Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
North Iceland
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

North Iceland

162

Published on

Published in: Travel
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
162
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. North Iceland
    August 2011
  • 2. Flight from the West Fjords to Akureyri
  • 3.
  • 4. Akureyri – population 17,500
    Iceland’s second largest city, located at the head of the Eyjafjörður. The city bus system is free!
  • 5. Statue of Helgi the Lean and his wife Þórunn, the first settlers of the Eyjafjörður region in 890 ce.
    Helgiwas both Norse and Celtic. Many Icelanders have Celtic ancestry, evidenced in an abundance of red hair, as a result of Norse Vikings intermarrying with Celtic women and bringing over Celtic slaves in the early days of settlement.
  • 6. The city looks out over the Eyjafjörður
  • 7. Mt. Súlur
  • 8. Central Akureyri – one of two cinemas.
    Iceland has been producing films since the 1980s, a small, but vibrant industry.
  • 9. Ráðhústorg – Akureyri’s central town square
  • 10.
  • 11.
  • 12. Hafnarstræti – full of shops and cafes
  • 13.
  • 14.
  • 15. BlaáKannan – favorite café in Akureyri and a local lunch favorite
  • 16. KEA is a local economic cooperative started in 1886 by sheep farmers, which now owns shares in many local businesses, including the bookstore.
  • 17.
  • 18. Akureyrarkirkja
    Designed by the same architect as Reykjavík’sHallgrímskirkja, GuðjónSamúelsson. The design of both churches is influenced by volcanic basalt column formations. Built 1940.
  • 19.
  • 20.
  • 21. Stained glass windows depict both the life of Christ and important chapters in the history of Christianity in Iceland.
  • 22. The middle window came from Coventry Cathedral in Britain. Someone removed the window at the start of WW2, saving the stained glass from the destruction of the cathedral during the Nazi bombings of London. An Icelandic antiques dealer bought the window in London and installed it here.
  • 23.
  • 24. Icelanders, especially in Akureyri, are incredibly athletic and active. Numerous youth soccer teams were training around the church grounds.
  • 25.
  • 26.
  • 27. Soccer match – Akureyri v. Ísafjörður
    Ísafjörður won 4-0
  • 28. Local Sundhöll – Icelanders love their community geothermal swimming pool, which usually includes several hot pots. Young and old soak and socialize, several times a week.
  • 29. Sundlaug Etiquette 101 – Always remove shoes before entering changing rooms.
  • 30. Back to school
  • 31.
  • 32. The Outlaw, sculpted by EinarJónsson
  • 33.
  • 34.
  • 35. Botanical Gardens
  • 36.
  • 37.
  • 38.
  • 39.
  • 40.
  • 41.
  • 42.
  • 43.
  • 44.
  • 45.
  • 46. The perfect place to watch planes land at the airport.
  • 47. Nonnahús
    Statue of Jesuit priest JónSveinsson, known for writing the Nonni children books, popular throughout Europe.
  • 48.
  • 49. Inside Nonnahús – childhood home of JónSveinsson. Built around 1850.
  • 50.
  • 51. Ingenious bed design in a land where wood must be imported from Norway –
    an expandable bed design. This design was used throughout Iceland.
  • 52. 19th century church
  • 53.
  • 54.
  • 55. Eyjafjörður
  • 56.
  • 57.
  • 58. Arctic Ocean
  • 59. Husavík – population 2340
  • 60. I am dressed for whale watching on the cold Arctic Ocean!
  • 61. Our ship sails away from Husavík.
    Traditionally a fishing and whaling town, Husavík is now a whale watching hot spot.
  • 62.
  • 63. We spot a humpback whale!
  • 64.
  • 65.
  • 66.
  • 67.
  • 68. Husavík’s Whale Museum
    Housed in a former slaughterhouse, the museum includes the biology of the world’s whales, as well as exploring Iceland’s relationship with whales, including commercial whaling.
    Iceland ended whaling with the 1989 worldwide ban on commercial whale hunts until 2002 when they rejoined the International Whaling Commission (IWC). Commercial whaling resumed in 2006, but was terminated after a year due to a lack of markets, only to be resumed in 2008. Strict quotas are followed, but remains controversial.
  • 69. Iceland’s medieval law manuscript – the Jónsbók – detailed who owned the meat of beached whales, when such meat could feed an entire community in lean times. The skeletons in the museum are from beached or drowned whales, not from whale hunts.
  • 70.
  • 71.
  • 72. Early morning in Akureyri

×