Seven misconceptions about amateur radio

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Seven misconceptions about amateur radio

  1. 1. Seven Misconceptions About Amateur Radio Dan Romanchik, KB6NU www.KB6NU.com, cwgeek@kb6nu.com
  2. 2. #1. Amateur radio is a dead hobby This is far from the truth. There are now more than 700,000 licensed radio amateurs in the U.S. and more than 2 million around the world.
  3. 3. #2. You need to know Morse Code. The Morse Code test was eliminated for the Technician Class license more than 20 years ago, and it has since been eliminated for the other license classes. You don’t need to pass a code test to get an amateur radio license!
  4. 4. #3. Amateur radio is obsolete technology. Some amateur radio operators enjoy using vintage equipment that uses vacuum tubes, but modern transceivers, are very sophisticated. They have multiple embedded processors and perform some very advanced digital signal processing.
  5. 5. #4. You need to be an electronics genius to be a ham. To get the most out of amateur radio you do need to have some knowledge of how radio works, but you don’t need to be an electronics engineer to enjoy the hobby.
  6. 6. #5. The Internet means the death of amateur radio. Amateur radio operators have embraced the Internet. Using Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP) technology, for example, amateur radio operators have networked their local repeaters with repeaters all over the world. And, the Internet provides a wealth of information about amateur radio, more than we would have dreamed of in the days before the Internet.
  7. 7. #6. Amateur radio is a hobby for old men. The median age of amateur radio operators is probably somewhere north of 40, but there are still plenty of women and kids in amateur radio. 30% of the members in our club, for example, are women, and I have had many women and young people in my amateur radio classes.
  8. 8. #7. All amateur radio operators are nerds. Actually, only 95% of licensed amateur radio operator are nerds. We can’t figure out how the other 5% got their licenses.
  9. 9. Dan “Mythbuster” Romanchik, amateur radio callsign KB6NU, blogs about the truth of amateur radio at KB6NU.Com. For more information about amateur radio, e-mail him at cwgeek@kb6nu.com.
  10. 10. Dan “Mythbuster” Romanchik, amateur radio callsign KB6NU, blogs about the truth of amateur radio at KB6NU.Com. For more information about amateur radio, e-mail him at cwgeek@kb6nu.com.

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