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Smoking & Cancer PPT
Smoking & Cancer PPT
Smoking & Cancer PPT
Smoking & Cancer PPT
Smoking & Cancer PPT
Smoking & Cancer PPT
Smoking & Cancer PPT
Smoking & Cancer PPT
Smoking & Cancer PPT
Smoking & Cancer PPT
Smoking & Cancer PPT
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Smoking & Cancer PPT

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    • 1. Smoking and Lung Cancer
    • 2. <ul><li>Lung cancer is now the leading killer of Americans. </li></ul><ul><li>Between 1960 and 1990 lung cancer deaths in women have increased over 400%, mostly due to smoking. </li></ul><ul><li>According to the Center for Disease </li></ul><ul><li>Control and Prevention, more </li></ul><ul><li>than 276,000 men and </li></ul><ul><li>142,000 women die </li></ul><ul><li>from smoking. </li></ul>
    • 3. Why are cigarettes so dangerous? <ul><li>Toxic gases include carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, hydrogen cyanide, ammonia, and formaldehyde. </li></ul><ul><li>Cigarettes also contain tar which </li></ul><ul><li> “ gunks” up the lungs </li></ul><ul><li>Cigarettes cause cancer! </li></ul>
    • 4. How does smoking cause lung cancer? <ul><li>The chemicals in the tar are the main cause of cancer. </li></ul><ul><li>The carcinogens in cigarettes cause damage to cells DNA, and can cause cells to rapidly multiply. </li></ul>
    • 5. What are the symptoms? <ul><li>Persistent cough. </li></ul><ul><li>Shortness of breath. </li></ul><ul><li>Coughing up phlegm and blood. </li></ul><ul><li>Loss of weight. </li></ul><ul><li>Fatigue. </li></ul><ul><li>Loss of appetite. </li></ul>
    • 6. What are the treatments? <ul><li>Small Cell: Treated with </li></ul><ul><li> chemotherapy and </li></ul><ul><li>radiotherapy. </li></ul><ul><li>Non Small Cell: Treated with </li></ul><ul><li>surgery, chemotherapy, and </li></ul><ul><li>radiotherapy depending </li></ul><ul><li>on the stage in which </li></ul><ul><li> it is caught. </li></ul>
    • 7. Stages of Lung Cancer. <ul><li>Stage 0: Usually treated with surgery to remove a small portion of the lung. </li></ul><ul><li>Stage 1: Treated with a lobectomy. </li></ul><ul><li>Stage 2: Lobectomy and chemotherapy to decrease chances of cancer coming back. </li></ul><ul><li>Stage 3: Whole lung may have to be removed. </li></ul><ul><li>Stage 4: Impossible to cure, but there are treatments that can be used. Chemotherapy to prolong survival time. </li></ul>
    • 8. Can non smokers get cancer? <ul><li>YES. </li></ul><ul><li>Every year, 3 thousand deaths in America are due to second hand smoke. </li></ul><ul><li>“ The amount of nicotine absorbed by a nonsmoking child whose father smokes is equivalent to the child himself smoking about 30 cigarettes a year; 50 cigarettes a year from a mother who smokes, and 80 cigarettes a year if both parents smoke.” </li></ul><ul><li>Smoking while pregnant increases chance of miscarriage, premature birth, and death of the baby within one year. </li></ul><ul><li>Growth and development of the child is impaired. </li></ul><ul><li>Brain development is affected. IQ is negatively affected. </li></ul><ul><li>The child will be more likely to develop behavioral problems. </li></ul>
    • 9. What are other dangers associated with smoking? <ul><li>Heart disease: 30% of all heart attacks and cardiovascular deaths. </li></ul><ul><li>Carbon monoxide and nicotine accelerate the deposition of cholesterol in the inner lining of arteries. </li></ul><ul><li>Cigarette smoking increases the chance of blood clots. </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of oxygen to the heart increase the chance of heart attack. </li></ul><ul><li>Smoking can effect the blood flow to legs that can lead to blockage and progress to gangrene and amputations. </li></ul><ul><li>Smoking can effect the elastic tissue and cause wrinkles on the face. Smokers look an average of 5 years older than they really are. </li></ul>
    • 10. Quit Smoking!! <ul><li>Within 48 hours of quitting, blood pressure decreases, heart rate decreases, pulse drops. </li></ul><ul><li>The ability to smell and taste increases. </li></ul>
    • 11. References Cancer Symptoms. (2006, September 8). Cancer Research UK . Retrieved March 26, 2007, from     http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/help/default.asp?page=2964 Cigarette smoking-related fatality. (2007, February 28). Center for disease control and prevention.      Retrieved March 26, 2007, from http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/Factsheets/     cig_smoking_mort.htm Facts about lung cancer. (2006, November). American lung association . Retrieved March 26, 2007, from     http://www.lungusa.org/site/pp.asp?c=dvLUK9O0E&b=35427 How smoking affects the body. (2005). Health information publications . Retrieved March 26, 2007,     from http://www.ehealthmd.com/library/smoking/SMO_affects.html Peto, R., Darby, S., Deo, H., Silcocks, P., Whitley, E., & Doll, R. (2000, August 5). Smoking,     smoking cessation, and lung cancer in the UK since 1950. British Medical Journal, 321 (7257),     323-329. Retrieved March 26, 2007, from http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/     articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=27446 Treatments of Lung Cancer. (2006, September 12). Cancer Research UK . Retrieved March 26, 2007, from     http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/help/default.asp?page=2971

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