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2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
2012 SAP Insider Keynote
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2012 SAP Insider Keynote

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This is a copy of my 2012 SAP Insider Singapore Keynote presentation. Here is the link to recording if you want to here the panel discussion as well http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYaz3r9fS2I

This is a copy of my 2012 SAP Insider Singapore Keynote presentation. Here is the link to recording if you want to here the panel discussion as well http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYaz3r9fS2I

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  • Companies in top 50 of Fortune 1000: ICBC #7, PetroChina #7, China Contruction Bank #13, Agricultural Bank of China #19, Bank of China #21, Sinopec-China Petroleum #24, Toyota Motor #25, Samsung Electronics #26, China Mobile #31, Mitsubishi UFJ Financial #36, Nippon Telegraph & Telephone #46, Commonwealth Bank #47 & BHP Billiton #49India internet usage: 8+%Singapore internet usage: 77+%
  • http://visual.ly/asia-pacific-web-what-do-1-billion-people-do-internetConsiderable mobile and Internet growth still to come – pennetration less than 25% - NA @ 75+%, EU @ ~60%Only 33% check bank accounts in Europe and US229M of 901M Facebook usersYOY growth of Facebook usersSouth Korea – 94%India – 69%Thailand – 41%
  • End: 5 mins
  • As the business world changes the decision making process in organizations is about to shift dramatically. The number of users who will need to access analytics will rise to 50% of all employees by 2014. By my calculations that number will grow to 75% by 2020. This represents a fundamental shift; the base of decision making is being distributed further into your organization. You no longer have just senior executives making decisions and pushing those down to consumers. It is the consumers who are now the ones driving decisions and pushing organizations forward. Businesses must be thinking about how they are going to support this fundamental shift. Enabling users to make better decisions is a huge challenge and introduces risk as essentially all decisions, no matter how material they seem are big decisions at the point an individual or team makes them. Today, the majority of companies report less than 10% of employees have any access at all to analytics. <<DRAW>> When you put that into the context of some of the largest companies today, that’s a huge leap to make in a very short amount of time. Think about Proctor and Gamble with 129k employees. They will need to go from enabling analytics for 13k employees to almost 100k. And what about Walmart with its 2.2m employees? They will be shifting from 220k to 1.6m. For your own organization, you are looking at moving from <<insert 10% of your prospect’s number of employees>> to <<insert 75% employees>>. On top of this growing need, it’s no secret that the amount of data you must manage is growing dramatically as well. In fact, it’s growing at a rate of 80% every year. <<DRAW>> The impact of this data explosion is hard to conceptualize, so take this personal example as context: <<Use your own big data example with social media, mobile devices, etc. For example, here is the story Eric Fearday tells:My dad is a farmer in Southern Illinois. I gave him an iPad for his 75th birthday two months ago. And in those two months, he has generated more data than he had in the prior 75 years of his life. Additionally, my dad is a customer of a tractor supply vendor, and for the last 20 years, that vendor has had no idea who my dad was or what kind of customer he’s been to them. Now that he has this tractor supply app on his iPad—which he absolutely loves—that company has more data on my dad’s needs and buying behavior than they ever had before. They now have the opportunity—and challenge—to make meaningful sense from all that data to influence the way he makes his decisions.>> Managing, ensuring the validity, and making sense of all that data is an overwhelming task.  And it’s this need for analytics by a growing base of users, <<DRAW “USERS” AND ARROW>> coupled with increasing volumes and the variety of data, <<DRAW “DATA” AND ARROW>> that is creating a flashpoint. <<DRAW FLASHPOINT>> This is a critical inflection point in the evolution of today’s enterprise, the social enterprise; one that represents both a challenge and a huge opportunity. We’ve seen something similar like this before when the introduction of the web changed our environment by creating a content explosion that we were hungry to consume. Think about how this has impacted each and every one of our lives; think about how this has changed your expectations in the way you use and access data.Consider a common situation that happens all the time for business travelers. Imagine you arrive in an unfamiliar city and realize you forgot your phone charger. You don’t resolve a problem like this by asking a front desk person for help—like you may have done in the past. Today, you ask Google maps a question and it tells you there is a Walgreens right down the street. But your expectations go even further than that because you don’t want to just know where its is, but how long it will take you to get there and the best route. You may also decide you want to meet your team for dinner close by and tell them how to get there. Consumer expectations have changed dramatically and you’re solving more complex problems faster and in new ways to make life easier. In effect making bigger decisions.Contrast that with the corporate world, in which you get a meeting request for a conference room you’ve never been to in a huge building on an unfamiliar campus. It takes you 30 minutes to find your room and you have no way of knowing whether there’s a break room nearby so you can get coffee, or if you’ll have access to a printer to prepare materials. So your needs and expectations in your personal life are dramatically different from your corporate experience. And that disconnect is agitating the flashpoint.
  • As the business world changes the decision making process in organizations is about to shift dramatically. The number of users who will need to access analytics will rise to 50% of all employees by 2014. By my calculations that number will grow to 75% by 2020. This represents a fundamental shift; the base of decision making is being distributed further into your organization. You no longer have just senior executives making decisions and pushing those down to consumers. It is the consumers who are now the ones driving decisions and pushing organizations forward. Businesses must be thinking about how they are going to support this fundamental shift. Enabling users to make better decisions is a huge challenge and introduces risk as essentially all decisions, no matter how material they seem are big decisions at the point an individual or team makes them. Today, the majority of companies report less than 10% of employees have any access at all to analytics. <<DRAW>> When you put that into the context of some of the largest companies today, that’s a huge leap to make in a very short amount of time. Think about Proctor and Gamble with 129k employees. They will need to go from enabling analytics for 13k employees to almost 100k. And what about Walmart with its 2.2m employees? They will be shifting from 220k to 1.6m. For your own organization, you are looking at moving from <<insert 10% of your prospect’s number of employees>> to <<insert 75% employees>>. On top of this growing need, it’s no secret that the amount of data you must manage is growing dramatically as well. In fact, it’s growing at a rate of 80% every year. <<DRAW>> The impact of this data explosion is hard to conceptualize, so take this personal example as context: <<Use your own big data example with social media, mobile devices, etc. For example, here is the story Eric Fearday tells:My dad is a farmer in Southern Illinois. I gave him an iPad for his 75th birthday two months ago. And in those two months, he has generated more data than he had in the prior 75 years of his life. Additionally, my dad is a customer of a tractor supply vendor, and for the last 20 years, that vendor has had no idea who my dad was or what kind of customer he’s been to them. Now that he has this tractor supply app on his iPad—which he absolutely loves—that company has more data on my dad’s needs and buying behavior than they ever had before. They now have the opportunity—and challenge—to make meaningful sense from all that data to influence the way he makes his decisions.>> Managing, ensuring the validity, and making sense of all that data is an overwhelming task.  And it’s this need for analytics by a growing base of users, <<DRAW “USERS” AND ARROW>> coupled with increasing volumes and the variety of data, <<DRAW “DATA” AND ARROW>> that is creating a flashpoint. <<DRAW FLASHPOINT>> This is a critical inflection point in the evolution of today’s enterprise, the social enterprise; one that represents both a challenge and a huge opportunity. We’ve seen something similar like this before when the introduction of the web changed our environment by creating a content explosion that we were hungry to consume. Think about how this has impacted each and every one of our lives; think about how this has changed your expectations in the way you use and access data.Consider a common situation that happens all the time for business travelers. Imagine you arrive in an unfamiliar city and realize you forgot your phone charger. You don’t resolve a problem like this by asking a front desk person for help—like you may have done in the past. Today, you ask Google maps a question and it tells you there is a Walgreens right down the street. But your expectations go even further than that because you don’t want to just know where its is, but how long it will take you to get there and the best route. You may also decide you want to meet your team for dinner close by and tell them how to get there. Consumer expectations have changed dramatically and you’re solving more complex problems faster and in new ways to make life easier. In effect making bigger decisions.Contrast that with the corporate world, in which you get a meeting request for a conference room you’ve never been to in a huge building on an unfamiliar campus. It takes you 30 minutes to find your room and you have no way of knowing whether there’s a break room nearby so you can get coffee, or if you’ll have access to a printer to prepare materials. So your needs and expectations in your personal life are dramatically different from your corporate experience. And that disconnect is agitating the flashpoint.
  • As the business world changes the decision making process in organizations is about to shift dramatically. The number of users who will need to access analytics will rise to 50% of all employees by 2014. By my calculations that number will grow to 75% by 2020. This represents a fundamental shift; the base of decision making is being distributed further into your organization. You no longer have just senior executives making decisions and pushing those down to consumers. It is the consumers who are now the ones driving decisions and pushing organizations forward. Businesses must be thinking about how they are going to support this fundamental shift. Enabling users to make better decisions is a huge challenge and introduces risk as essentially all decisions, no matter how material they seem are big decisions at the point an individual or team makes them. Today, the majority of companies report less than 10% of employees have any access at all to analytics. <<DRAW>> When you put that into the context of some of the largest companies today, that’s a huge leap to make in a very short amount of time. Think about Proctor and Gamble with 129k employees. They will need to go from enabling analytics for 13k employees to almost 100k. And what about Walmart with its 2.2m employees? They will be shifting from 220k to 1.6m. For your own organization, you are looking at moving from <<insert 10% of your prospect’s number of employees>> to <<insert 75% employees>>. On top of this growing need, it’s no secret that the amount of data you must manage is growing dramatically as well. In fact, it’s growing at a rate of 80% every year. <<DRAW>> The impact of this data explosion is hard to conceptualize, so take this personal example as context: <<Use your own big data example with social media, mobile devices, etc. For example, here is the story Eric Fearday tells:My dad is a farmer in Southern Illinois. I gave him an iPad for his 75th birthday two months ago. And in those two months, he has generated more data than he had in the prior 75 years of his life. Additionally, my dad is a customer of a tractor supply vendor, and for the last 20 years, that vendor has had no idea who my dad was or what kind of customer he’s been to them. Now that he has this tractor supply app on his iPad—which he absolutely loves—that company has more data on my dad’s needs and buying behavior than they ever had before. They now have the opportunity—and challenge—to make meaningful sense from all that data to influence the way he makes his decisions.>> Managing, ensuring the validity, and making sense of all that data is an overwhelming task.  And it’s this need for analytics by a growing base of users, <<DRAW “USERS” AND ARROW>> coupled with increasing volumes and the variety of data, <<DRAW “DATA” AND ARROW>> that is creating a flashpoint. <<DRAW FLASHPOINT>> This is a critical inflection point in the evolution of today’s enterprise, the social enterprise; one that represents both a challenge and a huge opportunity. We’ve seen something similar like this before when the introduction of the web changed our environment by creating a content explosion that we were hungry to consume. Think about how this has impacted each and every one of our lives; think about how this has changed your expectations in the way you use and access data.Consider a common situation that happens all the time for business travelers. Imagine you arrive in an unfamiliar city and realize you forgot your phone charger. You don’t resolve a problem like this by asking a front desk person for help—like you may have done in the past. Today, you ask Google maps a question and it tells you there is a Walgreens right down the street. But your expectations go even further than that because you don’t want to just know where its is, but how long it will take you to get there and the best route. You may also decide you want to meet your team for dinner close by and tell them how to get there. Consumer expectations have changed dramatically and you’re solving more complex problems faster and in new ways to make life easier. In effect making bigger decisions.Contrast that with the corporate world, in which you get a meeting request for a conference room you’ve never been to in a huge building on an unfamiliar campus. It takes you 30 minutes to find your room and you have no way of knowing whether there’s a break room nearby so you can get coffee, or if you’ll have access to a printer to prepare materials. So your needs and expectations in your personal life are dramatically different from your corporate experience. And that disconnect is agitating the flashpoint.
  • As the business world changes the decision making process in organizations is about to shift dramatically. The number of users who will need to access analytics will rise to 50% of all employees by 2014. By my calculations that number will grow to 75% by 2020. This represents a fundamental shift; the base of decision making is being distributed further into your organization. You no longer have just senior executives making decisions and pushing those down to consumers. It is the consumers who are now the ones driving decisions and pushing organizations forward. Businesses must be thinking about how they are going to support this fundamental shift. Enabling users to make better decisions is a huge challenge and introduces risk as essentially all decisions, no matter how material they seem are big decisions at the point an individual or team makes them. Today, the majority of companies report less than 10% of employees have any access at all to analytics. <<DRAW>> When you put that into the context of some of the largest companies today, that’s a huge leap to make in a very short amount of time. Think about Proctor and Gamble with 129k employees. They will need to go from enabling analytics for 13k employees to almost 100k. And what about Walmart with its 2.2m employees? They will be shifting from 220k to 1.6m. For your own organization, you are looking at moving from <<insert 10% of your prospect’s number of employees>> to <<insert 75% employees>>. On top of this growing need, it’s no secret that the amount of data you must manage is growing dramatically as well. In fact, it’s growing at a rate of 80% every year. <<DRAW>> The impact of this data explosion is hard to conceptualize, so take this personal example as context: <<Use your own big data example with social media, mobile devices, etc. For example, here is the story Eric Fearday tells:My dad is a farmer in Southern Illinois. I gave him an iPad for his 75th birthday two months ago. And in those two months, he has generated more data than he had in the prior 75 years of his life. Additionally, my dad is a customer of a tractor supply vendor, and for the last 20 years, that vendor has had no idea who my dad was or what kind of customer he’s been to them. Now that he has this tractor supply app on his iPad—which he absolutely loves—that company has more data on my dad’s needs and buying behavior than they ever had before. They now have the opportunity—and challenge—to make meaningful sense from all that data to influence the way he makes his decisions.>> Managing, ensuring the validity, and making sense of all that data is an overwhelming task.  And it’s this need for analytics by a growing base of users, <<DRAW “USERS” AND ARROW>> coupled with increasing volumes and the variety of data, <<DRAW “DATA” AND ARROW>> that is creating a flashpoint. <<DRAW FLASHPOINT>> This is a critical inflection point in the evolution of today’s enterprise, the social enterprise; one that represents both a challenge and a huge opportunity. We’ve seen something similar like this before when the introduction of the web changed our environment by creating a content explosion that we were hungry to consume. Think about how this has impacted each and every one of our lives; think about how this has changed your expectations in the way you use and access data.Consider a common situation that happens all the time for business travelers. Imagine you arrive in an unfamiliar city and realize you forgot your phone charger. You don’t resolve a problem like this by asking a front desk person for help—like you may have done in the past. Today, you ask Google maps a question and it tells you there is a Walgreens right down the street. But your expectations go even further than that because you don’t want to just know where its is, but how long it will take you to get there and the best route. You may also decide you want to meet your team for dinner close by and tell them how to get there. Consumer expectations have changed dramatically and you’re solving more complex problems faster and in new ways to make life easier. In effect making bigger decisions.Contrast that with the corporate world, in which you get a meeting request for a conference room you’ve never been to in a huge building on an unfamiliar campus. It takes you 30 minutes to find your room and you have no way of knowing whether there’s a break room nearby so you can get coffee, or if you’ll have access to a printer to prepare materials. So your needs and expectations in your personal life are dramatically different from your corporate experience. And that disconnect is agitating the flashpoint.
  • 10 mins + length of john’s video
  • So as the workforce ages, you’re hiring younger employees <<DRAW USERS>> who expect to have the same speed and intelligent information they have in their personal lives via the web, available to them at their fingertips in the corporate world. And they expect it to be as powerful and easy to use as smart apps. <<DRAW “USER PROLIFERATION + EXPECTATIONS>> And the data explosion <<DRAW “DATA EXPLOSION” AND DB SYMBOL>> is being driven by both a volume and velocity of data, and by the variety and validity of data. Yet, companies are still running business on the same lagging signals as the last 100 years:financials in the form of income statements and balance sheets. But your distributed base of decision makers want and need to pay attention to a whole host of new and increasingly forward looking signals, for example: customer sentiment and social data, <<DRAW “t” & “f”>>, new business risks, uncertainty and non-financial information <<DRAW VARIABLE ARROW>> and data stored in a variety of places including traditional data warehouses, but also data in the cloud and on their own machine in excel <<DRAW SPREADSHEET>> These signals change rapidly and you must be able to respond quickly. And because there are so many different signals out there, you also need to cut through the noise and isolate just the ones you should be paying attention to for the biggest business impact. If you don’t shift your approach and give users the ability to make meaning of this mess of data, you will fall behind in your competitive advantage, struggle with inefficiencies, and open your organization to security risks.
  • End: 2 minsJohn describes…What if you could give your users the information they need right in the moment of decision making? Information which allows them to take action, understanding both the opportunity and risk associated with it? We call this giving them “Intelligent Data”  It is by shifting from simply managing big data, to delivering intelligent data to a broader base of users, that you’ll move past this inflection point so that you can thrive in the new world of business and make better, more intelligent and bigger more impactful decisions. You already have a lot of the technology in place today to inform a portion of your users.  Now it’s time to bring data out from the hands of a few, to be used by the entire organization. You need to extend the reach of information across your business. With SAP, you are in a unique position to empower the right users to make decisions using the right trusted data, at the right time, through immediate and secure mobile, cloud, or desktop access. And in doing so, you’ll get more out of the assets you already have. 
  • John describes…What if you could give your users the information they need right in the moment of decision making? Information which allows them to take action, understanding both the opportunity and risk associated with it? We call this giving them “Intelligent Data”  It is by shifting from simply managing big data, to delivering intelligent data to a broader base of users, that you’ll move past this inflection point so that you can thrive in the new world of business and make better, more intelligent and bigger more impactful decisions. You already have a lot of the technology in place today to inform a portion of your users.  Now it’s time to bring data out from the hands of a few, to be used by the entire organization. You need to extend the reach of information across your business. With SAP, you are in a unique position to empower the right users to make decisions using the right trusted data, at the right time, through immediate and secure mobile, cloud, or desktop access. And in doing so, you’ll get more out of the assets you already have. 
  • Particularly now that your decision making base is more distributed, aligning data and decisions to corporate goals and objectives is more important than ever. You need to define strategy, clearly articulate your goals and objectives, and then develop a sustainable and risk-aware plan by which you can execute and measure your performance  You’ll make better use of intelligent data by driving alignment from the top levels of your organization to the bottom by facilitating a complete performance management process, across multiple lines of business, which embraces the need to manage risk as well as opportunity. Collaboration capabilities further enable you to move toward your corporate goals and strategies as one organization, even with a broader base of individual decision makers.
  • Finally, intelligent data creates a basis by which you can adapt to a constantly evolving and increasingly competitive marketplace, where unforeseen risk events can occur at any time. <<DRAW ARROW AND “ADAPT”>>  With SAP, you’ll be able to identify hiddensignals and risk by using more than just historical financial indicators. That means you’ll be able to adapt, stay nimble, and secure a competitive edge. You be able to leverage unstructured social data from across your organization, ecosystem, and customer base. And advanced (predictive) analytics will give users the power to better understand future outcomes from the decisions they make. <<DRAW LIGHT BULB>>
  • Finally, intelligent data creates a basis by which you can adapt to a constantly evolving and increasingly competitive marketplace, where unforeseen risk events can occur at any time. <<DRAW ARROW AND “ADAPT”>>  With SAP, you’ll be able to identify hiddensignals and risk by using more than just historical financial indicators. That means you’ll be able to adapt, stay nimble, and secure a competitive edge. You be able to leverage unstructured social data from across your organization, ecosystem, and customer base. And advanced (predictive) analytics will give users the power to better understand future outcomes from the decisions they make. <<DRAW LIGHT BULB>>
  • Finally, intelligent data creates a basis by which you can adapt to a constantly evolving and increasingly competitive marketplace, where unforeseen risk events can occur at any time. <<DRAW ARROW AND “ADAPT”>>  With SAP, you’ll be able to identify hiddensignals and risk by using more than just historical financial indicators. That means you’ll be able to adapt, stay nimble, and secure a competitive edge. You be able to leverage unstructured social data from across your organization, ecosystem, and customer base. And advanced (predictive) analytics will give users the power to better understand future outcomes from the decisions they make. <<DRAW LIGHT BULB>>
  • Transcript

    • 1. Join the Decision Revolution Driving Success with Analytics Solutions from SAP Kurt Bilafer, Regional Vice President, Analytics, SAP October 16th 2012
    • 2. The APJ market 54.6% 46% over 1 billion 31.8% % of world Population Internet users 29.9% Companies in Fortune 1000 GDP 13 of top 20 cities in the world (based on population) are in APJ Over 1 billion Internet users Demographia, economywatch.com © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. 2
    • 3. Impressive growth of emerging technologies Over half of APJ web users access Internet via mobile devices 47% have a college degree 62% work full-time 62% check bank accounts 623 Million 25% of total Facebook users reside in APJ Asia Pacific Digital Marketing Yearbook 2012, Tech in Asia article © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. 3
    • 4. SAP in APJ APJ Employees 20% of 60,900 2011 APJ software revenue 18% of 14.23 B EUR 31% growth over 2010 © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. 4
    • 5. Users 202 0 50% need access 201 2 75% need access 201 4 10% have access © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. 5
    • 6. Users 202 0 50% need access Improved Transparency 75% need access Customer Profitability Cost Structure 201 4 Key Business Processes 201 2 10% have access © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. Residual Risk Levels 6
    • 7. Users 202 0 50% need access Improved Transparency Data 75% need access +80% per year Customer Profitability Cost Structure 201 4 Key Business Processes 201 2 10% have access © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. Residual Risk Levels 7
    • 8. Users 202 0 50% need access Improved Transparency Data 75% need access Customer Profitability 201 4 INFLECTION POINT +80% per year Cost Structure Key Business Processes 201 2 10% have access © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. Residual Risk Levels 8
    • 9. The Decision Making Continuum Organizational & Competitive Impact Not all Business Questions are the Same What will Why did it happen happen? ? What is the best that could happen? What happened? Value © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. 9
    • 10. What question are you answering? Customer panel Chris New R. Narayanan N. Muthukumar Manager, Performance Analytics Deputy General Manager ERP Competency Center Senior Vice President Head, Corporate Affairs MMG Limited Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited Olam International © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. 10
    • 11. MMG Limited October 2012
    • 12. About MMG Limited Mid-tier global resources company which explores, develops and mines base metal deposits around the world. Headquartered in Melbourne, Australia. Listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (Stock Code: 1208). Experienced international management team. Mining operations in Australia, Asia and Africa. Primary products include copper, zinc, gold, silver and lead. Major shareholder - China Minmetals Corporation. Century concentrator operations. 12
    • 13. energising lives
    • 14. BPCL - A Fortune 500 Company Upstream Refining Marketing  BPRL - 100% subsidiary  A refinery each in all 4 regions  28 exploration blocks: 11 in India & 17 in abroad  Capacity of 29 MMT with 20% share  Pan India presence in Retail, LPG, Aviation, Industrial space Operations Financials  390 locations  US$31 bn turnover  3.4 Mn kl tankage  US$8 bn Assets  12,000 Retails points  US$5 bn market cap  27 MMT sales with 21% Market share Human Resources  14,000 employees  5,000 field staff
    • 15. Building Relevant Scale Delivering the Olam Strategy Building Relevant Scale : Delivering the Olam Strategy 15
    • 16. Olam Portfolio, largely focused on a single commodity asset class: agri-complex 5 Categories 5 Segments 16 Platforms Agri Commodities Edible Nuts, Spices & Beans Edible nuts 4 Spices & 7 Vegetable Ingredients Packaged Foods Confectionery & Beverage Ingredients Coffee Cocoa Commodity Financial Services Fertilisers Food Staples & Packaged Foods 3 Dairy 4 Industrial Raw Materials 6 Natural Fibres CFS Wood Products 3 Rubber Sugar/ 3 Sweeteners Palm Commodity Financial Services 3 Grains & 4 Oilseeds Rice 2 SEZ Fertilisers 3 2 2 SEZ 9 Packaged Foods 4 Value chain steps 65 Countries, 4 regions Upstream Asia, Oceania & Middle East Supply Chain Midstream Americas Building Relevant Scale : Delivering the Olam Strategy Europe Downstream Africa 16
    • 17. What question are you answering? Customer panel Chris New R. Narayanan N. Muthukumar Manager, Performance Analytics Deputy General Manager ERP Competency Center Senior Vice President Head, Corporate Affairs MMG Limited Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited Olam International © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. 17
    • 18. User Proliferation Improved Transparency © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. Data Explosion 18
    • 19. User SAP Intelligent Data… Proliferation Enabling the Decision Revolution Improved Transparency © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. Data Explosion 19
    • 20. User SAP Intelligent Data… Proliferation Enabling the Decision Revolution Inform Improved Transparency © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. Data Explosion 20
    • 21. User SAP Intelligent Data… Proliferation Enabling the Decision Revolution Inform Improved Transparency © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. Data Explosion 21
    • 22. User SAP Intelligent Data… Proliferation Enabling the Decision Revolution Inform Alig n Improved Transparency © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. Data Explosion 22
    • 23. User SAP Intelligent Data… Proliferation Enabling the Decision Revolution Inform Adap t Alig n Improved Transparency © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. Data Explosion 23
    • 24. User SAP Intelligent Data… Proliferation Enabling the Decision Revolution Inform Adap t Alig n Improved Transparency © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. Data Explosion 24
    • 25. SAP Intelligent Data Recognized market leader Collaboration, consumerization and acceleration Innovation SAP Visual Intelligence SAP Predictive Analysis © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. Inform Adap t Alig n BI4.0 EPM 10.0 GRC 10.0 Industry and Line of Business content 25
    • 26. How do you get started? © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. 26
    • 27. SAP Analytics Plus Previous Purchases © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. SAP BusinessObjects 4.0 Suite 27
    • 28. Join in the conversation Social Media Lounge Hands-on Labs #SAPAPJ SAP Mentors @SAP 2012 © 2012 SAP AG. All rights reserved. 28

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