objects.Assumption To be able to select data on the basis of user position and user preferences froms existing catalogues. To design methods of visualisation of three dimensional objects on the basis of available dataDescription Users will use tools supporting user reality visualisation for educational or research purposes. On the basis of his position and user preferences (topic of interest) available data will be selected for visualisation. It will be necessary to not only design data models, but also methods of visualisation for concrete types of data. When a person move around in the terrain, augmented reality will be displayed to himComments The task will require additional types of information, like DSM information. It will be necessary to take not only the position, but also the azimuth of the view of a subject into consideration.Use case Using augmented reality for inventory and manage purposesScenario Natural Reserve (ES)Actors • Public Administration • Tragsatec • Citizens, Scientists, StudentsTask Using augmented reality tools in terrain to add and edit real objects with photo included.Assumption To be able to select data on the basis of user position and user preferences froms existing catalogues. To design methods of visualisation of three dimensional objects on the basis of available data. To add points and take photos for each of these.Description Users will use tools supporting user reality visualisation for editing geodata. On the basis of his position and user preferences (topic of interest) available data will be selected for visualisation and edition. It will be necessary allow add a photo to each new point.Comments The task will require additional types of information, like DSM information. It will be necessary to take not only the position, but also the azimuth of the view of a subject into consideration.3.5. HIKING TRIP PLANNERPartner: MadonieLocation: Madonie Park, Sicily (IT); widely replicable throughout the Mediterranean 20
  • 21. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasService and user scenario:The Madonie Park in Sicily attracts thousands of visitors every year, including hikers who explore themostly mountainous 35,000 hectares; there are 6 mountains over 1,500m and several others well over1,000m. The highest, Pizzo Carbonara is 1,979m, second in Sicily only to the mighty Etna (3,323m).Hikers are attracted, in addition to the landscape, particularly by the park’s flora and wildlife. Indeed,there are over 2,600 different species of plants, many of which are endemic to the area.The Park Authority is currently developing a multimedia repertory of many of the park’s main features– including both natural elements and places of traditional farming and herding – and, in the context ofon-going initiatives, is developing an interactive multimedia map of the area that will allow hikers toplan visits as a function of the natural elements to see.The validation pilot in HABITATS will integrate habitats-related data into this map, to allow to viewbio-geographical regions within the park. In addition, use of mobile platforms (where coverage isavailable) will also be tested.Finally, the currently planned facility allowing for users to upload multimedia content and insertcomments and suggestions, will be enhanced to validate the possibility for users to insert contentthrough the SDI. The possibility to signal sightings of different species (i.e. through digital photos withtime date and location stamp) will also be integrated.Use of environmental data:This pilot will make significant use of the information in the regional Carta Natura database, and willalso access databases from other regions in order, for example, to compare habitats in differentgeographical contexts.In order to go toward a system “INSPIRE compliant” is necessary to make people, at Madonie Park,works in a way useful to realize some INSPIRE instances (such as metadata definition, organized wayto archive data (both spatial and non spatial, use of data located on a remote server accessible by webservices, publication of web service for data locally managed).The pilot will also explore the organisational issues in validating user-provided data.Stakeholders involved:This pilot is carried out within the Territorial Living Lab-Sicily partnership, which already includes arange of regional stakeholders including the Sicilian regional government, the CRES research centre,the University of Palermo, the ARCA innovation incubator, the Confindustria business association,etc. In addition, the pilot will also be carried out in collaboration with the national research centreCNR’s ICAR (Istituto di Calcolo e Reti ad Alte Prestazioni).Users involved:In the development of the pilot the users are the Public Administration and tourists.Policy / business model:The pilot is coherent with the Park’s mission but is also an element of the TLL-Sicily partnership’sinnovation piloting strategy.Cooperation/ data sharing:• Natural Reserve (ES)• Czech National Forest Programme (CZ)• ISPRA• FAO• HSRS 21
  • 22. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas• IMCSPilot use casesUse case Park ManagementScenario Hiking Trip Planner (IT)Actors Park employersTask • Planning support • Operative terrain managementAssumptions New, and mainly mobile, access can bring better and more operational management into the parkDescription The system will offer access to relevant information to park management in office and terrain. The system will support planning and also realisation of activities in the park.Comments3.6. SHEEP AND GOAT HERDING MANAGEMENTPartner: MadonieLocation: Madonie Park, Sicily (IT); widely replicable throughout EuropeService and user scenario:In the Madonie Park, over 1,500m is dominated by the Madonie Forest while lower down the slopes,the locals continue to pursue millennial agricultural activities including sheep and cattle farming andthe cultivation of wheat, olives and fruit. This gives rise to specific traditions such as the seasonal“transumanza” when herds are moved from their summer to winter pastures and back, and contributesto the Madonie’s gastronomic specialties of meat, sausages, salami, cheese, olives, mushrooms, andfresh seasonal vegetables.Grazing, as is well known, has a significant environmental impact and therefore needs to be carefullymanaged in order to guarantee the long-term sustainability of the grazing habitat. For this reason, thePark Authority adopted a grazing plan and releases licences; according to the grazing plan the ParkAuthority rotates the assignment and utilization of grazing areas in order to not damage areas ofenvironmental interest with an excessive pressure due to the presence of herding activities. All thisshould be carried out also by adding new layers on the current condition of pastures and otherenvironmental parameters regarding the same areas. Besides the Park Authority is responsible forother actions of monitoring, maintaining the necessary fencing and other infrastructures, etc.This management activity uses the Park’s GIS system, but the decision-making processes, in the pasthas been generally based on experience and implicit knowledge. The validation pilot will provideupdated environmental data to support better informed decisions, but it it will also be a starting pointto regulate the production of data according to Inspire recommendations.The system is important as it is replicable in other Italian mountain parks which have the saneproblem.Use of environmental data: 22
  • 23. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThis pilot will make significant use of the grazing plan imported in the WEBGIS as well as of someother geospatial layers as the ‘areas assignment plan’ and ‘animals position’ (the position is uploadedon Park Authority databases by tracking collars mounted on the neck of animal).Management activity is also based on information contained in the ISPRA Carta Natura-like databaserealized by Madonie Park Authority at a more detailed scale and also on recommendations comingfrom ISPRA partner itself that could be both partner and user (this last role for using webgis data andservices in order to write recommendations on the use of Madonie grazing areas). Joint managementscenarios are possible through the interconnection with similar habitats management systems in othercountries of Mediterranean area.Stakeholders involved:The pilot activity is useful not only for Park Authority, which is interested to manage grazing areas ina sustainable way, but also for different classes of stakeholders as: - Sheep and goat farmers; they are interested to obtain licence to use some areas inside the park forgrazing of their animals; - Owners of private areas usable for grazing - Dairy farmingUsers involved:The information made available in the development of project pilot e pilot activity could be used dailyby Madonie Park Authority personnel which has to manage the area using GIS.Information could be also useful to sheep and goat farmers that want to know the situation regardingareas assignment. But the information available as web services will be useful to researchers and ingeneral to people that could develop an activity based on Dairy farming (allevamento).Besides, and this is one of the most important aspects, the base data constitute the map on which theposition of animals will be shown thank to geospatial web service deployed by the WEBGIS server.Other categories indirectly interested are:- Schools- HikersPolicy / Business ModelThe data collection, once available through web service is in-line with Sicily Region policy forbuilding of an SDI, to be realized with contribution of different public body or institutions.Cooperation/ data sharing:The data are shared with all people interested to know about the use of grazing areas and relatedinformation inside the park.From other pilots here will be cooperation with• Natural Reserve (ES)• Economical activity at marine coastal benthic habitats (LV)• Czech National Forest Programme (CZ)• ISPRA• FAO• HSRS 23
  • 24. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas• IMCSPilot use casesThere are many different use cases, two of which are here reported.Use case 1 Sheep and Goat Herding ManagementActors Personnel at Madonie Park AuthorityTask This is mostly an internal but fundamental task at Madonie Park Authority the requires the availability of geospatial data inside the whole Office and for external consultants (mainly researchers) that must help internal staff in managing the areas of the park. All this people access data by their GIS software or the WEBGIS platform, through geospatial web services INSPIRE compliant.Assumptions The proprietary databases can be made INSPIRE-compliant using the HABITATS Metadata profile in order to be accessed through the Sicily Region Portal using GIS or WEBGIS software compliant to OGC web services.Description People at Madonie Park Authority deal with the management of grazing areas in a sustainable way allowing shepherds to access to areas, assigned to each of them, for grazing of sheep and goats. The control of the impact of grazing on assigned areas is carried out by Park Authority Personnel and external experts. This requires also the production of new layers on the state of areas the must be in a format compliant to ISPIRE directive in order to be used in an appropriate way.Comments Data used for this task are: 1. Grazing plan; 2. Animals position distributed over the whole period of grazing; 3. State of conservation of areas (this includes some information such as level of pressure caused by animals).Use case 2 Tracking position of animals on a grazing area inside the parkActors Sheep and goat farmersTask To know, when necessary, the position of animals inside the grazing areas in order to retrieve them.Assumptions There is a server that, on demand by Sheep and goat farmers or shepherds, answers with the position of animals shown on a map of the area surrounding them, whose position is uploaded to the server, periodically, by gps-gprs tracking collars mounted on the neck of some animals.Description The system is composed by different segments or parts. The first one is a tracking collar that is mounted on the neck of each animal (shep or goat) whose position must be tracked; the collar contains a gps receiver and a gprs 24
  • 25. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas transmitter through which the position of the animal is sent at predefined time interval to a server in which position of animals is saved. The second one is the server on which the position of animals is saved: The server makes available web services which allow to show on a map the position of animals when this is requested by shepherds by their mobile smart-phone. The third one is the mobile phone by which is possible to call the phone number which corresponds to a specific collar or animal; this mobile phone should be equipped with an internet browser by which the position of animals is shown on a map downloadable from the server at Madonie Park Authority. .Comments .3.7. ECONOMICAL ACTIVITY AT MARINE COASTAL BENTHIC HABITATSPartner: IMCSLocation: Marine coastal areas of Latvia; replicable in other sites of the Baltic SeaService and user scenario:IMCS will cooperate with the Latvian Institute of Aquatic Ecology using the monitoring data ofcoastal benthic communities and related environmental parameters. The needs and requirements ofvarious stakeholders will be researched and afterwards IMCS will pilot the use of advanced interfacesto improve presentation, accessibility and use of the data. It will help in decision making for portconstruction measures, fisheries policy, wind mill development actions in order to use the benthichabitats in a sustainable way. The benthic habitats in Latvian coastal waters are the areas with thehighest biological diversity and partly covered by NATURA 2000 territories.Use of environmental data:The data on composition, abundance and dynamics of the benthic communities together with therelated environmental parameters (physico-chemical measurements) collected by the Institute ofAquatic Ecology, will be made accessible to provide scientifically based information to variousstakeholders carrying out different types of economical activity at the coastal areas of Latvian marinewaters.Stakeholders involved:Latvian Institute of Aquatic Ecology (LIAE) collects and owns the data, but reports it to the nationalenvironmental authorities and international data base of ICES. The data are used also in HELCOMenvironmental assessments. LIAE collaborates with several marine research institutes around theBaltic Sea. The service to be piloted will provide that data as high quality information to differentgroups involved in economical activities at the coastal areas.Users involved:The Pilot Service will enable citizens (fishermen) and institutions (ports, environmental boards) to beinvolved, for future exploitation.Policy / business model: 25
  • 26. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe data collection is part of the Latvian National environmental policy, according to EU WaterFramework Directive and Habitats Directive. It is vaguely represented online and therefore theHABITATS pilot will explore making it available as an online service.Cooperation/ data sharing:• Wild Salmon Monitoring (IE)• La Palma Protected Marine Area (ES)• Sheep and Goat Herd Management (IT)• FAO• HSRS• IMCSUse casesUse case Marine coastal habitat data for construction activities and maritime spatial planningScenario Economical Activities (LV)Actors • Latvia Institute of Aquatic Ecology • IMCS • Citizens, Scientists, Students, Businessman’sTask Using WEB tools provide in well understandable way information about allowed activities in selected sea areas. Give information about limitations and information about involved/responsible organizations where to contact for more detailed information.Assumptions User to be able select interested area, choose interested activity and receive information about possibilities, rejection or acceptance of activity. To design solution for allowed restricted area identification and representation.Description Users will use tool to identify interested area for business or research purposes. On the basis of selected/drawn area (polygon of interest) using all available data will be calculated and returned information about limitations in selected area and list of recommended organizations to visit for more detailed clarifications.Comments The task will require additional types of information, like methodology of different factor combination results from GORWND project, and also additional data, like wind maps for best wind turbine locations. 26
  • 27. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasUse case Data access, management and maintenanceScenario Economical Activities (LV)Actors • Latvia Institute of Aquatic Ecology • IMCS • Scientists, studentsTask Using tools users are able to find and access collected data and data sets, view and download data, users with rights are able to edit and add new data to defined layers.Assumptions To be able search and find data on the basis of selected area or selected theme from existing catalogue. To be possible to view or download found data. To be possible to add new spatial objects and to existing objects load new measurement and analysis records, add documents and pictures.Description All user will be able to search in existing catalogue and after that view and download data. Users with rights will be able to edit existing data and add new records. User will be able to load new survey and measurement and analysis result tables and link to existing spatial objects (e.g. monitoring stations), possibility to add any type remarks and documents to selected record/object in database.Comments3.8. NATIONAL FOREST PROGRAMMEPartner: FMILocation: Czech RepublicService and user scenario:The purpose of this use case to deliver and share the harmonised forest site data to be used as basis forthe definition of the suitable forest management practices. The geographic data of the forest siteclassification describe the permanent ecological conditions, ie. division of forests into segments withsimilar growth conditions. The outputs of forest site classification serves as a basis for determining theeconomic measures, and operational and production goals (Forest management plans, forestmanagement scheme). The importance of the outputs of forest typology was further strengthened inthe new political-economic-environmental conditions, which has also become the basis for theevaluation functions of forest ecosystems, forest valuation, or the creation of management plans forspecially protected areas.Tool for the classification of environmental conditions is the Forest site classification system thatdescribes the ecosystems with the potential vegetation. The major differentiation within the ecologicalconditions are:1. Vegetation tiers (altitudinal vegetation zones) - taking into account the gradient of vertical zoningof vegetation (LVS)2. Edaphic categories - reflecting a gradient of trophic conditions and hydricity3. Forest type complex - combination of vegetation tier and the edaphic category is means unit (SLT) 27
  • 28. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasVegetation tier represents biocenological (geobiocenological) building unit, which reflects theinfluence of climate on the composition of biota of chtonophytic synusia (geobiocenoses) and which isdetermined by this composition. Vegetation tiers are differentiated by species that are in the first placetrees, or. shrub determinants of main canopy level of indigenous forest and shrubs communities andall chtonophytes, that react decisively to the length of the growing season and the negative effects ofclimate. This means that vegetation tiers are determinated according to presence and expressions ofliving trees. There are 10 vegetation zones1. Oak2. Beech-oak3. Oak-beech4. Beech5. Fir-beech6. Spruce-beech7. Beech-spruce8. Spruce9. dwarf pine10. alpineForest type complex is a basic unit, which involves similar elementary units (Forest type) according toecological affinity, according to their phytosociological similarity undergrowth and site conditions.Forest type complex is given by the combination of Vegetation tier and edaphic category. Forest typecomplex represent a natural forest ecosystems and all managed forests with same ecologicalconditions. Forest type complex are mapping units in the reconstruction maps.Timber transport technologies have the direct connection (link) with natural conditions of the site.According to the forest road network can be constructed the basic infrastructure for access to forestsite and is important for forest management. Based on transport accessing forestry harvestingtechnologies, silvicultural treatment and forest road network are constructed. Background of Jointrescue service aimed at navigation improvement for rescue service access in the forest complex (e.g.fire) is another significant area of model analysis in terms of Habitats project.The information from the FMI forest road network database serve the integrated rescue system tolocalize and reach the event of forest fire in short time. The further information derived from the forestsite maps (SLT) and digital terrain model (DTM) enhances the driver’s orientation and timeestimations. As there are similar activities in other the neighbouring countries (Slovakia, Austria), thispilot scenario can be used for the cross-border cooperation within the Habitats project.The biomass estimation from NFI data - The purpose of the use case is to test the Habitats technology(data models, metadata profiles, geoportal technology,…) for the presentation of the stand volumeestimates from the National Forest Inventory (NFI). This is the key estimate in several issues of theCzech National Forest Programme such as permanent forest monitoring, and the biomass estimationfor energetic purposes. Stand volume estimates can be also used in forest valuation processes, carbonstock reporting on both national and European level.Use of environmental data:The development of the forest scenario is focused on harmonisation of metadata, coordinate system,geometry, data models and sensor standardisation. For harmonisation tasks the following software 28
  • 29. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituastools and modules will be used: MIcKA, UMN MapServer, Intergraph platform, Geoserver, MapManetc. Several meeting and discussions with different stakeholders were organised to describe theHabitats Forest management pilot. The main purpose was to receive the feedback for the particularuser scenarios and to find out about their requirements. The questioners were structured according tothe stakeholder categories.The stand volume estimates from the National Forest Inventory (NFI) estimated for the district(regional) level, serve to identify the suitable candidate areas for wood and biomass energy industry(e.g. sites for building biomass power plants). Stand volume estimates can be also used in forestvaluation processes, carbon stock reporting, etc.NFP KA4 expert group, large variety of stakeholders is keen for using well-structured data of biomasspotentials from forests. The data of NFI will provide basic information on forests needed not only atthe national level. The problem is also assessed from the EU level.The Standing Forestry Committee ad hoc Working Group on mobilisation and efficient use of woodand wood residues for energy generation emphasized that: 1. Better understanding of the resource is only possible with sound basic data, which are often lacking in the context of predicting wood potential for mobilisation. There is a crucial need to analyse in greater detail the potential of wood supply on MS and regional level taking into account local conditions such as costs, ownerships patterns, quality requirements, infrastructure and environmental considerations. MS and regions should also conduct surveys on household consumption of wood for energy to gain a clear picture on energy usage. The Commission can facilitate the efforts through information exchange. Short to mid-term action required. 2. Monitoring and evaluation data are continuously needed in order to follow the developments in wood potential, supply and demand and to evaluate mobilisation efforts. The current levels of activity need to continue and be developed further. The Commission, MS and relevant international bodies need to periodically (3 – 5 years) update wood supply and wood use information, including wood for energy, processed wood fuels, post consumer recycled wood and wood waste streams. MS should also undertake wood fuel market reviews based on standardised nomenclature for trade statistics and conversion factors (e.g. MWh/GJ into cbm solid wood) to increase market transparency. The Commission and the MS should continue to cooperate on renewable energy statistics. Short-term and continuous action required.Stakeholders involved:The forest owners can be divided in 3 main categories: • Small forest owner - area up to 50 ha • Medium forest owner - area 50-500 ha • Large forest owner - area more then 500 haThe small forest owners need the information about the forest management scheme (LHO), where theyfind the basic information and claims for the management practices. Further, the information about thesubsidies and subsidy programmes in forestry.Data updates are performed online via a secure channel. All databases have mirror backup on thedifferent location due to safety. FMI began discussions with representatives of the firefighters, becauseof need to integrate data of forest road network for the system used. These steps require the design ofan interoperable data model, so that every data transfer can be carried out periodically. Both 29
  • 30. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasorganisations using own metadata system and therefore descriptive informations about silviculturaldata should be handled and shared only by FMI, to avoid duplication.FirefightersThe discussion showed that firefighters see great potential in information, which FMI currently lacks.Some of them can be obtained from the analysis and synthesis of existing datasets. However, somerequire a new survey in the field. Examples are listed below: • information about available water resources (artificial and nature) • obstacles on the road (gateway documentation) • road width • road quality • road curvature and corner radius (according to demands of the firefighters - special vehicles) • etc.Data are requested to be in a standard ESRI Shapefile exchange format and S-JTSK coordinate system.These source data are imported using internal tools into the data warehouse. The Agreement for theprovision of data have to be concluded between data provider and user. Data are shared with units offire protection, rescue services, police of the Czech Republic and civil protection.The both universities are providing MSc. /PhD. education in the field of forestry, landscapemanagement, ecology, or nature protection. The forestry data requirements are similar on bothinstitutions. The utilisation of open formats, open-source technologies and the independent platform isgenerally preferred in the data access fro this user groups. All data and metadata should be accessiblevia one website – the geoportal (http://geoportal.gov.cz/).This is the key concept of the nationalgeoportal, which is supported by the national legislation (the transposition of the INSPIRE directiveinto Czech law). The national geoportal will by included into the system of the European platform.The state administration, regional and local administration bodies, municipalities • Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Environment • Moravia-Silesian Region (NUTS 2), Liberec region administration (NUTS3) • municipalities Our ministry requires integration of the data (presented in Use Case 1 as a component of RPFD –Regional Plans of Forest Development) into the eAGRI. The eAGRI (http://eagri.cz/public/web/mze/) portal is operated by The Ministry of Agriculture. The Forest type complex and the Vegetation tier data are framework for differentiation of management principles and depend on nature conditions of the site.The administration on different levels requires different kinds of information:Ministry of Agriculture: SLT LDS LVS TDK 4. total increment + 5. forest accessibility – length and state of roads + 6. potential technology ratio + 7. ecologically acceptable technology ratio +Ministry of Environment unique biotops + typical biotops + + ecologically acceptable technology ratio + 30
  • 31. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasRegions 1. grow conditions + + 2. ecologically acceptable yield 3. sources of reproduction/ seeding material + 4. transfers of reproduction/ seeding material + 5. ecologically acceptable technology ratio +Municipalities: unique biotops + typical biotops + natural points of interest + + forest accessibility – forest road network + wood volume transported on the roads + mean transpiration distances +(http://geoportal1.uhul.cz/mapy/framesetup.asp)Fire rescue department ČR (HZS) is the main coordinator and serves as the backbone of theemergency system. Regional and local fire information infrastructure, working with a wide range ofdata sets; mainly focused on inhabitant register, transport infrastructure and others. Datasets are storedin Oracle database and data models are designed to suit the very sophisticated and proprietaryapplications. Fire fighters and rescuers are also using data sources, which can be shared and usedthrough map services and web applications/portals. Other spatial and non-spatial datasets are collectedfrom national organizations, which are cornerstones of the national spatial infrastructure, for example:Czech Hydrometeorological Institute, Czech Cadastre Institute, and Czech Environmental InformationAgency etc. The main software tools are products of ESRI, and other unspecified proprietary software.The medium and large forest owners require more detailed information about the forest siteclassification (division of forests into segments with similar growth conditions) to assess theenvironmental conditions and to draw appropriate conclusions for forestry management. Specifically,the assessment of the forest site conditions serve as a base to construct so-called the managementframework directives. The information about the Vegetation tiers (altitudinal vegetation zones) defineand limit the transfers of the genetic material (seeds, seeding, tree plantations,…).The information about the Vegetation tier and the Forest type complex also serve to determine the typeand the amount of subsidies in forest management - It is used to plan the reforestation of the target treespecies in respect with their natural conditions.The information about the Forest road network is very important especially for the large forest owners.This dataset is used to optimise the network, planning the investments, evaluate the specific siteaccessibility. In combination with the information about slope, exposition, terrain type, and terrainobstacles, the forest road data serve for terrain typology to estimate the potential for the harvestertechnology 31
  • 32. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasUsers involved:All Czech citizens and businesses, participants in cross-border cooperation, etc.Policy / business model:The Czech Republic, in terms of area, is one of the smaller states in Europe, but it can be proud of itshighly diverse natural wealth. Forests are undoubtedly one of the most valuable of its assets - theirvalue can be expressed by purely economic indicators, but the true significance of forests far exceedstheir economic importance. National Forest Programme (NFP) has been prepared in a harmony withthe ongoing policy discussion on forestry issues on European level.Cooperation/ data sharing:• Hiking Trip Planner (IT)• Natural Reserve (ES)• Sheep and Goat Herd Management (IT)• FAO• HSRS• IMCSUse case Forest site classification data for sustainable management and utilization of forest road networkScenario Forest management, Fire managementActors FOREST MANAGEMENT INSTITUTEStakeholders Forest Owners, Fire Fighters and Rescuers, Universities, Research and development institutes, Decision makers (regional authority)Community Municipalities, landscape managers, wide publicTask To deliver and share the harmonised data about forest site to be used as basis for the definition of the suitable forest management practices. Timber transport technologies have the direct connection (link) with natural conditions of the site. According to the forest road network can be constructed the basic infrastructure for access to forest site and is important for forest management. The information from the FMI forest road network database serve the integrated rescue system to localize and reach the event of forest fire in short timeAssumptions RPFD (Regional Plans of Forest Development) digital forest maps: Vegetation tiers (altitudinal vegetation zones) layer Forest type complex layer Forest road network layerDescription The geographic data of the forest site classification describe the permanent ecological conditions, i.e. division of forests into segments with similar growth conditions. The outputs of forest site classification serves as a basis for determining the economic measures, and operational and production goals (Forest management plans, forest management scheme). The importance of the outputs of forest typology was further strengthened in the new political-economic-environmental conditions, which has also become the basis for the evaluation functions of forest ecosystems, 32
  • 33. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas forest valuation, or the creation of management plans for specially protected areas. Tool for the classification of environmental conditions is the Forest site classification system that describes the ecosystems with the potential vegetation. The major differentiation within the ecological conditions are: Vegetation tiers (altitudinal vegetation zones) - taking into account the gradient of vertical zoning of vegetation (LVS) Edaphic categories - reflecting a gradient of trophic conditions and hydricity Forest type complex - combination of vegetation tier and the edaphic category is means unit (SLT) Timber transport technologies have the direct connection (link) with natural conditions of the site. According to the forest road network can be constructed the basic infrastructure for access to forest site and is important for forest management. The information from the FMI forest road network database serve the integrated rescue system to localize and reach the event of forest fire in short time. The information in the Forest road network layer are periodically updated by the field survey. There are four road categories distinguished in the database: 1L: asphalt (bitumen) surface - truck road, primary logging road 2L: gravel surface - truck road, main logging road 3L: skidding road, drag road, dragging road 4L: extraction track, extraction lane 5L: trail, singletrail, doubletrailComments There are similar activities also in Slovakia http://lvu.nlcsk.org/LC/, Austria (data from NFI), and Germany http://www.navlog.de/, http://www.holzlogistik.iff.fraunhofer.de/index.php?id=104261000100. Therefore this scenario represents an example of the cross-border cooperation within Habitats project.Use case The biomass estimation from NFI (the National Forest Inventory) dataScenario Forest management, wood and biomass industryActors FOREST MANAGEMENT INSTITUTEStakeholders Private and state forest owners, Forest and regional administration, Wood and energy industry, Research and development institutes (faculties, scientific institutes, NGOs)Community landscape managers, forest valuation, national carbon policy, publicTask The purpose of the use case is to test the Habitats technology (data models, metadata profiles, geoportal technology,…) for the presentation of the stand volume estimates from the National Forest Inventory (NFI). This is the key estimate in several issues of the Czech National Forest Programme such as permanent forest monitoring, and the biomass estimation for energetic purposes. Stand volume estimates can be also used in forest valuation processes, carbon stock reporting on both national and European level.Assumptions NFI output: stand volume estimatesDescription Biomass is one of the cheapest forms of renewable energy and the energetic utilization of biomass is consequently an important topic lately. Many studies 33
  • 34. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas showed that the forest stand volume is highly correlated with the above-ground biomass, and consequently to the organic carbon stock estimates. The biomass was agreed an important sustainable energy resource by the Ministerial Conference on the Protection of Forests in Europe (1990 – 2007). In the Czech context, the biomass production is a key estimate in several issues of the NATIONAL FOREST PROGRAMME. Specifically the NFP KeyAction (KA)4 and KA8 expressed to need of the permanent forest monitoring, and the biomass estimation for energetic purposes. The goal of the output is to estimate total volume of the standing stems (trees), and the volume calculated for the unit per area. Unit: m3, m3/ha Accuracy: 5%Comments There is certain call for relevant biomass data from national forest inventories. As we have seem in NFP KA4 expert group, large variety of stakeholders is keen for using well-structured data of biomass potentials from forests. The data of NFI will provide basic information on forests needed not only at the national level. The problem is also assessed from the EU level.3.8.1. Cross pilot use casesWe recognise, that there exist list of use cases, which are valid cross scenarios. This use casesdemonstrate mainly needs for data harmonisation. We recognise common use cases focused ontourism. Education, environment protection and researchUse case FishingScenario Cross scenarioActors FishersTask Interaction of an end-user with the system: - Presentation of the regions allowed for the some kind of fishing - Presentation of the species distribution - Warnings and distribution of invasive species or different alertsAssumptions • Fishers are close to nature and landscape • The presentation of information has to be done in a logical and easy way to be understandable for the end-userDescription Information support for fishing will solve next tasks: • Characteristic of possibility of fishing in a region depends on rules and condition of the region • It does not depend on too physical condition but on permit for fishing and rules of administration of the region • Parameters (knowledge and experience with fishing, equipment natural condition, accessibility, season, etc.) • Fishing can be pursued by – (a family with children, pensioners, the disabled, sport fishers, young people, professionals) 34
  • 35. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • Description of the possibility of fishing (to read and print, with maps) • GPS-coordinates of samples point • Information about the species (photos, maybe videos, 2D-maps) • Communication with another modules trough space and time coordinate (nature, history, events, accommodation, food services, healthcare services, shopping, etc.) • Information about weather conditionsCommentsUse case Food servicesScenario Cross-scenarioActors • Hikers • Divers • Bikers • Tourist • Sportsmen • Families with children • Seniors • The disabled • FishersTask Category Menu Working hours Geographical presentationAssumptions Food service is one from most important tourist servicesDescription The task will offer possibilities of food services in region. This food services must be described by parameters: • Categories (restaurant, farms, buffet, fast food) • Working hours • Menu • Additional services 35
  • 36. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas PositionCommentsUse case ProfessionalsScenario Cross-scenarioActors • Park management • Entrepreneurs of recreational sector • Divers • Fishers • Farmers • Householders • ResearchersTask • System for Reserve management • Information support for enterprises and householders and farmersAssumptions The situation in the Reserve is under influence not only Reserve management, but also enterprises and householders in a region. It is necessary to offer relevant information about possible activitiesDescription HABITATS system will offer an information support to peoples, whose activities have influence on the park. There exist more players, where exist direct relations between their economic activities and the park. • Park management • Entrepreneurs of recreational sector • Citizens • Farmers • Divers • Fishers • Householders • ResearchersComments 36
  • 37. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasUse case EducationScenario Cross-scenarioActors • Teachers • StudentsTask • System for preparation of information environmental maps from different regions • Teachers prepare dynamic map context, which could be stored • Teacher prepare educational lecture with embedded dynamic maps • Students used this maps and educational materialsAssumptions There exists global discovery services, which support access to environmental data across EuropeDescription HABITATS system will offer an information support for education. There will be developed common discovery services supporting search about metadata from all regions. The system will support composition of maps and their storage or in the form of map context or as embedded objects, which could be used in educational materials (for example part of e learning courses)CommentsUse case Research and park protectionScenario Cross-scenarioActors • Researchers • PolicymakersTask • Support for discovery of needed data from European Nature Protection Parks • Storage of discovered information and making this information publicly availableAssumptions There exists global discovery services, which support access to environmental data across Europe. There exist possibilities for storage of map context and their sharingDescription HABITATS system will offer an information support for education. There will be developed common discovery services supporting search about metadata from all regions. The system will support composition of maps and their storage or in the form of map context or as embedded objects, which could be used in educational materials (for example part of e learning courses) 37
  • 38. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasComments3.9. PILOT ACTORSPilot actors include stakeholders participating on management of platform, data owners and producersand contributors to services and user groups of all pilots. Here are list of pilots actors:• Wild Salmon Monitoring o Irish Marine Institute o Citizens (fishermen and researchers)• La Palma Protected Marine Area o TRAGSATEC o La Palma Protected Marine Reserve o Public Administration o Hiking Trip Planner o CRES research centre, the University of Palermo, o ARCA innovation incubator, o Confindustria business association, o CNR’s ICAR (Istituto di Calcolo e Reti ad Alte Prestazioni). o Public Administration and tourists• Natural Reserve o TRAGSATEC o National Heritage o Public Administration o Tourists• Sheep and Goat Herding Management o CRES research centre, o University of Palermo, o ARCA innovation incubator, o Confindustria business association, o CNR’s ICAR (Istituto di Calcolo e Reti ad Alte Prestazioni). o farmers o herders 38
  • 39. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas o citizens• Economical activity at marine coastal benthic habitats o Latvia Institute of Aquatic Ecology (LIAE) o citizens (fishermen) o public administration o scientists and researchers o students o business o institutions (ports, environmental boards)• National Forest Programme o National public authorities o citizens o businesses• Cross pilots o Teachers o Students o Researchers o Policymakers3.10. GENERIC ACTORS AND USERSGeneric actors could be organisations, individuals or groups of individuals with a common interest onthe functionality of HABITATS solutions. They will play a role in the deployment and utilisation ofthe HABITATS infrastructure. Users Description Activities Non registered End Users, who can use HABITATS − Uses services without registration; User system without registration for searching and accessing o Search for data information in infrastructure o Search for information and using public services o Personal content composition o Visualise information o Downloaded free information o Use free services. Registered User Users, who are registered in o Search for data 39
  • 40. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas infrastructure. They can search o Search for information and visualise content and who can also publish some type of o Personal content composition user driven content o Visualise information o Downloaded free information o Use free services. o Publish metadata o Personalised profile o Publish information o Share content with others o Use advanced services Expert User Users registered on the Portal, o Search for data who connect to data/services according to their rights, and o Search for information have some limited possibility to o Personal content composition publish their own data and results of their analysis o Visualise information o Downloaded free information o Use free services. o Personalised profile o Publish information o Publish metadata o Share content with others o Manage context among servers o Define analysis o Prepare reporting o Use advanced services Content Provider Users registered on the o Search for data HABITATS platform, who publish and make their own o Search for information data or services accessible; who o Personal content composition access data/services according to their rights. o Visualise information o Downloaded free information o Use free services. 40
  • 41. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas o Personalised profile o Publish information o Share content with others o Manage context among servers o Define analysis o Prepare reporting o provides data on the web; o produces metadata; o assures quality of data and metadata; o defines policies and license agreements. Administrator System administrator with full Technically manages the System. access to the Portal.3.11. ACTORS ACTIVITIES.User groups recognised previously could be sorted into the following groups: • Technological partners • Research organisation • Public servant • Park administration • Policy makers • Professionals groups (fisherman’s, farmers...) • Teachers • Citizens • Students • Tourists 41
  • 42. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe following table assigns single recognised user groups to generic users. The same role will not bepresent in all pilots, but they present a generic division User group/stakeholder Registered Expert Content End user Administrator users user provider Technological partners Research organisation Public servant Park administration Policy makers Professionals groups Teachers Citizens Students Tourists 42
  • 43. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas3.12. GENERIC USE CASESThe defined user cases are initial list, which is based on pilot use cases. This generic use cases will be further elaborated in final version of this deliverable.List of use cases:Generic use case Generic tasks Scenario relevance Description Actors involvedUser administration and User groups definition All scenarios To define user groups and Administratorsecurity: their access rights to single services of system Stakeholder registration All scenarios Every user can register Registered User, Expert User, himself in the system. The Content Provider, system generates a password Administrator for him. User approvement All scenarios Administrator has to Administrator approve, so users can have access to system Setting user roles All scenarios Administrator can define for Administrator eache user, to which groups he belongs Digital Rights Settings All scenarios It is necessary that it can be Content Provider, (DRM) defined, which groups of Administrator users have access to concrete data, metadata and services User priority definition All scenarios Every user can select Registered User, Expert User, priorities from a prepared Content Provider, list. This helps to customise Administrator the system for them 43
  • 44. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas User deregistration All scenarios Every user can decide about Registered User, Expert User, deleting his registration in Content Provider, the system. In such cases all Administrator information about them has to be deleted from the system. In some cases, the administrator could decide to deregistered a user. User login All scenarios A user can log or unlog Registered User, Expert User, himself to switch required Content Provider, functionality AdministratorSearch and discovery Search metadata; All scenarios To use simple or extended Non registered users, search in connected Registered User, Expert User, catalogues Content Provider, Administrator Browse metadata All scenarios Every user can see metadata Non registered users, detail from searched data Registered User, Expert User, Content Provider, Administrator Join a new catalogue All scenarios Every user can temporally Non registered users, selected a new catalogue for Registered User, Expert User, search Content Provider, Administrator Search for objects All scenarios Every user can provide Non registered users, search for existing objects Registered User, Expert User, Content Provider, AdministratorData and metadata Uploaded data All scenarios Data could be uploaded on a Registered User, Expert User,management server in predefined formats Content Provider, 44
  • 45. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas Administrator Delete data All scenarios System has to support Expert User, Content delegating data Provider, Administrator Change data format All scenarios System has to support Content Provider, changes of data format Administrator Change data model All scenarios System has to support Content Provider, changes of data model Administrator Metadata uploading and All scenarios System has registered, Registered User, Expert User, editing edited and deleted metadata Content Provider, for data Administrator Service registration All scenarios System has registered, Registered User, Expert User, edited and deleted metadata Content Provider, for services Administrator Catalogue registration All scenarios System has registered, Expert User, Content edited and deleted new Provider, Administrator catalogues for harvesting and switch parameters for harvesting Coordinate transformation All scenarios System has to support Expert User, Content changes among different Provider, Administrator coordinate system Downloaded data All scenarios Data can be downloaded by Non registered users, users according to their rights Registered User, Expert User, Content Provider, Administrator Sensor data collection La Palma Protected Marine Data are automatically Content Provider, Area (ES) collected from sensors Administrator On line terrain collection All scenarios Data are online stored in a Registered User, Expert User, system using mobile Content Provider, 45
  • 46. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas equipment with positioning Administrator systems Off line terrain collection All scenarios Data are stored on mobile Registered User, Expert User, system and then uploaded on Content Provider, server Administrator Off line terrain collection Wild Salmon Monitoring Position of measurement is Expert User, Content with laboratory analysis (IE) stored on mobile equipment Provider, Administrator La Palma Protected Marine and then uploaded on server. Area (ES) After data analysis in Economical activity at laboratory, results of marine coastal benthic measurement are connected habitats (LV) to position Web based Data All scenarios The client allows to visualise Registered User, Expert User, vectorisation objects and stored attributes Content Provider, AdministratorVisualisation Compose data and service All scenarios User can compose its own Non registered users, data composition from Registered User, Expert User, services. The composition Content Provider, description could be stored Administrator on local computer Publish composition of data All scenarios User can compose its own Registered User, Expert User, and services data composition from Content Provider, services. The composition Administrator description could be stored on local computer and on server 46
  • 47. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas Visualisation of All scenarios The selected composition Non registered users, composition could be visualised Registered User, Expert User, Content Provider, Administrator 2D View data All scenarios Client for Web based Non registered users, visualisation Registered User, Expert User, Content Provider, Administrator Selection of objects All scenarios Client for Web based Non registered users, visualisation Registered User, Expert User, Content Provider, Administrator Thick client for 2D All scenarios Desktop solution has to allow Non registered users, visualisation visualisation of web based Registered User, Expert User, data Content Provider, Administrator 3D Visualisation All scenarios Client for Web based Non registered users, visualisation Registered User, Expert User, Content Provider, Administrator Thick client for 2D All scenarios Desktop solution has to allow Non registered users, visualisation 3D visualisation of web Registered User, Expert User, based data Content Provider, Administrator Terrain visualisation All scenarios Mobile equipment has to Non registered users, allow online access to web Registered User, Expert User, based data and visualise this Content Provider, data Administrator 47
  • 48. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas Off line Terrain All scenarios Mobile client has to allow Non registered users, visualisation download of data from server Registered User, Expert User, and then visualise this data Content Provider, Administrator Augment reality La Palma Protected Marine System has to support on line Non registered users, Area (ES) augment reality visualisation Registered User, Expert User, Content Provider, Administrator Off line Augment reality La Palma Protected Marine Mobile client has to allow Non registered users, Area (ES) download of data from server Registered User, Expert User, and then support augment Content Provider, reality visualisation AdministratorAnalysis Web based Tracking System has to support basic Non registered users, analysis tracking functionality Registered User, Expert User, Content Provider, Administrator Off line tracking analysis Wild Salmon Monitoring Mobile clients has to support Non registered users, (IE) navigation functions Registered User, Expert User, Hiking Trip Planner (IT) Content Provider, Administrator Image processing La Palma Protected Marine System has to support Non registered users, Area (ES) analysis of satellite images Registered User, Expert User, Wild Salmon Monitoring Content Provider, (IE) Administrator Sensors data analysis La Palma Protected Marine System has to support on line Non registered users, Area (ES) and on demand sensors data Registered User, Expert User, 48
  • 49. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas analysis Content Provider, Administrator Other type of analysis All scenarios There is need for such Non registered users, analyses like buffering, Registered User, Expert User, overlapping, attribute Content Provider, analysis etc. Administrator Modelling and scenarios All scenarios System has to support a Non registered users, building complex analysis like for Registered User, Expert User, example analysis of chemical Content Provider, distribution in water AdministratorRegistry management To manage information in Thesaurus like Gemet has to Content Provider, thesaurus be supported Administrator Manage gazetteers All scenarios System has to support Content Provider, gazetteers for searching Administrator geographical terms Manage other registries All scenarios Need for support registries Content Provider, like list of organisations, etc. AdministratorMonitoring and control Monitor registration process All scenarios It is necessary to monitor, Content Provider,service who is registered, logged in Administrator etc. Monitor requests for access All scenarios For data it is necessary to Content Provider, with DRM monitor, who accesses data Administrator Monitor requests services All scenarios For services it is necessary to Content Provider, monitor, who uses concrete Administrator services 49
  • 50. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas4. INFORMATION VIEWPOINT – WHICH DATA AND HOW WILL BE SHAREDThe Information Viewpoint describes the way that the HABITATS Networking Architecture stores,collects, updates, manipulates, manages, and distributes information. The major issues which areanalysed and assessed are: - basic data types used in HABITATS - tasks related to HABITATS data - information structure and content with a clear focus on the metadata and data models developed through Work Packages 3; - how information can flow among the different actors and components in the architecture; - the ownership of the data and the responsibilities associated with its creation and maintenance; - references and mappings between different metadata and data sets;4.1. DATA TYPES USED IN HABITATS ARCHITECTURE AND HOW THE DATA ARE ACCESSEDData in HABITATS architecture are divided according to their origin and their usability. Basic typesof data can be found in next table.Data type Description Examples of data How data are How are data used accessibleReference data Reference data Topographic Data are primarily Data could be are data, which maps, Pan used for stored locally, or are coming from European data visualisation, in their could be other systems, sets, some tasks they accessible using and which are not administrative could be used also Web Services changed inside of borders, cadastre, as background (Web Mapping HABITATS orthophotos, data for analysis Services for (could define visualisation, areas of analysis, Web Feature buffers, etc.) Services or Web Coverage services for data analysis)Satellite imagery Data coming from SPOT IMAGE, Data are primary Primary data will Earth observation, Quick Bird, used for data be accessible which are used MODIS (Aqua analysis, partly trough external for analysis and and Terra) for visualisation catalogues using visualisation Web coverage servicesIn-situ Data measured by Meteorological Data are used for Data from sensorsobservation sensors and stored data, quality analysis are usually stored in databases water (including in database and measurement temporal) and then are partly for accessible through visualisation. services like Usually Sensor visualisation is Observation necessary using Services, or Web graphs etc. Processing Services 50
  • 51. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasTerrain Data collected in GPS Data are validated Data aremeasurement the field using measurement, and then used for accessible from specific geometrical updating of equipment in measurement measurement, existing data, next proprietary equipment photography with analysis or formats or using positioning etc. visualisation Web servicesUser edited data Specific data Point of interests, Data are validated Data are stored in layers, where user collected and then used for database using groups of people data about updating of system could on line edit objects, user existing data, next middleware, data and attributes observation analysis or accessible could visualisation be using web servicesUser derived data Results of Image Data are used for Data are stored on analysis of classification, reporting and server (often previous types of extrapolation visualisation temporally) and data from sensors are accessible using Web services4.2. INFORMATION LIFE-CYCLEEach of the previous data types has its own life cycle. This cycle also depends on whether the data arestored locally or are externally accessible using Web services. For the design of the HABITATSarchitecture mainly the data managed locally are important. For external data usually the followingoperations will apply: • Data discovery • Storage metadata about services on server • Data visualisation • Data downloaded4.2.1. Reference dataThe basic operations are: • Data upload, which could include o Data upload o Data format transformation o Data model transformation o Metadata import or description • Data publishing o Publishing Web services (WMS, WFS, WCS) o Publishing metadata for services • Using data for analysis o Services related to published data are used as part of processing services • Visualisation o Data are visualised using WMS • Data querying 51
  • 52. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas o Attribute queering o Graphical querying • Data analysis o Buffering, o Overlapping, o Tracking • Data updating o Data upload o Data format transformation o Data model transformation o Existing data replacement o Updating metadata • Data deleting o Deleting data o Deleting related services o Deleting related metadata for data and services4.2.2. Satellite imageryThe basic operations are: • Discovery of existing satellite images using external catalogues • Ordering of data • Accessibility data using Web services (WCS) • Data download • Data publishing including o Data storage on server o Publishing related services (WMS, WCS) o Publish metadata for data and services • Visualisation o Data are visualised using WMS • Data analysis • Data deleting o Deleting data o Deleting related services o Deleting related metadata for data and services4.2.3. In-situ observationThe basic operations are: • Data transmission from sensors to server • Data storage in database • Publishing data from database as service (SOS, WFS, WMS, SAS) including 52
  • 53. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas o Publishing services o Publishing related metadata • Visualisation of sensor data o Visualisation in maps o Graph visualisation • Data analysis o Processing of sensor data o Queering of sensor data • Data deleting o Deleting data o Deleting related services o Deleting related metadata for data and services4.2.4. Terrain measurementThe basic operations are: • Preparing reference data for terrain measurement • Terrain measurement • Data uploading, which could include o Data upload o Data format transformation o Data model transformation o Metadata import or description • Data publishing o Publishing Web services (WMS, WFS, WCS) o Publishing metadata for services • Visualisation o Data are visualised using WMS • Data querying o Attribute queering o Graphical querying • Using data for analysis o Services related to published data are used as part of processing services • Visualisation o Data are visualised using WMS • Data updating o Data upload o Data format transformation o Data model transformation o Existing data replacement o Updating metadata • Data deleting 53
  • 54. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas o Deleting data o Deleting related services o Deleting related metadata for data and services4.2.5. User edited dataThe basic operations are: • Definition of data models for online data editing • Definition DRM for online data editing • Definition metadata record for data • Data publishing o Publishing Web services (WMS, WFS) o Publishing metadata for services • Data collection and storing including o Object selection o Web vectorisation o Attribute editing o Metadata updating • Visualisation o Data are visualised using WMS • DEata querying o Attribute queering o Graphical querying • Data deleting o Deleting data o Deleting related services o Deleting related metadata for data and services4.2.6. User derived dataThe basic operations are: • Discovery of data (services), which are incoming for operation • Discovery of related services • Operation execution • Data storage including o Data storage o Metadata storage • Data publishing o Publishing Web services (WMS, WFS, WCS) o Publishing metadata for services • Visualisation o Data are visualised using WMS • Data querying 54
  • 55. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas o Attribute queering o Graphical querying • Data deleting o Deleting data o Deleting related services o Deleting related metadata for data and services4.3. DATA AND METADATA MODELSData and metadata models are defined in detail in WP3 (deliverable D3.1, D3.2.a and D3.3.).4.3.1. MetadataFor metadata, HABITATS metadata1 profiles are based on ISO standards 19115/19119/19139 and onINSPIRE profile. To define a common structure which describes spatial data, the internationalstandard ISO 19115 was created. After the participation of 33 member countries of ISO/TC211 and 16more through their experts, it was approved in 2003 as an International Standard Metadata and wasalso adopted as European Standard by CEN/TC 287 in 2005.ISO 19119, "Geographic Information - Services," has been developed jointly with the ServicesArchitecture SIG of the OpenGIS Consortium (OGC). As a project in ISO TC211, ISO 19119 hasreached the Draft International Specification stage. OGC has adopted ISO19119 as part of OpenGISAbstract Specification, Topic 12 "System Architecture." The OGCWeb Mapping Testbed activitiesprovided implementation experience in the development of ISO 19119.ISO 19139 is a technical specification that developed an implementation of metadata profilesdescribed by ISO 19115/19119 in XML. The XML markup language is used to create documents thatcontain structured information. For the creation of these documents is necessary to define tags andrelations between them. XML-Schema is a technology related with XML and one of the ways todefine the syntax of its files. For each language derived from XML, we must create a "XML Schema"following the specifications in XML-Schema. It will describe the structure of documents and willvalidate them.The INSPIRE metadata profile was adopted on December 3, 2008. It represents the minimum set ofmetadata elements necessary to comply with Directive 2007/2/EC while allowing the possibility fororganisations to document the information resources more extensively with additional elementsderived from international standards or working practices in their community of interest.As noted above, there is a mandatory INSPIRE profile to which the services and datasets must comply,regardless of the theme to which they belong. The mandatory elements are:Reference Metadata elements Multiplicity Condition1.1 Resource title 11.2 Resource abstract 11.3 Resource type 11.4 Resource locator 0..* Mandatory if a URL is available to obtain more information on the1 D-3.2a Metadata profile, CIP- ICT-PSP-2009-3-250455, Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III DataStructures in EU Habitats 55
  • 56. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas resource, and/or access related services.1.5 Unique resource identifier 1..*1.7 Resource language 0..* Mandatory if the resource includes textual information.2.1 Topic category 1..*3 Keyword 1..*4.1 Geographic bounding box 1..*5 Temporal reference 1..*6.1 Lineage 16.2 Spatial resolution 0..* Mandatory for data sets and data set series if an equivalent scale or a resolution distance can be specified.7 Conformity 1..*8.1 Conditions for access and use 1..*8.2 Limitations on public access 1..*9 Responsible organisation 1..*10.1 Metadata point of contact 1..*10.2 Metadata date 110.3 Metadata language 1There are other profiles that contain common elements with the mandatory profile elements, but alsoother specific elements not recorded in the mandatory profile to complement our list. After reviewingthese profiles, some elements seems to be of interest to add to the list:Reference Metadata elements Multiplicity Condition10.4 Metadata standard name 110.5 Metadata standard version 111 Reference system 112 Specific usage 0..* 56
  • 57. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe next points will specify the elements for each INSPIRE theme related to the HABITATS project.4.4. SEA REGIONSRegarding the first theme, Sea Regions, after analyzing various options, a great diversity of possibleforms, uses and layers has been observed. Therefore we have tried to establish data about themeasurement to identify data sets with similar characteristics.Reference Metadata elements Multiplicity Explanation13 Sea type 1 Ocean, opened sea, internal sea14 Physiographic province 1 Indication of the physiographical province in which the sample/core was taken15 Unit standard 116.1 Water depth 116.2 Measurement depth 1..* Medition depth at the sampling location17.1 Measured parameters 1..* Parameters derived from tests on the samples17.2 Measuring method 1 Method used in taking samples (vessel, buoy, immersion)4.5. BIO-GEOGRAPHICAL REGIONSThe bio-geographical regions theme seems to be more defined. We could choose to first identify theclassification system for the object and then continue with identifying details of the region.Reference Metadata elements Multiplicity Explanation13 Classification system 114 Name of class 115 Source 14.6. HABITATS AND BIOTOPESIn this theme the first task is to identify through metadata what kind of entity is addressed. Afterdetermining its nature, the ideal is to make clear which classification system is used. It will be possibleto identify the names of the next metadata. Additionally, the typical species data of the object areincluded to better locate the data related to the same species: 57
  • 58. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasReference Metadata elements Multiplicity Explanation13 Type 1 Habitat or biotope14 Classification system 115 Category name 1 Item name16 Typical species 0..* Scientific name4.7. SPECIES DISTRIBUTIONThis theme would take a choice that seems to Habitats and Biotopes theme. To identify the type ofspecies it is necessary to establish a hierarchy of identification and classification types. This will helpgreatly to relate our data to other similar data.Reference Metadata elements Multiplicity Explanation13 Classification system 114.1 Family 1 Scientific name14.2 Category name 1 Scientific name15 Status 1 Threatened, extinct, etc16 Update 1 Yearly, monthly4.7.1. Data modelsThe aim of the T3.1 (Conceptual data models) of HABITATS project is to define conceptual datamodels for the following spatial data themes declared in the Annex III of INSPIRE Directive(INSPIRE, 2007): • Sea regionsPhysical conditions of seas and saline water bodies divided into regions and sub-regions with commoncharacteristics. • Bio-geographical regionsAreas of relatively homogeneous ecological conditions with common characteristics. • Habitats and biotopesGeographical areas characterised by specific ecological conditions, processes, structure, and (lifesupport) functions that physically support the organisms that live there. Includes terrestrial and aquaticareas distinguished by geographical, abiotic and biotic features, whether entirely natural or semi-natural. • Species distributionGeographical distribution of occurrence of animal and plant species aggregated by grid, region,administrative unit or other analytical unit.SeaRegions unique class identifier in the data model. Inside this class we have included three basicfeature types: 58
  • 59. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • SeaRegionArea • SeaSubRegionArea • SamplingPointsThe HABITATS data model for bio-geographical regions is a simplified version of the INSPIREspecification and consists only of the class EcoRegion. At the time of writing, no bio-geographicalregions are defined or referenced by any of the HABITATS pilots – therefore, the simplified version issufficient for the time being. Should the need arise it could be extended with further attributes and / orimport or reference external classes.Habitats and biotopes conceptual data model imports and implements six packages: • INSPIRE Basic Types – the main INSPIRE Conceptual Data Model Package used in all data specifications. • MD_Metadata – classes imported from metadata standard describing the relation of elements of habitats and biotopes data model to original (source) data. • ISO 00639 Language Codes – declaration of languages used in string types. • Natural Risk Zones – INSPIRE application scheme provided the attribute determinationMethod and its values. • Geographical Names – INSPIRE application scheme specified the attribute habitatsName. • EUNIS Habitat Classification System – taxonomy of habitats embed in current version of documentation of habitats and biotopes data specification. • PESI (Pan-European Species directories Infrastructure)Species distribution conceptual data model imports and implements following packages: • INSPIRE Basic Types – the main INSPIRE Conceptual Data Model Package used in all data specifications. • MD_Metadata – classes imported from metadata standard describing the relation of elements of habitats and biotopes data model to original (source) data. • ISO 00639 Language Codes – declaration of languages used in string types. • Geographical Names – INSPIRE application scheme specified the attribute habitatsName. • EUNIS Classification System – taxonomy of species embed in current version of documentation of Species distribution data specification.4.7.2. Feature catalogues for sea regionsThe Sea Regions theme can have multiple features as many as parameter measured. This is becausemeasurements are mostly done on samples or points. Only measurements from airborne sensors,orbital, or sonars show us a grid. In the other cases we get points and from them could assignmeasurements and means to default polygons. We may also perform an interpolation of the points fora parameter thus obtaining a feature polygon. So we said we can have as many features as parameters.Currently our distinguished as follows: • Polygon: ◦ Sea Region ◦ Sub-Areas ◦ Species distribution ◦ Habitats and Biotopes ◦ Other parameters: 59
  • 60. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas ▪ Ph-value ▪ Temperature ▪ Salinity ▪ ... • Point ◦ Sampling points: ▪ Dives ▪ Land samplings ▪ Buoys • Line: ◦ Batthymetry ◦ Coastline • Grid: ◦ Bathymetry ◦ Temperatures ◦ Biological activity4.8. DATA HARMONISATIONIn its networking architecture, INSPIRE assumes, that the data will be published in one commonformat across Europe, in several pre-defined common coordinate systems. Since usually, this is not thecase for most of EU-located organizations, it is needed, that either all data are converted to targetformat and CRS or, download and view services will provide in their metadata description also link toparticular transformation service, which will be available free of any charge.INSPIRE definition of data harmonization says:Harmonisation is the “process of developing a common set of data product specifications in a way thatallows the provision of access to spatial data through spatial data services in a representation thatallows for combining it with other harmonised data in a coherent way.4.8.1. COORDINATE TRANSFORMATIONINSPIRE defines several coordinate systems, in which the data should be available. Usually, the dataare stored in national coordinate reference system, so transformation has to be performed.The data do not change their existing structure or attributes, only coordinate system and data geometryis changed.4.8.2. FORMAT TRANSFORMATIONSince now data in EU are complain to any format defined in any of INSPIRE Annexes, formattransformation has to be performed. In this case, structure of input data is usually changed completely,as well as their format. INSPIRE defines, that the output format should be GML 3.2. However,nowadays common software packages do have difficulties with this task.4.8.3. SCHEMA TRANSFORMATIONSpecial case of format transformation is Schema transformation. It deals with input data in basicallysame or very similar format of input and output data (XML), with different schema of both files.Transformation is in this case to be done with help of XML templating system (XSLT). 60
  • 61. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas4.9. USED DATA SETS4.9.1. Reference laboratory data setsReference laboratory will integrate Pan European and Worldwide public data sets, which will bepublicly available. The next Data Sets are supported by Reference Laboratory accessible as service(WMS, WFS, KML)4.9.1.1. OpenStreetMapThe maps are created using data from portable GPS devices, aerial photography, other free sources orsimply from local knowledge. Both rendered images and the vector graphics are available fordownload under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 licence.OpenStreetMap does not have any content restrictions on tags that can be assigned to OSM-Elements(Nodes Node, Ways Way or Relations Relation). Users can use any tags you like as long as the valuesare verifiable.The basic objects are:1 Physical 1.1 Highway 1.2 Barrier 1.3 Cycleway 1.4 Tracktype 1.5 Waterway 1.6 Railway 1.7 Aeroway 1.8 Aerialway 1.9 Public Transport 1.10 Power 1.11 Man Made 1.12 Leisure 1.13 Amenity 1.13.1 Sustenance 1.13.2 Education 1.13.3 Transportation 1.13.4 Financial 1.13.5 Healthcare 1.13.6 Entertainment, Arts & Culture 1.13.7 Others 1.14 Office 1.15 Shop 1.16 Craft 1.17 Emergency 1.18 Tourism 1.19 Historic 1.20 Landuse 61
  • 62. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas 1.21 Military 1.22 Natural 1.23 Geological2 Non Physical 2.1 Route 2.2 Boundary 2.3 Sport 2.4 Abutters 2.5 Accessories 2.6 Properties 2.7 Restrictions3 Naming 3.1 Name 3.2 References 3.3 Places 3.4 Addresses24.9.1.2. Natura 2000Natura 2000 is the key instrument to protect biodiversity in the European Union. It is an ecologicalnetwork of protected areas, set up to ensure the survival of Europes most valuable species andhabitats. Natura 2000 is based on the 1979 Birds Directive and the 1992 Habitats Directive. The greeninfrastructure it provides safeguards numerous ecosystem services and ensures that Europes naturalsystems remain healthy and resilient.The scheme of Natura 2000 is on next image2 http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Map_Features 62
  • 63. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas 34.9.1.3. Urban AtlasThe Urban Atlas is providing pan-European comparable land use and land cover data for Large UrbanZones with more than 100.000 inhabitants as defined by the Urban Audit. The GIS data can bedownloaded together with a map for each urban area covered and a report with the metadata.The type of objects are given by next list1 Artificial surfaces1.1 Urban fabric1.1.1 Continuous Urban fabric (1.1.2.1 Discontinuous Dense Urban Fabric1.1.2.2 Discontinuous Medium Density Urban Fabric1.1.2.3 Discontinuous Low Density Urban Fabric1.1.2.4 Discontinuous Very Low Density Urban Fabric1.1.3 Isolated Structures1.2 Industrial, commercial, public, military, private and transport units1.2.1 Industrial, commercial, public, military and private units1.2.2 Road and rail network and associated land3 http://www.eea.europa.eu/data-and-maps/data/natura-2000 63
  • 64. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas1.2.2.1Fast transit roads and associated land1.2.2.2 Other roads and associated land1.2.2.3 Railways and associated land1.2.3 Port areas1.2.4 Airports1.3 Mine, dump and construction sites1.3.1 Mineral extraction and dump sites1.3.3 Construction sites1.3.4 Land without current use1.4 Artificial non-agricultural vegetated areas1.4.1 Green urban areas1.4.2 Sports and leisure facilities2 Agricultural Areas, semi-natural areas and wetlands3 Forests5 Water4.9.1.4. Corine Land Cover (CLC2006, CLC2000)The CORINE CLC contain next classes:GRID CLC COLOR inCODE CODE LABEL1 LABEL2 LABEL3 RGB Artificial 1 111 surfaces Urban fabric Continuous urban fabric 230-000-077 Artificial Discontinuous urban 2 112 surfaces Urban fabric fabric 255-000-000 Industrial, Artificial commercial and Industrial or commercial 3 121 surfaces transport units units 204-077-242 Industrial, Artificial commercial and Road and rail networks 4 122 surfaces transport units and associated land 204-000-000 Industrial, Artificial commercial and 5 123 surfaces transport units Port areas 230-204-204 Industrial, Artificial commercial and 6 124 surfaces transport units Airports 230-204-230 Artificial Mine, dump and 7 131 surfaces construction sites Mineral extraction sites 166-000-204 Artificial Mine, dump and 8 132 surfaces construction sites Dump sites 166-077-000 Artificial Mine, dump and 9 133 surfaces construction sites Construction sites 255-077-255 Artificial Artificial, non- 10 141 surfaces agricultural Green urban areas 255-166-255 64
  • 65. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas vegetated areas Artificial, non- Artificial agricultural 11 142 surfaces vegetated areas Sport and leisure facilities 255-230-255 Agricultural 12 211 areas Arable land Non-irrigated arable land 255-255-168 Agricultural 13 212 areas Arable land Permanently irrigated land 255-255-000 Agricultural 14 213 areas Arable land Rice fields 230-230-000 Agricultural 15 221 areas Permanent crops Vineyards 230-128-000 Agricultural Fruit trees and berry 16 222 areas Permanent crops plantations 242-166-077 Agricultural 17 223 areas Permanent crops Olive groves 230-166-000 Agricultural 18 231 areas Pastures Pastures 230-230-077 Agricultural Heterogeneous Annual crops associated 19 241 areas agricultural areas with permanent crops 255-230-166 Agricultural Heterogeneous Complex cultivation 20 242 areas agricultural areas patterns 255-230-077 Land principally occupied by agriculture, with Agricultural Heterogeneous significant areas of natural 21 243 areas agricultural areas vegetation 230-204-077 Agricultural Heterogeneous 22 244 areas agricultural areas Agro-forestry areas 242-204-166 Forest and semi natural 23 311 areas Forests Broad-leaved forest 128-255-000 Forest and semi natural 24 312 areas Forests Coniferous forest 000-166-000 Forest and semi natural 25 313 areas Forests Mixed forest 077-255-000 Scrub and/or Forest and herbaceous semi natural vegetation 26 321 areas associations Natural grasslands 204-242-077 Scrub and/or Forest and herbaceous semi natural vegetation 27 322 areas associations Moors and heathland 166-255-128 Forest and Scrub and/or semi natural herbaceous 28 323 areas vegetation Sclerophyllous vegetation 166-230-077 65
  • 66. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas associations Scrub and/or Forest and herbaceous semi natural vegetation Transitional woodland- 29 324 areas associations shrub 166-242-000 Forest and Open spaces with semi natural little or no 30 331 areas vegetation Beaches, dunes, sands 230-230-230 Forest and Open spaces with semi natural little or no 31 332 areas vegetation Bare rocks 204-204-204 Forest and Open spaces with semi natural little or no 32 333 areas vegetation Sparsely vegetated areas 204-255-204 Forest and Open spaces with semi natural little or no 33 334 areas vegetation Burnt areas 000-000-000 Forest and Open spaces with semi natural little or no Glaciers and perpetual 34 335 areas vegetation snow 166-230-204 35 411 Wetlands Inland wetlands Inland marshes 166-166-255 36 412 Wetlands Inland wetlands Peat bogs 077-077-255 37 421 Wetlands Maritime wetlands Salt marshes 204-204-255 38 422 Wetlands Maritime wetlands Salines 230-230-255 39 423 Wetlands Maritime wetlands Intertidal flats 166-166-230 40 511 Water bodies Inland waters Water courses 000-204-242 41 512 Water bodies Inland waters Water bodies 128-242-230 42 521 Water bodies Marine waters Coastal lagoons 000-255-166 43 522 Water bodies Marine waters Estuaries 166-255-230 44 523 Water bodies Marine waters Sea and ocean 230-242-2554.9.1.5. DEMISThe DEMIS WMS services contain next layers:World Map• Bathymetry• Countries• Topography• Hillshading• Builtup areas• Coastlines• Waterbodies• Inundated• Rivers 66
  • 67. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas• Streams• Railroads• Highways• Roads• Trails• Borders• Cities• Settlements• Spot elevations• Airports• Ocean features4.9.1.6. GoogleMapsGoogleMaps are composed from three layers:• satelit• teren,• topo4.9.2. Wild Salmon MonitoringThe major information flows between the different actors in both Wild Salmon Monitoring Use Casesare summarised (from D2.4.1) as follows: 1. Anglers, Fishermen and Fishing related businesses using the system 1. To track salmon fishing conservation regulations and limitations 2. To download information 3. To upload/maintain information 4. To participate in and contribute to salmon conservation measures. 2. Scientific Researchers using the system 1. To download information 2. To upload/maintain information 3. To monitor, record and analyze salmon stocks. 4. To recommend salmon fishing conservation limits. 3. Decision Makers using the system 1. For socioeconomic planning purposes 2. To support environmental interventions 3. To issue salmon fishing conservation regulations 4. To support salmon fishing related businesses and promote local tourismThe Irish Pilot Salmon CL Portal uses 67
  • 68. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • Reference Data o from many official sources, such as the Scientific Standing Committee’s regulations for 2011 on limits in specific rivers to ensure salmon conservation4, fishing information and wider regulations5 especially for foreign tourist anglers, who are a particular target of the Portal (so multilingual aspects will be included), the Irish Spatial Data Exchange6 and key Irish angling associations and clubs7. • In-situ observations 8 o from various sources, such as the IFI Salmon Monitoring Programme , WFD water 9 10 quality monitoring , wild salmon census data from the Marine Institute and scientific wild salmon conservation data11. • Terrain measurement o from a number of sources, such as the Irish Spatial Data Exchange, IFI Salmon Monitoring Programme and Water Framework Directive water quality measurements (as above). • User edited data o from users of the Salmon CL portal itself, and various discussion forums12. • User derived data o from users of the Salmon CL Portal’s own services (such as “Where are the local Salmon biting”).The Irish Pilot is mainly focusing on the Habitats and Biotopes (HB), and Species Distribution (SD)INSPIRE themes, using the HABITATS Metadata profiles defined in D3.2.1 and the IFI SalmonConservation process best practice classification and naming schemas, in conjunction with aconceptual data model that imports and implements the following: • INSPIRE Basic Types – the main INSPIRE Conceptual Data Model Package used in all data specifications. • MD_Metadata – classes imported from metadata standard describing the relation of elements of habitats and biotopes data model to original (source) data.4 www.fishinginireland.info/salmon/salmontagging.htm5 Such as www.fishinginireland.info/regulations.htm, www.irelandflyfishing.com/fishing.php,www.fishinginireland.info/salmon, www.flyfishireland.net, www.salmon-ireland.com/contacts/salmon-websites.jsp, and www.shannon-fishery-board.ie/links-fishing-sites.htm6 www.isde.ie7 Such as www.fissta.com, www.sstrai.ie, www.salmon-ireland.com/irish-fishing-clubs/irish-fishing-clubs.jsp,www.fishinginireland.info/links/clubslinks.htm8 www.fisheriesireland.ie/Projects/national-salmon-monitoring-programme.html9 www.wfdfish.ie10 At www.marine.ie/home/services/operational/stock/Wild+Salmon+Census.htm11 Such as www.marine.ie/home/services/operational/stock/Analysis+of+annual+and+historical+catch+statistics+and+their+trends.htm12 Such as www.salmon-ireland.com, www.flyforums.co.uk/european-rest-world-fishery-updates/64639-lough-corrib.html,www.troutandsalmonfishingforum.com/forumdisplay.php?f=20, http://forum.iww.ie/viewforum.php?f=2www.salmonfishingforum.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?27-Irish-Rivers ,www.salmonireland.com/salmon-fishing-blog/blogs/salmon-fishing-blog-1.jsp ,www.fishy-forum.com/forum/index.php?topic=595.0, http://thebigfish.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=7&action=display&thread=211,www.salmonatlas.com/forums/salmon-fishing-talk-fly-fishing-forums/10030-atlantic-salmon-fishing-reports-irelands-cork-blackwater-river.html,www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/coldwater-fly-fishing/12951-atlantic-salmon-fishing-reports-irelands-cork-blackwater-river.html ,www.fishing.net/index.php?page=forum&section=forum&frm_id=100009,www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2055386003,http://fishinginscotland.yuku.com/forums/1/sort/updated_at/direction/DESC/mode/or/addtags/blackwater,fishing,ireland%20salmon%20fishing,salmon%20fishing/ 68
  • 69. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • ISO 00639 Language Codes13 – declaration of languages used in string types. • Geographical Names – INSPIRE application scheme specified the attribute habitatsName. • EUNIS Classification System14 – taxonomy of species embed in current version of documentation of Species distribution data specification.In addition, the HB theme uses the following: • Natural Risk Zones – INSPIRE application scheme provided the attribute determinationMethod and its values. • PESI (Pan-European Species directories Infrastructure)154.9.3. LA PALMA PROTECTED MARINE AREAThe project is developed in the the marine reserve on the island of La Palma. The data will feed thissystem come from different sources: • An oceanographic buoy located in the middle of the marine reserve, which provides the physico-chemical data of water, including: speed and direction of flow, dissolved oxygen, salinity, conductivity, pH, flourometría, turbidity, etc. • Manual multiparametric sensors: measure many chemical parameters of water including: chrome, nickel, nitrates, phosphates, chlorine, bromine, etc. • Socio-economic data of use of the reserve: acquired through the use of PDA for the surveillance of the marine reserve. • Biological data: acquired through independent professional divers using underwater communication masks. • Microbiological sensor manual: measuring the fecal contamination of water through the test of presence or absence of certain indicators.13 See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ISO_639-1_codes14 http://eunis.eea.europa.eu/15 At www.eu-nomen.eu/portal/ 69
  • 70. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas Figure : Data Flows in the Protected Marine Area PilotThe data is harvested through different samples. This samples have got XY coordinates that means apoint feature. With this points and its data we could create new polygons features or assign this data toexisting areas. SeaRegions class is the unique in the data model. Inside this class we have includedthree basic feature types: • SeaRegionArea • SeaSubRegionArea • SamplingPointsAlso we could obtain features about one parameter. A example of this option are two features veryrelated with that overlaps with other themes: • HabitatsAndBiotopesArea • SpeciesDistributionAreaWe may show the information in a geo-portal for predefined zones and the parameters associated withthem and also specific features for each parameter with its spatial variation.4.9.4. NATURAL RESERVEWe could use any type of information available in the environment, which in future will allow externallayers to add and interoperable with INSPIRE. But initially we are working with issues identified inINSPIRE as: - Hydrography, - Administrative units, - Land cover, 70
  • 71. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas - Land use, - Area management / restriction / regulation zones and reporting units, - Buildings, - Cadastral parcels, - Orthoimagery, - Elevation, - Protected sites, - Environmental monitoring facilities, - Geographical names , - Species distribution, - Transport networks, and - Utility and Governmental Services.We work with this information in varying degrees, for example the use of Buildings is much greaterthan the Transport networks.The information comes from two means of public agencies and own harvest. Spatial data are mostlypublic and come mostly from the city government, their access is also free. Cover the Parkenvironment and general aspects.However, the data collected by us are the core of the application, contain the most important objectsand points to represent. These can be species, buildings or other points of interest and are likely to bemodified by the preferences of users.4.9.5. HIKING TRIP PLANNER and SHEEP AND GOAT HERDING MANAGEMENTThe geospatial information is accessed by different actors according to the task to carry out: • Personnel at Madonie Park Authority Office access geospatial data in order to:1. To upload/maintain information about the assignment of grazing areas;2. To download information on GIS software through OGC web services;3. To monitor the presence of animals in the park area;4. To control the level of pressure on grazing areas due to the presence of sheep, goats or cows. • Researchers dealing with environmental aspects use the system1. To download information2. To upload/maintain information3. To study the effects of the presence of animals in the different areas of the park.Other than from Habitats Portal, all the resources coming from Habitats project will be accessible, fortwo different pilots projects of Madonie Park, by unique geo-portal reporting all the link to dataavailable in the different servers through web services; besides on the free and open source softwareserver has been activate a WEBGIS application by which it is possible browsing the spatial data andquerying operations. 71
  • 72. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe Madonie System uses some data coming from different sources:Reference DataThey comes from many official sources, such as Sicily Region Administration web site 16 ; data can be downloaded but they can also be accessed through geospatial web services OGC compliant17. 6. Tracking data 1. Data coming from ‘tracking collars’ mounted on the neck of animals are saved in a POSTGIS database, so they can be show in the map area of web gis interface superimposed to grazing area plan and assignment of grazing areas in order to monitor the presence of animal of different owners; 7. User edited data 1. These are the data regarding the assignment of grazing areas that are updated by personnel internal to Madonie Park Authority Office, each time an area is assign to a shepherd;The interaction between shepherds and Madonie Park Authority should take place through the socialforum as part of the living lab action, and in particular using the social forum active in the TLL Sicilysite.4.9.6. ECONOMICAL ACTIVITY AT MARINE COASTAL BENTHIC HABITATSIMCS has a cooperation with Latvian Institute of Aquatic Ecology (LIAE) which is a leading marineresearch institution and responsible for the marine environment monitoring. The aim of mutual work isto make easier accessible the environmental data that is being collected by the LIAE to provideupdated information to fishermen, potential developers, decision makers and researchers in the BalticSea area on the marine coastal habitats of Latvia. The LIAE collects and holds the data but is involvedinto data submission activity as a part of Helsinki Commission (HELCOM)18 data policy.The LIAE data are collected on the basis of regular monitoring and various scientific projects.Therefore data are having several formats and covering differing aspects regarding the coastal habitats.The implementation of the INSPIRE Directive is at the very first stage in Latvia and the activities havenot introduced the data themes 17-20 yet. A small part of coastal environment data is available onlinethrough database of the International Council for the Exploration of the Seas (ICES)19 which providesthe database service for HELCOM. However, the largest part of data and already producedinformation is stored offline. Thus the HABITATS pilot services will explore making it available as anopen online service. Table 1: Latvian Marine Coastal Habitats Data Summary Type Quantity Format IPR Current Use Existing Language and and Metadata Definition QualityMonitoring Database of Raw data, LIAE Internal use, for Proprietary English/Latviandata of annually quality preparation ofcoastal sampled controlled, environmentalbenthic marine mostly MS assessments andcommunities benthic Excel files research. Available for communities research upon request.16 Such as http://www.artasicilia.eu/17 Such as http://www.sitr.regione.sicilia.it/geoportale18 www.helcom.fi19 www.ices.dk 72
  • 73. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas and substrate in 1985-2008, Gulf of Riga coastMonitoring Video Collection LIAE Use for preparation of Proprietary English/Latviandata of recordings of videos, project reports andcoastal of marine avi.format researchbenthic benthic andcommunities communities samping and points in substrate ESRI coverage, Shapefiles site at the Baltic Sea coast, 2006- 2007Monitoring Database of Raw data, LIAE Internal use, for Proprietary English/Latviandata of related water quality preparation ofphysico- temperature, controlled, environmentalchemical salinity, Borland assessments andmeasurements Secchi Paradox, research. Available for depths, basic MS Access research upon request. nutrients, files Latvian coastal zone, 1988-2008 Table 2: Key Objectives of the Marine Habitats Pilot Pilot in the category of Economical activity at marine coastal benthic habitats economic activitiesCurrent platform Data stored in off-line databases. HABITATS Use the HABITATS INSPIRE data structures and advancedenhancement interface to improve presentation, accessibility and use of the data collected by the Latvian Institute of Aquatic Ecology.As the coastal region encompasses also protected areas (Natura 2000) with limited allowed actions theknowledge on location of habitats and their value is essential for all types of economical activities.Construction of wind parks and other types of renewable energy devices, building in ports andmarinas, fishing, recreational and tourism-related arrangements – any stakeholder involved inmentioned processes should be aware of the habitats’ status in the respective area. Besides, the sameknowledge is necessary for the authorities as ministries, environmental boards and coastalmunicipalities as the economical activities should be overseen and regulated to ensure sustainablemanagement of the natural resources.Taking into account the cross-border nature of any marine processes the data on habitat situation isrelevant also for the countries sharing the Baltic Sea area. So the regional research and regulatoryinstitutions will appreciate possibility on following the creation and test of structure and tools aimed atthe involvement of national users through providing data products as a pilot case for theimplementation of INSPIRE Directive.4.9.7. NATIONAL FOREST PROGRAMME 73
  • 74. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe purpose of this use case to deliver and share the harmonised forest site data to be used as basis forthe definition of the suitable forest management practices. The geographic data of the forest siteclassification describe the permanent ecological conditions, ie. division of forests into segments withsimilar growth conditions. The outputs of forest site classification serves as a basis for determining theeconomic measures, and operational and production goals (Forest management plans, forestmanagement scheme). The importance of the outputs of forest typology was further strengthened inthe new political-economic-environmental conditions, which has also become the basis for theevaluation functions of forest ecosystems, forest valuation, or the creation of management plans forspecially protected areas.Tool for the classification of environmental conditions is the Forest site classification system thatdescribes the ecosystems with the potential vegetation. The major differentiation within the ecologicalconditions are:1. Vegetation tiers (altitudinal vegetation zones) - taking into account the gradient of vertical zoningof vegetation (LVS)2. Edaphic categories - reflecting a gradient of trophic conditions and hydricity3. Forest type complex - combination of vegetation tier and the edaphic category is means unit (SLT)Vegetation tier represents biocenological (geobiocenological) building unit, which reflects theinfluence of climate on the composition of biota of chtonophytic synusia (geobiocenoses) and which isdetermined by this composition. Vegetation tiers are differentiated by species that are in the first placetrees, or. shrub determinants of main canopy level of indigenous forest and shrubs communities andall chtonophytes, that react decisively to the length of the growing season and the negative effects ofclimate. This means that vegetation tiers are determinated according to presence and expressions ofliving trees. There are 10 vegetation zones1. Oak2. Beech-oak3. Oak-beech4. Beech5. Fir-beech6. Spruce-beech7. Beech-spruce8. Spruce9. dwarf pine10. alpineForest type complex is a basic unit, which involves similar elementary units (Forest type) according toecological affinity, according to their phytosociological similarity undergrowth and site conditions.Forest type complex is given by the combination of Vegetation tier and edaphic category. Forest typecomplex represent a natural forest ecosystems and all managed forests with same ecologicalconditions. Forest type complex are mapping units in the reconstruction maps.Timber transport technologies have the direct connection (link) with natural conditions of the site.According to the forest road network can be constructed the basic infrastructure for access to forestsite and is important for forest management. Based on transport accessing forestry harvestingtechnologies, silvicultural treatment and forest road network are constructed. Background of Jointrescue service aimed at navigation improvement for rescue service access in the forest complex (e.g.fire) is another significant area of model analysis in terms of Habitats project.The information from the FMI forest road network database serve the integrated rescue system tolocalize and reach the event of forest fire in short time. The further information derived from the forestsite maps (SLT) and digital terrain model (DTM) enhances the driver’s orientation and time 74
  • 75. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasestimations. As there are similar activities in other the neighbouring countries (Slovakia, Austria), thispilot scenario can be used for the cross-border cooperation within the Habitats project. 75
  • 76. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas5. COMPUTATIONAL VIEWPOINT-LOGICAL ARCHITECTURE5.1. CONCERNSThe computational viewpoint is functional decomposition of the system into basic objects whichinteract at interfaces. It describes the functionality provided by the system and its functionaldecomposition. This viewpoint focuses on the components of the system, not considering distributionaspects, which are managed within the Engineering and Technology viewpoints. The proposedarchitecture extends principles of Service Oriented Architecture, based on publish-find-bind paradigm.The primary components identified for HABITATS are described below.5.1.1. FILE SYSTEMA file system (often also written as filesystem) is a method of storing and organizing computer filesand their data. Essentially, it organizes these files into a database for the storage, organization,manipulation, and retrieval by the computers operating system. Most file systems make use of anunderlying data storage device that offers access to an array of fixed-size physical sectors. , The filesystem is responsible for organizing these sectors into files and directories, and keeping track of whichsectors belong to which file and which are not being used. Most file systems address data in fixed-sized units called "clusters" or "blocks" which contain a certain number of disk sectors. This is thesmallest amount of disk space that can be allocated to hold a file. However, file systems need not makeuse of a storage device at all. A file system can be used to organize and represent access to any data,whether it is stored or dynamically generated.A file name (or filename) is a name assigned to a file in order to secure storage location in thecomputer memory. Whether the file system has an underlying storage device or not, file systemstypically have directories which associate file names with files, usually by connecting the file name toan index in a file allocation table of some sort, such as the FAT in a DOS file system, or an inode in aUnix-like file system. Directory structures may be flat, or allow hierarchies where directories maycontain subdirectories. In some file systems, file names are structured, with special syntax for filenameextensions and version numbers. In others, file names are simple strings, and per-file metadata isstored elsewhere.A network file system is a file system that acts as a client for a remote file access protocol, providingaccess to files on a server. Examples of network file systems include clients for the NFS, AFS, SMBprotocols, and file-system-like clients for example FTP. 20File system could be used for storing spatial data in proprietary format (shp, dgn, dwg, dgn and others)or also for storing non spatial data for example documents, photos etc.Required functions are upload and download of data and deleting of data.5.1.2. RDBMSA relational database management system (RDBMS) is a database management system (DBMS) thatis based on the relational model. Most popular commercial and open source databases currently in useare based on the relational database model. A short definition of an RDBMS may be a DBMS in whichdata is stored in the form of tables and the relationship among the data is also stored in the form oftables.21A relational database matches data by using common characteristics found within the data set. Theresulting groups of data are organized and are much easier for many people to understand. Forexample, a data set containing all the real-estate transactions in a town can be grouped by the year the20 Wikipedia File system, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File_system21 Wikipedia Relational database management system,http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relational_database_management_system 76
  • 77. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituastransaction occurred; or it can be grouped by the sale price of the transaction; or it can be grouped bythe buyers last name; and so on.Such a grouping uses the relational model (a technical term for this is schema). Hence, such a databaseis called a "relational database”.A relation is defined as a set of tuples that have the same attributes. A tuple usually represents anobject and information about that object. Objects are typically physical objects or concepts. A relationis usually described as a table, which is organized into rows and columns. All the data referenced byan attribute are in the same domain and conform to the same constraints.The relational model specifies that the tuples of a relation have no specific order and that the tuples, inturn, impose no order on the attributes. Applications access data by specifying queries, which useoperations such as select to identify tuples, project to identify attributes, and join to combine relations.Relations can be modified using the insert, delete, and update operators. New tuples can supplyexplicit values or be derived from a query. Similarly, queries identify tuples for updating or deleting. Itis necessary for each tuple of a relation to be uniquely identifiable by some combination (one or more)of its attribute values. This combination is referred to as the primary key.Relational databases are currently the predominant choice in storing financial records, medical records,manufacturing and logistical information, personnel data and much more. A stored procedure isexecutable code that is associated with, and generally stored in, the database. Stored proceduresusually collect and customize common operations, like inserting a tuple into a relation, gatheringstatistical information about usage patterns, or encapsulating complex business logic andcalculations.22 Frequently they are used as an application programming interface (API) for security orsimplicity. Implementations of stored procedures on SQL DBMSs often allow developers to takeadvantage of procedural extensions (often vendor-specific) to the standard declarative SQL syntax.Stored procedures are not part of the relational database model, but all commercial implementationsinclude them. SQL, is a database computer language designed for managing data in relational databasemanagement systems (RDBMS), and originally based upon relational algebra and calculus. Its scopeincludes data insert, query, update and delete, schema creation and modification, and data accesscontrol. SQL was one of the first commercial languages. 23Currently relation databases could be also used for storing spatial data, registries, images, textual filesetc.Required functions are upload and download of data and deleting of data.5.1.3. Sensor connectorData from sensor networks or sensors are usually coming on the server in proprietary form. The role ofsensor connector is to store sensors data into RDBMS. The In-Situ Data Access Service shall offer theDescribeSensor operation as defined in the OGC SOS standard, for requesting information about thesensor itself, encoded in a Sensor Model Language (SensorML) instance document. For data storingare important tables: units List of Gateways located in sensor network. sensors List of sensor types located in sensor network, sensors are attached to units (m:n) phenomenons Phenomenons of measured values observations particular sensor observations22 Wikipedia Relational database, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relational_database,23 WIKIPEDIA, SQL http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Structured_Query_Language, 77
  • 78. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas alert_events Real events of alert situation (e.g. temperature is exceeding predefined threshold) alerts General description of alert situation that should be monitored5.1.4. ACES infrastructureAs the geo-portal consists in various applications with different purposes, a single point of user loginand application permissions discovery are required.For this goal, the system is required to provide an application that is capable of using various requireddata backends due to deployment specifics. Also, it needs to provide a communication frontend forvarious “clients”, where client means everything from desktop application to mobile service. 78
  • 79. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe Server part of Access Control Service is composed from• Core: o Authentication Core – contains functions for communication with authentication connectors for specific authentication method (LDAP, SAML, …); o Authorization Core – contains functions for communication with authorisation connectors; o Administration Core – contains functions for manage objects inside ACOS (users, user groups, permissions, parameters).• Connectors: o a separate connector exists for each authentication and authorisation method.5.1.5. Web Map serverWeb Map Server includes tools, which support publishing of locally stored data (filesystem, RDBMS)in the form of web services. The basic required services are:• A Web Map Service (WMS) is a standard protocol for serving geo-referenced map images over the Internet that are generated by a map server using data from a GIS database• A Styled Layer Descriptor (SLD) is an XML schema specified by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) for describing the appearance of map layers. It is capable of describing the 79
  • 80. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas rendering of vector and raster data. A typical use of SLDs is to instruct a Web Map Service (WMS) of how to render a specific layer.• Web Feature Service Interface Standard (WFS) provides an interface allowing requests for geographical features across the web using platform-independent calls. One can think of geographical features as the "source code" behind a map, whereas the WMS interface or online mapping portals like Google Maps return only an image, which end-users cannot edit or spatially analyze.• Web Coverage Service Interface Standard (WCS) provides an interface allowing requests for geographical coverages across the web using platform-independent calls. The coverages are objects (or images) in a geographical area, whereas the WMS interface or online mapping portals like Google Maps return only an image, which end-users cannot edit or spatially analyze.5.1.6. Metadata serverA metadata server is a software server that performs metadata, administrative, and storage-management services and provides clients with shared, coherent access to shared storage (or globalnamespace). They process requests to create and manage filesets, storage pools, volumes, and policies;enforces the policies to place files in appropriate storage pools; and sends alerts when any thresholdestablished for the filesets and storage pools are exceeded.The regester functionality is to support: • ISO19115, which is is a standard of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). It is a component of the series of ISO 191xx standards for Geospatial metadata. ISO 19115 defines how to describe geographical information and associated services, including contents, spatial-temporal purchases, data quality, access and rights to use. • ISO 19119:2005 identifies and defines the architecture patterns for service interfaces used for geographic information, defines its relationship to the Open Systems Environment model, presents a geographic services taxonomy and a list of example geographic services placed in the services taxonomy. It also prescribes how to create a platform-neutral service specification, how to derive conformant platform-specific service specifications, and provides guidelines for the selection and specification of geographic services from both platform- neutral and platform-specific perspectives. • ISO 19139 provides the XML implementation schema for ISO 19115 specifying the metadata record format and may be used to describe, validate, and exchange geospatial metadata prepared in XML • Dublin Core ISO 15836:2009 defines the elements typically used in the context of an application profile which constrains or specifies their use in accordance with local or community-based requirements and policies. However, it does not define implementation details, which is outside the scope of ISO 15836:2009. • The OGC Catalog Service defines common interfaces to discover, browse, and query metadata about data, services, and other potential resources. Web Catalog Service includes several profiles including Catalog Service - Web. Metadata server has support standard and also transastional services.Catalogue Services shall be able:• Search for list of records on the base of requirements• to return associated meta information instances of features selected by user• support for harvesting• support transactional editing• discovery query on the base of INSPIRE (Habitats specification) 80
  • 81. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas5.1.7. WPSWeb Processing Service (WPS) is designed to standardize the way that GIS calculations are madeavailable to the Internet. WPS can describe any calculation (i.e. process) including all of its inputs andoutputs, and trigger its execution as a Web Service. WPS supports simultaneous exposure of processesvia HTTP GET, HTTP POST, and SOAP, thus allowing the client to choose the most appropriateinterface mechanism. The specific processes served up by a WPS implementation are defined by theowner of that implementation. Although WPS was designed to work with spatially referenced data, itcan be used with any kind of data.WPS makes it possible to publish, find, and bind to processes in a standardized and thus interoperablefashion. Theoretically it is transport/platform neutral (like SOAP), but in practice it has only beenspecified for HTTP.WPS has support operations:• GetCapabilities• DescribeProcess• Execute• Workflow creation5.1.8. Sensors serverA sensor web is a type of sensor network or geographic information system (GIS) that is especiallywell suited for environmental monitoring.[ The term describes a specific type of sensor network: anamorphous network of spatially distributed sensor platforms (pods) that have wireless communicationwith each other. This amorphous architecture is unique since it is both synchronous and router-free,making it distinct from the more typical TCP/IP-like network schemes. The architecture allows everypod to know what is going on with every other pod throughout the sensor web at each measurementcycle. For the purpose of HABITATS the accessibility of measurement in sensor database has to bedone using next services: • Sensor Observation Service Interface Standard (SOS) provides an API for managing deployed sensors and retrieving sensor data and specifically “observation” data. Whether from in-situ sensors (e.g., water monitoring) or dynamic sensors (e.g., satellite imaging), measurements made from sensor systems contribute most of the geospatial data by volume used in geospatial systems today. • Sensor Alert Service (SAS) provides a push-based access to observations. The SAS can be compared with an event notification system, where the sensor is the object of interest. Each sensor has to register (advertise) the observations it will send to the SAS via the publish operation. A consumer interested in certain events may subscribe to alerts disseminated by the SAS. If an event occurs the SAS will notify all clients subscribed to this event type. • The Sensor Event Service (SES) is an enhancement of the Sensor Alert Service (SAS). Both are used to provide a publish / subscribe based access to sensor data and measurements. They also provide optional methods to dynamically add new sensors and send notifications to the service • Additionally sensors measurement could be accessed using WFS and visualized using WMS5.1.9. Geographical extensions for RBDSMGeographical extensions for RBDSM support for geographic objects to the SQL object-relationaldatabase. In effect, its "spatially enables" the SQL server, allowing it to be used as a backend spatialdatabase for geographic information systems (GIS)5.1.10. Web Based GIS Analytical Tools 81
  • 82. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe part of architecture are GIS analytical tools, which could provide analysis and transformation ofspatial data. This tools will be usually hidden and will be accessible trough WPS. Principally thisanalytical tools could also be a desktop application, which is used by WPS as analytical engine.5.1.11. Registry managementThe system need to use different registers like register organisation, GEMET, etc. The registrymanagement support management of information in RDBMS. The registry services component acts asa “service repository” in a basic SOA “publish/find/bind” pattern for distributed system.This component implements the “publish-find-bind” pattern: • publish: register a service in the registry, along with service metadata suitable for further use from a consumer; • find: query the service registry to allow discovery (search) and locate a service to be invoked; the search is performed onto services metadata stored in the repository; •bind: returns the “service metadata” for services stored in the registry to allow the bind and invoke from a service consumer, allowing the service consumer to bind to the service provider.SOA publish/find/bind pattern.Basically, this pattern can be described as follows: • the service provider publishes a service into the registry, providing also the service description (capabilities) through service metadata; • the registry (the services repository) allows the search of services and retrieval of their descriptions, by which to locate a service; • the service consumer finds services via the registry and binds to the provider using service metadata.Operations • - register service through its metadata; • - search service (query service metadata repository); • - get service metadata (get capabilities).The component operations are accessed through the following interfaces: • - register; • - publish; • - search.Also, the component uses the following interfaces from other components: • - horizontal services : control.5.1.12. Authorisation/AuthenticationAccess Interface is given by next functions• SOAP – whole functionalities of ACOS Core are available throw SOAP WebService interface. This is very important for use from many different devices (server, desktop, mobile) and platform (Windows, .NET, Java, …)• OAuth – allows users to share their private resources stored on geo-portal (in any application of geo-portal) with another site / application without having to handout their credentials.• OpenID – each user registered on ACOS (geo-portal) have automatically OpenID identification which allows users login to external applications with it 82
  • 83. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas5.1.12.1. Authorization Service• Description - SOAP WebService for obtaining permissions and parameters for logged user• Methods o GetParameter o GetPermission5.1.12.2. Administration service• Description - SOAP Web Service (maybe RESTful will be better) for manage objects inside ACOS (users, user groups, permissions, custom objects)• Methods o AddUser, EditUser, DeleteUser o AddGroup, EditGroup, DeleteGroup o AddPermission, RemovePermission o AddObject, EditObject, DeleteObject5.1.12.3. OpenID• Description - OpenID provider service• Methods - related to OpenID specification5.1.12.4. OAuth• Description - OAuth provider service• Methods - related to OAuth specification5.1.12.5. DiscoveryThis component provides the access to HABITATS and external metadata to users or to other systemcomponents. It implements search/discovery services, thus exposes catalogue services.Search/discovery: the goal of discovery is to support discovery, evaluation and use of spatial data andservices through their metadata properties (source: D3.5 – INSPIRE Architecture v2.0).Thus, metadata services perform: • search/discovery (CSW): o search the metadata catalogue for record that matches the user’s search criteria; o extract the results list and pass it to the “portrayal service” through the horizontal service; • extract a single record from the metadata catalogue and pass it to the “portrayal service” through the horizontal service; • allow the content provider to produce, upload and import metadata; • allow the content provider to edit/update metadata. 83
  • 84. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasOperations • get discovery service metadata (get capabilities); • discover metadata: o get metadata records (through search); • get metadata record (by resource unique ID identification).InterfacesThe component operations are accessed through the interface capture metadata.5.1.13. ViewThe view services perform the rendering of “generic data” (catalogue entry, map image,…) into anoutput format that will be delivered to the user through the “horizontal service” and then through theapplication services.The generic “rendering” to the application service can be specialised to allow: • rendering of the output from search/discovery service (e.g. list of metadata item found from a search): o build the link to the catalogue item, allowing the user to direct access it. • rendering of a metadata item: o build, if available in the metadata record, the link to the resource, allowing the user to direct access it. • rendering of the output from view service (e.g. image with overlays); • rendering of the output from download service (e.g. a shapefile or a GML); • rendering of the output from transform service.The rendering is accessed through the interface view delivery.• services client shall support OGC Catalogue Service (CSW) specification, version 2.0.2, Application Profile ISO19115/19119• services client shall allow users to query and select data• services client shall allow users to access Table of Contents and switch layers on/off YES• services client shall allow users to retrieve maps and/or data, adding layers as: .1. Web Map Services .2. Web Feature Services .3. Web Coverage Services• services client shall allow users to add layers to the map in the following ways:• URL (OWS GetCapabilities)• services client shall allow users to remove layers• services client shall allow users to change the opacity of each layer• services client shall allow users to export and save locally the context of the map in the following graphic formats:• services client shall allow users to export and save locally the context of the map as hyperlink 84
  • 85. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas• services client shall allow users to export and save locally the context of the map as Web Map Context (WMC) document• services client shall allow users to export and save locally the context of the map as Keyhole Markup Language (KML) document• Zoom/Scale numeric and with bar• Pan• Favorite Views• Minimap of situation• Hide table of contents and/Minimap• Info bar of projection and coordinates• services client shall allow users to change the Coordinate Reference System (CRS) of the map. The minimum set of CRSs available to the user shall be the following: • EPSG:4326 YES • EPSG:4979 , EPSG:4327 , EPSG:4937 • WGS84 UTM covering Europe (roughly ranging from EPSG:32628 to EPSG:32638 ) • EPSG:4258 (aka ETRS89) • EPSG:4156 • EPSG:4818 • EPSG:4156 • EPSG:3763 • EPSG:3035 (aka ETRS89-LAEA) • EPSG:3034 (aka ETRS89-LCC) • EPSG:3038 to EPSG:3051 (aka ETRS89-TMzn)5.1.14. WFS GazetteerThe WFS-G serves has to be fully ISO 19112-compliant deployment of Gazetteer data. WFS-Ginclude:• Easy access to well-known place-name vocabularies• Facilitates geo-information discovery in GeoPortal applications• Promotes real-time access and maintenance of Geonames• Facilitates data currency of Geonames within Web Feature Services• Enables testing of collaborative maintenance of Geonames using transactions• Facilitates automated geosynchronization of data across multiple datasets• Support ISO 19112 information models• Supports development of a variety of location-based applications5.1.15. Data servicesThis component implements view and download services, thus exposes map/feature services.View: view services allow display, navigate, zoom in and out, pan or overlay viewable spatial data setsand display legend information and any relevant content of metadata. 85
  • 86. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasDownload: download services allow extracting copies of spatial data sets, or parts of such sets, to bedownloaded and, where practicable, accessed directly (source: D3.5 – INSPIRE Network ServicesArchitecture v2.0).Thus, this component exposes using services to: • produce the layer in raster format (view – WMS) and pass it, “through” the horizontal service, to the “view service”: o produce the “view” (PNG, GIF, …) of a whole data set or a part of in a coordinate system supported optionally through the transformation service exposed by “processing services”); • produce the data in vector format (download – WFS – GML, shapefile) and pass it, “through” the horizontal service, to the “portrayal service”: o allow the download of a whole data set or a part of it; o allow direct access to a whole data set or a part of it; allow direct access to a feature and to its attributes (structured attributes are managed o at the data model level/information viewpoint, e.g. structured attributes inherit the spatial attribute from the feature).This component can use the harmonisation service.Operations: • View services operations (WMS, WFS): o get service metadata (get capabilities); o get map; o get feature information. • Download services operations o get download service metadata (get capabilities); o get spatial objects (get feature); o describe spatial object type (describe feature type); o query spatial objects.Interfaces:The component operations are accessed through the interface capture data.Also, the component uses the following interfaces from other components: • harmonisation services :: mapping data; • horizontal services :: control.5.1.16. TransformationThis component is designed in order to carry out the mapping between the application schemas ofHABITATS and the application schemas of the data provided by the partners.The main goal of this component is to perform transformation of data starting from: • input schema (can be a WFS also); • target schema; • schema mapping (metadata/transformation rules).This service can be exploited on two scenarios: 86
  • 87. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • on-the-fly transformation; • upload unharmonised data.The main sub-components should be: • transformation engine (the transformer), which exposes the service to perform the physical transformation; the result is then passed, through the horizontal service, to the “portrayal service”; • the transformation designer, to build the mapping between schemas.This component is used, through horizontal services, by the application services and data services inresponse to a user agent request.Operations: • transform data.The component operations are accessed through the interface data mapping.Also, the component uses the following interfaces from other components: • horizontal services :: control.5.1.17. AnalysisThis component implements transform services (D3.5 – INSPIRE Network Services Architecturev2.0), thus exposes map/feature transform services.It exposes services to: • transform a data set from the native coordinate system to the required coordinate system (SRS transform – e.g. from Gauss Boaga to WGS84); • transform the format of a data set (e.g. from shapefile to GML). • Invoke: for spatial data services available on the InternetOperations • get transformation service metadata (get capabilities); • transform (transform coordinates). • Getprocessing servicesInterfacesThe component operations are accessed through the interface data delivery.Also, the component uses the following interfaces from other components: • data services :: capture data; • horizontal services :: control.5.1.18. MonitoringAs a basic tool monitoring, based on logins of users, will be established. A full log analysis will enableto show you the following information: • Number of visits, and number of unique visitors, 87
  • 88. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • Visits duration and last visits, • Authenticated users, and last authenticated visits, • Days of week and rush hours (pages, hits, KB for each hour and day of week), • Domains/countries of hosts visitors (pages, hits, KB, 269 domains/countries detected, GeoIP detection), • Hosts list, last visits and unresolved IP addresses list, • Most viewed, entry and exit pages, • Files type, • Web compression statistics (for mod_gzip or mod_deflate), • OS used (pages, hits, KB for each OS, 35 OS detected), • Browsers used (pages, hits, KB for each browser, each version , • Visits of robots , • Worms attacks • Search engines, key phrases and keywords used to find your site, • HTTP errors (Page Not Found with last referrer, ...), • Other personalized reports based on url, url parameters, referrer field for miscellaneous/marketing purpose, • Number of times your site is "added to favourites bookmarks". • Screen size (need to add some HTML tags in index page). • Ratio of Browsers with support of: Java, Flash, RealG2 reader, Quicktime reader, WMA reader, PDF reader (need to add some HTML tags in index page)In accordance with INSPIRE directive services requests and services conformity monitoring the use ofnetwork services. The indicator will count all the requests to the service. Second part will be themonitoring of the conformance of network services.Separate monitoring will be also provided by single applications, like catalogue. Then all results ofthe monitoring will be available trough reporting client.5.1.19. External servicesDiscovery, view, data, transformation, analysis, authorization and authentication services could beimplemented as internal, as describe in previous chapters or could be used as external services comingfrom remote servers. Interfaces are the same as for internal services.5.1.20. Geo-portal BUSCore of geo-portal is REST or SOAP service. SOA was used mainly because there was a need ofindependence on language and flexibility of the whole system. SOAP implementation is used in olderversion which is now used in most geo-portal installations. Python language was used for thisimplementation using Soaplib and Suds client.5.1.21. ApplicationsThe geo-portal is not a tool for standard users. For most of users applications are important. The ideaof HABITATS architecture is, that Applications are not developed as independent proprietarysolutions, but they are composed from existing services, using portal infrastructure.5.1.22. AppletsAn applet is a program written in the Java programming language that can be included in an HTMLpage, much in the same way an image is included in a page. When you use a Java technology-enabled 88
  • 89. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasbrowser to view a page that contains an applet, the applets code is transferred to your system andexecuted by the browsers Java Virtual Machine (JVM). For information and examples on how toinclude an applet in an HTML page, refer to this description of the <APPLET> tag.245.1.23. ServletsA Servlet is a Java class in Java EE that conforms to the Java Servlet API, a protocol by which a Javaclass may respond to HTTP requests. They are not tied to a specific client-server protocol, but aremost often used with this protocol. The word "Servlet" is often used in the meaning of "HTTPServlet". Thus, a software developer may use a servlet to add dynamic content to a Web server usingthe Java platform. The generated content is commonly HTML, but may be other data such as XML.Servlets are the Java counterpart to non-Java dynamic Web content technologies such as CGI andASP.NET. Servlets can maintain state in session variables across many server transactions by usingHTTP cookies, or URL rewriting.The servlet API, contained in the Java package hierarchy javax.servlet, defines the expectedinteractions of a Web container and a servlet. A Web container is essentially the component of a Webserver that interacts with the servlets. The Web container is responsible for managing the lifecycle ofservlets, mapping a URL to a particular servlet and ensuring that the URL requester has the correctaccess rights.A Servlet is an object that receives a request and generates a response based on that request. The basicservlet package defines Java objects to represent servlet requests and responses, as well as objects toreflect the servlets configuration parameters and execution environment. The packagejavax.servlet.http defines HTTP-specific subclasses of the generic servlet elements, including sessionmanagement objects that track multiple requests and responses between the Web server and a client.Servlets may be packaged in a WAR file as a Web application.255.1.24. PortletsPortlets are pluggable user interface software components that are managed and displayed in a webportal. Portlets produce fragments of markup code that are aggregated into a portal. Typically,following the desktop metaphor, a portal page is displayed as a collection of non-overlapping portletwindows, where each portlet window displays a portlet. A portlet (or collection of portlets) resemblesa web-based application that is hosted in a portal. Some examples of portlet applications are email,weather reports, discussion forums, and news. Portlet standards are intended to enable softwaredevelopers to create portlets that can be plugged in to any portal supporting the standards.The purpose of the Web Services for Remote Portlets protocol is to provide a web services standardthat allows for the "plug-n-play" of remote running portlets from disparate sources. Portelts allows toregistered users to personalise their view of the website by turning on or off portions of the webpage,or by adding or deleting features. The Portlet specification defines a portlet as a "Java-technology-based web component, managed by a portlet container that processes requests and generates dynamiccontent. The Java Portlet Specification (JSR168, JSR286) enables interoperability for portlets betweendifferent web portals. This specification defines a set of APIs for interaction between the portletcontainer and the portlet addressing the areas of personalization, presentation and security. LiferayPortal supports JSR168 standards.Portal functionality can be divided into three main parts: 1. Portlet container: every portlet is deployed inside a portlet container that controls the life cycle of the portlet and provides it with necessary resources and information about its environment. A portlet container is responsible for initializing and destroying portlets and also24 http://java.sun.com/applets/25 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_Servlet 89
  • 90. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas for passing user requests to it and collecting responses. URM allows to describe portlets by metadata 2. Content aggregator: As defined in the Portlet Specification, one of the main jobs of a portal is to aggregate content generated by various portlet applications. 3. Common services: One of the main strengths of a portal server is the set of common services that it provides. Services are not part of the portlet specification, but portal implementations provide a rich set of common services. A few common services are: o Single sign on: Allows you to get access to all other applications once you log into the portal server, meaning you dont have to log into every application separately. For example, once I log in to my intranet site, I should get access to my mail application, IM messaging application, and other intranet applications, without having to log into each of these applications separately.A portal server provide a secured credentials store.Personalization: The basic implementation of personalization service allows a user to customize hispage in two ways. The user can decide what colors he wants for title bars and what icons he wants forcontrols. User can decide which portlets are wanted on his page.Portlets do provide some additional functionality. 1. Persistent storage for preferences: Portlets provide a PortletPreferences object for storing user preferences. These preferences are stored in a persistent data store, so they will be available across server restarts. 2. Request processing: Portlets provide much more refined request handling. A portlet may get a request when user takes some action on it (a state called action phase), or because the user took action on some other portlet and the page needs to be refreshed. A portal server provides different callback methods for handling both situations. 3. Portlet modes: Portlets use a concept of mode to indicate what user is doing. Portlets normally provide this in VIEW mode. But there are other activities, like specifying a refresh time or (re- )setting the username and password. These activities allow the user to configure the behavior of the application, so they come under EDIT mode. 4. Window state: The window state determines how much space should be given to content generated by a portlet on a portal page. 5. User information: Commonly, portlets provide content personalized to the user making the request. The Portlet API provides the concept of user attributes for this. A developer can access these attributes in a standard way, and it is the responsibility of the administrator to map these attributes to an actual user information repository.5.1.25. WMCWeb Map Context (WMC) describes how to save a map view comprised of many different layers fromdifferent Web Map Servers. A context can be encoded and saved so that Web maps created by userscan be automatically reconstructed and augmented by the authoring user or other users in the future. AContext document is structured using eXtensible Markup Language (XML). Potential uses for contextdocuments in the risk management environment include creating default initial views for Web mapsfor different hazards, saving the state of a users work on a viewer client to preserve information suchas how geospatial layers are added or modified, and saving the state of a client session for sharing withother users. This mechanism is valuable for efficiently communicating across shift transitions. Also,context documents can be catalogued and discovered for reuse by others; this allows analysts tobenefit from lessons learned in previous episodes. 2626 Orchestra http://www.eu-orchestra.org/TUs/Standards/en/html/Unit4_learningObject6.html 90
  • 91. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas5.1.26. RSS/GeoRSSRSS (most commonly expanded as Really Simple Syndication) is a family of web feed formats used topublish frequently updated works—such as blog entries, news headlines, audio, and video—in astandardized format. An RSS document (which is called a "feed", "web feed", or "channel") includesfull or summarized text, plus metadata such as publishing dates and authorship. Web feeds benefitpublishers by letting them syndicate content automatically. They benefit readers who want to subscribeto timely updates from favored websites or to aggregate feeds from many sites into one place. RSSfeeds can be read using software called an "RSS reader", "feed reader", or "aggregator", which can beweb-based, desktop-based, or mobile-device-based. A standardized XML file format allows theinformation to be published once and viewed by many different programs. The user subscribes to afeed by entering into the reader the feeds URI or by clicking a feed icon in a web browser that initiatesthe subscription process. The RSS reader checks the users subscribed feeds regularly for new work,downloads any updates that it finds, and provides a user interface to monitor and read the feeds. RSSallows users to avoid manually inspecting all of the websites they are interested in, and insteadsubscribe to websites such that all new content is pushed onto their browsers when it becomesavailable.27GeoRSS is an emerging standard for encoding location as part of a Web feed. (Web feeds are used todescribe feeds ("channels") of content, such as news articles, Audio blogs, video blogs and text blogentries. These web feeds are rendered by programs such as aggregators and web browsers.) The name"GeoRSS" is derived from RSS, the most known Web feed and syndication format.In GeoRSS, location content consists of geographical points, lines, and polygons of interest and relatedfeature descriptions. GeoRSS feeds are designed to be consumed by geographic software such as mapgenerators. By building these encodings on a common information model, the GeoRSS collaborationis promoting interoperability and "upwards-compatibility" across encodings.At this point, the GeoRSS collaboration has completed work on two primary encodings that are calledGeoRSS Geography Markup Language (GML) and GeoRSS Simple. GeoRSS-Simple is a verylightweight format that supports basic geometries (point, line, box, polygon) and covers the typical usecases when encoding locations. GeoRSS GML is a formal Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) GMLApplication Profile, and supports a greater range of features than GeoRSS Simple, notably coordinatereference systems other than WGS84 latitude/longitude. There is also a W3C GeoRSS serialization,which is older and partly deprecated but still the most widely used.285.1.27. KML/KMZKeyhole Markup Language (KML) is an XML schema for expressing geographic annotation andvisualization within Internet-based, two-dimensional maps and three-dimensional Earth browsers.KML was developed for use with Google Earth, which was originally named Keyhole Earth Viewer.KML is an international standard of the Open Geospatial Consortium. Google Earth was the firstprogram able to view and graphically edit KML files. Other projects such as Marble have also startedto develop KML support.The KML file specifies a set of features (place marks, images, polygons, 3D models, textualdescriptions, etc.) for display in Google Earth, Maps and Mobile, or any other 3D Earth browser(geobrowser) implementing the KML encoding. Each place always has a longitude and a latitude.Other data can make the view more specific, such as tilt, heading, altitude, which together define a"camera view". KML shares some of the same structural grammar as GML. Some KML informationcannot be viewed in Google Maps or Mobile.KML files are very often distributed in KMZ files, which are zipped files with a .kmz extension. Thesemust be legacy (ZIP 2.0) compression compatible (e.g. deflate method), otherwise the .kmz file might27 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RSS28 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GeoRSS 91
  • 92. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasnot uncompress in all geobrowsers. The contents of a KMZ file are a single root KML document(notionally "doc.kml") and optionally any overlays, images, icons, and COLLADA 3D modelsreferenced in the KML including network-linked KML files. The root KML document is typically afile named "doc.kml" at the root directory level but the first .kml file entry in the KMZ file is theactual one selected in Google Earth regardless of its name. By convention the root KML document isat root level and referenced files are in subdirectories (e.g. images for overlay images).295.1.28. iFrameThe <iframe> tag defines an inline frame that contains another document. HTML frames allow authorsto present documents in multiple views, which may be independent windows or subwindows. Multipleviews offer designers a way to keep certain information visible, while other views are scrolled orreplaced. For example, within the same window, one frame might display a static banner, a second anavigation menu, and a third the main document that can be scrolled through or replaced by navigatingin the second frame. An HTML document that describes frame layout (called a frameset document)has a different makeup than an HTML document without frames. A standard document has one HEADsection and one BODY. A frameset document has a HEAD, and a FRAMESET in place of the BODY.The FRAMESET section of a document specifies the layout of views in the main user agent window.In addition, the FRAMESET section can contain a NOFRAMES element to provide alternate contentfor user agents that do not support frames or are configured not to display frames. Elements that mightnormally be placed in the BODY element must not appear before the first FRAMESET element or theFRAMESET will be ignored.305.1.29. DIVThe <div> tag defines a division or a section in an HTML document. The <div> tag is often used togroup block-elements to format them with styles. In HTML, the span and div elements are used whereparts of a document cannot be semantically described by other HTML elements. Most HTMLelements carry semantic meaning – i.e. the element describes, and can be made to function accordingto, the type of data contained within. For example, a p element should contain a paragraph of text,while an h1 element should contain the highest-level header of the page; user agents should distinguishthem accordingly. However, as span and div have no innate semantic meaning besides the logicalgrouping of the content, they can be used to specify non-standard presentation or behavior withoutsuperfluous semantic meaning.315.1.30. Augment realityAugmented reality (AR) is a term for a live direct or indirect view of a physical, real-worldenvironment whose elements are augmented by computer-generated sensory input, such as sound orgraphics. It is related to a more general concept called mediated reality, in which a view of reality ismodified (possibly even diminished rather than augmented) by a computer. As a result, the technologyfunctions by enhancing one’s current perception of reality. By contrast, virtual reality replaces the real-world with a simulated one.Augmentation is conventionally in real-time and in semantic context with environmental elements,such as sports scores on TV during a match. With the help of advanced AR technology (e.g. addingcomputer vision and object recognition) the information about the surrounding real world of the userbecomes interactive and digitally manipulable. Artificial information about the environment and itsobjects can be overlaid on the real world. Research explores the application of computer-generatedimagery in live-video streams as a way to enhance the perception of the real world. AR technology29 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keyhole_Markup_Language30 http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/present/frames.html31 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Span_and_div 92
  • 93. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasincludes head-mounted displays and virtual retinal displays for visualization purposes, andconstruction of controlled environments containing sensors and actuators.325.1.31. CMSA content management system (CMS) is the collection of procedures used to manage work flow in acollaborative environment. These procedures can be manual or computer-based. The procedures aredesigned to do the following: • Allow for a large number of people to contribute to and share stored data • Control access to data, based on user roles (defining which information users or user groups can view, edit, publish, etc.) • Aid in easy storage and retrieval of data • Reduce repetitive duplicate input • Improve the ease of report writing • Improve communication between usersIn a CMS, data can be defined as nearly anything: documents, movies, pictures, phone numbers,scientific data, and so forth. CMSs are frequently used for storing, controlling, revising, semanticallyenriching, and publishing documentation. Serving as a central repository, the CMS increases theversion level of new updates to an already existing file. Version control is one of the primaryadvantages of a CMS.335.1.32. Social Networks and MediaSocial media are media for social interaction, using highly accessible and scalable publishingtechniques. Social media use web-based technologies to turn communication into interactive dialog.Andreas Social media as could be also defined as "a group of Internet-based applications that build onthe ideological and technological foundations of Web 2.0, which allows the creation and exchange ofuser-generated content". Businesses also refer to social media as consumer-generated media (CGM). Acommon thread running through all definitions of social media is a blending of technology and socialinteraction for the co-creation of value.345.1.33. Workflow managementA workflow consists of a sequence of connected steps. It is a depiction of a sequence of operations,declared as work of a person, a group of persons, an organization of staff, or one or more simple orcomplex mechanisms. Workflow may be seen as any abstraction of real work. For control purposes,workflow may be a view on real work under a chosen aspect, thus serving as a virtual representation ofactual work. The flow being described often refers to a document that is being transferred from onestep to another. A workflow is a model to represent real work for further assessment, e.g., fordescribing a reliably repeatable sequence of operations. More abstractly, a workflow is a pattern ofactivity enabled by a systematic organization of resources, defined roles and mass, energy andinformation flows, into a work process that can be documented and learned. Workflows are designedto achieve processing intents of some sort, such as physical transformation, service provision, orinformation processing. Workflow concepts are closely related to other concepts used to describeorganizational structure, such as silos, functions, teams, projects, policies and hierarchies. Workflowsmay be viewed as one primitive building block of organizations. The relationships among these32 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Augmented_reality33 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Content_management_system34 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_media 93
  • 94. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasconcepts are described later in this entry. The term workflow is used in computer programming tocapture and develop human-to-machine interaction.35A workflow management system is a computer system that manages and defines a series of taskswithin an organization to produce a final outcome or outcomes. Workflow Management Systems allowyou to define different workflows for different types of jobs or processes. So, for example, in amanufacturing setting, a design document might be automatically routed from designer to a technicaldirector to the production engineer. At each stage in the workflow, one individual or group isresponsible for a specific task. Once the task is complete, the workflow software ensures that theindividuals responsible for the next task are notified and receive the data they need to execute theirstage of the process. Workflow management systems also automate redundant tasks and ensureuncompleted tasks are followed up. Workflow management systems may control automated processesin addition to replacing paper work order transfers.5.2. PILOTS COMPUTATIONAL VIEW5.2.1. WILD SALMON MONITORINGThe Irish Pilot Salmon CL portal integrates inputs from many sources, as listed in section 4.9.2. Theportal is being implemented at www.habitats.ie using GeoNetwork36 for the metadata definition andmaintenance, and GeoServer37 to expose the various data. Using the HABATATS metadata (defined inD3.2.1) this data is being made Discoverable and Viewable as Catalogues on the Irish Spatial DataExchange (ISDE) and HABITATS RL Portal to demonstrate and validate its “INSPIRE Compliance”and use in the WP5 pilot validation.The Salmon CL portal will also contain various Salmon Angling services and applications that areconstructed from the various data sources in response to users’ requests and suggestions, and will beconstantly evolved throughout the WP5 Validation Pilots.Thus the pilot will implement the following services: • The data management • The metadata management • Catalogue service platform • The HABITATS metadata profile is being applied. • View, share and download services will be in the geoportal • Next step expected is to develop smatphones apps5.2.2. LA PALMA PROTECTED MARINE AREIn this pilot we obtain data from a sensor system and from a sensor connector we store these data in adatabase. This first database is a SQL DBMS in the form of tables and the relationship among the datais also stored in tables.From these tables, we get the representative geodata in shapefile format. The platform to publish thesedata is composed by Geoserver, Geonetwork with PostgreSQL. This platform works with WMS, WFS,WCS and CSW standards and allows View and Discovery services. Also we get Authetication serviceand from this we could manage groups, roles and users with different levels of permission, it allows aprofiling and open the door to Download an Metadata Editor services.35 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Workflow36 http://geonetwork-opensource.org37 http://geoserver.org/display/GEOS/Welcome 94
  • 95. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas5.2.3. AUGMENTED REALITY - NATURAL RESERVEWe have harvested the representative geodata in shapefile format, mainly interesting points. Theplatform to publish these data is composed by Geoserver, Geonetwork with PostgreSQL. Thisplatform works with WMS, WFS, WCS and CSW standards and allows a Discovery service. Also weget Authetication service and from this we could manage groups, roles and users with different levelsof permission, it allows a profiling. It opens the possibilities to Download, Metadata Editor, and Viewservices. The last case could be oriented to different users.The View service must be process through our Augmented Reality software to be displayed in the ARdevices and mobile phones. From these platforms we could work to implement the Web 2.0 for theusers.5.2.4. HIKING TRIP PLANNER and SHEEP AND GOAT HERDING MANAGEMENTThe platform will be use: - Data management - WMS, - WFS, - CSW services - WPS - Download services5.2.5. ECONOMICAL ACTIVITY AT MARINE COASTAL BENTHIC HABITATSIn pilot are collected all Latvia Institute of Aquatic Ecology maintained data and datasets. Historicallydata are collected and maintained in ESRI Shapefiles, Microsoft XLS and CSV files. These data hasbeen normalized, created data models and imported in SQL relation database management system withspatial data support. Using in database created data model and stored data in the platform is possible tocreate and manage as OGC WMS, WFS, WPS, WCS services and manage access and publishingoptions. Since data are not maintained in INSPIRE equivalent or extended data model will be providedINSPIRE compliant WFS view on data. Meta-data system are stored information about datadatasetsand services, meta-data system is able to read WMS, WFS and WCS service meta-data information.5.2.6. NATIONAL FOREST PROGRAMMEFMI currently we can offer: - Datasets for Habitats reference laboratory - WMS service - Validated metadata (available both in English and Czech language)We are trying to update our data models to be suitable for new technologies. Nowadays ourstakeholders are using our geoportal (http://geoportal2.uhul.cz/wms_oprl?SERVICE=WMS) withonly WMS service and not quite so interoperable client, which has serious problems across differentbrowsers. Geoportal client side uses modified Openlayers and on the server side is working UMNmapserver.We have tested software architectures with Geonetwork/Geoserver and Geohosting/Micka and bothare more or less suitable for our purposes. The FMI uses LDAP authentication protocol for allMicrosoft and Unix desktop clients, therefore administrative part of the geoportal should have thesame login backend.The conclusions about The Forest site classification data for sustainable management and utilization offorest road network: 95
  • 96. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas - • Platform used - UMN Minnesota, Openlayers and Micka - • Validated metadata (available both in English and Czech language) - WMS, WFS, CSW services - Download services 96
  • 97. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas6. ENGINEERING VIEWPOINT- DISTRIBUTION OF INFRASTRUCTUREThe engineering viewpoint focuses on the mechanisms and functions required to support distributedinteractions among objects in the system. It describes the distribution of processing performed by thesystem to manage the information and provide the functionalities. This section defines the HABITATSLogical ArchitectureThe HABITATS Networking Architecture has the goal of defining a system able to ensure theinteroperability and security of provided data and services. In particular, since an integration with theINSPIRE initiatives is needed, it is based on:• a methodological approach able to define a system architecture that is scalable and adaptable to the specifications and standards currently being defined;• the adoption of a Service Oriented Architecture based on WebServices and SOAP technology.6.1. RELATION OF PILOT IMPLEMENTATION AND REFERENCE LABORATORYThe reference laboratory will have next roles in project!• To offer possibility for testing new services• To offer access to global data for pilots• To support implementation of cross pilot scenarios• To making discoverable Habitats services for external platformsThe objective of RL is implement such functions, which will guarantee this functions. Interlinkage ofRL with pilots will be based on next schemes. Pilot implementation will implement only functionality required by pilot user needs, ReferenceLaboratory will implement full functionality. 97
  • 98. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas6.2. DESIGN FOR REFERENCE LABORATORYIn reference to the Computational Viewpoint (described above), which proposes a view of the systemas a set of functional components (or blocks) that communicate through defined interfaces, the systemis configured as an architecture made of levels or functional layers:• data layers – management data and files on storage, eventually guarantee access to external sensors• Server (engine layer) – define tools, which guarantee basic services on the server side – supplying service• Client layer – is client side of Web services, which guarantee access of users to services• Application layer is some form of wrapping elementary client services into application or into such form, which could be used by other Web tools• Presentation layer contain such web tools, which allow to combine and publish single objects from application level as part of Web presentationThe basic scheme is on next picture 98
  • 99. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas 99
  • 100. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas7. TECHNOLOGY VIEWPOINT – INFRASTRUCTURE MAPPINGThe Technology Viewpoint describes the technological specifications for the physical deployment ofthe system implementation. In particular, it focuses on:• the choice of technology in the system;• how specifications are implemented;• specification of relevant technologies;• support for testing.The Technology Viewpoint will be analysed deeply in D4.2.2. The current version only gives onlysome ideas for implementation of some components of architecture. This list is not complete and willbe updated during the second phase of design.7.1. EXAMPLES OF POSSIBLE COMPONENTS FOR IMPLEMENTATIONRDBMS• PostgreSQL• Oracle• Microsoft SQL• MySQLSENSOR CONNECTOR• CCSS daemonWEB MAP SERVER• MapServer• Geoserver• ArcGIS• GeoMedia WebMap• Topol Internet ServerMETADATA SERVER • MIcKA • GeoNetwork • Conterra • DegreeWPS • PyWPS • Nord52 • ZOO 100
  • 101. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasSENSORS SERVER • North 52 • MaplogGEOGRAPHICAL EXTENSIONS FOR RBDSM - PostGIS - SDO - ArcSDE - JaspaWEB BASED GIS ANALYTICAL TOOLSGRASS with any WPS extensionR or any other custom analyses and processing tool with pyWPSDISCOVERY - MIcKA catalogueVIEW - Open layers - HSlayers - Mapfish - Mapbender - pMapperDATA SERVICES - Geohosting - GeoserverTRANSFORMATION - Hale - Topol - ArcGIS - GeoKettle - Spatial data integratorVIRTUAL MODELLING - GoogleEarth - NASA WindCMS - Liferay - SimpleCMS 101
  • 102. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas - WordPress - Joomla - DrupalSOCIAL NETWORKS AND MEDIA - MediaWikiWORKFLOW MANAGEMENT - Liferay - Taverna Workbench - Apache Orchestra - 52n Workflow modeller (it is more modeller than manager, but is able to work with native WPS services)7.2. REFERENCE LABORATORY IMPLEMENTATIONFor reference laboratory the design was dan on the base of next schemeThe Reference Laboratory architecture provides functionality through modular, re-usable andinteroperable application services. Each modular service have to have a clear, standards-basedinterfaces so that the services underlying technology, which could be replaced if or when the currentbase-technology is upgraded to a new version - or when a competitors technology platform emerges 102
  • 103. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituastakes over as technology leader. As a consequence, the architecture is extensible, especially in terms ofplug-ins for additional, non-standard or "modified standard" protocols. which have been applied onnational or regional level. The modular architecture secures that any third party is free to create his orher own extension points to the core architecture.The data layer consists of two parts:a) A registry of web service end-points for standard, interoperable spatial data access services likeWMS, WFS, WCS and CSW accessible over TCP/IP on the Internet and;b) A data store implementing storage for remotely retrieved cached data, locally stored base maps,indexes and lookup data such as a geographical names gazeteer, administrative division and addresses. • A Map Server Module which will consist of the two leading open source map servers: MapServer and GeoServer. The reason for including two different servers at this stage is to enable easy switching between the two and to secure that the solution is not locked into one specific product. All communication with the map server will go via standards based interfaces. • A Catalog Module which is based on Micka (HSRS professional edition catalogue service application) will serve the purpose of OGC-compliant CS-W server and will provide functionality for both external catalog web services as well as be the foundation for the Catalog Viewer. This product is chosen over its two principal alternatives Geonetwork and Degree as it is an older and more mature product which has supported the CS-W specification much longer than the other two and hence has rooted out many issues which will be found in less mature code bases. Also here, all communication will be performed via standard interfaces. For this reason, any of the three catalog software products mentioned may be substituted for each other pending the Clients request, it is however our assessment that the proposed product will provide best performance and robustness. • A CMS Module provides content management functionality for the Geoportal including the ability to write and publish articles according to an editorial workflow, publish and syndicate content using HTML and XML-based protocols like WWW, (Geo)RSS/ATOM etc. For this purpose we provide the open source product Simple CMS as it is scaled to suit the specific purpose without adding the overhead of complicated systems targeted at running online newspaper sites. • A Thesauri Module which will inherit functionality from the Thesauri Service offered by EEA GEMET API, extending this component to support upload, management and dissemination of any SKOS-based thesauri/vocabulary - including mapping between different vocabularies using skos:mapping attributes. This component will be re-usable within several domains and may play a key role in the infrastructure required for content harmonization of INSPIRE data themes in scenarios where not only field- mapping from schema to schema is required but also harmonization of content values between classification systems of varying granularity.The Client layer offers three different types of end-user interfaces which will be available to humanand machine end-users over the Internet. Access to any or all of these may be controlled by flexibleauthentication mechanisms as described in the proposal. The services are: 103
  • 104. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • The Geoportal client interface offers end-users access to Portal Content as created in the underlying CMS, a sophisticated Map Viewer, a Catalogue Viewer enabling directory and search access to the overall INSPIRE metadata holdings as well as a Thesauri Viewer which will enable search and lookup functionality for GEMET (and other SKOS-based thesauri as required by the Client). • The Administration Console interface provides Geoportal administrators and privileged users with tools required to add and manage resources to the Registry including look-up tables, SLD definitions etc. Furthermore, the console allows administration of the Map Viewer and Catalog Viewer including content, access control, display and formatting. • The Web Services interface provides standards based OWS and Linked Data web services which may be consumed by applications in the Users and external platforms layer. One of the most important functions of the INSPIRE Geoportal will likely be to serve as a look-up web service for 3rd party applications to connect to data layers from the INSPIRE domain.Management of distributed spatial data sources is one is the key requirements on currentGeospatial portals. Current principles of SDI building required such systems that wouldfacilitate spatial data management and publication. Main requirements are• the ability of fast access to up-to-date information,• searching and classification of information,• possibility of their use in other systems/subsystems and also their publication.• Connect in situ sensors measurementThese functions related to searching and accessibility of spatial data are relatively common indifferent client applications, but the possibility of publication and sharing of spatial data byusers is till now problematic remains. Users data could be used in a number of webapplications, but there are missing tools supporting users to make geodata accessible in theform of web services. For users is problem to making their data publicly accessible.The system has to guarantee possibilities publishing of spatial and non spatial data. DataManagement has to include four main modules:• Non spatial data and metadata publishing• Spatial Data module for importing spatial data on the• Maps and maps services publishing module for creating and publication of map• Module for creating projects for mobile editing of data in situThe module for Data Management has to be designed for making users data accessible on theInternet, creating new map compositions by combining various data sources (users’ sources orexternal ones) and their publication on the web, possibly also for other work with data savedon the server.Data for creating a new map composition has to be integrated from the following sources:• A WMS server with a known address• A WFS server with a known address• A WMS or WFS server found by an integrated catalogue service• The File Repository of the portal 104
  • 105. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas• The Geodatabase of the portal• A geodatabase connected through ODBCProjects of new map compositions have to be defined by XML files. Till now there is nostandard form supporting such compositions storing. For example Web Map context supportonly composition from WMS. The data and their composition has to be accessible by severalways:• Using different visualization clients for example Openlayers, Googlemaps, DHTMLclients etc.• By a desktop map browser• Through the OGC Web Map Service (WMS)• Through the OGC Web Feature Service (WFS)• Used by other analytical tools trough Web Processing Services (WPS)For the integration of Sensor environment with other data there is necessary to support nextfunctionality: • Describe sensors in a standardized way • Standardize the access to observed data • Standardize the process of what is commonly known as sensor planning, • Building a framework and encoding for measurements and observations • Some sensors are already on the Web and able to return their location information as well as observations and measurements.The integration has to be based on Open Geospatial Consortium standard framework SensorWeb Enablement (SWE) ,There are reused some common well known software like Mapserver or Geoserver,OpenLayers, Ext. Other components are own development of contractors (Micka, HSlayers,SimpleCMS, MapMan, Authorisation module). Some components are already published asOpen Source under GPL licence. Metadata catalogue server and client Micka are nowprepared to be published as Open Source under GPL licence.The main requirements for the Geo-portal are: • Demand for multi-lingual content (dynamic and static) - Translation of application captions and language-specific design elements should be done on application level preferably using gettext. This will secure a flexible expansion to new languages using one master-language as a spine. • Choose and store user preferred language - When the user will be providing first login (or first visit) to the geo-portal, the default language will be detected by GeoIP mechanisms. Should this prove to be provide the wrong language by default, the user preferred language will be saved for future visits based on a stored user profile and/or client-cookies. 105
  • 106. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasAs basic tools will be established monitoring based on logins of users. A full log analysis willenable to show you the following information: • Number of visits, and number of unique visitors, • Visits duration and last visits, • Authenticated users, and last authenticated visits, • Days of week and rush hours (pages, hits, KB for each hour and day of week), • Domains/countries of hosts visitors (pages, hits, KB, 269 domains/countries detected, GeoIp detection), • Hosts list, last visits and unresolved IP addresses list, • Most viewed, entry and exit pages, • Files type, • Web compression statistics (for mod_gzip or mod_deflate), • OS used (pages, hits, KB for each OS, 35 OS detected), • Browsers used (pages, hits, KB for each browser, each version , • Visits of robots , • Worms attacks • Search engines, key phrases and keywords used to find your site, • HTTP errors (Page Not Found with last referrer, ...), • Other personalized reports based on url, url parameters, referrer field for miscellaneous/marketing purpose, • Number of times your site is "added to favourites bookmarks". • Screen size (need to add some HTML tags in index page). • Ratio of Browsers with support of: Java, Flash, RealG2 reader, Quicktime reader, WMA reader, PDF reader (need to add some HTML tags in index page)To speed-up access to data some type of caching should be provided on central portal.Proposal: • cache tiles of harmonized view services of member states • cache only small and middle scale data, more detailed data should be provided directly from MS • cache tiles in one European projection (LAEA ) - more available, but consume capacity of repository • Querying (GetFeatureInfo) should be processed to original services • mechanism must distinguish extent of original service to provide request only to corresponding ones not to all • inter-state boundaries will be processed to enable seamless look and feel • metadata records will be periodically queried for detecting changes (date of update) in original data to perform updating of tilesIn future central vector database should be maintained to give unique access to download and viewsservices (should be generated from here) 106
  • 107. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • again based on metadata detection of changes • using download services to central repository • generate view + download services (WMS / WFS), tiles etc.Gazetteer will be based on Open StreetMap as well as other INSPIRE themes. Hierarchy structure issupposed to be used. But there is no this kind of service at the moment. SomeWith the Semantic Web currently proving itself as a key delivery channel for content, the importanceof multi-lingual thesauri for creating relationships between "atomic" information resources isincreasingly important. Beyond the GEMET thesauri, there is also a wide array vocabularies,classification systems and thesauri used on national and even regional level. The publishing ofcommon thesauri with global URIs as Linked Data will enable efficient re-use of this system forclassification of pan-European metadata.Thesaurus REST service is provided by EEA. ZOPE/Python. The software is available as OS and maybe used as is without problems on INSPIRE portal servers. So the service may be used directly fromEEA and/or from local servers to increase the performance. For the INSPIRE Geoportal will beinstalled GEMET directly as part of registries Some kind of replication shall be used.New thesauri may be defined in GEMET underlying database. SO it is open for introducing newthesauri in the future according to INSPRIE/MS needs. • ExtJS Based already existing Open Source GEMET client will be used to provide access to thesaurus service - for more sophisticated Thesaurus browsing • input fields with suggestions will be available in the metadata search form too.MapViewer is based on known Open Source libraries OpenLayers and Sencha (formerly ExtJS) andHSLayers. Display, navigate, zoom in/out, pan or overlay spatial data sets or layers, transparency 107
  • 108. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituascontrol, print and display legend information and any relevant content of metadata are part offunctionality. System also allows play legends of each map layer.User can choose, which format he/she prefers the data to be displayed in, while adding new WMSlayer to exiting map composition. Display legends of each map layer. It is part of HSLayers,Supported coordinate systems are:• ETRS89 EPSG:4258• ETRS-LAEA EPSG:3035• ETRS-LCC EPSG:3034• ETRS-TM26 to ETRS-TM39 EPSG:3039 to EPSG:3051• ETRS89/(X,Y,Z)• ETRS89 ellipsoidal heights• World Geodetic System 1984 EPSG:4326• Thematic and parametric CRSs covering e.g. Meteorology or Oceanography (see ISO19111-2)• Universal Polar Stereographic (UPS) (used in Meteorology)User can choose with special tool, in which coordinate system he/she wants to work. The map isredrawn on-the-fly.The Map Project Manager is a software tool for users who want to create new map projects andcompositions. User can use the tool for displaying of different GIS data in the Internet environment.MapMan is capable of creating various map compositions and users can use different data sources –data on the local server, but also the data available through web services, which are saved on anexternal server. User can define coordinate system and data sources available through web services –Web Map Services (WMS), Web Features Services (WFS), Metadata Catalogue or data stored oninternal data server in geo-database or files. The data can be in both raster and vector forms, for vectorobjects the new definition of their colour and symbol is possible. Search component connect metadatacatalogue to user be able better find special data sets. MapMan can be closely linked to different mapvisualization clients – DHTML or JAVA clients, Google Maps, Google Earth and others. New mapcomposition should be published as independent Web Service (WMS, WFS). • Coordination System – any coordinate reference system defined in EPSG database • Map extend – area of interest defined in local coordinate reference system • List of data layers - raster or vector data from different data sources • Sources for vector data o Files – ESRI shapefile (SHP), GML, DGN, the formats supported by OGR library (http://www.gdal.org/ogr) 108
  • 109. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas o Server sources – ESRI ArcSDE, OGC WFS, PostGIS (PostgreSQL), Oracle Spatial Database • Sources for raster data o Files – TIFF, GeoTIFF, JPEG, the formats supported by GDAL library (http://www.gdal.org) o Server sources – ESRI ArcSDE Raster, OGC WMS, OGC WCSDefinition of visualisation is provided by SLD (Styled Layer Descriptor). Each data layer mayhave its own definition of visualization using: • user interactive definition in the application (embedded SLD Editor) • loading of existing visualization style from the user storage accessible from the application • loading of existing SLD definition from XML • loading of existing SLD definition through URLThe visualization loaded from external sources (XML, URL) may be updated interactive wayin the application. User can export the final definition: • into file with SLD definition • into user storage with defined access permissionIf the layers of the project have got definition of visualization it is possible to display them inthe map viewer. Portal map viewer is based on HSLayers library (extended OpenLayers) andsupports all current important technologies (Web 2.0, OGC Web Services, etc.) • Publication of the map project as WMS – the functionality gives a possibility to create new WMS sources composed from different data sources. These new WMS has standardized metadata record (INSPIRE) stored in metadata catalogue Micka • Publication of the project as WFS – map project with vector data can be published also as WFS. This functionality gives a possibility to create new WFS sources composed from different data sources. These new WFS has standardized metadata record (INSPIRE) stored in metadata catalogue Micka 109
  • 110. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasContent management system should be focused on usability and simplicity for end users on its mind. Itshould be prefered CMS which will be tailored to be used with Geoportal. Development should befocused on using frameworks. Proper using of this frameworks guarantees security on application side.There should be integrated WYSIWYG for this purpose. This editor will simplify content creation forend users.Editor should allow inserting various multimedia content user can think of, videos, photos,etc. This media can be inserted directly into text or as attachments under created content (e.g. article).The CMS should support including any RSS feeds from remote sites. This functionally allowsgathering all requested information into one place. Content should be also exported as RSS. Thisshould allow exporting per menu or more specific. Content should be also exported in raw code(HTML) to another web site which will allow dynamic integration.MIcKa is a complex solution for metadata management (not only Metadata editor) and forSpatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) and geoportal building. It contains tools for editing andmanagement of metadata for spatial information, web services and other sources (documents,web sites, etc.). It includes their search on the Internet, portrayal in map or download to localcomputer.MIcKA is compatible with obligatory standards for European SDI building (INSPIRE).Therefore it is ready to be connected with other nodes of prepared network of metadatacatalogues (its compatibility with pilot European geoportal is continuously tested).Functions: • Spatial data metadata (ISO 19115) • Spatial services metadata (ISO 19119) • Dublin Core metadata (ISO 15836) • Feature catalogue support (ISO 19110) • OGC CSW 2.0.2 support (catalogue service) • User defined metadata profiles 110
  • 111. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • INSPIRE metadata profile • Web interface for metadata editing • Multilingual (both user interface and metadata records). Currently 16 languages supported. It is possible to dynamically extend the system for other languages. • Context help (multilingual) • Import from the following metadata formats are supported: o ESRI ArcCatalog, o ISO 19139, o OGC services (WMS, WFS, WCS, CSW) o Feature catalogue XML • Export – ISO 19139, GeoRSS • Support of thesauri and gazetteers. • Display of changes with GeoRSS • Template base interface with possibilities to change according to user requirements • Possibility of deep cooperation with any of map clients for display of on-line map services.Support of the INSPIRE: • INSPIRE metadata profile is included • selecting keywords from GEMET thesaurus • selecting keywords from code list of INSPIRE services • Continuous checking of metadata completeness according to the INSPIRE profile • Batch checking of completeness of INSPIRE profile • Implementation of catalogue service according to OGC CSW 2.0.2 / AP ISO 1.0Catalogue service is an integral part of the system. It is based on OpenGIS® CatalogueServices Specification – profile Catalogue Service for Web (CSW) and OpenGIS® CatalogueServices Specification 2.0.2 - ISO Metadata Application Profile standards. 1. Supported operations: 2. Basic: GetCapabilities, DescribeRecord, GetRecords, GetRecordById 3. Editing: (CSW-T): Transaction, Harvest 4. Queryable elements: according to used standards (OGC, INSPIRE). May be extended according to user needs 5. Extensions: o OpenSearch standard is implemented. These formats are supported: GeoRSS, RDF, HTML, KML Web browsers integration is enabled o OAI-PMH harvesting support7.3. PILOTS ARCHITECTURE7.3.1. WILD SALMON MONITORINGThe Irish Pilot Salmon CL follows all of the primary components of the HABITATS SOA architecturebased on the publish-find-bind paradigm. 111
  • 112. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe portal is implemented using GeoNetwork38 and GeoServer39, and includes data and services frommany sources including the SSC regulations for 2011 on limits in specific rivers, fishing informationand wider regulations, the Irish Spatial Data Exchange, IFI Salmon Monitoring Programme, WFDwater quality monitoring, Wild Salmon census data from the Marine Institute and scientific wildsalmon conservation data (see section 4.9.2).The Salmon CL portal will also contain various Salmon Angling Services and Applications that areconstructed from the various data sources such as • Salmon Angling current Information. • Where are the local Salmon biting. • When Can I fish. • Fishing License • Catch recording (on a map) • Feedback (as a tourist Angler). • EtcThese are being developed in response to users’ requests and suggestions using Microsoft Silverlight40in a Visual Studio IDE41, and will be constantly evolved throughout the WP5 Validation Pilots. Inaddition the Salmon CL Portal data layers will be exposed through GeoServer to be merged into theIFI ArcGIS Interactive Map Viewer42.7.3.2. LA PALMA PROTECTED MARINE AREAThe architecture design is according following scheme38 http://geonetwork-opensource.org39 http://geoserver.org/display/GEOS/Welcome40 www.microsoft.com/silverlight/41 www.microsoft.com/visualstudio/en-us42 At www.fisheriesireland.ie/Projects/interactive-gis-map.html 112
  • 113. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe first implementation based on selected infrastructure will be described in D4.3.1 HABITATSNetworking Services and D-5.2.1, D-5.3.1, D-5.4.1 Pilot Platform Integration, Execution & InterimEvaluation Report 113
  • 114. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas7.3.3. NATURAL RESERVEThe architecture design is according following schemeThe first implementation based on selected infrastructure will be described in D4.3.1 HABITATSNetworking Services and D-5.2.1, D-5.3.1, D-5.4.1 Pilot Platform Integration, Execution & InterimEvaluation Report 114
  • 115. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas7.3.4. HIKING TRIP PLANNER and SHEEP AND GOAT HERDING MANAGEMENTThe architecture design is according following schemeThe first implementation based on selected infrastructure will be described in D4.3.1 HABITATSNetworking Services and D-5.2.1, D-5.3.1, D-5.4.1 Pilot Platform Integration, Execution & InterimEvaluation Report 115
  • 116. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas7.3.5. ECONOMICAL ACTIVITY AT MARINE COASTAL BENTHIC HABITATShe architecture design is according following schemeThe first implementation based on selected infrastructure will be described in D4.3.1 HABITATSNetworking Services and D-5.2.1, D-5.3.1, D-5.4.1 Pilot Platform Integration, Execution & InterimEvaluation Report7.3.6. NATIONAL FOREST PROGRAMMESimple scheme for the First use case - "Forest site classification data for sustainable management andutilization of forest road network" is displayed bellow: 116
  • 117. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasFMI has a long experience with MapServer 117
  • 118. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe first implementation based on selected infrastructure will be described in D4.3.1 HABITATSNetworking Services and D-5.2.1, D-5.3.1, D-5.4.1 Pilot Platform Integration, Execution & InterimEvaluation Report 118
  • 119. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas8. CONCLUSIONThis document is based on first Architecture design. Second release was prepared on the base ofdiscussion with all pilots. The document contain as generic model, but also suggestion forimplementation of pilot applications, and reference laboratory. The document is used as input for D4.3and WP5. Where all architecture design will be validate. Transformation services will be developedunder D-3.4 HABITATS Transformation Service 119
  • 120. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas9. REFERENCES • D-3.2a Metadata profile, CIP- ICT-PSP-2009-3-250455, Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habitats • D-3.3a HABITATS Data models, CIP-ICT-PSP-2009-3-2504553-250455, Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habitats • Wikipedia File system, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File_system • Wikipedia Relational database management system, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relational_database_management_system • Wikipedia Relational database, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relational_database, • WIKIPEDIA, SQL http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Structured_Query_Language, • http://java.sun.com/applets/ • Orchestra http://www.eu-orchestra.org/TUs/Standards/en/html/Unit4_learningObject6.html • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RSS • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GeoRSS • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keyhole_Markup_Language • http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/present/frames.html • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Span_and_div • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Augmented_reality • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Content_management_system • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_media • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Workflow • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_Coverage_Service • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_Feature_Service • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_Map_Service • IEEE (1998), Std 830-1998 IEEE Recommended Practice for Software Requirements Specifications – Description • IEEE (2000), Std 1471-2000 IEEE Recommended Practice for Architectural Description of Software-Intensive Systems – Description • INSPIRE Network Services Drafting Team (2007), D3.5 – INSPIRE Network Services Architecture v2.0 • ISO (1998), ISO/IEC 10746-1 Information technology – Open Distributed Processing – Reference model: Overview • ISO (1996), ISO/IEC 10746-3 Information technology – Open Distributed Processing – Reference Model: Architecture • ISO (2002), ISO 19101: Geographic information – Reference model • ISO (2005), ISO 19109: Geographic information – Rules for application schema • ISO (2005), ISO 19110: Geographic information – Methodology for feature cataloguing • ISO (2003), ISO 19115: Geographic information – Metadata • ISO (2005), ISO 19119: Geographic information – Services • ISO/IEC JTC (2008), Information technology – Open distributed processing – Use of UML for ODP system specifications • JRC (2009), SOAP Primer for INSPIRE Discovery and View Services • Open Geospatial Consortium Inc. (2004), Geospatial Portal Reference Architecture - A Community Guide to Implementing Standards-Based Geospatial Portals • Open Geospatial Consortium Inc. (2008), OGC Reference Model • Open Geospatial Consortium Inc. (2004), OGC Web Map Service Interface 120
  • 121. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • Open Geospatial Consortium Inc. (2007), OpenGIS Catalogue Services Specification • Open Geospatial Consortium Inc. (2007), OpenGIS Web Processing Service • Open Geospatial Consortium Inc. (2005), Web Feature Service Implementation Specification • Percivall G. (2002), ISO 19119 and OGC Service Architecture¸ FIG XXII International Congress, Washington, D.C., USA • Plan4all (2009), D2.1 – Cluster of Leading Organisations in SDI for Spatial Planning • Plan4all (2009), D2.2 – Analysis of Innovative Challenges • Plan4all (2009), D2.3 – INSPIRE Requirement Analysis • Plan4all (2009), D2.4 – User Analysis Report • Plan4all (2010), D3.1 – Analysis of National Requirements on Spatial Planning Metadata • Plan4all (2010), D3.2.1 – European Spatial Planning Metadata Profile (First version) • Plan4all (2010), D4.1 – Analysis of Conceptual Data Models for Selected Schemes Used in Single Countries • Plan4all (2010), D5.1 – Analysis of Demand on European Spatial Planning Data Sharing • Plan4all (2010]) D5.2 – Plan4all Networking Architecture • United Nations (),United Nations Spatial Data Infrastructure Compendium (A UNSDI Vision, Implementation Strategy and Reference Architecture) • W3C (2001), Web Services Description Language (WSDL) 1.1 • W3C Working Group (2004), Web Services Architecture 121