Cutting Water, Gas &Electricity CostsPractical Measures to IncreaseProfitabilityPresented by: Ben PearsonDate: 11 March 2012
Today            1.   About GreenChef            2.   Resource Pricing Trends            3.   Where is the Energy Used?   ...
About GreenChef            Energy Efficiency for Commercial KitchensSection 2
Focus Areas                     •    Cooking Appliances                     •    Kitchen Ventilation                     •...
Benefits            Benefits      1. Reduce Costs      2. Improve Profitability      3. Reduce GHG emissions!!!Section 2
Similar Programs                          Resource Pricing TrendsWork book 1 / Session 1
Energy Prices                                               • Electricity: 30% increase since 2007                        ...
QLD : Electricity Prices Electricity prices across Australia have increased by around 30% since 2006                      ...
QLD : Gas Prices                                                                                                          ...
What Does this Mean?     • Energy & water prices are increasing!     • Major ‘headwinds’ for SME’s     • High energy - low...
Tourism Impacts        • Carbon emissions price will apply to fuel in domestic aviation          and rail transport       ...
Where is Energy Consumed?                                  Energy use in                                  restaurants is  ...
Energy Intensity                         Kitchen                         Energy Footprint                                 ...
Energy Use in RestaurantsA single appliance can consume more energy per year than your                           entire ho...
Energy Saving Opportunities            Cooking AppliancesSection 6
Appliance SelectionSection 6
Appliance Selection                                                     Base               High      Difference           ...
S&S Schedules    • Low Hanging Fruit    • Relevant to all areas of      energy consumption NOT just      appliances    • S...
Example: Char GrillConsider this…..Rated Energy Input:                                    150 MJ/hrAssume Av. consumption:...
Example: Char Grill               •           Non-Thermostatic device               •           High energy - low efficien...
Example: Char Grill                            OFF 2 hrs               OFF 1 hr                                        1hr...
Example: Char Grill        Base Operating Cost:      $10,066/year        S&S Schedule Saves:         $2,182/year        Re...
Energy Saving Opportunities            Commercial Kitchen VentilationSection 7
Kitchen Ventilation                         Greasy Ceiling Tiles                           A Sure Sign of                 ...
Kitchen Ventilation                                                                    Spillage                          T...
Kitchen Ventilation                         Push Back Your AppliancesSection 7
Kitchen Ventilation                         Maximum Overhang                            (At least 150-200mm)              ...
Kitchen Ventilation            Centre Heavy Duty AppliancesSection 7
Kitchen Ventilation                         Add Side PanelsSection 7
Energy Saving Opportunities            RefrigerationSection 8
Refrigeration: Maintenance        Clean/clear evaporator & condensor coils        Ice             Debris            DustSe...
Refrigeration: Maintenance                              Example: Dirty Condensor Coils              1800              1600...
Refrigeration: Maintenance            Avoid Blocking Evaporator            Airflow is important for effective refrigeratio...
Refrigeration: Maintenance            Avoid Bending Aluminum Fins            If fins are bent or damaged, call a service t...
Refrigeration: Maintenance            Don’t Forget Your Ice MachinesMin. 15 cm clearanceSection 8
Refrigeration: Maintenance                          Replace Worn Door SealsWork book 1 / Session 1
Refrigeration: Strip Curtains            Reduce Warm Air Infiltration up to 75%Section 8
Refrigeration: Strip Curtains Work book 1 / Session 1
Refrigeration: Strip Curtains Work book 1 / Session 1
Refrigeration: Defrost Cycles• Defrost = 15% of total freezer  energy consumption• Minimize unnecessary defrost cycles  (4...
Refrigeration: Defrost Cycles                                      2AM                          8PM                       ...
Energy Saving Opportunities            Water Heating & UseSection 9
Water Heating & Use    6,500 litres/day    2.4 ML/year    That’s nearly an entire Olympic    Swimming Pool     and that’s ...
Water Heating & Use                         Water Heating Must Do’s            1. Control                                 ...
1. Control Re-circulation            Control re-circulation pump with a timer                      TURN OFF AT NIGHT      ...
-2. Insulate Piping     Insulate hot  Ex.water pipes$9-12      Savings     metre/year     where     practicalSection 9
3. Regulate Temperature        Regulate Temperature. Turn Down Thermostat   • Hot water in commercial kitchens need only b...
4. Check Pressure Relief                    Case Study                    Leaking Valve: 17 L/hr                    Water:...
LeaksConsider this…..Leak: 1.5 cups/minute (200KL/Year)Water Cost:                          $2.10/KLSewer Cost:           ...
Dish RoomWork book 1 / Session 1
Dish RoomWork book 1 / Session 1
Dish Room            A Costly Alteration   5.4 L/min rated nozzle                                  converted to 7.6 L/min ...
Defrost             Control Defrost Water UseSection 9
DefrostSection 9
DefrostSection 9
DefrostConsider this…..Defrost Water Use:   2.7 L/minute (162 L/hr)    Cost: $383/yrWater Cost:     $2.10/KLSewerperformed...
Defrost            or Dedicated Defrost Refrigerator• 9 hrs defrost/week @ 11 L/min =  $900/year• Use existing refrigerati...
Energy Efficiency Opportunities             Heating & CoolingSection 10
Patio Heaters• Radiate heat- absorbed by  people/objects in close proximity• Energy use 40-50MJ/hr• Effective heating area...
Patio Heaters   • Persons 2m from heater 2oC warmer   • Any closer up to 4-5 oC warmer   •   Distance Matters!   •   Wind ...
Patio Heaters         Install Wind Breaks to Negate Chilling EffectsSection 10
Patio Heaters                          An Innovative Approach                                        Press Here for On Dem...
Case Study: Heating Impacts                      Total Floor Space: 85m2                      Seating Capacity: 55        ...
Case Study: Heating Impacts                Electricity Costs ($)/Cover         0.80         0.75                        En...
Case Study: Heating Impacts  Consider this.....  Additional Electricity Costs:  $900/month x 3 months = $2,700  Additional...
Energy Saving Opportunities             LightingSection 11
Halogens      • Type of incandescent      • 50W Halogen most common FOH lamp      • Don’t forget the 15W transformer      ...
Halogens      Consider this:      • 50 x 65W Halogen (lamp + transformer)      • Cost $3,182/yrSection 11
Halogens     Replace with high efficiency alternatives      High Efficiency Halogens      Cost: $7-10/lamp      Suppliers:...
SummarySection 12
Summary                    If you had to fill up each appliance every                     morning, your perspective would ...
SummaryWork book 1 / Session 1
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Green Chef Presentation March 2012

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Presentation by Ben Pearson at Fine Food Queensland - March 2012. How restaurant, cafe, hotel and club operators can reduce water, gas, electricity and waste disposal costs.

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  • Restaurants are extremely energy intensive. Restaurants use about 5-7 times more energy per square foot than other commercial buildings, such as office buildings and retail stores. High volume quick-service restaurants (QSRs) may even use up to 10 times more energy per square foot than other commercial buildings.Much of the energy use in the commercial food service industry can be reduced through employing more efficient equipment and practices. (Source of chart: www.energy.ca.gov/2006publications/CEC-400-2006-005/CEC-400-2006-005.PDF and PG&E’s FSTC.)
  • Trainer NotesLets assume Ben’s Brasserie has a 4ft CharGrill and the CharGrill has a Rated Energy Input of 150MJ/hr. However I dont use it at its maximum energy input all of the timeSo, for arguments sake lets assume my average energy consumption for the device is 80MJ/hrThe CharGrill is on for 12.5 hrs per day and I am open 360 days year
  • Trainer NotesLets look at a your typical Char Grill and understand how an S&S schedule might apply to this appliance. CharGrills are open to the kitchen and radiate a lot of heat to the room. High energy use and low efficiency and represent one of the most expensive appliances to operateNon-ThermostaticDon’t have thermostats so they use energy at the same rate all day long or until you manually adjust them.Expensive to OperateAn average Char Grill uses 6-10 times the energy of an idling fryer. At its at the same rate whether its cooking 25 hamburgers or one chicken breast or is just ‘standing by’Energy costs for a chargrill depend on the size you operate (underfired char grills are generally biggest energy users) and whether you turn it down or off during slow periods.
  • Trainer NotesHave a look at the ceiling in the kitchen. Quite often this can tell you how your ventilation hood is performing. Yellow staining is a tell tale sign that the ventilation system is not functioning effectively.
  • Trainer NotesThe following image uses Schlieren optical system to detect the thermal plume emanating from a range top and show the impact of a makeup air diffuser positioned in front of the hood.Makeup air introduced in close proximity to an exhaust hood has the potential to interfere with the foods ability to capture and contain. Temperature of the locally supplied makeup air can also impact hood performance as air density impacts the dynamics of air movement around the hood. Generally hotter (32oC) air temps have a greater impact than cooler air. (24oC). In most temperate climates such as Sydney, evaporative cooling is an effective method of maintaining MUA temps within a range that is comfortable for kitchen staff and does not hamper hood performance.
  • Trainer NotesMake sure your appliances are pushed back against the wall so that they get the full benefit of the ventilation hood. If you don’t push the appliance back you quite often can an updraft flowing underneath and around the back of the appliance. This updraft interferes with the exhaust ventilation and forces the thermal plume for the appliance out into the kitchen. A hot kitchen means an unhappy chef and places increases the load on the AC system.If you cant push your appliances right back you might consider installing a stainless steel ledge to
  • Trainer NotesClose the gap andmaximise the area of overhang. Increase in overhang improves the ability of the hood to capture the plume . Larger overhangs (300mm) are recommended for appliances that create plume surges, such as convection and combination ovens, steamers and pressure fryers.
  • Trainer NotesTo get the maximum benefit of your ventilation hood make sure you centre your heavy duty appliances.
  • Trainer NotesAdd side panels to ensure that the replacement air is drawn across the front of the equipment, which improves containment of the thermal plume. Cost effective solution.Side panels:Permit a reduced exhaust rate which means smaller motor which in turn means reduced energy costsMitigate the effects of cross draftsPartial panels are considered as effective as full panels. Can also be used for single or double island canopy hoods.
  • Trainer NotesAir flow is an important part of refrigeration. When the coils are clogged and dirty, the compressor works harder and will fail sooner. So clean your evaporator coil (the cold one inside the refrigerator) and condensor coil (the hot one outside your refrigerator or on the roof) at least quarterly.
  • Trainer NotesBuild up of dirt, dust and grime reduces the capacity for condensor coils to transfer heat. Increase in residual heat - forces compressors to work harder to raise system pressure Increases energy consumption
  • Trainer NotesAvoid packing product around the evaporator coils as it will inhibit air flow.
  • Trainer NotesIf the aluminium fins are frozen, bent or damaged then call a qualified service technician and remember never use a caustic cleaner on these coils.
  • Trainer NotesTake a look at all the door seals / gaskets on all your refrigerators and replace any gaskets that are torn, cracked or worn out, or just plain missing. Always use the manufacturers specified replacement. A refrigerator door must seal completely to be effective. Remember you are not trying to keep cold air in. You are trying to keep the cold air in – you are trying to keep the hot humid kitchen air out!
  • Trainer NotesThe doors on refrigerators often get a bit of a hammering. It is not uncommon for the hinges or the door closers to be damaged thereby preventing the door sealing properly and allowing warm moist air to infiltrate the box.
  • Trainer NotesFind the time clocks that control your freezer defrost and set them properly. Time clocks might be located on top or underneath your freezers, on the wall or on the roof. There is a clock for each freezer. Usually you can reduce the daily number of daily defrost cycles from four to three and sometimes two. Each cycle should be about 15 minutes long. If you can try and avoid during Peak Periods. Thats the time when you pay the most for electricity. Also make sure that the evaporator drain line is heated and insulated so that the defrost condensate has some place to go. Improper defrosting can waste a lot of your money and compromise safe freezer temperatures.
  • Trainer NotesFind the time clocks that control your freezer defrost and set them properly. Time clocks might be located on top or underneath your freezers, on the wall or on the roof. There is a clock for each freezer. Usually you can reduce the daily number of daily defrost cycles from four to three and sometimes two. Each cycle should be about 15 minutes long. If you can try and avoid during Peak Periods. Thats the time when you pay the most for electricity. Also make sure that the evaporator drain line is heated and insulated so that the defrost condensate has some place to go. Improper defrosting can waste a lot of your money and compromise safe freezer temperatures.
  • Trainer Notes
  • Trainer NotesTo reduce operating costs associated with continuous operation of a circulation system, the recirc pump should be time controlled and operated only when the restaurant needs hot water. Adding a timer that turns the pump on shortly before restaurant staff begins preparation and off just before closing hours could save 8-10 hours of run time for a 2 meal per day restaurant.
  • Trainer NotesInsulate: By far the most effective solution (if not the most overlooked) to improve effectiveness of the distribution system to deliver hot water on demand.Fibreglass or foam insulation are used most commonly. This saves extends the cool down time, reduces operating cost and improves the effectivness of the distribution system to deliver hot water.
  • Trainer NotesIt is common to find hot water temperatures in restaurants elevated above 60 degrees celsius. A simple energy saving measure is simply to turn down the thermostat, as long as water temperatures remain around 50-60 degree range.
  • Trainer NotesWater heaters are most commonly hidden away in mechanical rooms allowing them to fly under the radar screen. Temperature Pressure Relief (TPR) valves are the safety mechanism that keeps modern water heaters from exploding when they become over heated. However, this device can fail over time, allowing hot water to leak unnoticed. 17 litres per hr = 280ML/minute
  • Trainer Notes
  • Trainer NotesHere’s an example of what can happen when employee’s take things into their own hands. The low flow pre-rinse spray valve had another few holes punched into it for good measure. As it turns out it was a fairly expensive increase, costing the business about $270 per year.
  • Trainer NotesLow flow high performance pre-rinse spray valves are the single most cost effective piece of equipment for water and energy savings in commercial kitchens. A busy full service restaurant can clock 3 hours of pre-rinse operation per day. Even at 1 hr of use per day the best in class 2.5 litres per minute valve can save $290 per annum when compared to the 4.4 litres per minute valve. When compares to a high flow valve at 17.0 litres per minute the savings would be around $2,081 annually.
  • Trainer NotesHere’s an example of what can happen when employee’s take things into their own hands. The low flow pre-rinse spray valve had another few holes punched into it for good measure. As it turns out it was a fairly expensive increase, costing the business about $270 per year.
  • Trainer NotesPractices that are generally not considered best practice in the restaurant industry!
  • Trainer NotesPractices that are generally not considered best practice in the restaurant industry!
  • Trainer NotesOutdoor patio heaters can be expensive to run. For example – Kingsley’s @ Wooly have a combination of in-ground and mobile patio heaters. The mobile patio heaters alone costs around $1,000 per month to run. Its worth turning them off when they are not in use.
  • Trainer NotesExample of innovation. A Canadian bar owner who was getting sick of his excessive gas bills. Asked the manufacturer to retrofit the existing patio heaters with an on-demand switch. When pressed the patio heater remained on for 30 minute intervals.
  • Trainer NotesReal restaurant, real figures, shall remain nameless to protect the innocent.Of the total floor space 25 m2 is outside and 60m2 is inside
  • Trainer NotesWould expect energy costs to increase, however it is the magnitude of the increase that is suprising.
  • Trainer NotesPatio Heaters x 3 rated at 38.5 MJConsuming 10 per week @ $20 each12 weeksCost $800/monthTotal additional cost being absorbed at a time when patronage has decreased due to winter
  • Green Chef Presentation March 2012

    1. 1. Cutting Water, Gas &Electricity CostsPractical Measures to IncreaseProfitabilityPresented by: Ben PearsonDate: 11 March 2012
    2. 2. Today 1. About GreenChef 2. Resource Pricing Trends 3. Where is the Energy Used? 4. Energy Saving Opportunities • Cooking Appliances • CKV • Refrigeration • Water Heating & Use • Heating & Cooling • LightingSection 2
    3. 3. About GreenChef Energy Efficiency for Commercial KitchensSection 2
    4. 4. Focus Areas • Cooking Appliances • Kitchen Ventilation • Refrigeration • Water Heating & Use • Heating & Cooling • LightingWork book 1 / Session 1
    5. 5. Benefits Benefits 1. Reduce Costs 2. Improve Profitability 3. Reduce GHG emissions!!!Section 2
    6. 6. Similar Programs Resource Pricing TrendsWork book 1 / Session 1
    7. 7. Energy Prices • Electricity: 30% increase since 2007 • Projected increase 40-60% by 2015 • Gas: 14% increase since 2008 • Projected increase 15-20% by 2014Section 3 (Source: Presentation to Multi-Party Climate Change Committee and Clean Energy Australia Report)
    8. 8. QLD : Electricity Prices Electricity prices across Australia have increased by around 30% since 2006 From the early 1990’s to mid 2000’s electricity prices in QLD tracked about 10% lower than the Australian average due to access to relatively cheap coal powered electricity generation. However major increases in network costs have now brought prices back to the national average.(http://www.climatechange.gov.au/government/initiatives/~/media/publications/committee/rod-sims-energy-market-outlook.ashx)Section 3
    9. 9. QLD : Gas Prices Higher than average gas prices in QLD reflect a comparatively small customer base and low rates of consumption, due to the warm climate. (Australian Energy Regulator (2009) State of the Energy Market 2009. Australian Competition and Consumer Commission )Section 3
    10. 10. What Does this Mean? • Energy & water prices are increasing! • Major ‘headwinds’ for SME’s • High energy - low margin hospitality businesses particularly vulnerable • First movers will maintain competitive edge!Section 3
    11. 11. Tourism Impacts • Carbon emissions price will apply to fuel in domestic aviation and rail transport • Implications for transport-reliant tourism (ie. remote destinations) • Greater public focus on environmental issues likely to influence consumer preferences towards more sustainable, less Where is the Energy Used? emissions-intensive tourism product Source: Victorian Employers Chamber of Commerce & Industry, December 2011SectionWork book 1 / Session 1 4
    12. 12. Where is Energy Consumed? Energy use in restaurants is dominated by food preparationSection 4
    13. 13. Energy Intensity Kitchen Energy Footprint YOUR KITCHEN IS BIGGER THAN YOU REALIZE!Section 4
    14. 14. Energy Use in RestaurantsA single appliance can consume more energy per year than your entire home! = $1,190/year 4.0t GHG emissionsSection 4
    15. 15. Energy Saving Opportunities Cooking AppliancesSection 6
    16. 16. Appliance SelectionSection 6
    17. 17. Appliance Selection Base High Difference Case Study: Char Grill Model Efficiency Initial Cost ($) $3,450 $5,000 $1,550 Annual Energy Consumption (MJ) 432,784 351,967 Annual Energy Cost ($) $8,656 $7,039 $1,617 10 Year Energy Cost (Discounted) $87,858 $71,446 TOTAL COST $91,308 $76,446 $14,862 Annual Savings: $1,617 Lifetime Savings: $14,862Section 6 Source: FSTC Energy Savings Calculator
    18. 18. S&S Schedules • Low Hanging Fruit • Relevant to all areas of energy consumption NOT just appliances • Successful requires understanding & commitment: Staff Induction!Section 6
    19. 19. Example: Char GrillConsider this…..Rated Energy Input: 150 MJ/hrAssume Av. consumption: 80 MJ/hrUsage: 16 hrs/dayOpen: 360 days /yearOperating Costs $10,066/yearBased on average daily consumption of 1,398 MJ/day x 360 days = 503280 MJ/year. Cost = $0.02/MJ Work book 1 / Session 1
    20. 20. Example: Char Grill • Non-Thermostatic device • High energy - low efficiency • Expensive to operate • Ideal Candidate for S&S Schedule Work book 1 / Session 1
    21. 21. Example: Char Grill OFF 2 hrs OFF 1 hr 1hr @ 50% Reduce Use: 3hrs/day 50% Power: 1hr/day Save $2,182/yrWork book 1 / Session 1
    22. 22. Example: Char Grill Base Operating Cost: $10,066/year S&S Schedule Saves: $2,182/year Revised Operating Cost: $7,884 22% SavingSection 6
    23. 23. Energy Saving Opportunities Commercial Kitchen VentilationSection 7
    24. 24. Kitchen Ventilation Greasy Ceiling Tiles A Sure Sign of Spillage The Cause?Section 7
    25. 25. Kitchen Ventilation Spillage Thermal Plume Schlieren Optical ImageWork book 1 / Session 1
    26. 26. Kitchen Ventilation Push Back Your AppliancesSection 7
    27. 27. Kitchen Ventilation Maximum Overhang (At least 150-200mm) Close the GapSection 7
    28. 28. Kitchen Ventilation Centre Heavy Duty AppliancesSection 7
    29. 29. Kitchen Ventilation Add Side PanelsSection 7
    30. 30. Energy Saving Opportunities RefrigerationSection 8
    31. 31. Refrigeration: Maintenance Clean/clear evaporator & condensor coils Ice Debris DustSection 8
    32. 32. Refrigeration: Maintenance Example: Dirty Condensor Coils 1800 1600 1400 $400/yr 1200 75% increase in $/year 1000 compressor head 800 pressure 600 = 35% increase in 400 energy consumption 200 Clean Dirty Consuming 20 kWh electricity per day with a clean coil Source: US Department of EnergySection 8
    33. 33. Refrigeration: Maintenance Avoid Blocking Evaporator Airflow is important for effective refrigeration!Section 8
    34. 34. Refrigeration: Maintenance Avoid Bending Aluminum Fins If fins are bent or damaged, call a service technicianSection 8
    35. 35. Refrigeration: Maintenance Don’t Forget Your Ice MachinesMin. 15 cm clearanceSection 8
    36. 36. Refrigeration: Maintenance Replace Worn Door SealsWork book 1 / Session 1
    37. 37. Refrigeration: Strip Curtains Reduce Warm Air Infiltration up to 75%Section 8
    38. 38. Refrigeration: Strip Curtains Work book 1 / Session 1
    39. 39. Refrigeration: Strip Curtains Work book 1 / Session 1
    40. 40. Refrigeration: Defrost Cycles• Defrost = 15% of total freezer energy consumption• Minimize unnecessary defrost cycles (4 cycles every 24 hours)• Use timers to control when defrost occurs Work book 1 / Session 1
    41. 41. Refrigeration: Defrost Cycles 2AM 8PM 7AM 2PMWork book 1 / Session 1
    42. 42. Energy Saving Opportunities Water Heating & UseSection 9
    43. 43. Water Heating & Use 6,500 litres/day 2.4 ML/year That’s nearly an entire Olympic Swimming Pool and that’s just the HOT water!Section 9
    44. 44. Water Heating & Use Water Heating Must Do’s 1. Control 2. Insulate 4. Check 3. RegulateSection 9
    45. 45. 1. Control Re-circulation Control re-circulation pump with a timer TURN OFF AT NIGHT Ex. Savings $800/yearSection 9
    46. 46. -2. Insulate Piping Insulate hot Ex.water pipes$9-12 Savings metre/year where practicalSection 9
    47. 47. 3. Regulate Temperature Regulate Temperature. Turn Down Thermostat • Hot water in commercial kitchens need only be set at 45 C (FSA) • Although 60-65 C is recommended to prevent bacterial or algal build up Set thermostat 5 C higher than required = $500 p.a.Section 9 Source: US Dept of Energy
    48. 48. 4. Check Pressure Relief Case Study Leaking Valve: 17 L/hr Water: 50oC Energy/Water Cost: $981/yr New Valve: $6.50Section 9
    49. 49. LeaksConsider this…..Leak: 1.5 cups/minute (200KL/Year)Water Cost: $2.10/KLSewer Cost: $0.86/KLWater Heating: $3.62/KLAnnual Cost: $1,309Calculations: Sewer costs assuming water use of 4,000 KL/yr, sewer discharge factor of 70% and sewer usage rate of$1.493/KLWater heating costs calculated for gas hot water system assuming $0.02/MJ and using calculations fromhttp://www.enviro-friendly.com/cost-of-hot-water.shtml
    50. 50. Dish RoomWork book 1 / Session 1
    51. 51. Dish RoomWork book 1 / Session 1
    52. 52. Dish Room A Costly Alteration 5.4 L/min rated nozzle converted to 7.6 L/min Increase $270/yrSection 9
    53. 53. Defrost Control Defrost Water UseSection 9
    54. 54. DefrostSection 9
    55. 55. DefrostSection 9
    56. 56. DefrostConsider this…..Defrost Water Use: 2.7 L/minute (162 L/hr) Cost: $383/yrWater Cost: $2.10/KLSewerperformed for if Cost: $0.86/KLWater Heating:/day 1 hr $3.62/KLSection 9
    57. 57. Defrost or Dedicated Defrost Refrigerator• 9 hrs defrost/week @ 11 L/min = $900/year• Use existing refrigeration ≈ $0 - but requires planning• Additional refrigerator ≈ $1,800 + $ 400/year for electricity• Payback ≈ 2 yearsSection 9
    58. 58. Energy Efficiency Opportunities Heating & CoolingSection 10
    59. 59. Patio Heaters• Radiate heat- absorbed by people/objects in close proximity• Energy use 40-50MJ/hr• Effective heating area 8-9m2• Operating Costs – up to $3.50/hr• Costs not accounted for in energy bills Section 10
    60. 60. Patio Heaters • Persons 2m from heater 2oC warmer • Any closer up to 4-5 oC warmer • Distance Matters! • Wind / Breeze – negates warming effect • Install windbreaks – use them! • Never run heaters over empty tables • Maintenance is criticalSection 10
    61. 61. Patio Heaters Install Wind Breaks to Negate Chilling EffectsSection 10
    62. 62. Patio Heaters An Innovative Approach Press Here for On Demand Patio HeatWork book 1 / Session 1
    63. 63. Case Study: Heating Impacts Total Floor Space: 85m2 Seating Capacity: 55 Open: B,L,D Av. Spend/ Cover: $59 Net Profit: $3.42 (5.8%) Heated by: • Gas Patio Heaters x 3 • Electric Radiant Heaters x 10 • Air ConditioningSection 10
    64. 64. Case Study: Heating Impacts Electricity Costs ($)/Cover 0.80 0.75 Energy Costs Per 0.70 Cover Increased 0.65 0.60 100% During Winter 0.55 0.50 Winter Spike 0.45 Cost: $2,500 per yr 0.40 0.35 0.30Section 10
    65. 65. Case Study: Heating Impacts Consider this..... Additional Electricity Costs: $900/month x 3 months = $2,700 Additional Gas Costs $800/month x 3 months = $2,400 Winter Spike Additional Heating Cost: Cost: $2,500 per yr $5,100How many additional covers? 1,491Section 10
    66. 66. Energy Saving Opportunities LightingSection 11
    67. 67. Halogens • Type of incandescent • 50W Halogen most common FOH lamp • Don’t forget the 15W transformer • Each lamp consumes 65W • AC has to work harder to counteract the heat emitted • Opportunity to utilise high efficiency alternativesSection 11
    68. 68. Halogens Consider this: • 50 x 65W Halogen (lamp + transformer) • Cost $3,182/yrSection 11
    69. 69. Halogens Replace with high efficiency alternatives High Efficiency Halogens Cost: $7-10/lamp Suppliers: GE, OSRAM Save $734/year 35W IRC Constant Colour Like for like replacementSection 11
    70. 70. SummarySection 12
    71. 71. Summary If you had to fill up each appliance every morning, your perspective would quickly change . . .Work book 1 / Session 1
    72. 72. SummaryWork book 1 / Session 1

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