References and nested data structures
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This is the eighth set of slightly updated slides from a Perl programming course that I held some years ago. ...

This is the eighth set of slightly updated slides from a Perl programming course that I held some years ago.
I want to share it with everyone looking for intransitive Perl-knowledge.
A table of content for all presentations can be found at i-can.eu.
The source code for the examples and the presentations in ODP format are on https://github.com/kberov/PerlProgrammingCourse

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References and nested data structures Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Perl Programming Course References and nested data structuresKrassimir BerovI-can.eu
  • 2. Contents1. What are references?2. Reference types3. Creating references4. Using references5. Reference interpolation
  • 3. What are references?• A piece of data that tells us the location of another piece of data• A reference is a scalar value that refers to an array or a hash (or to just about anything else).• References are the way to implement complicated data structures in Perl• References are like pointers that know what they point to
  • 4. Reference types• Builtin types include: SCALAR ARRAY HASH CODE REF GLOB LVALUE FORMAT IO VSTRING Regexp
  • 5. Reference types• Most used: SCALAR – reference to scalar ARRAY – reference to array HASH – reference to hash CODE – reference to anonymous sub
  • 6. Creating references• Just two ways to make a reference 1. By putting a in front of a variable $aref = @array; # $aref - reference to @array $href = %hash; # $href - reference to %hash $sref = $scalar; # $sref - reference to $scalar 2. [ITEMS] makes a new, anonymous array, {ITEMS} makes a new, anonymous hash $aref = [ 1, "foo", undef, 13 ]; # $aref now holds a reference to an array $href = { APR => 4, AUG => 8 }; # $href now holds a reference to a hash
  • 7. Using references• Just two ways to use references 1. Use curly braces preceded with the sigil of the variable you refer to @{$aref}; # An array reverse @{$aref}; # Reverse the array ${$aref}[3]; # An element of the array ${$aref}[3] = 17; # Assigning an element %{$href}; # A hash keys %{$href}; # Get the keys from the hash ${$href}{red} # An element of the hash ${$href}{red} = 17; # Assigning an element
  • 8. Using references (2)• Just two ways to use references 2. Use the arrow operator to access elements ● In between two subscripts, the arrow is optional. @$aref; # An array reverse @$aref; # Reverse the array $aref->[3]; # An element of the array $aref->[3] = 17; # Assigning an element $aref->[0]->[2] can be written as $aref->[0][2] %$href; # A hash keys %$href; # Get the keys from the hash $href->{red} # An element of the hash $href->{red} = 17; # Assigning an element $href->{green}->{leaf} can be written as $href->{green}{leaf}
  • 9. Using references• Example: my $self = { name =>Krassi, family_name => Berov, children =>[qw|Maria Pavel Viktoria|], favorite_things =>{ } }; print "Hello! I am $self->{name} $self->{family_name}" print I have . scalar @{$self->{children}} . children.; print They are named: . map {$_ . "n"} @{$self->{children}}; #see using.pl for more
  • 10. Using references• Example: my $self = { name =>Krassi, family_name => Berov, children =>[qw|Maria Pavel Viktoria|], favorite_things =>{ } }; print "Hello! I am $self->{name} $self->{family_name}" print I have . scalar @{$self->{children}} . children.; print They are named: . map {$_ . "n"} @{$self->{children}}; #see using.pl for more
  • 11. Reference interpolation• Example: my @pets = qw|Goldy Amelia Jako|; my $self = { name =>Krassi, family_name => Berov, can => sub { return shift }, pets => @pets, children =>[qw|Maria Pavel Victoria|], }; print <<TXT; Hello! I am $self->{name} $self->{family_name}. I can ${$self->{can}(talk)}. My first child is $self->{children}[0]. My last child is $self->{children}[-1]. I do not have a pet named $self->{pets}[1]. TXT
  • 12. References and nested data structures• Resources • perlreftut • perllol • perldsc • perlref • Beginning Perl (Chapter 7 – References)
  • 13. Referencesand nested data structuresQuestions?