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KCC Art 141 Chapter 2 Curriculum And Lesson Planning
 

KCC Art 141 Chapter 2 Curriculum And Lesson Planning

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    KCC Art 141 Chapter 2 Curriculum And Lesson Planning KCC Art 141 Chapter 2 Curriculum And Lesson Planning Presentation Transcript

    • Chapter 2 Curriculum Components and Identifying Student Art Progress
    • Stages of Artistic Development Developmental Stages in Children's Art Children all pass through the same stages of their development, but the pace of their development varies. The stages vary from child to child, however, are clearly seen with daily drawings that are kept and studied. Movement towards complexity takes the form of small changes rather than giant leaps. The scribbling stage : 2 - 4 Years The pre schematic stage: 4 - 7 Years The schematic stage: 7 - 9 Years The preteen stage: 9 - 11 Years The age of reasoning: 11 -13 Years The crises of adolescence: after 13 Years
    • Scribble to Mature Realism: SCRIBBLE Typically, children are about 18 months to 3 years old when they are at this stage of development. Children make random scribbles and explore materials in a playful way. At first the scribbles are uncontrolled and then progressively become controlled. Children are experimenting with holding a pencil (left or right handed). The drawer discovers and points to a familiar object found in the random scribble. This is called named scribble. Children are learning to talk about marks, color, etc.
    • PRE-SCHEMATIC STAGE
      • Ages 2 to 4 years old.
      • Colors are used unrealistically and children tend to use their favorite colors.
      • Draw simple people with few features.
      • Tadpole figure people are drawn with a large head on tiny body with extended arms.
      • Objects are floating in space - not anchored.
      • Figure is normally three heads high.
      • X-ray drawings - show interiors and exteriors at the same time.
    • SCHEMATIC STAGE
      • Ages 5 to 8 years old.
      • - Children have a set schema about a way of drawing.
      • - Might draw a fish in the same way in many drawings.
      • - Use more realistic color.
      • - Often make color choices based on stereotypical notions of the proper color of things such as a blue sky and green grass.
      • - A sky line and ground line start to show.
      • - More proportionate body and head and shows more detail.
      • Start to understand relationship between their art and their world.
      • - Create stories to go along with their drawings.
    • PRETEEN STAGE Ages 9 to 11 years old. - Incorporate more detail in drawings. - Want images to be very realistic and become frustrated if this cannot be achieved. - The "I can't draw" syndrome typically starts to emerge at this stage. - Use of perspective in space is developing.
    • The most obvious reason children draw is for the shear pleasure of it. How many times have we witnessed a small child completely engaged in their drawing and humming a joyful tune? We can probably remember our own spontaneous experiences as being pleasurable ones. Spontaneous is used to define a type of drawing that is free and without rules or limitations for the drawer. Spontaneous drawings encourage children to explore and experiment with their own thoughts and ideas while leaving a record of these on paper. This type of spontaneous drawing should be nurtured at all times. Children interact with their world and often use drawing as the medium to describe their experiences. Children's literacy skills are still developing - drawing allows them the means to communicate complex thoughts. Children's drawings tell us what they think and feel. Drawing empowers children to experiment and practice various drawing techniques and processes. This, of course, can be achieved through school art. A school drawing program teaches children to observe, create, express, and experiment with the principles and elements of drawing. School art will teach children the tools that are used for drawing. Drawing allows the child to invent. In their drawings children create objects, characters, and worlds that erupt from the child's imagination. These drawings are essential and help children develop a sense of self, what they like and dislike.
    • Age 6, crayon
    • Kindergarten Textbook pg 40 chart 2.4 When looking at a work of art, students are able to: - pick out an object that is different from the rest. - distinguish between bright and light, as well as dull and dark, colors. - recognize basic shapes such as squares, triangles, and circles. - identify types of lines, such as long and short, thick and thin, and straight and curved. Age 5, marker
    • Kindergarten Art Curriculum Line: identifying different types of line, incorporating continuous line, observing emotional qualities of line, constructing lines Shape: identifying basic shapes to create figures Color: identifying primary and secondary colors Texture: identifying and using different textures, simulating textures Pattern: identifying and constructing patterns Art Appreciation: introducing famous artists in history, using age-appropriate books, posters, and videos Left, age 4 watercolor and pencil Age 5, oil pastel
    • First and Second Grade Textbook pg 41 chart 2.4 When looking at a work of art, students are able to: - analyze similarities and differences. - learn and use new vocabulary. - identify details. - identify artistic media. - identify primary and secondary colors and discuss how color relates to feelings and moods. - describe various types of lines. - find basic geometric shapes and forms in their world—plants, animals, figures, etc. Age 6, crayon
    • Age 7, pastel and ink Age 7, watercolor and construction paper
    • First Grade Art Curriculum Line: identifying different lines and their emotive qualities, drawing lines to express mood, utilizing continuous line to construct drawings Shape: identifying geometric and organic shapes, utilizing organic and geometric shapes in creating paintings and drawings, appreciating and understanding shape Color: identifying primary and secondary colors, introducing warm and cool colors Texture: real vs. simulated textures, creating textures in a variety of media Form: introducing the concepts of 2-D and 3-D, mass, space Balance: introducing and exploring the concepts of symmetrical and asymmetrical balance Art Appreciation: exploring famous contemporary and historical artists Age 6, paint and crayon
    • Second Grade Art Curriculum Line : continuing and expanding the exploration of line Shape: further exploring concepts of geometric and organic shapes Color: identifying complementary colors; creating a color wheel to explore mixing and creating colors Pattern:  identifying and constructing rhythm through pattern, creating radiating patterns Form : constructing 3-D forms Art Appreciation: exploring and emulating the work of famous artists Multicultural integration : exploring the art and traditions of various cultures in correlation with core classroom curriculum Age 7, pen and colored pencil
    • Age 8, construction paper Age 8, crayon
    • Age 8, crayon, colored pencil, marker Age 8, oil
    • Third and Fourth Grade Textbook pg 42 chart 2.4 When looking at a work of art, students are able to: - discuss differences and similarities in form and shape of body parts and architectural elements. - identify three-dimensional forms such as cubes, spheres, and cones. - find examples of line repetition and pattern. - understand viewpoint, such as "bird's eye" (something depicted as if from a very high vantage point) and "worm's eye" (something depicted as if from a very low vantage point). - explain basic perspective using foreground, middle ground, and background. - identify genres such as portrait, still life, and landscape; and media such as marble, paint, photography, wood, etc Age 8, colored pencil
    • Third Grade Art Curriculum Line : continuing and expanding the exploration of line Shape : further exploring concepts of geometric and organic shapes Color: identifying complementary colors; using a color wheel to explore mixing and creating secondary, intermediate, and complementary colors, as well as shades and tints Principles of Art: introducing balance, movement, and contrast Art Appreciation : exploring and emulating the work of famous artists Multicultural Studies : exploring the art and traditions of various cultures in correlation with core classroom curriculum Age 9, acrylic
    • Age 8, watercolor Age 10, watercolor
    • Fourth Grade Art Curriculum Line: hatching and crosshatching lines to create value Form: identifying 3-D forms, mass, space, and creating forms Aesthetics: introducing the concept of aesthetics in students' own art through self-reflection and writing Art Appreciation: exploring and emulating the work of famous artists Multicultural Studies: exploring the art and traditions of various cultures in correlation with core classroom curriculum Age 9, marker Age 9, charcoal
    • Age 10, pastel
    • Age 10, pencil Age 11, acrylic
    • Fifth and Sixth Grade Textbook pg 43 chart 2.4 When looking at a work of art, students are able to: - identify light sources and discuss depiction of light and shadow. - identify positive and negative space. - discuss concepts of hue, value, and intensity in color. - analyze how an artist achieved a textural effect. - recognize genres and media. - speak to the impact a work of art has on their emotions. - recognize works of artists based on style. Age 11, watercolor
    • Fifth Grade Art Curriculum Line: creating complex drawings through the utilization of various lines Color: analogous and monochromatic color schemes Aesthetics: expanding the concept of aesthetics in students' own art through self-reflection, group critiques, and writing Art Appreciation: exploring, analyzing, and emulating the work of famous artists Multicultural Studies: exploring the art and traditions of various cultures in correlation with humanities curriculum Age 10, crayon
    • Age 11, watercolor Age 12, oil
    • Sixth Grade Art Curriculum Line: creating complex drawings through the utilization of various lines Space: introducing perspective and creating the illusion of space in drawings Composition: understanding the concept of composition in creating unique paintings and drawings Aesthetics: expanding the concept of aesthetics in students' own art through self-reflection, group critiques, and writing Art Appreciation: continuing to explore, analyze, and emulate the work of famous artists Multicultural Studies: exploring the art and traditions of various cultures in correlation with humanities curriculum Age 12, acrylic
    • Age 12, watercolor
    • Age 12, acrylic
    • Sample Lesson Plan
      • Title of Lesson: Sample
      • Grades: e.g. K–2, 3–5
      • Subjects: e.g. Visual Arts, English—Language Arts, History—Social Science
      • Time Required: In minutes, hours, or by class period
      • Featured Artworks/Examples: List the images you will use in the lesson.
      • Lesson Overview: This should be a short 1–2 sentence description that describes what students do in the lesson, and/or the main goal of the lesson.
      • Learning Objectives: Students should be able to:
      • - Finish sentence above with objectives for the lesson that tie into Lesson Steps and content standards.
      • - There is no limit on the number of Learning Objectives you can have, but more than three or four may indicate a lesson that’s too complicated.
      • The Learning Objectives should be MEASURABLE.
      • Materials:
      • - List supplies needed for the lesson
      • - This can include art supplies, books, etc.
    • Vocabulary: Any new words the students can learn Art History: A brief paragraph on how the lesson relates back to art Steps: 1. Steps for the lesson go here. 2. Include prompting questions, for example: - Look at the colors in this work of art. Which one did you see first? Was color the first thing that you noticed? What else caught your eye? - Take turns describing the lines and shapes that you see in this work of art. (For example, “I see a thin curving line.”) - Do you see movement in this work of art or does it seem still? Do the colors, lines, and shapes make it seem that way? How? - Is there a story in this work of art? How do the colors help to tell this story? - If you see a story, who or what do you think is the most important figure, shape, or object? What makes you think this? - Does anything you see happening in this work of art remind you of your life story, or of another story you know? 3. Tie the art-making activity back into the Learning Objectives for the lesson. Try not to tag an unrelated art-making activity at the end of the lesson. Think about how the skills students learn by doing an art activity carry over to the other skills you are teaching in the lesson. 4. Steps
    • Extensions: Using what the students learned in another way. How will this be used again or in connection with another lesson? Assessment: Review of objectives (testing), did students learn the objectives? How will you assess/measure student outcomes? Closure: Wrap up of the class – what happens next? Remember to write your lesson plan as if you have a substitute for the day and she knows nothing about teaching!!
    • TALK! TALK! TALK! Don’t!
      • When giving teaching instructions to your class -
      • don’t use so much language in guiding instruction.
      • speak in outlines not essays when you are giving your lessons. Students often miss the first and most critical thing said.
      • when giving oral directions, use a list not a paragraph. Reduce information to headlines and give students “just the facts”.
      • Repeat – tell them what you are going to tell them, then tell them, then tell them what you told them. Effective, structured repetition can be powerful rather than tedious.
      • use a simple “are you listening?” before you begin. Check for attention before you start speaking, don’t just speak into the air and expect students to catch it.
      • let students fill in the spaces – model oral language, no verbal diarrhea!
      • use visuals, lists and written support for all directions
      • use the KISS mantra – Keep It Short and Sweet when giving directions.
      • Remember most children DON’T need that much auditory instruction and many CAN’T handle it.