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Creating An Effective Media Relations Plan

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A special workshop presentation given at the 2009 National Conference on Service & Volunteering on Wednesday, June 24, 2009. Presenters include Eric Borsum, Marta Bortner, Kelly Huston, Jessica Payne, …

A special workshop presentation given at the 2009 National Conference on Service & Volunteering on Wednesday, June 24, 2009. Presenters include Eric Borsum, Marta Bortner, Kelly Huston, Jessica Payne, Alexia Allina.

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  • 1.
    • Presented June 24, 2009
    Creating an Effective Media Relations Plan
  • 2. Presenters
    • Eric Borsum Managing Partner PainePR
    Marta Bortner Assistant Director/External Affairs CaliforniaVolunteers Kelly Huston Assistant Secretary California Emergency Management Agency Jessica Payne Social Media Strategist PainePR Alexia Allina Media Relations Strategist PainePR Mary Borrelli Media Relations Manager American Cancer Society
  • 3. Agenda
    • Media Relations Fundamentals
      • Today’s Media Landscape
      • Working with Media
      • Creating Your Story
      • Telling Your Story
      • Traditional Approaches
      • On-Line/Digital Approaches
    • Case Studies
    • Discussion/Q&A
  • 4. Today’s Media Landscape
  • 5. Journalism in Transition
    • Technology has dramatically changed the way consumers get information
      • Blogs, podcasts, vlogs, v-mail, PDAs, RSS, etc.
    • Broadcast/print media are losing “share of mind”
      • Only 1/3 get information from TV news
      • Newspaper readership (printed) has dropped; recent circulations: down 2.8% daily and 3.4% Sunday
        • Online editions are adding readers and advertising revenues are at a healthy pace
      • More than 32 million people in U.S. read blogs
  • 6. Today’s Media Are …
    • Under increased pressure and facing uncertain industry economics
    • Journalists are producing content for multiple mediums
      • Print publication and outlet’s online site and/or blog
    • Being asked to do more with less
    • Constantly monitoring their value to their media companies
    6
  • 7. Media +
    • We’re evolving from … get me ink … to a combination, including word of mouth “buzz” and influencer marketing
    Now we can generate publicity as well as help ignite conversations among our target audiences directly.
  • 8. Working with Media
  • 9. Media – The Perfect World
    • Ready to take our calls
    • Have plenty of space or time to fill
    • Committed to getting the story right the first time
    • Double-check facts and sources
    • Believe we have a valuable story
  • 10. Media – The Real World
    • Traditional media are stretched thin and struggling to keep up with online competitors (i.e., news sites and blogs)
    • Editorial space is shrinking
    • Fighting to be first and pressure to produce
    • Believe we have a valuable story
  • 11. How Media Work – Print
    • Newspapers
      • Access to spokespeople for detailed interviews
      • Allows for greater explanation
      • Work against varying deadlines
    • Magazines
      • More in-depth interviews
      • Angle relevance to readers
      • Longer deadlines
    • Wire Services
      • Always want story first and always on deadline
      • Service all of the above
  • 12. How Media Work – Broadcast
    • Television
      • Completely driven by visuals and sound bites
      • Varying formats
      • Emotional hooks, personal relevance
      • Work against hard deadlines for scheduled programs
    • Radio
      • Reliant on sound bites and audio
      • Varying formats
      • Work against hard deadlines for scheduled programs
  • 13. How Media Work – Online
    • Varying formats and focus
    • Utilize print, visual and audio elements
    • Optimum flexibility
    • Allows interactive dialogue
    • Anyone can be a reporter
    • Huge opportunities, huge risks (can be a spoiler)
  • 14. Media Deadlines
    • All reporters write stories on a deadline … could be days or minutes!
      • Always respond before the deadline, even if it is to explain that you cannot provide them with the needed information
  • 15. Creating Your Story
  • 16. What’s News?
  • 17. News Is…
    • Controversy or change
    • Rooted in the “new” and each story must contain newsworthy elements
    • A strong story idea is a must
      • Idea must be interesting to viewers, listeners or readers
    • The reporter will ask: “Why would my audience care about this story?”
      • Have an answer
  • 18. What Isn’t News?
  • 19. News Isn’t …
    • Just any event
    • A personal opinion or interpretation of something
    • Only a bunch of facts
    • Always news
  • 20. What Media Are Looking For 20 Accurate Facts Credible Experts 3 rd Party Validation Colorful Anecdotes Audience/ Time Relevance Unique Perspective Story
  • 21. What Makes A Story?
    • Angle – The theme of the story; you must provide an angle that will make sense to the reporter’s audience
    • Hook – The initial idea that grabs the reporter’s attention – provide facts that support your story
    • Timing – Pitch your story at an appropriate time; do not pitch when a major, national news event has occurred (e.g. Hurricane Katrina)
  • 22. Decision Process
    • Does this fit my beat?
    • Is this “breaking” now?
    • Is this something people want/need to know about?
    • Will this help people make decisions about how to live their lives?
    • What else is happening?
    • Is this a credible source?
    • Does this support/impact another story?
    • Is this exclusive?
    • Who else has the story?
    • Can I tell the whole story right now?
  • 23. Where Media Go for Info
    • Internet
    • Industry Trade Publications
    • Past Media Coverage
    • Competitors or Colleagues
    • Influencers/Experts
    • PR Practitioners
    • Blogs/Message Boards/Community Forums
    • Other Media
    • White Papers/Annual Reports
  • 24. The Five W’s
    • Good news stories need to answer:
  • 25. Story Mining
    • What are all the related stories?
    • Which can I support?
      • Information
      • Impact
      • Immediacy
      • Individuals
      • Images
  • 26. Story Mining Process National Conference on Volunteering & Service Topic Event People
  • 27. Story Mining Process PEOPLE Government Staff Speakers Partners Community Participants Youth Faith Community Nonprofit Experts Volunteers Employees Corporate First Ladies
  • 28. First Ladies Story
    • What we know:
      • Support service and volunteering
      • Serve America Act/CaliforniaVolunteers backdrop
      • Attending largest gathering of volunteer/service leaders
    • Strategies
      • Remarks frame service and volunteering
      • Activities kick off Summer of Service
      • Serve as chief motivators to drive volunteering
  • 29. Key Messages
    • Key messages communicate a vision, position or essential fact in a concise statement
    • They should be consistent and incorporated in all communications
    • Spokespeople should be trained to deliver messages effectively
    • Key messages are the points to your story
  • 30. What is a Key Message?
  • 31. Developing Key Messages
  • 32. Sample Message
  • 33. Telling Your Story
  • 34. Media Materials
    • National Press Release – Communicates your news and includes quote(s) from organization
      • Tailor for local markets as needed
    • Pitch Letter/E-mail – Offers various angles for covering story for editor/reporter/producer’s audience
    • Fact Sheet – Includes more detailed information
    • Backgrounder – Provides a history of the organization
  • 35. Media Materials
    • Media Alert – Promotes specific event, including details about what, why, when, where and PR contact information
    • Biography – Offers more detail about campaign spokesperson's background and expertise
    • Infographic – Illustrates a statistic or key information graphically
    • Photography – Photos that media can use in their stories
  • 36. News Strategies
    • Broad Pitching – Target all relevant outlets
    • Exclusive – Give single media outlet(s) the story before any other outlet receives it
      • Used for stories that might be tough to sell
      • Can secure bigger story and drive other types of media to cover
      • Strategy MUST be used carefully … can really upset other key contacts
  • 37. News Strategies
    • Embargo – Offer details to media, but asks they do not publish/broadcast info before a specified date
      • Can be risky to media relationships, especially since online outlets and bloggers have such a fast news cycle
      • “ Lead Steer” – Leverage key outlet, such as wire, to ignite more broad coverage
      • Heavily focus on USA Today and Today in order to generate interest from local market broadcast and print
  • 38. Example Media Strategy Target Audience Local Radio Blogs Online Press Release Trade Media First Ladies at the National Conference Story Newspapers in Top-20 Markets Local TV Business & News Weeklies Exclusive Embargo Local Newspapers
  • 39. Traditional Approaches
  • 40. High-Profile Spokesperson
    • Using a high-profile spokesperson can really help get media (and consumer) attention for your cause, event or ongoing initiative
    Julianne Moore and Susan Sarandon for Duracell Wendy Bellissimo for Pampers & Dreft… Celebrity Nursery Designer and exclusive product line at Babies R Us (LOVED by moms) NASCAR’s Tony Stewart for Old Spice Felicity Huffman and Tucker for IH4TH
  • 41. Media Event
    • Provides setting for news in a high-profile way
    • Opportunity for on-site media to capture b-roll, photos and interviews with spokesperson
      • Images and interviews captured provide additional content for resulting media coverage
  • 42. Consumer Surveys
    • Independent research company conducts survey to gauge perceptions
    • Data offers statistical info for media materials
      • Cost: $8M
    • Statistics sell story to media
    • Data offers reporters news nuggets and provides reason to write the story now
      • Survey data is best used when it ’ s new
  • 43. Satellite Media Tour
    • Producers book time in “windows” with interview live or edited for later use
    • Two types of SMTs:
      • Stand-alone or Co-op
    • Broadcast bookings (12-20); 2MM-3MM impressions
    • Cost: $40M (stand-alone); $25M (co-op)
      • Includes spokesperson fees
  • 44. Audio News Release (ANR)
    • Pre-packaged "news" story distributed to 500+ radio stations and 7M online news sites
    • Transmissions sent via popular radio networks
    • CBS Radio, Westwood One, CNN Radio, NBC Radio and CNBC Radio
    • Reach: 10MM-12MM impressions
    • Cost: $8M
  • 45. Matte Release
    • “ Controlled” print opportunity consisting of a camera-ready, 350-word print story with photo
    • Pre-produced article is mailed to small, localized daily and weekly newspapers
    • Reach: 1MM impressions via 250+ outlets
    • Cost Estimate: $7M
  • 46. Other Examples
    • Media/Deskside Tour – Road tour with to meet with editors and talk about an organization, industry news, etc .
    • Bylined Article – Written by a non-media person, usually an influencer in a certain field, and submitted for publication
    • B-roll Package – Includes footage of an event, real people and soundbites that can be used in resulting TV stories
    • Webcast – Use of Web to deliver “tours”
  • 47. Online/Digital Approaches
  • 48.
    • Crowd sourcing will drive new business models and innovation
    • Leveraging offline contact via social networks
    • Mobile Web and iPhone application development
    • “ Micro-Segmentation” or niche communities
    • Slim-down, build-up of news media
    • Mandate for “doing good” amps volunteering and service organizations
    What’s Going On?
  • 49.
    • Essential social media tools
    • Start here for an understanding: ProCommunicator.com
    Social Media Tools: Taking A Closer Look Wikis Bookmarking Forums
  • 50.
    • 300+ million users; largest social network in the world
    • 70+ million American users
    • 95 percent of users have used at least one app
    • The fastest growing demographic - Boomers
    Facebook
  • 51.
    • Official Stats http://www.facebook.com/press/info.php?statistics
    • Uncovering Tastemakers http://facebook.grader.com/
    • Popular Facebook Forums http://forum.developers.facebook.com/
    • Still confused? http://www.commoncraft.com/video-social-networking
    Research: Facebook
  • 52.
    • Essentially a photo and video publishing platform – enables users to upload photos, tag them with relevant info
    • More than 5 billion images hosted; 24 million monthly unique visitors
    Flickr
  • 53.
    • Search Flickr.com for tagged photos
    • Don’t forget to search for misspellings or abbreviations
    • Looking for research on most popular cameras? Try Flickr’s camera page, based on camera metadata from uploaded images: http://www.flickr.com/cameras/
    • Still confused? http://www.commoncraft.com/photosharing
    Research: Flickr
  • 54.
    • Video sharing site – users, brands can create “channels” with their own content that others can subscribe to
    • Also a social network – account creates ability to comment on photos, join groups
    • An expensive Google acquisition – $1.6 billion
    • High traffic – 60-80 million users/month, serves 100 million videos daily
    • Crackdown on overly promotional videos (and ads) signifies emerging trend of monetization
    YouTube
  • 55.
    • Go to YouTube and search for client names or industry terms
    • Helpful FAQ page: http://help.youtube.com/support/youtube/
    • Take a look at Blendtec “channel” to grasp how YouTube can be customized: http://www.youtube.com/user/Blendtec
    Research: YouTube
  • 56.
    • Answers the question: “What are you doing?”
    • Micro-blog = express publishing of the here and now
    • 3 rd most trafficked social network – 17+ million unique visitors
    • Reports of wild growth – 2700 percent, 900 percent … whatever, it is a force of nature
    • Oprah and Ashton “stamp” helped it go mainstream
    Twitter
  • 57.
    • Twitter search is straightforward, searchable by date via advanced http://Search.twitter.com
    • Twitter Grader is useful for searching out top Twitter influencers by keyword, location and more; also has interface for Facebook http://twitter.grader.com/
    • Still confused? http://www.commoncraft.com/Twitter
    Research: Twitter
  • 58.
    • Private-label social networks platform
    • Lets you host a content-specific social network without building the infrastructure
    • Commonly used for specialty groups, nonprofits
    • Requires some HTML/coding but is very straightforward
    Ning
  • 59.
    • Ning has a search interface on its home page: http://www.ning.com
    • For now, search is pretty limited – no ability to sort by number of members or relevance
    Research: Ning
  • 60.
    • There are two kinds of Wikis:
      • Internal Wiki (Razorfish) designed for real-time collaboration within an organization and streamlining/simplification of file-sharing over multiple sources
      • External Wiki (Wikipedia) augmented and policed by consumers and viewed by the general public
    Wikis Wikis
  • 61.
    • Still confused? http://www.commoncraft.com/video-wikis-plain-english
    Research: Wikis Wikis Main Wiki Page Discussion about Page Content View Page Source (edits) See Change History
  • 62.
    • Blog – “a type of Web site, usually maintained by an individual with regular entries of commentary, descriptions of events, or other material such as graphics or video” (Wikipedia.org)
    • 77.7 million unique visitors in the U.S. (ComScore, August 2008)
    • Moms (aka “Chief Household Officers”) heavily use blogs as source of information; according to the 2009 Women in Social Media Study by BlogHER:
      • 64 percent of women are twice as likely to use blogs than social networks as source of information
      • 55 percent of women are in the blogosphere each week
    Blogs
  • 63.
    • Technorati: Helps identify blogger influencers by topic http://technorati.com/
    • Google Blog Search: Provides a good second layer for uncovering blog content. Use advanced search page to dig a bit deeper on date and other delimiters http://blogsearch.google.com/blogsearch/advanced_blog_search
    • Build lists of top blog influencers for your topic http://www.blogs.com/topten/ and http://alltop.com/
    • Still confused? http://www.commoncraft.com/blogs
    Research: Blogs
  • 64.
    • Top 10 social bookmarks garner more than 30 Million monthly visitors
    • These include (in order): Digg (news), Y!Buzz (news), Technorati (blogs), StumbleUpon (news), del.ici.ous (news), kaboodle (shopping), reddit (news), mixx (media sharing), Propeller (news) and Fark (media-sharing)
    • “ Slashdot Effect” aka “Slashdotting”
    Social Bookmarking Bookmarking
  • 65.
    • Junoba ( http://www.junoba.com/ ) currently offers one of the more robust social bookmarking search engines
    • Still confused? http://www.commoncraft.com/bookmarking-plain-english
    Research: Social Bookmarking Bookmarking
  • 66.
    • Thread-based conversation sites for users to pose, answer questions and engage in dialogue
    • Structured much like e-mail; forum might be based on a large topic (airline travel) with sub-forums for specific categories (airlines, destinations)
    • Often used for technical content on consumer electronics sites
    Discussion Forums
  • 67.
    • Researching and monitoring posts within forums: http://boardreader.com/
    Research: Discussion Forums
  • 68.
    • 162 million smartphones sold globally in 2008
    • 34 million smartphones were sold in the United States in 2008 (20 percent of the nation's overall mobile phone market of some 173 million units)
    • Apple's App Store offers 27,000 iPhone applications
    • As of March 2009, 800 million downloads from the App Store (500 million as of mid-January 2009)
    • According to marketers: mobile apps – trillion dollar industry; mobile gaming apps – billion dollar industry
    Mobile/iPhone Apps
  • 69.
    • Google remains the easiest way to find mobile applications
    • iPhone, BlackBerry and Windows all offer very popular mobile applications, some of which are platform-specific, however many are cross-platform
    • Popular aggregators like Google and Yahoo! also offer branded apps
    Research: Mobile/iPhone Apps
  • 70. Web-/Pod-/VOD-casts
    • What is it?
      • Distribution of edited video or audio clips to media outlets
      • Helps support programs with online or buzz-driven coverage
    • Expected Results
      • Postings on variety of Web sites/blogs
      • Potential traffic increase to brand Web site
    • Best used for
      • Supporting larger PR initiatives and tactics
      • Generating broader awareness for campaign, event, etc. with media
      • Repurposing b-roll, sound bites, etc.
  • 71. Asset Page for Online Influencers
    • Develop brand asset page and populate with content that bloggers and target sites can drag and drop
    • Includes multiple categories for information
    • Facts, stats, pics, video, media coverage and more
    • Link to content is given to target sites when we’re dialoguing with them; so content is exclusive to our online influencers
  • 72. Research, Education & Empowerment
  • 73. For more information, please contact Eric Borsum PainePR (213) 430-0480 [email_address]

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