Cutting gas, electricity & water costs in your club kitchen

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Presentation by Ben Pearson from AVANA Group to the Clubs+ Chefs Tw-Day Management Summit in Sydney, June 2012

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  • What are the benefits of GreenChef training:Save Energy (electricity, gas and water)Reduce your operating costsImprove your profitabilityReduce your Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG’s) Note: At the end of June 2007 there were 13,987 cafe and restaurant businesses operating in Australia. These businesses employed 145,546 people and generated income of $9.7M (an average of $693,700 per business). During 2006-07, operating profit before tax for these businesses was $368.3m and their operating profit margin was 3.8%.Source: http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/8655.0Main%20Features32006-07?opendocument&tabname=Summary&prodno=8655.0&issue=2006-07&num=&view= Note: A useful calculator for calculating GHG emissions can be found athttp://www.carbonneutral.com.au/carbon-calculator/energy.html In NSW:1,000kWh is equivalent to 1.06 tonnes of CO2.1,000MJ is equivalent to 0.07 tonnes of CO2.
  • Electricity BillsA typical electricity bill encompasses at least 4 different charges these include:Energy Charges: the amount of electricity consumed. The energy charges are divided into peak, shoulder and off peak. Importantly off peak is less than half the peak rate whilst the shoulder rate is almost comparable to the peak rate.Network Charges: A network charge is a ‘use of system fee’. This is passed onto the customer, for the use of the electrical network infrastructure. The amount charged is regulated by the Australian Energy Regulator (AER). Note: DUOS Distribution Use of System: refers to the network charges for the use of the distribution network. Network charges are also divided into peak, shoulder and off peak. Market Charges:Ancillary services are those services used by Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) to manage the power system safely, securely and reliably. These services maintain key technical characteristics of the system, including standards for frequency, voltage, network loading and system restart processes.Other Charges: description are as per the bill Discussion Point: Why have we seen such dramatic increases in network charges over the past few years? Network charges have been affected by the increasing cost of sourcing longer-term financing arising from the GFC. Network costs have also been under pressure by the need to compete for technical and engineering staff with the still expanding resources sector in a relatively tight labour market.  Energy Charges: 41%Network Charges: 46%Market Charges: 0.5%Other Charges: 9.9%Gas BillsGas bills are a lot easier to interpret than electricity bills. The particular bill provided by AGL shows that pricing is per a demand base tariff that actually decreases with increased levels of consumption. Not really much of an incentive to use less!Based on the bills provided it appears that gas is about 3-4 times cheaper than electricity. However, generally speaking gas appliances are less efficient than electric.Water BillsComprise of two elements:1. Fixed ChargesWater ServiceWastewater/Sewerage Service2. Usage ChargesWaterWastewater
  • Energy & water prices are increasing throughout AustraliaIntroduction of a carbon price will represents a portion of the increase, however there are other driversUtility costs typically represent 3-6% of a businesses total operating costs. Significant increases in energy prices will have the impact of reducing profitability.There are a number of strategies that can be implemented that will a. help to offset the impact of the price increases and b. reduce energy demand. These strategies underpin the GreenChef program and will be discussed in detail during today’s workshop.
  • The pie chart provides a breakdown of energy use in commercial kitchens in the USA. The data are broadly representative of Australian kitchens. The majority of energy consumed by restaurants occurs in the kitchen where the cooking appliances are concentrated. The types of cooking appliances are often governed by the menu. A large proportion of these appliances are usually gas fired.Space heating and water heating each account for 19% of the energy consumed. It is important to note that many restaurants are sub-let as part of larger premise and as such share their heating/ventilation infrastructure (HVAC). The restaurant does not pay directly for heating energy consumption. HVAC costs are typically addressed in rental outgoings. The other area of heating that tends to be overlooked (because it is not purchases from a utility company) in the total energy costs is the cost of running gas heaters.
  • Cooking appliances can consume up to 35% of the total energy used by a commercial kitchen.To understand this a little better lets look at the energy consumed by your typical deep fryer, most kitchens have at least one, many have two, some have more. A single fryer can consume as much energy as your average 4 bedroom family home. This is quite astounding when you consider that your typical fryer spends 75% of its time idling (ie. Not in use).Consider this, a typical kitchen required to feed 200 people over a 2hr service period is likely to have the following cooking equipment1 x gas bratt pan, 2 x gas deep fat fryers, 1 x electric filter unit, 1 x gas salamander, 1 x electric 6 grid combi oven, 1 x electric 10 grid combi oven, 1 x gas open top range, 1 x gas solid top range, 1 x electric pressure steamer, 1 x electric tilting kettle. If you include kitchen ventilation and make-up air you will The energy required to power this equipment on a daily basis is substantial.
  • The following slide provides a 2006 quote from The New York Times. The NYT examined the energy efficiency of commercial kitchens and concluded that restaurants were the automotive equivalent of a hummer. The fuel efficiency of a Hummer is approximately 3.8km per litre (subject to model).
  • An example of the differences in operating costs Annually & over a 10 year period for 2 models of Char Grill – a base model and a high efficiency model. The upfront cost for the High Efficiency model is $1,550 more than the Base model. If you were to select on basis $$ price alone you would select the base model. However, what the data shows is that the additional cost of the high efficiency model could be offset in the first 12 months of operation. If we look at this over a 10 year period this translates to a $15,000 difference in operating costs.
  • If you have a Rational combi oven in your kitchen you might like to think about how you operate the device. When an oven is not in use it is often left to idle. They are often not turned off because they are in constant use and because of the time that it takes to get them up to operating temperature.Idling the device in Manual Mode will consume 36MJ has per hr and consume nearly 110 litres of water per hour. In SCC mode the oven does not maintain a set cavity temperature and therefore does not consume any gas or water. This calculation assumes that the oven is idling at 180 degrees Celsius in Manual Mode Notes: Rational combi-oven’s can be operated in two modes:Self Cooking Centre (SCC) ModeManual ModeThe SCC Mode gives the oven the ability to measure and adjust temperature, humidity and cook time during the cooking event.The Manual Mode allows the operator to select specific temperature and humidity settings. In the Manual mode the operator can select a:Convection oven dry heat only modeSteam only mode andCombination of dry heat and steam modes.FSTC (2006) Rational Model SCC 62G Gas Combination Oven Performance Test. FSTC Report#5011.06.10. Food Service Technology Centre July 2006.
  • Lets compare the operating costs between Manual Mode and Self Cooking Centre Mode Assume that the oven is on 12 hrs per day and cooks about 100kg of food per day 365 days per year.
  • SS schedules are one of the simplest and most cost effective ways to reduce energy consumption in commercial kitchens. They provide the staff with guidance as to when appliances should be turned on, off and/or reduced to half power.It is important to note that the SS Schedules don’t only apply to cooking appliances, they may also be relevant to other areas of the operation such as lighting.SS Schedules are important because appliances are often turned ‘on’ first thing in the morning when the kitchen brigade arrive and are only turned ‘off’ at the end of service. In some restaurants this can see some appliances being ‘on’ for 16 hours per day.Some reasons given for appliances being turned ‘on’, when they are not required include:Confusion as to how long it takes a particular appliance to warm up to operating temperature;Turning appliances ‘on’ to heat up the kitchen on a cold morning;Turning appliances on well before they are required on the off chance that they fail before service (thereby allowing Chef to contact a service technician so that the problem can be fixed.
  • Trainer NotesLets look at a your typical Char Grill and understand how an S&S schedule might apply to this appliance. CharGrills are open to the kitchen and radiate a lot of heat to the room. High energy use and low efficiency and represent one of the most expensive appliances to operateNon-ThermostaticDon’t have thermostats so they use energy at the same rate all day long or until you manually adjust them.Expensive to OperateAn average Char Grill uses 6-10 times the energy of an idling fryer. At its at the same rate whether its cooking 25 hamburgers or one chicken breast or is just ‘standing by’Energy costs for a chargrill depend on the size you operate (underfired char grills are generally biggest energy users) and whether you turn it down or off during slow periods.
  • Trainer NotesThis hypothetical example is designed to show how an SS schedule could potentially be applied to a chargrill.Gas fired chargrills are a heavy duty appliance that can be costly to operate. The chargrill has a rated energy input of 150 MJ/hr. However, we would not expect to it to consume energy at this rate for the duration of service. Instead we will pick a more conservative demand load of 80MJ/hr (53% of the rated energy input).If our restaurant operates 16hrs per day & 360 days per year then we would be looking at an operating cost of approximately $10,000 per year for a single appliance! Rated Energy Input: This is the data plate rating and is the maximum load that an appliance will draw. This is usually expressed as kW for electrical appliances and MJ for gas appliances.Demand Load: This is the actual load that the appliance will draw when in use.
  • Trainer NotesIf we look at the energy consumption profile of the char grill we can see thatthey use energy at the same rate all day long or until they are manually adjusted. In this instance we have chosen a demand load of 80MJ/hr. Additional Notes: Depending on the model, a char grill can use 6-10 times more energy than an an idling fryer. Its the same rate whether its cooking 25 hamburgers or one chicken breast or is just ‘standing by’.Energy costs for a chargrill depend on the size you operate (under fired char grills are generally biggest energy users) and whether you turn it down or off during slow periods.
  • Lets look at how a SS schedule may apply to this appliance. In the example instead of turning the device on at 7.00 am (when Chef arrives) it is instead turned on at 9.00 am.During the day, between service, the char grill was not turned off but instead turned down (50% power). Another way of achieving this result would be to turn one (of the two) grill plates off completely during this period.The could also be turned off an hour earlier in the evening.The total result achieved through a 3 per day reduction in use and 1 hr at 50% power. is $2,182 which is a 22% saving.Additional Notes: we recognise that this is a hypothetical example and may not necessarily be practical, however it serves to highlight how a SS schedule can be utilised in a restaurant environment.
  • Trainer NotesHave a look at the ceiling in the kitchen. Quite often this can tell you how your ventilation hood is performing. Yellow staining is a tell tale sign that the ventilation system is not functioning effectively.
  • Trainer NotesThe following image uses Schlieren optical system to detect the thermal plume emanating from a range top and show the impact of a makeup air diffuser positioned in front of the hood.Makeup air introduced in close proximity to an exhaust hood has the potential to interfere with the foods ability to capture and contain. Temperature of the locally supplied makeup air can also impact hood performance as air density impacts the dynamics of air movement around the hood. Generally hotter (32oC) air temps have a greater impact than cooler air. (24oC). In most temperate climates such as Sydney, evaporative cooling is an effective method of maintaining MUA temps within a range that is comfortable for kitchen staff and does not hamper hood performance.
  • Trainer NotesMake sure your appliances are pushed back against the wall so that they get the full benefit of the ventilation hood. If you don’t push the appliance back you quite often can an updraft flowing underneath and around the back of the appliance. This updraft interferes with the exhaust ventilation and forces the thermal plume for the appliance out into the kitchen. A hot kitchen means an unhappy chef and places increases the load on the AC system.If you cant push your appliances right back you might consider installing a stainless steel ledge to Close the gap andmaximise the area of overhang. Increase in overhang improves the ability of the hood to capture the plume . Larger overhangs (300mm) are recommended for appliances that create plume surges, such as convection and combination ovens, steamers and pressure fryers.
  • Trainer NotesClose the gap andmaximise the area of overhang. Increase in overhang improves the ability of the hood to capture the plume . Larger overhangs (300mm) are recommended for appliances that create plume surges, such as convection and combination ovens, steamers and pressure fryers.
  • Trainer NotesAdd side panels to ensure that the replacement air is drawn across the front of the equipment, which improves containment of the thermal plume. Cost effective solution.Side panels:Permit a reduced exhaust rate which means smaller motor which in turn means reduced energy costsMitigate the effects of cross draftsPartial panels are considered as effective as full panels. Can also be used for single or double island canopy hoods.
  • Trainer NotesThe following image uses Schlieren optical system to detect the thermal plume emanating from a range top and show the impact of a makeup air diffuser positioned in front of the hood.Makeup air introduced in close proximity to an exhaust hood has the potential to interfere with the foods ability to capture and contain. Temperature of the locally supplied makeup air can also impact hood performance as air density impacts the dynamics of air movement around the hood. Generally hotter (32oC) air temps have a greater impact than cooler air. (24oC). In most temperate climates such as Sydney, evaporative cooling is an effective method of maintaining MUA temps within a range that is comfortable for kitchen staff and does not hamper hood performance.
  • Trainer NotesAir flow is an important part of refrigeration. When the coils are clogged and dirty, the compressor works harder and will fail sooner. So clean your evaporator coil (the cold one inside the refrigerator) and condensor coil (the hot one outside your refrigerator or on the roof) at least quarterly.
  • Trainer NotesBuild up of dirt, dust and grime reduces the capacity for condensor coils to transfer heat. Increase in residual heat - forces compressors to work harder to raise system pressure Increases energy consumption
  • Trainer NotesHot air rises - that’s why the evaporator coils are located on the roof of the refrigerator.Avoid packing product around the evaporator coils as it inhibits air flow. Air flow is critical to effective operation!
  • Air circulation is critical for effective operation. In this photo we see that the dishwasher cleaning chemicals have been packed around the ice machine, leaving no room for air circulation.
  • Trainer NotesTake a look at all the door seals / gaskets on all your refrigerators and replace any gaskets that are torn, cracked or worn out, or just plain missing. Always use the manufacturers specified replacement. A refrigerator door must seal completely to be effective. Remember you are not trying to keep cold air in and keep the hot humid kitchen air out!  Note: Informational video re: how to replace and clean door seals (gaskets) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1EIJhQ-qp3I
  • Trainer NotesStrip curtains are designed to keep the cold air in. Effective use of strip curtains can reduce heat ingress by up to 75%. Other strategies for reducing heat ingress include:closing doorways and switching off lights, which can save up to 10 %.maintaining insulation and door sealsreducing heat from lighting by installing energy efficient lighting that produces less heatcooling the product as much as possible before placing in refrigerated areas using plastic strip curtains or swinging doors for frequently opened areas
  • Trainer NotesFind the time clocks that control your freezer defrost and set them properly. Time clocks might be located on top or underneath your freezers, on the wall or on the roof. There is a clock for each freezer. Usually you can reduce the daily number of daily defrost cycles from four to three and sometimes two. Each cycle should be about 15 minutes long. If you can try and avoid during Peak Periods. Thats the time when you pay the most for electricity. Also make sure that the evaporator drain line is heated and insulated so that the defrost condensate has some place to go. Improper defrosting can waste a lot of your money and compromise safe freezer temperatures.
  • Trainer NotesFind the time clocks that control your freezer defrost and set them properly. Time clocks might be located on top or underneath your freezers, on the wall or on the roof. There is a clock for each freezer. Usually you can reduce the daily number of daily defrost cycles from four to three and sometimes two. Each cycle should be about 15 minutes long. If you can try and avoid during Peak Periods. Thats the time when you pay the most for electricity. Also make sure that the evaporator drain line is heated and insulated so that the defrost condensate has some place to go. Improper defrosting can waste a lot of your money and compromise safe freezer temperatures.
  • The following example shows how the water usage profile for a casual dining restaurant (bar and full service dining room) with seating capacity for 192. Hot water is provided via a 400 litre storage tank.The profile indicates a hot water requirement of 7,900 litres/day which is equivalent to 2.9 ML per year (if restaurant is open for 365 days/year).If we were to apply the current Sydney Water pricing for water use, disposal and Energy Australia’s charge for water heating we are looking at an annual water cost of $22K.Staff arrive at 0500hrs and peak water consumption appears to occur between 0500-0700 hrs. There is a short spike around midday during lunch service but the majority of the water is consumed when dinner service starts at around 1800hrs and does not finish until around 0030hrs when the kitchen closes.There is a consistent 10-25 litres per minute being used from 5 pm to midnight. Source http://www.fishnick.com/publications/fieldstudies/Commercial_Water_Heating_Systems.pdf
  • Trainer NotesInsulate: By far the most effective solution (if not the most overlooked) to improve effectiveness of the distribution system to deliver hot water on demand.Fibreglass or foam insulation are used most commonly. This saves extends the cool down time, reduces operating cost and improves the effectivness of the distribution system to deliver hot water.
  • Trainer NotesInsulate: By far the most effective solution (if not the most overlooked) to improve effectiveness of the distribution system to deliver hot water on demand.Fibreglass or foam insulation are used most commonly. This saves extends the cool down time, reduces operating cost and improves the effectivness of the distribution system to deliver hot water.
  • Trainer NotesIt is common to find hot water temperatures in restaurants elevated above 60 degrees celsius. A simple energy saving measure is simply to turn down the thermostat, as long as water temperatures remain around 50-60 degree range.
  • Toilet urinals – one of the most common ‘leaks’. Excuse the pun. A cold water leak but nonetheless very expensive if left unchecked. Obviously we didn’t measure the exact amount of water being leaked by this urinal, however 2.0 litres per minute would be conservative.
  • Trainer NotesThe following graph shows a 24 hr flow rate profile for a single pre-rinse spray valve monitored from 7.00 am to 1.00am when the restaurant closed . In this particular example the total water use from the pre-rinse spray valve over the course of the day was a staggering 14,160 litres. After hours cleaning averaged around 2,100 Litres per hour.Source: Don Fisher, D (2011) Emerging Patterns from 15 Field Monitoring Projects in Commercial Foodservice Facilities. ACEEE Water Heating Forum May 11th, 2011. Fisher Nickel & PG&E Food Service Technology Centre.
  • Trainer NotesLow flow high performance pre-rinse spray valves are the single most cost effective piece of equipment for water and energy savings in commercial kitchens. A busy full service restaurant can clock 3 hours of pre-rinse operation per day. Even at 1 hr of use per day the best in class 2.5 litres per minute valve can save $290 per annum when compared to the 4.4 litres per minute valve. When compares to a high flow valve at 17.0 litres per minute the savings would be around $2,081 annually.
  • Trainer NotesPractices that are generally not considered best practice in the restaurant industry!
  • There are a couple of options for defrosting - how about using your existing refrigerator, there is no additional cost, it just requires a little bit of planning.  Alternatively, if you have the space you can opt for a dedicated defrost refrigerator. Lets say you are doing 9 hrs defrost per week @ 9 litres per minute this will cost you around $750 per year in water and sewer costs. The payback period will be about 2.4 years.
  • Programmable thermostats are a cost effective way to control your air conditioning system. The primary advantage is that not only can you specify an optimal temperature range, they allow you to adjust these ranges depending upon the time of the day. If you already have them make sure that the batteries are being changed on a regular basis. If you don’t have them make sure you install ones with locking covers or that are remotely controllable. You can almost guarantee that one persons ‘warm balmy day’ is another’s ‘polar icecap’. These are the ones that generally take temperature control into their own hands.It makes no sense, to having your air conditioning working hard when there are no patrons in the restaurant.
  • Sometimes you can be a little bit more Prescriptive!
  • Patio heaters radiate heat, this heat is absorbed by the people/objects that are in close proximity.Each patio heater has effective heating area of 8-9m2Persons 2m from heater 2oC warmerAny closer up to 4-5oC warmerThey can consume up to 40-50MJ/hr which means they cost about $3.50 /hr to operate.Typically the energy costs (bottled LPG) are not accounted for in a company’s energy bills.
  • Trainer NotesReal restaurant, real figures, shall remain nameless to protect the innocent.Of the total floor space 25 m2 is outside and 60m2 is inside
  • Trainer NotesWould expect energy costs to increase, however it is the magnitude of the increase that is suprising.
  • Trainer NotesPatio Heaters x 3 rated at 38.5 MJConsuming 10 per week @ $20 each12 weeksCost $800/monthTotal additional cost being absorbed at a time when patronage has decreased due to winter
  • Cutting gas, electricity & water costs in your club kitchen

    1. 1. Cutting Electricity, Gas &Water Costs in Your ClubKitchenPresented by: Ben PearsonDate: 5 June 2012
    2. 2. Today’s Focus1. Key Drivers: Utility Pricing2. Where is the Energy Used?3. Energy Saving Opportunities: 20 Tips4. Summary@GreenChefNews Section 2
    3. 3. Cutting Costs: 20 Tips• Cooking Appliances• Kitchen Ventilation• Refrigeration• Water Heating & Use• Heating & Cooling• Lighting@GreenChefNews Section 2
    4. 4. Benefits 1. Reduce Operating Costs 2. Reduce GHG Emissions 3. Improve Profitability@GreenChefNews Section 2
    5. 5. Utility Prices
    6. 6. Energy Prices • Billing Unit = Kilowatt Hours (kWh) • 1000 Watts = 1kW • Price : $0.17-$0.25 kWh • Typical Cost: $0.30-$0.80/Cover • Billing Unit = Megajoules (MJ) • 1,000,000 Joules = 1 MJ • Price : $0.015-$0.02/MJ • Typical Cost: $0.20-$0.50/Cover • Billing Unit = Kilolitres (kL) • 1,000 litres = 1 kL • Water & Disposal Price : $3.60/kL • Typical Cost: $16-18/day@GreenChefNews Section 3
    7. 7. Energy Prices• Electricity: 30% increase since 2007• Projected increase 40-60% by 2015• Gas: 14% increase since 2008• Projected increase 15-20% by 2014@GreenChefNews Section 3
    8. 8. What Does this Mean?• Utility prices are increasing!• Major ‘headwinds’ for SME’s• High energy - low margin hospitality businesses particularly vulnerable• First movers will maintain competitive edge! @GreenChefNews Section 3
    9. 9. Energy & Water Consumption in Clubs
    10. 10. Energy Consumption in Clubs? Cost ($)/Day/Visitor Electricity $0.17-$0.90 Gas Costs $0.03-$0.07Greene, M & O’Donnell, A. (2009). Sustainable Clubs: Dispelling the Myths. Powerpoint Presentation prepared by Clubs’ SustainableFutures to RSL and Services Clubs Association. October 2009. Source: US Environmental Protection Agency @GreenChefNews Section 4
    11. 11. Restaurant Energy Consumption Office Refrigeration Equipment Ventilation Other 6% 1% 5% 8% Cooling 8% Cooking Appliances 23% Lighting 11% Water Heating Space Heating 19% 19% Source: US Environmental Protection Agency@GreenChefNews Section 4
    12. 12. Energy Consumption in Clubs?Source: Greene, M & O’Donnell, A. (2009). Sustainable Clubs: Dispelling the Myths. Powerpoint Presentation prepared by Clubs’Sustainable Futures to RSL and Services Clubs Association. October 2009. @GreenChefNews Section 4
    13. 13. Energy Consumption in Clubs?Cooking & Refrigeration 10%Air Conditioning 5%Kitchen Ventilation 3%Lighting 3%Total 21%@GreenChefNews Section 4
    14. 14. Water Use in Clubs?Source: Sydney Water Corporation (2009) Best Practice Guidelines for Water Efficiency in Clubs. @GreenChefNews Section 4
    15. 15. Water Use in Clubs? Main areas of water use: • Basins & Sinks: rinsing food scraps and grease from plates before washing • Food Preparation: thawing or blanching off & cooling pasta • Pot washing: use of pre-rinse spray guns • Cooking Appliances: Water-cooled wok stoves, rice steamers & combi-ovens • Dishwashers & glass washers • Icemakers • Cleaning@GreenChefNews Section 4
    16. 16. Water Use in Clubs? Cost/kL Water $2.10 Wastewater Disposal & Processing $2.06 Hot Water Heating $3.62 Total $7.78Source: Sydney Water Corporation (2009) Best Practice Guidelines for Water Efficiency in Clubs. @GreenChefNews Section 4
    17. 17. Water Use in Clubs? Club Water Usage / Cover (Litres) Good < 35 Fair 35-45 Poor >45Source: Sydney Water Corporation (2009) Best Practice Guidelines for Water Efficiency in Clubs. @GreenChefNews Section 4
    18. 18. Water Use in Clubs? Cost ($)/1,000 Covers Good <$272 Fair $272-$350 Poor >$350Source: Sydney Water Corporation (2009) Best Practice Guidelines for Water Efficiency in Clubs. @GreenChefNews Section 4
    19. 19. Energy Use in RestaurantsA single appliance can consume more energy per year than your entire home! = $1,190/year 4.0t GHG emissions @GreenChefNews Section 4
    20. 20. Energy Use in Restaurants“If restaurants were we automobiles they would be Hummers”Shaping Restaurants to BeModels of EfficiencyBy LAURA NOVAK May 17, 2006@GreenChefNews Section 4
    21. 21. Energy Saving OpportunitiesCooking Appliances
    22. 22. Appliance Selection@GreenChefNews Section 6
    23. 23. Tip # 1: Appliance Selection Base High Difference Case Study: Char Grill Model Efficiency Initial Cost ($) $3,450 $5,000 $1,550 Annual Energy Consumption (MJ) 432,784 351,967 Annual Energy Cost ($) $8,656 $7,039 $1,617 10 Year Energy Cost (Discounted) $87,858 $71,446 TOTAL COST $91,308 $76,446 $14,862@GreenChefNews Section 6
    24. 24. Appliance OperationCompare idle energy rates between operating modes! Energy Water Rate Idle Rate (litres/hr) (MJ/h)Manual 36 96.5Mode*SCC Mode 0 0 * Combination Setting: Dry Moist & Heat Rational SCC62G@GreenChefNews Section 6
    25. 25. Appliance OperationLets compare operating costs between ModesConsider this…..Operating Time/Day: 12 hrsOpen: 365 days /yearFood Cooked/Day: 100 kg@GreenChefNews Section 6
    26. 26. Tip # 2: Appliance Operation Energy Costs ($) Manual Mode $2,991 SCC Mode $1,290 Operate in SCC Mode & Save $1,701 pa@GreenChefNews Section 6
    27. 27. S&S Schedules• Low Hanging Fruit• Relevant to all areas of energy consumption NOT just appliances• Successful requires understanding & commitment: Staff Induction!@GreenChefNews Section 6
    28. 28. S&S Schedules Ex. Char Grill• Non-Thermostatic device• High energy - low efficiency• Expensive to operate• Ideal Candidate for S&S Schedule @GreenChefNews Work book 1 / Session 1
    29. 29. S&S SchedulesConsider this…..Rated Energy Input: 150 MJ/hrAssume Av. consumption: 80 MJ/hrUsage: 16 hrs/dayOpen: 360 days /yearOperating Costs $10,066/year@GreenChefNews Work book 1 / Session 1
    30. 30. S&S Schedules@GreenChefNews Work book 1 / Session 1
    31. 31. S&S Schedules OFF 2 hrs OFF 1 hr 1hr @ 50%@GreenChefNews Work book 1 / Session 1
    32. 32. Tip # 3: S&S SchedulesRevised Operating Schedule…..Current Operating Cost: $10,066Revised Operating Cost: $7,884 Implement S&S Schedule & Save $2,182 (22%)@GreenChefNews Section 6
    33. 33. Energy Saving OpportunitiesCommercial Kitchen Ventilation
    34. 34. Kitchen VentilationGreasy Ceiling TilesA Sure Sign of SpillageThe Cause?@GreenChefNews Section 7
    35. 35. Kitchen Ventilation@GreenChefNews Work book 1 / Session 1
    36. 36. Push Back Appliances@GreenChefNews Section 7
    37. 37. Tip #4: Push Back Appliances Maximum Overhang (At least 150-200mm) Close the Gap@GreenChefNews Section 7
    38. 38. Tip # 5: Add Side Panels @GreenChefNews Section 7
    39. 39. Kitchen Ventilation@GreenChefNews Work book 1 / Session 1
    40. 40. Energy Saving OpportunitiesRefrigeration
    41. 41. Refrigeration MaintenanceClean/clear evaporator & condensor coils Ice Debris Dust@GreenChefNews Section 8
    42. 42. Tip # 6: Maintenance Example: Dirty Condensor Coils 1800 1600 1400 $400/yr 1200 75% increase in $/year 1000 compressor head 800 pressure 600 = 35% increase in 400 energy consumption 200 Clean Dirty@GreenChefNews US Department of Energy Source: Section 8
    43. 43. Tip # 7: Operation Avoid Blocking Evaporator Airflow is important for effective refrigeration!@GreenChefNews Section 8
    44. 44. Tip # 8: Air Flow Don’t Forget Your Ice Machines Min. 15 cm clearance@GreenChefNews Section 8
    45. 45. Tip # 9: Fridge Seals Replace Worn Door Seals@GreenChefNews Work book 1 / Session 1
    46. 46. Strip Curtains Reduce Warm Air Infiltration up to 75%@GreenChefNews Section 8
    47. 47. Strip Curtains@GreenChefNews Work book 1 / Session 1
    48. 48. Strip Curtains@GreenChefNews Work book 1 / Session 1
    49. 49. Defrost Cycles• Defrost = 15% of total freezer energy consumption• Minimize unnecessary defrost cycles (4 cycles every 24 hours)• Use timers to control when defrost occurs@GreenChefNews Work book 1 / Session 1
    50. 50. Tip # 11: Defrost Cycles 2AM 8PM 7AM 2PM@GreenChefNews Work book 1 / Session 1
    51. 51. Energy Saving OpportunitiesWater Heating & Use
    52. 52. Water Heating & Use6,500 litres/day2.4 ML/yearThat’s nearly an entire OlympicSwimming Pooland that’s just theHOT water!@GreenChefNews Section 9
    53. 53. Water Heating & Use No Insulation = Heat Loss = Wasted $$$@GreenChefNews Section 9
    54. 54. Tip # 12: Insulate Hot H2O Pipes Ex. Savings $9-12 metre/year@GreenChefNews
    55. 55. Tip # 13: Regulate Hot H2O Temp • Hot water @ taps need only be set at 45°C • 60°C required to prevent bacterial build up Set thermostat 5oC lower Save $500 paSource: US Dept of Energy@GreenChefNews Section 9
    56. 56. Tip #14: H2O LeaksConsider this…..Leak: 2.0 litres/minute (1,051 KL/Year)Water Cost: $2.10/KLSewer Cost: $0.86/KLAnnual Cost: $3,111@GreenChefNews
    57. 57. Dish Room@GreenChefNews Work book 1 / Session 1
    58. 58. Tip #15: Dish Room@GreenChefNews
    59. 59. Tip # 16: WELSWater Efficiency Labelling & Standards (WELS) Scheme• Taps• Pre-Rinse Spray Guns• Urinals• Toiletswww.waterrating.gov.au@GreenChefNews
    60. 60. Defrost H2O Use Control Defrost Water Use@GreenChefNews Section 9
    61. 61. Tip #17: Defrost H2O UseConsider this…..Water Use: 4 L/minuteWater Cost: $2.10/KLSewer Cost: $0.86/KL Cost: $518/yr if performed for 2 hrs /day@GreenChefNews Section 9
    62. 62. Energy Efficiency OpportunitiesHeating & Cooling
    63. 63. Thermostats Summer: 22-25°C Winter: 20-22°C@GreenChefNews Section 10
    64. 64. Tip # 17: Thermostats Be Prescriptive if NecessaryEnergy use falls by 4-5%for every degree that youincrease your thermostattemperature duringsummer (Source US EPA 2010) Set thermostat 1oC lower/higher & Save $400 pa @GreenChefNews Section 10
    65. 65. Tip # 18: Patio HeatersConsider this…..No Patio Heaters: 5Usage: 4 hrs/dayDuration: 18 weeksTotal Operating Hr: 2,520Operating Cost: $3.50/hrTotal Cost: $8,820 Reduce Use by 1 hr per day & Save $2,205 (25%)@GreenChefNews Section 10
    66. 66. Tip # 19: Wind Breaks Wind Breaks Negate Chilling Effects@GreenChefNews Section 10
    67. 67. Case Study: Heating CostsTotal Floor Space: 85m2Seating Capacity: 55Open: B,L,DAv. Spend/ Cover: $59Net Profit: $3.42 (5.8%)Heated by:• Gas Patio Heaters x 3• Electric Radiant Heaters x 10• Air Conditioning@GreenChefNews Section 10
    68. 68. Case Study: Heating Costs Gas & Electricity Costs ($)/Cover 0.80 0.75 0.70 0.65 0.60 0.55 0.50 0.45 0.40 0.35 0.30@GreenChefNews Section 10
    69. 69. Case Study: Heating ImpactsConsider this.....Additional Electricity Costs:$900/month x 3 months = $2,700Additional Gas Costs$800/month x 3 months = $2,400Additional Heating Cost: $5,100How many additional covers? 1,491@GreenChefNews Section 10
    70. 70. Energy Saving OpportunitiesLighting
    71. 71. Lighting• 50W Halogen most common lamp FOH• Don’t forget the 15W transformer• AC has to work harder to counteract the heat emitted• Opportunity to utilise high efficiency alternatives & NOT compromise lighting quality@GreenChefNews Section 11
    72. 72. LightingConsider this…..No Lamps: 50Total Watts: 65WDuration: 15 hrs/dayCost: $0.18/kWTotal Cost: $3,203 pa@GreenChefNews Section 11
    73. 73. Tip # 20: LightingReplace Existing Halogens with High Efficiency Alternatives Cost: $7-10/lamp Suppliers: GE, OSRAM 35W IRC Constant Colour Like for like replacementUse high efficiency alternatives & Save $739 (23%) @GreenChefNews Section 11
    74. 74. Summary
    75. 75. Savings Summary Tip # Saving 1 Appliance Selection $1,617 2 Appliance Operation $1,701 3 S&S Schedules $2,182 7 Refrigeration Maintenance $400 13 Regulate Water Temp $500 14 Leaks $1,309 18 Program Thermostat $400 19 Patio Heaters $2,205 20 Energy Efficient Lighting $739 Total $11,053@GreenChefNews
    76. 76. Summary If you had to fill up each appliance every morning, your perspective would quickly change . . .@GreenChefNews
    77. 77. Summary@GreenChefNews
    78. 78. Training WorkshopsSydney: 26 June 2012Cost: $395 ppavanagroup.com.au/greenchef@GreenChefNews
    79. 79. Stay InformedJoin the Sustainable Food Service Revolution: Follow us on twitter @GreenChefNews Or join us on facebook facebook.com/avanagreenchef Contact: Ben Pearson ben.pearson@avanagroup.com.au@GreenChefNews

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