European CommissionInformation Society and Media                                             DELIVERABLEProject Acronym:  ...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INSPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D-4.2.2Project...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INSPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D-4.2.2Project...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INSPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D-4.2.2Project...
Date: 2011-08-01                                               Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4...
Date: 2011-08-01                                               Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                    Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
Date: 2011-08-01                                   Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project:...
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Habitats d4.2.2 final

  1. 1. European CommissionInformation Society and Media DELIVERABLEProject Acronym: HABITATSGrant Agreement number: CIP- ICT-PSP-2009-3-250455Project Title: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habitats D-4.2.2 HABITATS INSPIRE Networking ArchitectureDocument identifier: D 4.2.2Date: July 28th, 2011Nature: REPORTDissemination level: PUWP Lead Partner: HSRSRevision Final Project co-funded by the European Commission within the ICT Policy Support Programme Dissemination LevelPU Public XRE Restricted to a group specified by the consortium (including the Commission Services)CO Confidential, only for members of the consortium (including the Commission Services)This project is partially funded under the ICT Policy Support Programme as part of the Competitiveness andInnovation Framework Programme by the European Commission http://ec.europa.eu/ict_pspThis document reflects only the authors views and the European Community is not liable for any use that mightbe made of the information contained herein. © HABITATS Consortium, 2010
  2. 2. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INSPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D-4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas Abstract: This document defines the generic architecture for the HABITATS project, but also include individual pilot applications and Reference Laboratory. The Architecture definition use RM-ODP methodology. The document is updating of first version of D4.2.1 and it was updated on the base of pilot works during period from Month 9 to Month 15. On the base of pilot user cases, generic user cases are defined. Architecture is defined as platform independent. Key Words: INSPIRE, Networking Architecture , RM ODP, Metadata, Data models, Reference Laboratory, Pilots implementationAuthors: Karel Charvat HSRS Gregorio Urquía Osorio TRAGSATEC Lisa Maurer TUG Peteris Bruns IMCS John O’Flaherty MAC Andrea Scianna Madonie Filip Hajek, Marek Mlcousek, Jan Bojko FMI -2-
  3. 3. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INSPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D-4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas Revision History Revision Date Author Organization Description 2010-09-14 K.Charvat HSRS Table of Contents 2010-09-21 K.Charvat HSRS TOC, responsibilities 2011-01-31 K.Charvat HSRS Draft version 2011-02-10 G.Urquia TRAGSATEC Revision, detail modifications, comments 2011-02-10 K. Charvat HSRS Update of documents, user scenarios, generic scenarios, and single viewpoints 2011-02-15 L.Maurer TUG Comments 2011-02-17 K. Charvat HSRS Revision 2011-03-03 A.Sierra TRAGSA Format Revision V1.0 2011-07-15 K. Charvat HSRS Document updating and including contribution from partners V1.1 2011-07-21 K. Charvat HSRS Integration of contribution from MAC, IMCS and TRAGSATEC V1.2 2011-07-25 K. Charvat HSRS Update of introduction V1.3 2011-07-25 A. Sierra TRAGSA Format revision Final 2011-07-28 All Final revisionDocument Change Record Issue Date Author Item Reason for Change -3-
  4. 4. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INSPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D-4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas Project Officer: Krister Olson European Commission DG Information Society and Media Project Officer Address: DG INFSO – E06 Office: EUFO – 01/177 L – 2920 LUXEMBOURG Phone: +(352) 43 0134332 Fax: +(352) E-mail: Krister.olson@ec.europa.eu Project Manager: Mariano Navarro Address: C/ Julián Camarillo, 6b, 28037, Madrid, Spain Phone: + 34 91 322 65 21 Fax: + 34 91 322 63 23 E-mail: mnc@tragsa.es -4-
  5. 5. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas TABLE OF CONTENTS1. INTRODUCTION ..............................................................................................................................................7 1.1. TERMS ..........................................................................................................................................................7 1.2. ABBREVIATIONS ............................................................................................................................................82. METHODOLOGY .............................................................................................................................................9 2.1. BASIC PRINCIPLES OF RM ODP METHODOLOGY AND ITS APPLICATION FOR HABITATS .....................................9 2.2. GENERIC AND PILOT DESIGN .........................................................................................................................113. ENTERPRISE VIEWPOINT – USER SCENARIOS, USE CASES AND BUSINESS MODELLING....12 3.1. PILOT DEFINITION ........................................................................................................................................12 3.2. WILD SALMON MONITORING .......................................................................................................................12 3.3. LA PALMA PROTECTED MARINE AREA ........................................................................................................16 3.4. NATURAL RESERVE .....................................................................................................................................18 3.5. HIKING TRIP PLANNER.................................................................................................................................20 3.6. SHEEP AND GOAT HERDING MANAGEMENT ................................................................................................22 3.7. ECONOMICAL ACTIVITY AT MARINE COASTAL BENTHIC HABITATS ..............................................................25 3.8. NATIONAL FOREST PROGRAMME.................................................................................................................27 3.8.1. Cross pilot use cases ...........................................................................................................................34 3.9. PILOT ACTORS .............................................................................................................................................38 3.10. GENERIC ACTORS AND USERS .....................................................................................................................39 3.11. ACTORS ACTIVITIES. .................................................................................................................................41 3.12. GENERIC USE CASES ...................................................................................................................................434. INFORMATION VIEWPOINT – WHICH DATA AND HOW WILL BE SHARED ..............................50 4.1. DATA TYPES USED IN HABITATS ARCHITECTURE AND HOW THE DATA ARE ACCESSED .................................50 4.2. INFORMATION LIFE-CYCLE ...........................................................................................................................51 4.2.1. Reference data .....................................................................................................................................51 4.2.2. Satellite imagery ..................................................................................................................................52 4.2.3. In-situ observation ...............................................................................................................................52 4.2.4. Terrain measurement...........................................................................................................................53 4.2.5. User edited data ..................................................................................................................................54 4.2.6. User derived data ................................................................................................................................54 4.3. DATA AND METADATA MODELS ...................................................................................................................55 4.3.1. Metadata ..............................................................................................................................................55 4.4. SEA REGIONS ...........................................................................................................................................57 4.5. BIO-GEOGRAPHICAL REGIONS ...........................................................................................................57 4.6. HABITATS AND BIOTOPES....................................................................................................................57 4.7. SPECIES DISTRIBUTION ........................................................................................................................58 4.7.1. Data models .........................................................................................................................................58 4.7.2. Feature catalogues for sea regions .....................................................................................................59 4.8. DATA HARMONISATION ...............................................................................................................................60 4.8.1. COORDINATE TRANSFORMATION .................................................................................................60 4.8.2. FORMAT TRANSFORMATION ..........................................................................................................60 4.8.3. SCHEMA TRANSFORMATION ..........................................................................................................60 4.9. USED DATA SETS ..........................................................................................................................................61 4.9.1. Reference laboratory data sets ............................................................................................................61 4.9.2. Wild Salmon Monitoring .....................................................................................................................67 4.9.3. LA PALMA PROTECTED MARINE AREA .........................................................................................69 4.9.4. NATURAL RESERVE ..........................................................................................................................70 4.9.5. HIKING TRIP PLANNER and SHEEP AND GOAT HERDING MANAGEMENT .........................71 4.9.6. ECONOMICAL ACTIVITY AT MARINE COASTAL BENTHIC HABITATS ......................................72 4.9.7. NATIONAL FOREST PROGRAMME .................................................................................................735. COMPUTATIONAL VIEWPOINT-LOGICAL ARCHITECTURE .........................................................76 5.1. CONCERNS ...................................................................................................................................................76 5.1.1. FILE SYSTEM .....................................................................................................................................76 5
  6. 6. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas 5.1.2. RDBMS ................................................................................................................................................76 5.1.3. Sensor connector .................................................................................................................................77 5.1.4. ACES infrastructure ............................................................................................................................78 5.1.5. Web Map server ...................................................................................................................................79 5.1.6. Metadata server ...................................................................................................................................80 5.1.7. WPS .....................................................................................................................................................81 5.1.8. Sensors server ......................................................................................................................................81 5.1.9. Geographical extensions for RBDSM ..................................................................................................81 5.1.10. Web Based GIS Analytical Tools .......................................................................................................81 5.1.11. Registry management ........................................................................................................................82 5.1.12. Authorisation/Authentication.............................................................................................................82 5.1.13. View ...................................................................................................................................................84 5.1.14. WFS Gazetteer ...................................................................................................................................85 5.1.15. Data services .....................................................................................................................................85 5.1.16. Transformation ..................................................................................................................................86 5.1.17. Analysis .............................................................................................................................................87 5.1.18. Monitoring .........................................................................................................................................87 5.1.19. External services ...............................................................................................................................88 5.1.20. Geo-portal BUS .................................................................................................................................88 5.1.21. Applications .......................................................................................................................................88 5.1.22. Applets ...............................................................................................................................................88 5.1.23. Servlets ..............................................................................................................................................89 5.1.24. Portlets ..............................................................................................................................................89 5.1.25. WMC ..................................................................................................................................................90 5.1.26. RSS/GeoRSS ......................................................................................................................................91 5.1.27. KML/KMZ .........................................................................................................................................91 5.1.28. iFrame ...............................................................................................................................................92 5.1.29. DIV ....................................................................................................................................................92 5.1.30. Augment reality .................................................................................................................................92 5.1.31. CMS ...................................................................................................................................................93 5.1.32. Social Networks and Media ...............................................................................................................93 5.1.33. Workflow management ......................................................................................................................93 5.2. PILOTS COMPUTATIONAL VIEW ....................................................................................................................94 5.2.1. WILD SALMON MONITORING .........................................................................................................94 5.2.2. LA PALMA PROTECTED MARINE ARE ...........................................................................................94 5.2.3. AUGMENTED REALITY - NATURAL RESERVE...............................................................................95 5.2.4. HIKING TRIP PLANNER and SHEEP AND GOAT HERDING MANAGEMENT .............................95 5.2.5. ECONOMICAL ACTIVITY AT MARINE COASTAL BENTHIC HABITATS ......................................95 5.2.6. NATIONAL FOREST PROGRAMME .................................................................................................956. ENGINEERING VIEWPOINT- DISTRIBUTION OF INFRASTRUCTURE ..........................................97 6.1. RELATION OF PILOT IMPLEMENTATION AND REFERENCE LABORATORY .......................................................97 6.2. DESIGN FOR REFERENCE LABORATORY .......................................................................................................987. TECHNOLOGY VIEWPOINT – INFRASTRUCTURE MAPPING .................................................. - 100 - 7.1. EXAMPLES OF POSSIBLE COMPONENTS FOR IMPLEMENTATION ............................................................. - 100 - 7.2. REFERENCE LABORATORY IMPLEMENTATION ....................................................................................... - 102 - 7.3. PILOTS ARCHITECTURE ......................................................................................................................... - 111 - 7.3.1. WILD SALMON MONITORING .................................................................................................. - 111 - 7.3.2. LA PALMA PROTECTED MARINE AREA .................................................................................. - 112 - 7.3.3. NATURAL RESERVE ................................................................................................................... - 114 - 7.3.4. HIKING TRIP PLANNER and SHEEP AND GOAT HERDING MANAGEMENT ...................... - 115 - 7.3.5. ECONOMICAL ACTIVITY AT MARINE COASTAL BENTHIC HABITATS ............................... - 116 - 7.3.6. NATIONAL FOREST PROGRAMME .......................................................................................... - 116 -8. CONCLUSION .......................................................................................................................................... - 119 -9. REFERENCES .......................................................................................................................................... - 120 - 6
  7. 7. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas1. INTRODUCTIONThe objective of Task 4.2 is to define generic architecture (platform neutral) and also architecture forpilot solutions. Important part basic set of networking services which are an extension of existingINSPIRE services, for the management, discovery, sharing, processing and publishing of spatialplanning data by public and commercial sector, NGOs, citizens, private sector, education and science,and all those who play an important role in biodiversity and see region protection and alsoexploitation.The objective of this task is to define such architecture for SDI, which will allow effectivemanagement of sensitive areas, support for tourism, education and research in this areas, and alsopromotion of these regions. HABITATS defines the tools and interfaces by which the different partieswill be able to manage, discovery, share and reuse spatial data.This D4.2.2 document provides final version of HABITATS networking and data sharing architecture,and suggests its possible logical components, but also possibilities, how provide practicalimplementation of this logical components. This architecture is based on user needs and is validated byusers on the base of concrete implementations. The starting point and requirements can be found in theHABITATS deliverable D4.1, but document is mainly based on D4.2.1. Initial architecture designfrom D4.2.1 was modified in interaction with users to develop concrete pilot cases and led to the finalarchitecture design. First version of the document was updated on the base on user response. In thisprocess local technical expert’s plaid an important role, who and contributed to the testing ofprinciples and of the architecture and cooperate on design of concrete local implementation. For thisthe Living Lab methodology was used.1.1. TERMS• infrastructure for spatial information – metadata, spatial data sets and spatial data services;network services and technologies; agreements on sharing, access and use; and coordination andmonitoring mechanisms, processes and procedures, established, operated or made available inaccordance with this Directive; [INSPIRE Directive]• INSPIRE application schema – application schema specified in an INSPIRE data specification• INSPIRE data specification – harmonized data product specification for a theme adopted as anImplementing Rule• metadata – information describing spatial data sets and spatial data services and making it possibleto discover, inventory and use them [INSPIRE Directive]• spatial data – data with a direct or indirect reference to a specific location or geographic area[INSPIRE Directive]• spatial data set – identifiable collection of spatial data [INSPIRE Directive]• spatial object – abstract representation of a real-world phenomenon related to a specific location orgeographical area [INSPIRE Directive]• feature – abstraction of real world phenomena [ISO 19101]• feature catalogue – catalogue(s) containing definitions and descriptions of the spatial object types,their attributes and associated components occurring in one or more spatial data sets, together with anyoperations that may be applied [ISO 19110 – modified]• discovery services – search for spatial data sets and services on the basis of the content of thecorresponding metadata and to display the content of the metadata [INSPIRE Directive]• view services – services to display, navigate, zoom in/out, pan, or overlay viewable spatial datasets and to display legend information and any relevant content of metadata [INSPIRE Directive]• download services – services to copy of spatial data sets, or parts of such sets, to be downloadedand, where practicable, accessed directly [INSPIRE Directive] 7
  8. 8. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas• transformation services – services enabling spatial data sets to be transformed with a view toachieving interoperability [INSPIRE Directive]• services allowing – spatial data services to be invoked [INSPIRE Directive]1.2. ABBREVIATIONS • INSPIRE – Infrastructure for Spatial Information in Europe • ISO – International Organisation for Standardisation • SDI – Spatial Data Infrastructure • WMS – Web Service Map • WFS – Web Feature Map • WCS – Web Coverage Map • WFS – G - Web Service Map Gazetteer • WMC – Web Map Context • WPS – Web Processing Services • CS – W - Catalogue Service Web • CNIG – National Centre of Geographic Data of Spain • URM – Uniform Resource Management • OGC – Open Geospatial Consortium • SOA – Service Oriented Architecture • CMS – content management systems • SOS – Sensor Observation Services • SAS – Sensors Alert Services • SES – Sensors Event Services • SEIS – Shared Environmental Information System • HTML – HyperText Markup Language • API – Application Programming Interface • ESA – European Space Agency • GMES – Global Monitoring for Environment and Security • GEOSS - Global Earth Observation System of Systems • EU – European Union • EC – European Commission • URI – Uniform Resource Identifier • KML – Keyhole Markup Language • GML – Geography Markup Language • RM-ODP - Reference Model of Open Distributed ProcessingINSPIRE – INfrastructure for SPatial InfoRmation in Europe • ISO – International Organisation for Standardisation 8
  9. 9. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas2. METHODOLOGYAs was already described in D4.1, architecture design is realised on the base of a Reference Model ofOpen Distributed Processing (RM-ODP) (ISO/IEC 10746-1). This model is the architecture referencemodel used also within ISO/TC 211 “Geographic Information – Reference model” [ISO 19101:2002],and on Open Geospatial Consortium Reference Model (ORM).The use of RM-ODP will give us two opportunities: • To define the basic design of the solution as platform neutral and to support different local implementation. This is important, because the objective of the document D4.2 is not to describe one unique technology solution, but to give general models, which could be used by different organisation across Europe. These models are then demonstrated on selected pilot cases that are part of the project, in order to demonstrate the feasibility of such solution • To build on positive experiences of previous European research projects, as this methodology is used by most European (mainly research) projects and some recommendations already exist. A previous analysis (D4.1) demonstrates that the basic principles for INSPIRE, GEOSS and GMES projects are very similar and that some basic building blocks could easily be re-used in different applications. Our objective is to extend these models to make them more oriented towards actual user needs.The architecture design provides an overall conceptual framework for building geo-processingservices for biodiversity, sea region protection and for effective management and utilisation ofsensitive areas The RM-ODP framework will have to be integrated with the Model DrivenArchitecture (MDA) approach, which allows to define the system through an abstract schema,independent from implementation tools and techniques.2.1. BASIC PRINCIPLES OF RM ODP METHODOLOGY AND ITS APPLICATION FOR HABITATSThe RM-ODP divides all process of architecture design into five generic and complementary steps,which are called viewpoints on the system and its environment. This viewpoints are:• The enterprise viewpoint, which focuses on the purpose, scope and policies for the system. It describes the business requirements and how to meet them. It is based on user scenarios and user cases• The information viewpoint, focuses on the semantics of the information and the information processing performed. It describes the information managed by the system and the structure and content type of the supporting data. This viewpoint is related to WP3, where data and metadata models are defined. The Information viewpoint extends these models and analyses also necessary operation• The computational viewpoint provides functional decomposition of the system into objects which interact at interfaces. It describes the functionality provided by the system and its functional decomposition.• The engineering viewpoint focuses on the mechanisms and functions required to support distributed interactions between objects in the system. It describes the distribution of processing performed by the system to manage the information and provide the functionality.• The technology viewpoint focuses on the choice of technology of the system. It describes the technologies chosen to provide the processing, functionality and presentation of information. In 9
  10. 10. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas principle only this viewpoint is platform dependent. In our architecture design in this first document we will analyse potential components for implementation. In the second version of the document delivered in Month 15 concrete tools for single pilots will be defined.For the architecture design of HABITATS we adapted RM ODP methodology to guarantee realadoption of user needs and to give real possibilities of an user involvement into the design process.The design process will be done iteratively with this as the first version, so all views will be modifiedon the basis of user validation and user experiences. It is necessary to take into consideration, that inmany cases users are not familiar with newest technologies and also have no experience in the designof distributed systems. Another important aspect is also, that we don’t design one concrete solution,but a number of relatively independent services. In order to allow reuse of some components we havedefined among pilots what common generic functions are that fulfil the requirements of differentscenarios and what specific solution dependent components are. In the first version of the design, wewill focus mainly on generic functionality, in the second version, we will try to add more pilot specificfunctions.The relation of all these five viewpoints could be described by the following scheme:The Enterprise viewpoint of the architecture design is focused on the analysis of pilot scenarios andthe definition of a limited numbers of generic use cases, which are implemented to support basisfunctionalities required by more scenarios, but also supporting the process of data and metadataharmonisation based on outputs from WP3.The Information viewpoint is focused on basic data and metadata sets, which could be shared amongdifferent scenarios and also will be focused on data and metadata related to HABITATS and INSPIREspecification. It is also focused on common infrastructure being accessible trough ReferenCeLaboratoryThe Computational viewpoint is focused on generic components, which could be reused for morescenarios and which will be some basic parts of the infrastructure. Already here we extend the basic 10
  11. 11. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasprinciples of INSPIRE, GMES and GEOSS and add some new functionalities related to datamanagement and updating.The Engineering viewpoint defines a generic scheme, which can be reused for all pilotimplementations and which could be modified for different scenarios. Also this viewpoint is platformindependent.The Technical viewpoint defines basic architecture modifications for single scenarios and suggestspotential technical implementation. This solution is really basic definition and will give more option ofimplementation. Concrete implementation will be modified during the implementation and validationprocess.2.2. GENERIC AND PILOT DESIGNAn important part of the methodology is to divide design of generic architecture and pilot dependentarchitecture. On the basis of user requirements, generic use cases will be defined and generics serviceswill be designed for these generic use cases, which will be reusable for different pilot solutions. On thebasis of these generic services pilot applications will be defined, which will be composed from genericservices. Generic services will be available for developers so they can implement specific userapplications using these generic services. Important is, that these applications can reuse existingcomponents. Such a model was used in the past in the c@r project and also is used currently in theGENESIS project.For the development of applications it will be possible to:• Orchestrate existing services using some workflow management of language as BPEL• Integrate existing services and components using standard programming tools 11
  12. 12. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas3. ENTERPRISE VIEWPOINT – USER SCENARIOS, USE CASES AND BUSINESS MODELLING3.1. PILOT DEFINITIONAccording to the HABITATS user-driven approach to standardisation, the full impact of results will besparked off by the pilot service scenarios and their ability to attract new participants to thecommunities of adoption. Each pilot is therefore built on a) existing concrete services currently carried out by project partners, b) potentials of data access through network services and c) enhancement through usage scenarios developed by user communities, in order to meet the three criteria of relevance, openness and responsiveness.The pilots fall into the three forward-looking categories described above as follows:• Management of natural resources o Wild Salmon Monitoring (IE) o La Palma Protected Marine Area (ES)• Eco-tourism o Hiking Trip Planner (IT) o Natural Reserve (ES)• Economic activities o Sheep and Goat Herd Management (IT) o Economical activity at marine coastal benthic habitats (LV)• National policy o Czech National Forest Programme (CZ)Each of these validation pilots relies on trans-regional and trans-European data sharing between pilotsettings within INSPIRE networks present in the project, and with collaborating members of theHABITATS User Communities.3.2. WILD SALMON MONITORINGPartner: MACLocation: Ireland; replicable in other Member StatesService and user scenario:Ireland has best practice in Salmon Conservation and Management – so the processes and data-structures used in Ireland have pan-European significance for INSPIRE, and so are very relevant forthe HABITATS project, and should also help to promote Irish fishing across Europe. 12
  13. 13. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasInland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) have taken over responsibility for coordinating the monitoring andconservation of wild salmon in Ireland. MAC is working with the IFI National Salmon MonitoringProgramme, Salmon Scientific Standing Committee, and other involved agencies such as the IrishMarine Institute (MI) to develop a Salmon Conservation Limits portal, to pilot the use of theHABITATS INSPIRE metadata profile, and bottom-up social validation process to improvepresentation, accessibility and use of the data that is being collected, and get better buy-in by allstakeholders (particularly scientists, anglers, and angling related businesses) to be aware of,understand and engage in the salmon conservation procedures, regulations and catch limitations thatare set each year. This will provide better intelligence to researchers, fishermen and decision makerson salmon conservation, so that they can better manage the wild-salmon resource in a sustainablemanner and help prevent the extinction of wild salmon in rivers on the North Atlantic coast of Europe.Once operational in Ireland the process will be scaled up in collaboration with the FP7 SALSEA-Merge project which is investigating the migration and distribution of salmon in the North-EastAtlantic, working with the North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organisation (NASCO).To explore use of the HABITATS approach, the initial Irish Salmon CL pilot is focusing on onespecific area and community (such as a catchment or sub-catchment), where users can link to thevarious data for that area, including a range of static data (such as catch regulations, WFD fish data,water quality etc) as well as more dynamic data partially generated by users themselves there (e.g. byonline listing of their catches etc). Part (or a tributary) of the river Nore in the South-East of Irelandcould be a good pilot site, as discussions with the community of active local groups and stakeholdersthere are proving to be quite positive. However the final pilot location is to be made by the IFI in thecoming weeks.In line with IFI policy, the Salmon CL Portal will have special focus on the involvement and feedbackfrom tourist (mainly foreign) anglers, local angling-related businesses and awareness/education ofusers for the social validation aspects of HABITATS. User feedback so far indicates that this couldsupplement and link to the many existing local angling groups and sites, to pilot a bottom-up andconsultative approach that IFI could subsequently use in other contexts in Ireland and across Europe(with NASCO and SALSEA-Merge).IFI are currently undertaking internal deliberations with their staff for their inputs and support of theSalmon CL Portal and to agree its initial community/location-focus. Once it goes active, the externalstakeholders, including scientists, anglers and angling-related businesses will be brought into theprocess through the HABITATS validation process on the Salmon CL portal.From an IFI business perspective this is a very worthwhile pilot that introduces IFI’s staff to the wholeINSPIRE process, and also allows them and other government and public agencies to explore use ofsocial networking to involve communities of users, improve and promote fishing, and ultimately helpconserve and manage the vital wild salmon stocks.Use of environmental data:Wild salmon data that is being collected by the IFI and other public agencies such as the MarineInstitute will be made accessible through the Salmon CL Portal to provide better intelligence toresearchers, fishermen and decision makers on salmon conservation, so that they can better participatein the management of the wild-salmon resource in a sustainable manner and help prevent theextinction of wild salmon in rivers on the North Atlantic coast of Europe.By merging genetic and ecological investigations, to advance understanding of stock specificmigration and distribution patterns and overall ecology of the marine life of Atlantic salmon and gainan insight into the factors resulting in recent increases in marine mortality. Textual and map-based datafrom the project as it progresses is available on their website under the following headings: 13
  14. 14. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • Background • Ecological Studies • Genetic Identification Methodology • Migration Modelling • Marine Surveys • Documents • Genetic Stock IdentificationThe SALSEA Group are developing 2 major databases that will be issued as a unit in the same format: • Genetic database – the big one. Brand new work – very valuable as it allows salmon to be traced back to their rivers of origin. Keen to keep these aspects of the database private. • Sea database – based on WGNAPES (ICES). Much simpler – smaller database. Less sensitive. Sea-going fish data. Maintained in the Faroh’s by the same people who developed the original WGNAPEs database.Stakeholders involved:The SALSEA Group has extensive data bases, and is currently developing 2 new ones. It is onlyrecently that they have accepted the value of INSPIRE and its principles, but now fully accept that allof their data should be INSPIRE compliant.Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI), and the Irish Marine Institute (MI) collect and own the data, butcollaborate with other Agencies and the North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organisation (NASCO).The service being piloted is packaging and providing that data as better intelligence to researchers,fishermen and decision makers on salmon conservation. The main stakeholders (IFI and MI) arecurrently benefiting from the project in getting a clearer appreciation of INSPIRE requirements and thepotential of social networking to engage all of the other stakeholders.Once operational, the Salmon CL pilot will 1. Provide better communication, consultation and involvement of all stakeholders in the process of specifying fishing conservation measures in Ireland and beyond. 2. Make formulation of the Irish Wild Salmon Fishing Regulations more participatory and interactive by involving all relevant actors proactively in the process, 3. Make the datasets open and widely available (and INSPIRE complaint), 4. Enable users (such as anglers and scientists) to provide feedback on how to make the data more useful for them.However the key and very clear long-term objective is the sustainable management, conservation andexploitation of the wild salmon stocks.Users involvedThe Pilot Service will enable Citizens, including researchers, anglers, fishermen, fishing-relatedbusinesses and public agencies (policy and regulations decision makers) to be involved, for futureexploitation of the Salmon CL Portal and HABITAT’s results.Policy / Business ModelThe data collection is part of the Irish National Policy in line with its NASCO, International Councilfor the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) and EU Habitats Directive obligations.. Currently the data ismainly documented rather provided online. The HABITATS pilot is making it available as an onlineservice. 14
  15. 15. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasCooperation/ data sharing: • La Palma Protected Marine Area (ES) • Economical activity at marine coastal benthic habitats (LV) • FAO • HSRS • IMCSUse casesUse case Wild Salmon Fishing Conservation in IrelandActors Fishermen, Anglers, Angling Researchers, Decision Makers, other actors related to the salmon fishing industry in Ireland.Task To provide participatory input to the early stages of the formulation of the Irish wild salmon fishing conservation measures by involving all relevant actors interactively in the data monitoring process, making their databases more open and widely available (and INSPIRE complaint), and enable users to engage and provide feedback on how to make the data and related services more useful for them. For instance, anglers could provide real-time rod-catch data using a smart phone application – where catch and release fishing is allowed on rivers.Assumptions That the proprietary databases can be made INSPIRE-compliant using the HABITATS Metadata profile to be accessible on the Irish Spatial Data Exchange (ISDE) using the HABITATS Reference Laboratory tools and portal. So far, of the 4 HABITATS themes, the Habitats and Biotopes, and Species Distribution appear to be most relevant using the HABITATS metadata profiles (from D3.2.1) and the IFI scientist’s salmon conservation process best practice classification and naming schemas.Description The Irish Standing Scientific Committee (SSC) on the status of Irish Salmon Stocks (or Salmon Advisory Group) scientifically analyses all data on wild salmon in Ireland and issues recommendations every December on the conservation of salmon stocks in each of the 148 Irish salmon fishing rivers for the coming year. This is a statutory based process that has a major direct impact on anglers, commercial fishermen and fishing-related businesses such as guest houses, hotels and lodges, associated with each of these individual rivers. From discussions with the various stakeholders it has become clear that the decision makers are concerned that a social validation pilot could end up doing more harm than good in this very sensitive, legal and highly political process. So the Salmon CL Portal pilot will aim to involve users in the collection and monitoring of the data at the early stages to informally feed into the formal statutory process. This allows the HABITATS social validation approach to be piloted with the wider process of wild salmon monitoring and conservation that feeds into the SSC, without upsetting its legal process. But in a broader context it also provides a useful model and experience to make the regulation process more participative in the future, and for use by the National Inland Fisheries Forum that is being established in Ireland and to tie in with IFI’s outreach work to the wider community, especially schools and school-children later on. The IFI could also use the HABITATS social validation / INSPIRE open data access approach, with a similar social networking methodology to address other environmental issues, such as addressing Invasive Species and water research coordination in Ireland.Comments The aim is to use the HABITATS INSPIRE Social Validation approach to transform the data and modes of operation of this community from being mainly “information 15
  16. 16. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas push” to be being a lot more “User pull” by making the data open and usable online based on INSPIRE principles, open standards, and social networks to validate the utility and acceptability of the data. This will enable the development of services based on economies of scale using spatial information that adheres to a standard format that is widely adopted. This fits well into the HABITATS “Management of Natural Resource Management” cluster, and will engage Citizens (fishermen, anglers, fishing-related business, researchers and administrators/decision-makers) to be involved, for future sustainable operation.Use case Wild Salmon Monitoring and Management InternationallyActors Researchers, and Decision MakersTask The International SALSEA Group through collaboration in the FP7 SALSEA- Merge project is investigating and recording in 2 major databases, the migration and distribution of salmon in the North-East Atlantic. The Use Case is to make their extensive data open and accessible using INSPIRE principles. Based on their existing best-practice, this group is likely to impact on the proposed salmon-related data, metadata and services that will be input to the INSPIRE TWGs.Assumptions As the SALSEA Group wish to focus all of their efforts on their scientific work until the end of the SALSEA Merge project, it will be late 2011 before they will allow their data to be made available to a HABITATS pilot. They also wish to see how the Irish National pilot gets on and reuse its learning and approach.Description This group uses the widely used best-practice ICES WGNAPES database structure. WGNAPES is a permanent Group that will continue after the SALSEA-Merge project ends in 2011. ICES/WGNAPES is an Internal database composed of National databases. With some fields added for SALSEA-Merge and the Genetic database. So it is good practice and a permanent working group which should lead to very useful inputs to the 4 HABITATS INSPIRE themes.Comments This case with SALSEA-Merge is complex, and touches on the potentially high commercial value of the genetic databases, which is the reason for the reticence of the scientists involved in opening up their information to be INSPIRE compliant. On the other hand, interfacing INSPIRE-compliant databases with commercial services might be the most effective means for them to profit from their research. These issues will be further explored when MAC is able to more actively engage with the SALSEA-Merge stakeholders, after their current project work ends.3.3. LA PALMA PROTECTED MARINE AREAPartner: TRAGSATECLocation: The pilot takes place in the La Palma Protected Marine Reserve in the Canary Islands.Service and user scenario:Protected Marine Areas (PMA) are areas where it is intended to maintain a high environmental qualityin order to protect and even regenerate the flora and fauna in the area. For the development of thispilot, the La Palma’s Protected Marine Reserve (Canary Islands) in the Atlantic Sea has been chosen.The island of La Palma is suffering from a peculiar environmental sea degradation due to the coastplantations (basically banana plantations).The objective of this pilot is to develop a system based on ICT to automatically control theenvironment. The system will get data based on indicators from the coast area of the PMA, then 16
  17. 17. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasprocess them, analysed them and make them available so the authorities can take the best decisions.Data can be obtained through the use of sensors or, like in the case of the flora and fauna data, withhuman intervention.When using sensors and in order to make it simple for our purpose, the coast area of this PMA hasbeen divided into two sub-areas that will be defined as open sea (not more than 600 m from the coast)and border sea. With the same criteria, indicators that we will take into account will be: biologicalparameters or physical-chemical parameters and only the three among the most relevant ones will betaken for each one of the sub-areas.This division allows us to apply to each of the sub-areas the correct indicators since for example thereis no need to measure pesticides on the open sea. Here there are the indicators that will be measuredfor each of the sub-areas.When human intervention is necessary, the use of images and voice recognition systems will bestudied. All these data will be georeferenced in cartographic maps.Use of environmental data:If we want the public administration to accomplish environmental rules and regulations concerningwater, they must know the quality of it and investigate which activities are the main factors in waterdegradation. With the data obtained from this pilot, environmental information related to the quality ofthe water in the coast should be accessible to the authorities in order to help them to take correctdecisions concerning the environment.Some of these rules and regulations are the 2008/56/CE DIRECTIVE of JUNE 17th, 2008 where theenvironmental management policy for marine areas is mandatory for the member states.Stakeholders involved:The main stakeholder involved in the development of this pilot is TRAGSATEC. Some othercollaborators are companies manufacturing sensors and developing voice.Users involved:In the development of the pilot the users are the La Palma Protected Marine Reserve but in futureexploitation any Public Administration could be involved.Policy / business model:Coherent with TRAGSA role towards the Spanish Government.Cooperation/ data sharing:• Wild Salmon Monitoring (IE)• Economical activity at marine coastal benthic habitats (LV)• FAO• HSRS• IMCSUse casesUse case Indicators calculation and reportingScenario La Palma Protected Marine Area (ES)Actors • La Palma Public Administration 17
  18. 18. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • TragsaTask To analyse sensor measurements, and to calculate indicators on everyday basis to measure the quality of the sea. To publish this information.Assumptions Sensor data will be made available using standardised interfaces and will be accessible by analytical toolsDescription The data captured from sensors will be analysed on a regular basis and reports about quality of the sea will be prepared. The results of this analysis will be stored in form of tables, graphs, etc.Comments The analysis and indicators will be used by other use casesUse case Visualisation of resultsScenario La Palma Protected Marine Area (ES)Actors • La Palma Public Administration • Tragsa • Citizens, ScientistsTask Visualise reference data, sensors measurement and calculated indicatorsAssumptions Visualisation will help to make different types of data available in a user friendly form to support visualisation both on computers but also on mobile devicesDescription The system will support selection of data, maps and indicators and support visualisation in right formComments On the basis of user access rights different possibilities of visualisation will be available for users3.4. NATURAL RESERVEPartner: TRAGSATECLocation: This pilot is going to be developed for a small area in Madrid (Spain), El Campo del Moro,but the strength of the pilot is that if a standardization of the data and metadata modelling for this kindof environmental tourism is defined, some other standards will appear for the specific hardware that isneeded for its representation, and the idea of environmental tourism could equally be developed in thewhole Europe.Service and user scenario:The objective within a Nature Restricted Areas (NRA), as the European Nature 2000 Network definesit, is the survival of species in danger of extinction, contributing at the same time to soften the impactof human activities. They are the instrument to nature conservation in the European Union.For the development of this pilot obviously it is not possible to choose a NRA, but for the purposes ofthis pilot an interesting place has been chosen in Madrid.The objective of this pilot is to develop a system that, using real nature information and addingmetadata to real images (texts, images, sounds, etc.), allows improving environmental tourism with a 18
  19. 19. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituasreal nature observation. Introducing interpretation information and augmented reality we willparticularly protect fragile areas.The base information will be:• Cartographic information for long distance scenes (landscape)• Topographic information for short distance scenes (some trees, flowers, rocks…)On top of this cartographic/topographic information there are a lot of metadata that could begeoreferenced, as for example:• Nature data: species, flora and fauna, names,• Historic data: reconstruction of ruins, dates and facts• Landscape: name of villages, mountains, etc.Use of environmental data:Environmental information can be used in a wide range of areas apart from environmental educationor nature interpretation, it can also be used for historical or cultural heritage, evaluation of newedification impact, etc.Stakeholders involved:The main company involved in the development of this pilot is TRAGSATEC. Some othercollaborators are hardware manufacturing companies. The National Heritage of Spain is the mainstakeholder for this pilot.Users involved:In the development of the pilot the users are the Public Administration and tourists.Policy / business model:Coherent with TRAGSA role towards the Spanish Government.Cooperation/ data sharing:• Hiking Trip Planner (IT)• Sheep and Goat Herd Management (IT)• Czech National Forest Programme (CZ)• FAO• HSRS• IMCSUse casesUse case Using augmented reality for educational, research and awareness purposesScenario Natural Reserve (ES)Actors • Public Administration • Tragsatec 19
  20. 20. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas • Citizens, Scientists, StudentsTask Using augmented reality tools in terrain to combine reality with mapped objects or with artificial objects.Assumption To be able to select data on the basis of user position and user preferences froms existing catalogues. To design methods of visualisation of three dimensional objects on the basis of available dataDescription Users will use tools supporting user reality visualisation for educational or research purposes. On the basis of his position and user preferences (topic of interest) available data will be selected for visualisation. It will be necessary to not only design data models, but also methods of visualisation for concrete types of data. When a person move around in the terrain, augmented reality will be displayed to himComments The task will require additional types of information, like DSM information. It will be necessary to take not only the position, but also the azimuth of the view of a subject into consideration.Use case Using augmented reality for inventory and manage purposesScenario Natural Reserve (ES)Actors • Public Administration • Tragsatec • Citizens, Scientists, StudentsTask Using augmented reality tools in terrain to add and edit real objects with photo included.Assumption To be able to select data on the basis of user position and user preferences froms existing catalogues. To design methods of visualisation of three dimensional objects on the basis of available data. To add points and take photos for each of these.Description Users will use tools supporting user reality visualisation for editing geodata. On the basis of his position and user preferences (topic of interest) available data will be selected for visualisation and edition. It will be necessary allow add a photo to each new point.Comments The task will require additional types of information, like DSM information. It will be necessary to take not only the position, but also the azimuth of the view of a subject into consideration.3.5. HIKING TRIP PLANNERPartner: MadonieLocation: Madonie Park, Sicily (IT); widely replicable throughout the Mediterranean 20
  21. 21. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasService and user scenario:The Madonie Park in Sicily attracts thousands of visitors every year, including hikers who explore themostly mountainous 35,000 hectares; there are 6 mountains over 1,500m and several others well over1,000m. The highest, Pizzo Carbonara is 1,979m, second in Sicily only to the mighty Etna (3,323m).Hikers are attracted, in addition to the landscape, particularly by the park’s flora and wildlife. Indeed,there are over 2,600 different species of plants, many of which are endemic to the area.The Park Authority is currently developing a multimedia repertory of many of the park’s main features– including both natural elements and places of traditional farming and herding – and, in the context ofon-going initiatives, is developing an interactive multimedia map of the area that will allow hikers toplan visits as a function of the natural elements to see.The validation pilot in HABITATS will integrate habitats-related data into this map, to allow to viewbio-geographical regions within the park. In addition, use of mobile platforms (where coverage isavailable) will also be tested.Finally, the currently planned facility allowing for users to upload multimedia content and insertcomments and suggestions, will be enhanced to validate the possibility for users to insert contentthrough the SDI. The possibility to signal sightings of different species (i.e. through digital photos withtime date and location stamp) will also be integrated.Use of environmental data:This pilot will make significant use of the information in the regional Carta Natura database, and willalso access databases from other regions in order, for example, to compare habitats in differentgeographical contexts.In order to go toward a system “INSPIRE compliant” is necessary to make people, at Madonie Park,works in a way useful to realize some INSPIRE instances (such as metadata definition, organized wayto archive data (both spatial and non spatial, use of data located on a remote server accessible by webservices, publication of web service for data locally managed).The pilot will also explore the organisational issues in validating user-provided data.Stakeholders involved:This pilot is carried out within the Territorial Living Lab-Sicily partnership, which already includes arange of regional stakeholders including the Sicilian regional government, the CRES research centre,the University of Palermo, the ARCA innovation incubator, the Confindustria business association,etc. In addition, the pilot will also be carried out in collaboration with the national research centreCNR’s ICAR (Istituto di Calcolo e Reti ad Alte Prestazioni).Users involved:In the development of the pilot the users are the Public Administration and tourists.Policy / business model:The pilot is coherent with the Park’s mission but is also an element of the TLL-Sicily partnership’sinnovation piloting strategy.Cooperation/ data sharing:• Natural Reserve (ES)• Czech National Forest Programme (CZ)• ISPRA• FAO• HSRS 21
  22. 22. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas• IMCSPilot use casesUse case Park ManagementScenario Hiking Trip Planner (IT)Actors Park employersTask • Planning support • Operative terrain managementAssumptions New, and mainly mobile, access can bring better and more operational management into the parkDescription The system will offer access to relevant information to park management in office and terrain. The system will support planning and also realisation of activities in the park.Comments3.6. SHEEP AND GOAT HERDING MANAGEMENTPartner: MadonieLocation: Madonie Park, Sicily (IT); widely replicable throughout EuropeService and user scenario:In the Madonie Park, over 1,500m is dominated by the Madonie Forest while lower down the slopes,the locals continue to pursue millennial agricultural activities including sheep and cattle farming andthe cultivation of wheat, olives and fruit. This gives rise to specific traditions such as the seasonal“transumanza” when herds are moved from their summer to winter pastures and back, and contributesto the Madonie’s gastronomic specialties of meat, sausages, salami, cheese, olives, mushrooms, andfresh seasonal vegetables.Grazing, as is well known, has a significant environmental impact and therefore needs to be carefullymanaged in order to guarantee the long-term sustainability of the grazing habitat. For this reason, thePark Authority adopted a grazing plan and releases licences; according to the grazing plan the ParkAuthority rotates the assignment and utilization of grazing areas in order to not damage areas ofenvironmental interest with an excessive pressure due to the presence of herding activities. All thisshould be carried out also by adding new layers on the current condition of pastures and otherenvironmental parameters regarding the same areas. Besides the Park Authority is responsible forother actions of monitoring, maintaining the necessary fencing and other infrastructures, etc.This management activity uses the Park’s GIS system, but the decision-making processes, in the pasthas been generally based on experience and implicit knowledge. The validation pilot will provideupdated environmental data to support better informed decisions, but it it will also be a starting pointto regulate the production of data according to Inspire recommendations.The system is important as it is replicable in other Italian mountain parks which have the saneproblem.Use of environmental data: 22
  23. 23. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThis pilot will make significant use of the grazing plan imported in the WEBGIS as well as of someother geospatial layers as the ‘areas assignment plan’ and ‘animals position’ (the position is uploadedon Park Authority databases by tracking collars mounted on the neck of animal).Management activity is also based on information contained in the ISPRA Carta Natura-like databaserealized by Madonie Park Authority at a more detailed scale and also on recommendations comingfrom ISPRA partner itself that could be both partner and user (this last role for using webgis data andservices in order to write recommendations on the use of Madonie grazing areas). Joint managementscenarios are possible through the interconnection with similar habitats management systems in othercountries of Mediterranean area.Stakeholders involved:The pilot activity is useful not only for Park Authority, which is interested to manage grazing areas ina sustainable way, but also for different classes of stakeholders as: - Sheep and goat farmers; they are interested to obtain licence to use some areas inside the park forgrazing of their animals; - Owners of private areas usable for grazing - Dairy farmingUsers involved:The information made available in the development of project pilot e pilot activity could be used dailyby Madonie Park Authority personnel which has to manage the area using GIS.Information could be also useful to sheep and goat farmers that want to know the situation regardingareas assignment. But the information available as web services will be useful to researchers and ingeneral to people that could develop an activity based on Dairy farming (allevamento).Besides, and this is one of the most important aspects, the base data constitute the map on which theposition of animals will be shown thank to geospatial web service deployed by the WEBGIS server.Other categories indirectly interested are:- Schools- HikersPolicy / Business ModelThe data collection, once available through web service is in-line with Sicily Region policy forbuilding of an SDI, to be realized with contribution of different public body or institutions.Cooperation/ data sharing:The data are shared with all people interested to know about the use of grazing areas and relatedinformation inside the park.From other pilots here will be cooperation with• Natural Reserve (ES)• Economical activity at marine coastal benthic habitats (LV)• Czech National Forest Programme (CZ)• ISPRA• FAO• HSRS 23
  24. 24. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas• IMCSPilot use casesThere are many different use cases, two of which are here reported.Use case 1 Sheep and Goat Herding ManagementActors Personnel at Madonie Park AuthorityTask This is mostly an internal but fundamental task at Madonie Park Authority the requires the availability of geospatial data inside the whole Office and for external consultants (mainly researchers) that must help internal staff in managing the areas of the park. All this people access data by their GIS software or the WEBGIS platform, through geospatial web services INSPIRE compliant.Assumptions The proprietary databases can be made INSPIRE-compliant using the HABITATS Metadata profile in order to be accessed through the Sicily Region Portal using GIS or WEBGIS software compliant to OGC web services.Description People at Madonie Park Authority deal with the management of grazing areas in a sustainable way allowing shepherds to access to areas, assigned to each of them, for grazing of sheep and goats. The control of the impact of grazing on assigned areas is carried out by Park Authority Personnel and external experts. This requires also the production of new layers on the state of areas the must be in a format compliant to ISPIRE directive in order to be used in an appropriate way.Comments Data used for this task are: 1. Grazing plan; 2. Animals position distributed over the whole period of grazing; 3. State of conservation of areas (this includes some information such as level of pressure caused by animals).Use case 2 Tracking position of animals on a grazing area inside the parkActors Sheep and goat farmersTask To know, when necessary, the position of animals inside the grazing areas in order to retrieve them.Assumptions There is a server that, on demand by Sheep and goat farmers or shepherds, answers with the position of animals shown on a map of the area surrounding them, whose position is uploaded to the server, periodically, by gps-gprs tracking collars mounted on the neck of some animals.Description The system is composed by different segments or parts. The first one is a tracking collar that is mounted on the neck of each animal (shep or goat) whose position must be tracked; the collar contains a gps receiver and a gprs 24
  25. 25. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituas transmitter through which the position of the animal is sent at predefined time interval to a server in which position of animals is saved. The second one is the server on which the position of animals is saved: The server makes available web services which allow to show on a map the position of animals when this is requested by shepherds by their mobile smart-phone. The third one is the mobile phone by which is possible to call the phone number which corresponds to a specific collar or animal; this mobile phone should be equipped with an internet browser by which the position of animals is shown on a map downloadable from the server at Madonie Park Authority. .Comments .3.7. ECONOMICAL ACTIVITY AT MARINE COASTAL BENTHIC HABITATSPartner: IMCSLocation: Marine coastal areas of Latvia; replicable in other sites of the Baltic SeaService and user scenario:IMCS will cooperate with the Latvian Institute of Aquatic Ecology using the monitoring data ofcoastal benthic communities and related environmental parameters. The needs and requirements ofvarious stakeholders will be researched and afterwards IMCS will pilot the use of advanced interfacesto improve presentation, accessibility and use of the data. It will help in decision making for portconstruction measures, fisheries policy, wind mill development actions in order to use the benthichabitats in a sustainable way. The benthic habitats in Latvian coastal waters are the areas with thehighest biological diversity and partly covered by NATURA 2000 territories.Use of environmental data:The data on composition, abundance and dynamics of the benthic communities together with therelated environmental parameters (physico-chemical measurements) collected by the Institute ofAquatic Ecology, will be made accessible to provide scientifically based information to variousstakeholders carrying out different types of economical activity at the coastal areas of Latvian marinewaters.Stakeholders involved:Latvian Institute of Aquatic Ecology (LIAE) collects and owns the data, but reports it to the nationalenvironmental authorities and international data base of ICES. The data are used also in HELCOMenvironmental assessments. LIAE collaborates with several marine research institutes around theBaltic Sea. The service to be piloted will provide that data as high quality information to differentgroups involved in economical activities at the coastal areas.Users involved:The Pilot Service will enable citizens (fishermen) and institutions (ports, environmental boards) to beinvolved, for future exploitation.Policy / business model: 25
  26. 26. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasThe data collection is part of the Latvian National environmental policy, according to EU WaterFramework Directive and Habitats Directive. It is vaguely represented online and therefore theHABITATS pilot will explore making it available as an online service.Cooperation/ data sharing:• Wild Salmon Monitoring (IE)• La Palma Protected Marine Area (ES)• Sheep and Goat Herd Management (IT)• FAO• HSRS• IMCSUse casesUse case Marine coastal habitat data for construction activities and maritime spatial planningScenario Economical Activities (LV)Actors • Latvia Institute of Aquatic Ecology • IMCS • Citizens, Scientists, Students, Businessman’sTask Using WEB tools provide in well understandable way information about allowed activities in selected sea areas. Give information about limitations and information about involved/responsible organizations where to contact for more detailed information.Assumptions User to be able select interested area, choose interested activity and receive information about possibilities, rejection or acceptance of activity. To design solution for allowed restricted area identification and representation.Description Users will use tool to identify interested area for business or research purposes. On the basis of selected/drawn area (polygon of interest) using all available data will be calculated and returned information about limitations in selected area and list of recommended organizations to visit for more detailed clarifications.Comments The task will require additional types of information, like methodology of different factor combination results from GORWND project, and also additional data, like wind maps for best wind turbine locations. 26
  27. 27. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasUse case Data access, management and maintenanceScenario Economical Activities (LV)Actors • Latvia Institute of Aquatic Ecology • IMCS • Scientists, studentsTask Using tools users are able to find and access collected data and data sets, view and download data, users with rights are able to edit and add new data to defined layers.Assumptions To be able search and find data on the basis of selected area or selected theme from existing catalogue. To be possible to view or download found data. To be possible to add new spatial objects and to existing objects load new measurement and analysis records, add documents and pictures.Description All user will be able to search in existing catalogue and after that view and download data. Users with rights will be able to edit existing data and add new records. User will be able to load new survey and measurement and analysis result tables and link to existing spatial objects (e.g. monitoring stations), possibility to add any type remarks and documents to selected record/object in database.Comments3.8. NATIONAL FOREST PROGRAMMEPartner: FMILocation: Czech RepublicService and user scenario:The purpose of this use case to deliver and share the harmonised forest site data to be used as basis forthe definition of the suitable forest management practices. The geographic data of the forest siteclassification describe the permanent ecological conditions, ie. division of forests into segments withsimilar growth conditions. The outputs of forest site classification serves as a basis for determining theeconomic measures, and operational and production goals (Forest management plans, forestmanagement scheme). The importance of the outputs of forest typology was further strengthened inthe new political-economic-environmental conditions, which has also become the basis for theevaluation functions of forest ecosystems, forest valuation, or the creation of management plans forspecially protected areas.Tool for the classification of environmental conditions is the Forest site classification system thatdescribes the ecosystems with the potential vegetation. The major differentiation within the ecologicalconditions are:1. Vegetation tiers (altitudinal vegetation zones) - taking into account the gradient of vertical zoningof vegetation (LVS)2. Edaphic categories - reflecting a gradient of trophic conditions and hydricity3. Forest type complex - combination of vegetation tier and the edaphic category is means unit (SLT) 27
  28. 28. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU HabituasVegetation tier represents biocenological (geobiocenological) building unit, which reflects theinfluence of climate on the composition of biota of chtonophytic synusia (geobiocenoses) and which isdetermined by this composition. Vegetation tiers are differentiated by species that are in the first placetrees, or. shrub determinants of main canopy level of indigenous forest and shrubs communities andall chtonophytes, that react decisively to the length of the growing season and the negative effects ofclimate. This means that vegetation tiers are determinated according to presence and expressions ofliving trees. There are 10 vegetation zones1. Oak2. Beech-oak3. Oak-beech4. Beech5. Fir-beech6. Spruce-beech7. Beech-spruce8. Spruce9. dwarf pine10. alpineForest type complex is a basic unit, which involves similar elementary units (Forest type) according toecological affinity, according to their phytosociological similarity undergrowth and site conditions.Forest type complex is given by the combination of Vegetation tier and edaphic category. Forest typecomplex represent a natural forest ecosystems and all managed forests with same ecologicalconditions. Forest type complex are mapping units in the reconstruction maps.Timber transport technologies have the direct connection (link) with natural conditions of the site.According to the forest road network can be constructed the basic infrastructure for access to forestsite and is important for forest management. Based on transport accessing forestry harvestingtechnologies, silvicultural treatment and forest road network are constructed. Background of Jointrescue service aimed at navigation improvement for rescue service access in the forest complex (e.g.fire) is another significant area of model analysis in terms of Habitats project.The information from the FMI forest road network database serve the integrated rescue system tolocalize and reach the event of forest fire in short time. The further information derived from the forestsite maps (SLT) and digital terrain model (DTM) enhances the driver’s orientation and timeestimations. As there are similar activities in other the neighbouring countries (Slovakia, Austria), thispilot scenario can be used for the cross-border cooperation within the Habitats project.The biomass estimation from NFI data - The purpose of the use case is to test the Habitats technology(data models, metadata profiles, geoportal technology,…) for the presentation of the stand volumeestimates from the National Forest Inventory (NFI). This is the key estimate in several issues of theCzech National Forest Programme such as permanent forest monitoring, and the biomass estimationfor energetic purposes. Stand volume estimates can be also used in forest valuation processes, carbonstock reporting on both national and European level.Use of environmental data:The development of the forest scenario is focused on harmonisation of metadata, coordinate system,geometry, data models and sensor standardisation. For harmonisation tasks the following software 28
  29. 29. Date: 2011-08-01 Habitats INPIRE Networking ArchitectureDoc. Identifier: D 4.2.2Project: Social Validation of INSPIRE Annex III Data Structures in EU Habituastools and modules will be used: MIcKA, UMN MapServer, Intergraph platform, Geoserver, MapManetc. Several meeting and discussions with different stakeholders were organised to describe theHabitats Forest management pilot. The main purpose was to receive the feedback for the particularuser scenarios and to find out about their requirements. The questioners were structured according tothe stakeholder categories.The stand volume estimates from the National Forest Inventory (NFI) estimated for the district(regional) level, serve to identify the suitable candidate areas for wood and biomass energy industry(e.g. sites for building biomass power plants). Stand volume estimates can be also used in forestvaluation processes, carbon stock reporting, etc.NFP KA4 expert group, large variety of stakeholders is keen for using well-structured data of biomasspotentials from forests. The data of NFI will provide basic information on forests needed not only atthe national level. The problem is also assessed from the EU level.The Standing Forestry Committee ad hoc Working Group on mobilisation and efficient use of woodand wood residues for energy generation emphasized that: 1. Better understanding of the resource is only possible with sound basic data, which are often lacking in the context of predicting wood potential for mobilisation. There is a crucial need to analyse in greater detail the potential of wood supply on MS and regional level taking into account local conditions such as costs, ownerships patterns, quality requirements, infrastructure and environmental considerations. MS and regions should also conduct surveys on household consumption of wood for energy to gain a clear picture on energy usage. The Commission can facilitate the efforts through information exchange. Short to mid-term action required. 2. Monitoring and evaluation data are continuously needed in order to follow the developments in wood potential, supply and demand and to evaluate mobilisation efforts. The current levels of activity need to continue and be developed further. The Commission, MS and relevant international bodies need to periodically (3 – 5 years) update wood supply and wood use information, including wood for energy, processed wood fuels, post consumer recycled wood and wood waste streams. MS should also undertake wood fuel market reviews based on standardised nomenclature for trade statistics and conversion factors (e.g. MWh/GJ into cbm solid wood) to increase market transparency. The Commission and the MS should continue to cooperate on renewable energy statistics. Short-term and continuous action required.Stakeholders involved:The forest owners can be divided in 3 main categories: • Small forest owner - area up to 50 ha • Medium forest owner - area 50-500 ha • Large forest owner - area more then 500 haThe small forest owners need the information about the forest management scheme (LHO), where theyfind the basic information and claims for the management practices. Further, the information about thesubsidies and subsidy programmes in forestry.Data updates are performed online via a secure channel. All databases have mirror backup on thedifferent location due to safety. FMI began discussions with representatives of the firefighters, becauseof need to integrate data of forest road network for the system used. These steps require the design ofan interoperable data model, so that every data transfer can be carried out periodically. Both 29

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