Newspaper style the link campus journalism training-workshop 2012

  • 3,186 views
Uploaded on

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
3,186
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
304
Comments
1
Likes
6

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. July 16, 2012GJC Audio-Visual Room
  • 2. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1
  • 3. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1  Must have a nose for news  Must be able to tell the truth  Must not be afraid of people  Must be able to finish articles on time  Must be knowledgeable in style
  • 4. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1  It is a distinctive form or a way of doing something.  In journalism, it refers to the fact that every time a certain term appears in a newspaper, they are spelled the same way.  It also covers the use of abbreviations, titles, punctuations and how time is mentioned.
  • 5. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1
  • 6. Mr. Antonio Delgado July 16, 2012GJC Audio-Visual Room
  • 7. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1  Thenumbers 1 – 9 are written in words while the numbers 10 and above are written in figures. Example: nine students 13 children
  • 8. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1 EXCEPTIONS:  dates, address: always in figures.  proper nouns: may be written in figures/words  beginning of sentence: always in words  events: 1st – 9th is allowed
  • 9. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1  Here in the Philippines, American English is used, not British English. Ex: color, not colour  If a word has more than one accepted spelling, the shortest one is preferred. Ex: judgment, instead of judgement enrolment, instead of enrollment
  • 10. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1  The first letter of the sentence is always capitalized.  Proper nouns are capitalized, common nouns are not. Ex: singer Regine Velasquez
  • 11. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1  Small letters are usually used for title or position. Ex: Dr. Noemi Villanueva, the president of GJC, delivered the opening remarks.  Titles are capitalized when they appear right before a name: Ex: President Noemi Villanueva, Ph.D.
  • 12. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1  Spellout Dept., gov’t, and other abbreviations.  The abbreviations Jr. and Sr. are allowed in names.  Remember: Engr. Emmanuel Delgado; Engineer Delgado 12 Dimagiba St.; Dimagiba Street
  • 13. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1 A title or position of a person may be abbreviated if it appears before the name but not if simply used in the sentence: Ex: Sen. Recto filed another taxation bill yesterday. The senator filed another taxation bill yesterday.
  • 14. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1  Acronyms are usually written in capital letters. Example: GJC
  • 15. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1  When an acronym appears for the first time in a news story, it is written after its meaning and it is enclosed in parentheses. Ex: University of the Philippines (UP)
  • 16. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1  The first sentence of a paragraph is indented.  In news stories, the rule is one paragraph, one sentence only.
  • 17. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1 Check for errors in:  Tenses of Verbs  Subject-Verb Agreement  Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement (agreement in gender and number)  Articles (a, an, the)
  • 18. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1 Remember: he said and not said he; Aquino said and not said Aquino Remember: three-day training and not three-days training. Trained for three days and not trained for three-day.
  • 19. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1  It is used at the end of declarative and imperative sentences.  It is used in abbreviations such as p.m., a.m., Jr., Sr., Pres., Sen., Rep., Gov., Gen., Capt., Dr., Fr., Atty., Corp., and Inc.  Acronyms of schools, organizations and offices do not need periods.
  • 20. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1 Use commas:  to separate the month and day from the year.  to separate the street, barangay, town and province in an address  to separate facts. Ex: Jolas Burayag, 17, sophomore BSIT student
  • 21. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1 Do not use commas:  to separate the abbreviation Jr., Sr., or III from the name. Ex: Emmanuel Delgado Jr.
  • 22. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1 Use colons when presenting a series of information and use semicolons to separate components of the series. Ex. Elected officers of the Board of Elders are: Dr. Arturo Guina, President; Atty. Ferdinand Dumlao, Vice President; Dr. Narciso V. Matienzo, Secretary; and Dr. Poyen Pini, Treasurer.
  • 23. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1 Use hyphen:  in most compound nouns Ex: editor-in-chief, officer-in-charge  in fractions Ex: two-thirds, three-fourths  in numerals Ex: twenty-two, fifty-nine
  • 24. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1  Quotation marks are used in direct quotations. Indirect quotations do not need them. Ex. “I forgot it,” he said. He said he forgot it.  Periods and commas are written first before closing quotation marks. Ex. “Let’s go to SM,” the boy said.
  • 25. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1  Quotation marks are used to set off titles of events, shows, movies, books, etc. Ex. We watched “The Titanic.”  Quotation marks are used to set off an alias or nickname. Ex. Ramon “Bong” Revilla Junior Juan Chua also known as “Boy Singkit”
  • 26. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1  Apostrophes are used in the possessive form of the noun. Ex. the teacher’s table the teachers’ meeting  In contractions of words Ex. I’m (am) you’re (you are) (Avoid using contractions except when quoting sources)
  • 27. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1  Watch out for jumbled letters, words and paragraphs.  Delete editorializing words/phrases. Ex. The very beautiful and intelligent principal… The cops were right in arresting…
  • 28. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1  Check for redundancies (recurring words/phrases/paragraphs, synonymous or redundant terms). Ex. the concert the concert ended at the back of the rear advance planning asked a question repeat again
  • 29. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1
  • 30. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1
  • 31. The LinkJuly 16, 2012 Vol.1 Issue 1 POINTERS: 5 W’s and 1 H  Quotations  Details  One paragraph, one sentence