Kj f2013 thesisbook

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Kj f2013 thesisbook

  1. 1. PRESCIENT provocations A DESIGN FICTION RESEARCH THESIS K AT Y J E R E M KO _ FA L L 2 0 1 3
  2. 2. _2
  3. 3. 1_ for Cathy, Elisabeth, Lara, and Steve
  4. 4. _2 SCIENCE SCIENCE SCIRE SCIENTIA study of structure and behavior of the physical and natural world FICTION FINGERE FICTIO to shape, form,or invent FICTION
  5. 5. METROPOLIS MAGAZINE THE FICTION EDITION In January 2003, Metropolis Magazine asked Sci-fi writers to use interiors as the starting point for a piece of fiction. Above, a student reads Bruce Sterling’s piece about “grown” furniture that thinks, feels, and reacts to it’s owners.
  6. 6. Table of contents ABST RAC T PART I DESIG N FICT ION Wha t is it? PART II FUT URES H ISTORY Sc i-fi timeli n e s Futurist Pro je ct io n s _5 _15 PART III BUILDING SP ECULAT ION Writing sc ie n ce fict io n a n d t h e d e sig n p r o ce ss I nterv iew : Po e t C h r ist o p h e r Ke n n e d y Rela ting 19 50 ’s sci-fi t e ch n o lo g y t o t o d a y Method : Sc ie n ce F ict io n Ske t ch in g _3 9 PART IV T HE G LOBA L V ILLAGE Ma ss c olla bo r a t io n a n d t h e g r e a t e r g o o d openNASA Sc i-fi Frid a y co n v e n t io n a t RM SC Method : Sc ie n ce F ict io n P r o t o t y p in g Asimov ’s pre d ict io n s o f t h e 201 4 Wo r ld ’s F a ir 1939 World’s F a ir e / 201 3 M a ke r F a ir e K ic ksta rting a 3D P r in t in g C o m p a n y I nterv iew : In t e l F u t u r ist B r ia n D a v id Jo h n so n Rob otHa c ks ch a lle n g e _43 PART V T HE NEW NAT UR A L _7 7 E merg ing te ch n o lo g ie s in 20 1 2 & 20 1 3 I nterv iew : In t e r a ct io n A r t ist Lo r n e C o v in g t o n How c ompu t e r s r e a d o u r b o d ie s Low b a rriers t o e n t r y cr e a t in g im m e r siv e t e ch n o lo g y G oog le G lasse s Method : Rap id p r o t o t y p in g wit h fo u n d m a t e r ia ls Journov a tio n PART VI T HE PRO DUCT AS T H E H ER O _10 3 Cha ra c teriz a t io n Method : Lo v e le t t e r & b r e a k-u p le t t e r t o t e ch n o lo g y FUT URES C REDITS G LO SSARY BIBLIO G RA P H Y IMAG E BIBLIOGR A P H Y _124
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  8. 8. 1_ abstract HOW CAN WE SHAPE THE FUTURE? Science Fiction opens one portal into our imaginations and curiosities. It gets us to think beyond our present landscape and extend beyond interactions that are possible today and tomorrow. Technological devices have become an inextricable part of our lives. On the boundaries of our imaginations, technology invites us to experience alternate worlds. Our current relationships with technology foreshadow things to come. To design is to constantly experiment and push technology into what is now and what could be. As the future becomes increasingly fantastic, it is the challenge of a designer to consider and always be mindful of the needs of the human being and how our efforts can enhance the future lives of generations to come. _ Katy Jeremko 2013
  9. 9. _2 I’ll be with you the rest of the night, a vinegar gnat tickling your ear when you need me. RESEARCH METHOD I read this story to 3 people and asked them to draw what they pictured being described in the story. Throughout the course of the research process, Ray Bradbury was referenced several times as being an influence for envisioning potential futures.
  10. 10. 3_ RAY BRADBURY FAHRENHEIT 451 Faber opened the bedroom door and left Montag into a small chamber where stood a table upon which a number of metal tools lay among a alter of microscopic wire-hairs, tiny coils, bobbins, and crystals. “What’s this?” asked Montag. “Proof of my terrible cowardice. I’ve lived alone so many years, throwing images on walls with my imagination. Fiddling with electronics, radio-transmission, has been my hobby. My cowardice is of such a passion, complementing the revolutionary spirit that lives in its shadow, I was forced to design this.” “It looks like a Seashell radio.” “And something more! It listens! If you put it in your ear, Montag, I can sit comfortable home, warming my frightened bones, and hear and analyze the firemen’s world, find drone, the travelling ear. Eventually, I could put out ears into all parts of the city, with my various men, listening and evaluating. If the drones die, I’m still safe at hone, tending my fright with a maximum of comfort and a minimum of chance. See how safe I play it, how contemptible I am?” Montag placed the green bullet in his ear. The old man inserted a similar object in his own ear and He picked up a small green-metal moved his lips. object no larger than a .22 bullet. “Montag!” “I paid for all this-how? Playing the stock-market, of course, the The voice was in Montag’s head. last refuge in the world for the dangerous intellectual out of a “I hear you!” job. Well, I played the market and built all this and I’ve waited. I’ve The old man laughed. “You’re waited, trembling, half a lifetime coming over fine, too!” Faber for someone to speak to me. I whispered, but the voice in dared speak to no one. That day Montag’s head was clear. “Go in the park when we sat together, to the firehouse when it’s time. I knew that some day you might I’ll be with you. Let’s listen to drop by, with fire or friendship, it this Captain Beatty together. was hard to guess. I’ve had this He could be one of us. God little item ready for months. But I knows. I’ll give you things to say. almost let you go, I’m that afraid!” We’ll give him a good show. Do you hate me for this electronic cowardice of mine? Here I am sending you out into the night, while I stay behind the lines with my damned ears listening for you to get your head chopped off.” “We all do what we do,” said Montag. He put the Bible in the old man’s hands. “Here. I’ll chance turning in a substitute. Tomorrow--” “I’ll see the unemployed printer, yes; that much I can do.” “Good night, Professor.” “Not good night. I’ll be with you the rest of the night, a vinegar gnat tickling your ear when you need me. But good night and good luck, anyway.”
  11. 11. F ORE -SIGHT ST RAT E GY CRIT ICAL DE SIGN
  12. 12. 5_ PA R T I DESIGN FICTION DESIGN FICTION IS AN EMERGING DESIGN P R O C E S S T O D AY. I T L O O K S AT S C I E N C E F I C T I O N F O R I N S P I R AT I O N A N D F R A M E S O U R UNDERSTANDING OF POTENTIAL FUTURES. LEFT Emerging trends embody the future. Researching these trends and understanding new markets is strategic thinking. Applying them to everyday life is critical design.
  13. 13. what if people could experience a reality before it came to be?
  14. 14. _2 8 what is design fiction? “It’s the deliberate use of diegetic prototypes to suspend disbelief about change.” _ Bruce Sterling Sci-fi Writer Design is everywhere and pervasive. Whether obvious or not, design is enormously influential on your personal views, thoughts, and actions. There is not one object in your world without the consideration and process of design. As the world becomes more technologically savvy, designers are asked and tasked to produce useful, functional, user-centered, and aesthetically pleasing products. Design Fiction uses emerging technology and positions it for integration into society. New products are sometimes most valued for their ability to influence society in positive ways. Lets speculate on tomorrow through a critical lens of today. RIGHT United Micro Kingdoms is a Design Fiction project by designers Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby.
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  16. 16. _10 UNITED MICRO KINGDOMS United Micro Kingdoms (U.M.K.) is “a deregulated laboratory for competing social, ideological, technological and economic models.” Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby are critical designers who create design fictions. Their design pieces discover new territory for other worlds based on the current trends and fixations in society today. Four design artefacts are resultant of potential economic, relational, and energy-distribution landscapes in our future based on trends today. Self-driving cars are thought of as being utopian ideals. In Walt Disney’s World of Tomorrow, the people mover was furtive first step. Driverless cars were a thing of fiction in movies like Forbidden Planet and This Island Earth. Technologies that were cutting edge 60 years ago are finally realized today. There is travel that is designed for work and the driverless car concept is a perfect application for that. In this scenario, Digicars are spaces for us to efficiently use our time to work while traveling. While we recognize that there are constraints, we allow ourselves to think more wildly about technology. Designers are faced with constant pressure to produce something on-time and under budget using available resources. Design Fiction eases those boundaries to enable free thought.
  17. 17. 11_ VERY LARGE BIKE In a world without cars, transportation is human, wind, or animal powered. By traveling in groups, the bikes can travel far distances. Communities form around expert storytellers and singers to entertain the group. TRAIN A constantly moving mountain carriage which contains labs, factories, hydroponic gardens, gyms, dorms, kitchens, nightclubs, and anything else needed. The environment surrounding is a natural paradise that can be enjoyed safely from the train. DIGICARS Development of an electric self-drive car that monetizes and optimizes every square metre of road surface. Selfdrive cars are possible social spaces but can function like a computer. BIOCARS Using anaerobic digesters that produce gas, biocars run with fuel cells to produce electricity. Powered individually, the cars are made of artificial lab-grown skin, bone and muscle.
  18. 18. _12 50 years ago, the father of science fiction invented tv glasses HUGO GERNSBACK Inventor, the “father of modern science fiction” and the namesake for the Hugo Award (science fiction writing). Hugo is the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories.
  19. 19. 13_
  20. 20. F UT UR E P RES ENT PAST
  21. 21. 15_ future’s history PA R T I I SCIENCE FICTION IS A FIGMENT OF A FA N TA S I C A L F U T U R E - C R E AT E D BY YEARNINGS OF OUR UTOPIAN IDEAS AND U N D E N I A B L E PA N G S O F O U R DY S T O P I A N NIGHTMARES. LEFT Predictions made by Science fiction authors and filmmakers of the past still pertain to the future. Science fiction can be understood as in constant orbit around topics today.
  22. 22. _16 sci-fi design history Suppose, however, that you become genuinely interested in gadgets-not as symbols of wonder to be deployed as symbols of wonder to be depicted as scifi stage props, but as actual, corporeal physical presences. It may dawn on you that you are surrounded by a manufactured environment _ Bruce Sterling Shaping Things Science Fiction has always provided mankind with a road map to the future. Certainly not an exact science, the artistry of science fiction it points design towards the future. Just as narratives augment reality for a purpose, science fiction sets expectations for the next “big thing”. RIGHT In STANLEY KUBRICK’S FILM 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY , astronauts Dr. David Boeman and Dr. Frank Poole watch a newscast on flat visual displays while taking a leisure breakfast. Kubrick introduced us to an impossible technology in 1965 by understating it in context.
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  24. 24. _18 Science fiction is the branch of literature that deals with the responses of human beings to changes in science and technology. _ ISAAC ASIMOV
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  26. 26. _20 WHEN IS THE FUTURE? A collection of case studies Sci-fi, CLOG 1 9 0 0 -1 9 20 MET RO PO LIS BRAVE NEW WO RLD 1 9 84 T HE JETSO NS DUNE 2 001: A SPAC E ODYSSEY PLANET OF T HE APES SOLYENT G REEN LOGAN’S RUN STAR WARS EPISO DE IV STAR TR E K : T HE MOT IO N PIC T URE ALIEN BLADE RUNNER T RO N T ERMINATO R B AC K TO T HE FUT URE SHORT C IRC UIT ROBO C O P BI LL & T ED’S ADVENT URE TOTAL RECALL DEMO LIT ION MAN G HOST IN T HE SHELL 1 2 MO NKEYS WAT ERWO RLD T HE FIFT H ELEMENT EVENT HORIZON T HE MAT RIX MINORIT Y REPORT I, ROBOT V FOR VENDET TA AEON FLUX C HILDREN O F MEN WALL-E AVATAR DIST RIC T 9 SURRO GAT ES INC EPT ION AFT ER EART H ENDER’S GAME 1 9 20-1 9 4 0 1 9 4 0-1 9 6 0 19 6 0 - 19 80
  27. 27. r e le a se date st o r y setti n g 20 1 3 1 9 80- 2000 2000-2 02 0 2 02 0-2 08 0 208 0 -21 4 0 21 4 0-2200 220 0 -226 0 FAR FUTURE 21_
  28. 28. _22 1 0 0 Y E A R S U R V E Y: F I C T I O N T O E V E R Y D A Y A S S I S T I V E D E S I G N [5] MASS BROADCASTING MEDIA-ENABLED SMART GLASSES VIDEO PHONE CALLING COMPUTER WITH EYES, EARS, THOUGHTS SMART WATCH 1 93 8 -1945 190 0 - 1 9 3 0 1965-1 9 70 1956 1981- 1 9 74 SIMULATED ALIEN INVASION FLIP-PHONE MOBILE COMMUNICATION
  29. 29. 23_ DRIVERLESS CAR TRANSPORTATION TUBE MEDICAL SELF SCANNING DEVICE PERSONAL VISUAL DISPLAY PANEL ABILITY TO RAPIDLY SHAPE OBJECTS 2 001-2 006 1996 20 1 1 -P RESENT UNIVERSAL INFORMATION DATABASE GESTURAL INTERACTION FULL BODY SCANNING ABILITY TO RAPIDLY REPLICATE OBJECTS
  30. 30. Science fiction MAKES US EXPECT A PARTICULAR FUTURE
  31. 31. _26 FUTURIST PROJECTIONS Ray Kurzweil, Futurist The majority of communication does not involve a human. 3D virtual reality displays, are in glasses, contact lenses, and auditory “lenses”. These are interfaces for communication with people, computers, the web. Interaction is gestural and two-way natural language with computers. Automated driving systems are installed in most roads. Computers are invisible and are embedded everywhere. _2019 Eye and cochlear implants provide input and output between the human user and the WEB. Direct neural pathways have been perfected for highbandwidth connection to the human brain. A range of neural implants is becoming available to enhance visual and auditory perception and interpretation, memory, and reasoning. The Turing test is passed by computers. Automated devices _2029 VIEWED AS are companions, teachers, caretakers, and lovers. Holograms create visual, auditory, & tactile projections of people and objects in reality. There is a growing discussion about the legal rights of computers and what constitutes being “human”. Knowledge is being created by machines with little or no human intervention. Machines claim to be conscious. Claims are largely accepted. Nanoproduced food has the nutritional composition and similar taste and texture of organically produced food. _2049 Nano-engineer machines are used in manufacturing. 100_
  32. 32. 27_ Picoengineering (developing technology at the scale of picometers or trillionths of a meter) becomes practical. A merger of human thinking with machine intelligence. There is no longer any clear distinction between humans and computers. Conscious entities do not have a permanent physical presence. Neural-implants augment human perceptual and cognitive abilities. As information can be instantly understood, the goal of education and intelligence is to discover new knowledge. _2072 Femroengineering proposals _2099 are controversial. Life expectancy is no longer a viable term for intelligent beings. Intelligent beings consider the fate of the Universe. _DISTANTLY
  33. 33. FACT histories trends PA S T FUTURE myths scenarios FICTION
  34. 34. 29_ PA R T I I I building speculation A GOOD STORY IS ABOUT PEOPLE. GOOD DESIGN IS ALSO ABOUT PEOPLE. THE LINK BETWEEN DESIGN AND SCIENCE FICTION IS WITHIN THE PLIGHT OF THE PEOPLE IN THE N A R R AT I V E . LEFT The intersection of belief demonstrates the existence of four types of stories. Histories are factual pasts, myths are fictional pasts, trends are factual futures, and scenarios are
  35. 35. _30 THE SIMILARITIES BETWEEN writing and designing “By combining these approaches, you now have a framework to begin imagining your world, the people that live in that world and the effect that your science will have on them” _ Brian David Johnson Science Fiction Prototyping Design is a process through which we create solutions for people. By using the speculative processes in science fiction, design has the ability to saturate all aspects of human imperfection. A new technology or research project may inspire, but without application, it has no tangible substance in our daily lives. By positioning products within the context of the future mundane, design can better form the future.
  36. 36. HOW WE EXPERIENCE AND INTERACT WITH A STORY READING STORIES Dr. Oatley and Dr. Mar reported in studies that fiction readers seem to be better able to understand other people, empathize with them and see the world from their perspective. LISTENING TO STORIES “I think good radio often uses the techniques of fiction: characters, scenes, a big urgent emotional question. And as in the best fiction, tone counts for a lot.” _ Ira Glass Creator, This American Life Podcast Series WATCHING STORIES “There is nothing more mysterious than a tv set left on in an empty room. It is even stranger than a man talking to himself or a woman standing dreaming at her stove. It is as if another planet is communicating with you.” _ Jean Baudrillard America WRITING STORIES “There is something universal about approaches to storytelling and it is up to you to change and mold it however you see fit.” _ Joseph Campbell The Power of the Myth 31_
  37. 37. _32 CHRISTOPHER KENNEDY SHORT FICTION PROFESSOR SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY HTTP://AS-CASCADE.SYR.EDU Christopher Kennedy is a graduate-level writing professor at Syracuse University with 30 years of experience writing poetry. He teaches a class called “forms” that encourages serious writers to exercise and practice new methods to creative writing in poetry and short fiction. building alternate world lies in associations with our world.
  38. 38. Pe op le A re tt er nd th em — th e po th e w or ld ar ou ed by m ud dy re d fin ge rs cl ay of Pe op le ar e th e to be m ol de d an d sh ap e e m ad e t of th e C lif fs id ce lls Th ey ar gh th ey gr ew ou bl oo d an d or ga ns , m ad e of ou Th at lo ok as th ju st cr ea tu re s w ith n Pe op le ar e no t ta ils an d in si de s of th ei r ow er w at ch ed di sa pp ea r “People Are” w ith ’v e ev Ti ny th in gs tif ul su ns et th ey on ar e ev er y be au co lo re d on th e sk y lik e cr ay e ra inby Christopher R. Kennedy Pe op le s d pi nk ng in th Re d an d go ld any m in ut e th ey ’v e sp en t w al ki r af te r m is si ng th e sc ho ol bu er ot he Pe op le ar e ev el la w ith th ei r yo un ge r br st ar m y ar in g an um br sc en di ng up on WRITING a va DO th e USE SOUND ShWHAT ELEMENTS DO YOU BRING INTOth em lik e HOW om YOU co ok ie ja r TO CREATE A k fr STORY? e ra in dr op s de pe an ut bu tt ThSHORT FICTION FROM POETRY? er co ok ie sn uc ze bo le ar e ev er y th e ol d ga Pe op un de r e a a greatk It’s ev er y fir st ki ss sh ar ed es more about There’sfir ew or example of it by Lydia Davis. A nd very language-driven for me andin to th e ai r lik ei r ey es ap or at at ev ge sound and rhythm - things da you would th A the nt le on e, th rt an d th eythat re to op en She’sr a fiction writer and all of her inspiration lip poem. Rather ha s ev er licup d comes ch eesound.eShe used the sound of the ke th ei from k ei r withsapa associate A ft er th y do g th at than coming ed at th e lu nc h ta bl Pe op le ar e ev erfor aha ve it’s er be frworking washing r machine, it’s rhythms being created with an idea first ey story, ev usually ie nd ou nd af te sc ho ol r th y t Ev er of ou tc as tor y on e that catches sh ed ar I was what fu ne her to sitye ar s af te write the offw el phrase er sound th ey ’v e pu my no t du ri ng th e got ra l, bu down and ear. ev l as As dm ot he r, This might hear sh ed fo r a gr an pi an o re ci ta l Ev er y te ar somebody say something and use story.nd thing sort of ticked for me and got me a ri ng what that y no te st ru ck du th ey pl uc k Because,e gr ou as a starting, jumping off point. fr om th thinking about on a couple of words sound Ev er a dr ag as s er y bl ad e of gr writing ey se already know m bl es so da me.ttAnd I ask myself “why do w hi ch re se interesting to bo le Ev not interested cl ou d th what I e I’m in a ey m ul us Ev er y to write, I’m gh w hi sp er ed in finding out op en om ac ro ss th e st re et to me and what I want cu in g si more interested w he n th ngthose words sound interesting st ra er fr hi ss ta l Ev er yI can write thatsh ar e know consciously. is inri ve subconscious to trigger interest?” I just my r what I don’t w ith a to Ev er y sm ile th ey, lik e th e ri pp lin g w at er in a r m os t pr ec io us po ss es si on , ou flu id assume there’s more there. d bl es si ng Pe op le ar e ou r m os t bl es se Ke nn ed y A nd ch an ge is WHAT IS A TYPICAL ASSIGNMENT FOR THE - C hr is to ph er R. I wrote a poem based on a comment I heard by WRITING FORMS CLASS? I passed on the Quad that said “Oh a student In the class, it’s pure creative responses to that happened the day before my violin broke.” whatever they read. I’m asking them to just And I thought it was the strangest way to frame write and reflect on what they want to write that, so I used the title to write something new. after reading that writer. So, how does that Hearing her say that gave me the opportunity inspire them to write something that you might to write. have not of otherwise? For the most part, I think people just write and try to use that as a HOW CONSCIOUS OF THE READER IS THE starting point. To not worry about it being read FICTION WRITER? by anyone else. It’s more so of doing a good job of making an alternate reality seem interesting enough HOW OFTEN DO YOU SIT DOWN AND GET INTO for someone to want to know what’s going to THE MODE OF WRITING? happen in that alternate reality. I remember I try to write everyday. Sometimes I’ll write for a reading Ray Bradbury - what’s interesting about while, and sometimes I can only write for a short those writers is that they create a world that time. But, I like to stay in that habit. The hardest you believe. And if you believe that world, you thing to do is to write when you don’t feel like it. will believe what happens to those characters. You’re going to make an association to People have a misconception about the something in this world. That requires an inspirational aspect of writing. It’s like if you’re understanding of what’s going on in this world, an athlete. You wouldn’t sit around and wait to as well as the world that you are creating and be struck by inspiration to throw a football. the relationship between those two worlds. ARE THERE ANY MEMORABLE SHORT STORIES OR POEMS? They’re all good - there are always good responses. That’s one of the great things about teaching classes. They’re all different from each other. They read the same thing but then what they write is extremely different than another person. It’s always interesting to see how they interpret or how they’re inspired and integrate it into their own voice when they sit down to write. I remember when I was a freshman in High School, I read the Marshain Chronicles by Bradbury. They go to Mars and they’re setting up a hot dog stand. He made it seem like what would be going on here, but it was in a strange environment. It is a comment on something going on in your life. 33_
  39. 39. _34 SCIENCE FICTION PROTOTYPING: G U I D E L I N E S W R I T I N G A S T O R Y [8] _0 1 PIC K YO UR S C IEN C E & B UIL D YO UR WO R L D Choose the science or technology to explore and give it an explanation. Establish the main characters and the location of the action. _0 2 THE S C IEN TIFIC IN FL EC TIO N PO IN T Explore the affect the technology has on daily life, governments, and systems in your story. _0 3 R AM IFICATIO N S O F THE S C IEN C E O N PEO PL E What effect does the science have on the world? How does it change people’s lives? Does it create a new danger? _0 4 THE HUM AN IN FL EC TIO N PO IN T What did we learn from seeing technology conceptualized? Can the technology be modified to fix the problem? identify opportunities for experimentation and research. _05 W H AT D I D W E L E A R N What can be improved? What fears are unfounded? How has your exploration changed your outlook? How could it improve your research?
  40. 40. DESIGN PROCESS AND FLOW U N PAC K AS S U M P T I ONS W I T H DATA & A N E C DOT ES D E VE LOP P E RSON AS B ASE D ON STA KE HOLD E RS si m ul ate stakehol der ex peri ences SY NT H E S IZE RE S E A RC H P ROP OSE D E SIG N D IRE CTION TO SOLVE THE P ROB LE M AT T E M P T S O LU T I O N THROUGH P R OTOT YP I N G 35_
  41. 41. _36 1956 FRED M. WILCOX FORBIDDEN PLANET When I watched this film for the first time, I immediately drawn to the questions raised by the use of the technologies in the story and how they shaped the flow of the narrative. When we are first introduced to the MindHarvesting Machine, it is merely presented as a fantastic machine that allows us the freedom to shape tangible objects from our minds. Is it not until we learn about the fate of the Krell people and expeditioners that we discover the machine’s implications. While being able to produce physical objects from the mind and place them anywhere, this machine created monsters from our minds and wiped out a species. While technology can frighten us with it’s possibilities, Science Fiction stories like these provide valuable lessons about how we should consider a design before setting it loose. Design cannot be taken lightly, as we come to depend on it for life. As the story unfolds, and the power of technology revealed, character development occurs. While assistive technologies in the film are highly imaginative and fantastic, they also sit in the shadows lurking CHARACTERS CAN BE UNDERSTOOD IN THEIR R E L AT I O N S H I P S W I T H T E C H N O L O G Y.
  42. 42. 37_ 1 e pl im rs s a vo as urvi ts ar r s st h fo t ha rc W sea pr Be od co uc me ts s f a ge rom n ex ni us an plor sp ext ati ec inc on ie t s of s up er 2 - One of which is a robot with a personality who inhibits harm To rational beings 5 “M Cul on min st at e th r of ing e mi the in a nd Id de of ” c va a rea sta hu t ti ma ed ng n fro m l oo t s t ifes u rio an te o m ys t ts r m i n db j e c e th e m o no th ible a s g e d An t us tan a th 4 3
  43. 43. _38 R E L AT I N G S P E C U L AT I O N S O F F O R B I D D E N P L A N E T TO TO DAY ROBBY THE ROBOT ROTATING ANTENNA EARS Robby is simply a tool. Tremendously strong, of course. CURVED BLUE LIGHT ORGAN SYNTHETIC VOICE LASER BEAM CHEMICAL LAB SUBSTANCE REPRODUCER _ DOCTOR MORBIUS MECHANICAL LEGS [11] [10] WIRELESS 3D PRINTING Technology without a direct line or connection to a system is an accordance in most devices today. Being able to build almost product from a computer drawing is a feat that embodies the future of how our world will be shaped. NATURAL LANGUAGE PROCESSING 100_ Speech recognition by a computer or informationprocessing system is a service available at our fingertips through companies like GoogleVoice and Apple’s Siri. These systems use databases of possible requests and translate language to data.
  44. 44. 39_ THE MIND-HARVESTING MACHINE In the wrong hands, mightn’t such a tool become a deadly weapon? OPERATED BY ELECTROMAGNETIC BRAIN IMPULSES PROJECT SOLID MATTER ANYWHERE SELF-SUSTAINING AND REPAIRING _ DOC OSTROW [13] [14] NANOTECHNOLOGICAL MANUFACTURING DESIGNING 3D OBJECTS FROM OUR BRAINS THE COMPUTATIONAL SINGULARITY The scale of manufacturing is decreasing significantly to the molecular and cellular level. At this scale, experimentation with the reproduction of living things is being developed. The “Thinker-Thing” captures electric brain waves and converts them into 3D models that can be 3D printed. Information processing or “computation” can be done much faster than we do it. Further, there appear no obvious physical limits as to how fast computation may ultimately be done. _ Ira Glass Creator, This American Life W E R E W E R I G H T A B O U T H O W W E T H O U G H T T H E S Podcast E C T S E O B J Series WOULD BE SHAPED?
  45. 45. _40 HOW CAN SCIENCE FICTION FILMS GALVANIZE DESIGN THINKING? THE ACTIVITY I wondered what elements from science fiction designers would pull into their creative work. By showing a highly imaginative and visual film such as WALL-E in the studio space, designers began to draw by using a reference design in the film and progressively adding to it.
  46. 46. 41_
  47. 47. 43_ THE GLOBAL Village PA R T I V T H E H E R O I C T H E O R Y O F “ M U LT I P L E D I S C OV E R Y ” H Y P OT H E S I Z E S T H AT M O S T I N V E N T I O N S A R E M A D E I N D E P E N D E N T LY B Y M A N Y P E O P L E AT O N C E . T O D AY, W E A R E S I M U LT A N E O U S LY C O N N E C T E D T H R O U G H T E C H N O L O G Y T O P A R T I C I P A T E I N A C T I V E LY C O - C R E AT I N G T H E F U T U R E . LEFT Collective future visions manifested by digital social networks that enable us to gather and collaborate on projects for the greater good.
  48. 48. _44 MASS COLLABORATION The truth is out there. _ Fox Mulder, THE X-FILES enabled E I G H T M I L L I O N P E O P L E to stream Felix Baumgartner jump from the edge of space back onto W H E N W E W O R K TO G E T H E R , W E H AV E Earth. Technology Mass collaboration is the effort to engage broad and diverse groups of participants in generating innovative and relevant solutions to the world’s most pressing and complex problems. As accessibility to technology grows, the demand goes beyond consuming experiences - it becomes the desire to participate in them. THE ABILITY TO TA K E M O R E I N TO C O N S I D E R AT I O N .
  49. 49. 45_ VIEW FROM ABOVE My first job as Designer in Residence for NASA was to participate in a hackathon and build something within a weekend. Using astronaut photography, my team developed an application for viewing these photos using ISS coordinates.
  50. 50. _46 AN ASTRONAUT WILL NEVER TELL YOU THAT SPACE IS A LONELY EXPERIENCE
  51. 51. WE HAVE CHOSEN TO SEND HUMANS INTO SPACE FOR A REASON : TO HEAR THEIR STORIES ISS CARRIER The tools we designed to support human life outside of our world had to be considered before sending a mission into Space. The design of the International Space Station focuses on optimizing room, securing safety, lining the walls with experimentation chambers, and marginal room for Astronaut leisure time. 47_
  52. 52. _48 open nasa NASA is expanding transparency, participation, and collaboration and creating a new level of openness and accountability. We are focusing on embedding open government into three integrated aspects of our operations—policy, technology, and culture. Whether NASA is using social networks to allow students to interact directly with astronauts, or creating a Cloud Computing Platform to give unprecedented access to scientific data, we have embraced the Open Government Directive. _ openNASA Team open.nasa.gov I could have never anticipated to learn as much about the complicated relationship between government and citizen until I stepped onto the Johnson Space Center grounds as open NASA’s Designer in Residence. In 1958, NASA formed by principle to “provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information”. The Open Government Initiative is a call for government agencies worldwide to de-pack the mysteries of their organizations, innovate policies, infuse new culture internally, and expose the public to complex data sets through technology.
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  54. 54. _50 2013 ROCHESTER AFTER-DARK SCI-FI FRIDAY EXHIBITION Science Fiction inspires us to gather around ideas and like-minded people. At the Rochester Museum and Science Center, an exhibit on Alien Worlds and Androids drew a crowd of all ages together to celebrate the history of science fiction. The design of the costumes at the event demonstrated how we define science fiction visually. By taking a few basic materials and shaping them around our bodies, the materials begin to have a form and a story. The creation of these “wearables” was a quick, generative process that suspended our expectations of design and what they do to our bodies. ABOVE Event programs for the Sci-fi Friday exhibition.
  55. 55. 51_ SCIENCE FICTION PROTOTYPES A designed science fiction costume using a bowl, a jewelry piece, and different types of flexible turbing, THE SINGING TESLA COIL CONVENTION GOERS Tesla was an inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, physicist, and futurist. The Tesla Coil was invented to provide electricity. This version of the coil is modified to produce musical tones. Our fascination with Science Fiction is apparent through the collection of attendees. While Science Fiction pursues our imaginations, it also is a way that we can connect with one another.
  56. 56. _52 I don’t know, but I can guess. RESEARCH METHOD I read this story to 3 people and asked them to draw what they pictured being described in the speculative piece about life in 2014. Isaac Asimov was not only a science fiction writer, he was also a futurist and the creator of the 3 Laws of Robotics.
  57. 57. 53_ 1964 ISAAC ASIMOV VISIT TO WORLD’S FAIRE ... The scenes, set in or about 1900, 1920, 1940 and 1960, show the advances of electrical appliances and the changes they are bringing to living. I enjoyed it hugely and only regretted that they had not carried the scenes into the future. What will life be like, say, in 2014 A.D., 50 years from now? What will the World’s Fair of 2014 be like? I don’t know, but I can guess. One thought that occurs to me is that men will continue to withdraw from nature in order to create an environment that will suit them better. Jets of compressed air will also lift land vehicles off the highways, which, among other things, will minimize paving problems. Smooth earth or level lawns will do as well as pavements. Bridges will also be of less importance, since cars will be capable of crossing water on their jets, though local ordinances will discourage the practice. Much effort will be put into the designing of vehicles with “Robot-brains”*vehicles that can be set for particular destinations and that will then proceed there without interference by the slow reflexes of a human driver. I suspect one of the major attractions of the 2014 fair will be rides on small roboticized cars, neatly and automatically avoiding each other. For short-range travel, moving sidewalks (with benches on either side, standing room in the center) will be making their appearance in downtown sections. They will be raised above the traffic. Traffic will continue (on several levels in some places) only because all parking will be off-street and because at least 80 per cent of truck deliveries will be to certain fixed centers at the city’s rim. Compressed air tubes will carry goods and materials over local stretches, and the switching devices that will place specific shipments in specific destinations will be one of the city’s marvels. Communications will become sight-sound and you will see as well as hear the person you telephone. The screen can be used not only to see the people you call but also for studying documents and photographs and reading passages from books. Synchronous satellites, hovering in space will make it possible for you to direct-dial any spot on earth, including the weather stations in Antarctica (shown in chill splendor as part of the ‘64 General Motors exhibit). Although technology will still keep up with population through 2014, it will be only through a supreme effort and with but partial success. Not all the world’s population will enjoy the gadgety world of the future to the full. A larger portion than today will be deprived and although they may be better off, materially, than today, they will be further behind when compared with the advanced portions of the world. They will have moved backward, relatively. Even so, mankind will suffer badly from the disease of boredom, a disease spreading more widely each year and growing in intensity. This will have serious mental, emotional and sociological consequences, and I dare say that psychiatry will be far and away the most important medical specialty in 2014. The lucky few who can be involved in creative work of any sort will be the true elite of mankind, for they alone will do more than serve a machine. Indeed, the most somber speculation I can make about A.D. 2014 is that in a society of enforced leisure, the most glorious single word in the vocabulary will have become work!
  58. 58. _54 1939/2013 C O M PA R I N G PA S T & P R E S E N T WORLD FAIR(E)S “Here millions of citizens may visualize the national life that is to come. That it will be a memorable and historic Fair, that it will profoundly influence our national life to years to come, and that success may attend every phase of its activities - these are hopes of the people of the United States.” _ Franklin D. Roosevelt Opening Lines of the 1939-40 World’s Faire Souvenir Book Looking back on the past 75 years, the innovations brought to the World’s Fair in 1939 are transcendent to the world we live in today. In 1939, large exhibitions were designed by powerhouse companies such as GE, IBM, Westinghouse, and Bell Labs to W E W A N T T O B U I L D showcase their visions of the future. THE FUTURE In 2006, MAKE brought back the Fair to showcase the growing presence of the Maker Culture and to demonstrate the possibilities of experimenting with technology in an open and transparent way.
  59. 59. 55_ FAIR MISSION STATEMENT “The eyes of the Fair are on the future; it stresses the necessity for peace. The Fair says to it’s millions of visitors: “Here are the materials, the ideas and the forces at work in our world. These are the ingenious tools with which the World of Tomorrow might be made.” [17] FAIR DESCRIPTION Maker Faire is an event “to celebrate crafts, engineering, science projects, and the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) mindset.” Sponsored by Disney.
  60. 60. _56 _ the map [18] NEW YO R K WO RL D’ S FA IR 1 939- 40 In 1939, America was coming off of it’s worst economic period and tension was mounting between nations leading up to World War II. To inspire hope and look forward, a group of New York City Policemen organized an international exhibition. East of New York City, 1,216 acres were allocated for “Building the World of Tomorrow”.
  61. 61. 57_ _ the map NE W YO RK M AKE R FAI R E 20 13 Since 2006, MAKE magazine has organized and hosted “The Greatest Show (and Tell on Earth”, or a celebration of the Maker movement. Maker Faire sits on the same location as the original site of the World’s Fair 1939, at the New York Hall of Science, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens, New York.
  62. 62. _58 PAG E S F R O M T H E 1 9 3 9 - 4 0 N E W YO R K W O R L D ’ S FA I R COMMUNITY INTERESTS This section of the Fair engaged visitors in a “Town of Tomorrow”, where shelter, education, religion, recreation, and art were part of the discussion. SCIENCE AND EDUCATION In order to education and explain the power of science in the future, exhibits, movies, and lectures were tools to explain how solving problems can be done through experimentation, observation, formulation of hypotheses, and reflection.
  63. 63. 59_ COMMUNICATIONS One of the largest centers at the Fair speculated man’s ability to consume knowledge, sentiments, and ideas from other men. The prediction stated was that communication will be shaped by man’s ability and desire to communicate his aspirations to is fellow men and to posterity. FARM FACTORIES Tomorrow was expected to provide us the ability to produce food in an efficient, clean, and convenient way. The image shown from the souvenir book demonstrates a future where cows run through a conveyer system that mechanically milks the cows. HOW MIGHT HAVE WE BEEN RIGHT AND HOW HAVE WE D E S I G N E D?
  64. 64. _60 VISIT TO MAKER FAIRE 2013
  65. 65. 61_ THE BRAND THOUGHT-LEADERS MAKE is a community-driven company that develops in relation to the interests of the “makers”, “hackers”, and “thinkers”. Despite a reliance on the community to exist, the MAKE brand has shaped a community of their own and have shaped how we define a maker. The main events of Maker Faire revolve around the people who speak. Lecturers are given 5 to 20 minutes to talk about their projects and principles in the community. Rather than MAKE presenting, the company acts as a gravitational force, pulling in the “thought-leaders” of today’s generation. THE BOOTHS MAKING THE MAKER OPEN TO NEW EXPERIENCES At Maker Faire, sponsors are given an amount of space to design their booth with. Booths are grouped according to category. This year, the 3D Printing Village was the largest and most popular collection of booths. Maker Faire is not a passive experience by any means. The intention of the Fair is to educate new community members. This means, all ages, all races, and all levels of intelligence have the ability to walk up to an exhibit and make something. At any moment, you might be struck by an insight or a new process when visiting the grounds at Maker Faire. Not only do the sponsors and thought-leaders teach us about the future of their industry, but a maker or child might ask a question that was never before considered.
  66. 66. _62 MAKER FAIRE DETROIT 2012 INSPIRED KICKSTARTING A 3D PRINTING COMPANY In the summer of 2012, I was beginning to learn about the world of making, sharing, data, and communication between government and citizen at NASA. Many of the discussions within the walls of NASA led to a group discussion on the exciting promises of 3D printing. When 3D printing was displayed at Maker Faire Detroit, the industry was in it’s infancy. The prospects of being able to find a real purpose for the technology led to the formation of a group of friends who wanted to make a change. Building a 3D printer from scratch starts with the Rep-Rap wiki, an Open-Source framework and set of guidelines calling for mass collaboration. In order to build capacity and educate the masses from our perspectives, we decided to build the technology. From there, we launched on Kickstarter and were funded $250,000 in 60 days.
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  68. 68. _64 OUR CUSTOMERS VIEW GIGABOT AS AN EXTENSION OF THEMSELVES.
  69. 69. W H AT I S 3 D P R I N T I N G? HOW TO BUILD A 3D PRINTER EXTRUDER WITH A FACE DEMONSTRATING THE PROCESS The barriers to entry are increasingly lower for new makers in the 3D printing industry. Rep Rap is the forum in which one can learn how to build a machine that can “replicate” itself by producing the parts that it uses. In design, this would be design for repair. A 3D printer is a tool that pulls plastic filament through a heated port. With the use of computer programming, the device distributes successive layers to form a shape. The market for 3D printing is still fairly new, so demonstrations become opportunities to build capacity. To capacity build is to educate new markets about the adaptive power of implementing new technologies in their communities. [21] WHERE TO FIND A MARKET, THE PRICE-POINT, AND COMMUNITY Kickstarter is another example of a company built around community. This company provides the space for new businesses to test and market a product they want to bring to the world. SHOWCASE PIECES COMPARATIVE FICTION Building a brand in a new market involves understanding how the user sees the product in his or her life. Tangible objects create conversation. The Green Lantern is a hero. When encountering a foe, his imagination projects through the lantern to produce a tangible solution. In the above image, the Green Lantern projects a solar furnace to avoid harm from harsh sun rays. 65_
  70. 70. WHEN WE COME FROM CONSUMER CULTURE TO MAKER CULTURE, WE HAVE TO START EVEN THOUGH WE DON’T KNOW HOW
  71. 71. _68 MAKErs Make it so. _ Jean Luc Picard Star Trek With the advent of mass collaboration, data combined with creativity allows for the transcendence limitations imposed by culture, time, and space. When we started to share information on a mass level with Google, Wikipedia, Government websites, and community forums, a shift began in our physical worlds. Makers emerge. Social network inclusion M A K E R S C R E A T E gave way to publishing things from a S O L U T I O N S . physical world - and soon projects that were too big for one person. in ____, MAKE began to document and connect the people who wanted to grow their network in building. Now, people are gathering to meet and collaborate on solutions never before explored. RIGHT Jimmy the Robot was imagined by an Intel Futurist, sketched by an illustrator, and 3D modeled and printed by a maker for New York Maker Faire 2013. [22]
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  73. 73. _70 BRIAN DAVID JOHNSON FUTURIST | INTEL ROBOTS21.COM Brian David Johnson is a futurist for Intel. At New York Maker Faire 2013, Johnson gave a talk titled, “Imagining the Future and Building It”, simultaneously launching a global call for hackers and makers to build their own personal robot. Johnson envisions that we will be imagining the future of robotics through his flagship exploration “The Tomorrow Project”. Two weeks later, I caught up with Johnson about the project he’s launching and his perspective on the role Science Fiction plays in design thinking. Robots can facilitate the relationships shared between people.
  74. 74. 71_ WHAT IS THE ROBOTS21.COM PROJECT? The 21st century robot platform is a project through which we create social machines. Unbounded, these robots start in the imagination and move from the 3d file to the mechanics. It’s a fiercely collaborative and open source platform. Not just one group is solving the problem, but it is intensely inclusive. WHAT ROLE DO YOU SEE DESIGN PLAYING IN THE PROJECT? HOW HAS THE SCOPE OF ROBOTS21.COM CHANGED SINCE IT’S LAUNCH? With the launch of Maker Faire, Robot Hacks has had a huge echoing effect. The illustrator can’t keep up, he literally is overwhelmed with positive attention. HOW WOULD YOU DEFINE A ROBOT? Design Science and Technology are merging and I’m here to get people imagining and designing robots in a different way. You don’t have a wall anymore to learn the skills and tools, but you still need trained designers and people to do it. I’m using human behavior to design higher level AI. By using computers and AI, Robots will exist, making their own good and bad decisions. By looking at humans, we adapt to situations. Instead of creating machines as handicaps, we should be designing rational robots. We’ll begin to draw and design anything which allows a level of hyper-personalization. Maybe we’re not going to be building one robot, but really, designing many. In the world of Science Fiction, robots are making rational and irrational decisions. When you look at something like Jimmy, you don’t know what’s going on in his head.
  75. 75. _72 HOW HAS SCIENCE FICTION INFLUENCED THE PROJECT? ARE YOU INVOLVING ETHICS IN THE DISCUSSION AROUND YOUR PROJECT? The project was nested around the notion of Fiction first. So what I really want to do is say, “Tell me a story of your robot”. When you say “tell me what your robot would do different from other robots”, you have a better understanding of what you would want to create. Seeing and hearing about robots the size of cars indicates that there’s nothing he cannot do. Technology is just a tool and tools are just machines that do human work and this is what I’ll take off my shoe and pound about. There is no line to draw. If technology is a tool and if tools do the work of humanity, then there is a level of humanity in all tools. In the role of what computational systems do, they are just expressions of ourselves. Maybe our better angels, our better selves, without the dilemma of having an ego. Computational systems are only programmed to do what they’re meant to do. AS A FUTURIST, WHERE DO YOU SEE ROBOTS PLAYING A CRITICAL ROLE? When you look at something like health care, there is a huge potential for assistive robotics. What if you begin to think about how you care about a person. Robots can facilitate the relationships shared between people. Then, these robots become more of a social network. They’re not just our servants folding clothes, but they’re something more. This will allow us to approach thinking about robots in a different way. This way would be more like, “oh yeah! we think about robots”. It will not be a relationship based technology. We have a fascination with the notions of emotions and computing. To better serve human life, robotics should be more about the relationship and less about command and control.
  76. 76. CONCLUSIONS THE FUTURE IS STILL IN OUR HANDS A PHYSICAL OBJECT SUSPENDS OUR BELIEF Yes, the future is a scary and haunting place. However, we have not designed it yet. It is still lingering, awaiting our hands and minds. If we train ourselves to consider before we design, we might not have much to fear in the future. Jimmy the Robot was simple a 3D modelled shell, but the craft of his construction and his life adventures have made us believe. THE PERSONALITY OF AN INANIMATE OBJECT CAN BE DEVELOPED IN FICTION The decisions that were made about who Jimmy was as a character were determined by writing speculative fiction about him. Rather than developing the technology to race the market, Johnson believes half the battle is crafting the narrative of the design. 73_
  77. 77. _74 2013 MEET Jimmy the robot Ask yourself: Who do you want your robot to be? Science fiction stories, comics, and movies are powerful tools to imagine your robot first. We can use science fiction based on science fact to design robots and then share those stories as a technical requirements document. _ Brian David Johnson 21st Century Robot By initiating the project, Johnson is not only forecasting the future, actively making it happen. By engaging the crowd at Maker Faire, Johnson is leveraging the burgeoning maker community. Compared to the 20th century, today electronics are easy to learn and computers are compact and as fast as thought itself. By combining the quick building tools we have at our fingertips, robots are merely a hybrid of all of the pieces.
  78. 78. DESIGNING SOMETHING WITH LIFE REQUIRES GUIDELINES FROM A STORY Johnson cited many popular Science Fiction authors and stories as the backbone for the project. Johnson describes the guiding principles for the project. ASIMOV’S ROBOTICS FIRST LAW OF “1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.” ASIMOV’S ROBOTICS SECOND LAW OF “2. A robot must obey the orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.” ASIMOV’S ROBOTICS THIRD LAW OF “3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.” 75_
  79. 79. M ACHINE MAN WE ARABLE TE CHNOLOGY T HE BODY AS A COM PUT E R
  80. 80. 77_ PA R T V THE NEW NATURAL TECHNOLOGY IS NOT DEVELOPED IN A VAC U U M . A S I T ’ S C R E AT E D A N D T E S T E D THROUGH IT’S USE, EXTRAORDINARY DESIGNS BECOME COMMON PLACE AND SOON IN INVISIBLE IN OUR LIVES. LEFT The human body is becoming a model and mold for technology development. By building around our bodies, we are becoming one with our gadgets.
  81. 81. _78 MACHINES WITH HUMAN SENSES “The new technologies, with their new machines, new images and interactive screens, do not alienate me. Rather, they form an integrated circuit with me. Video screens, televisions, computers and Minitels resemble nothing so much as contact lenses in that they are so many transparent prostheses, integrated into the body to the point of being almost part of its genetic make-up: they are like pacemakers -- or like Philip K. Dick’s “papula”, a tiny implant, grafted onto the body at birth as a “free gift”, which serves the organism as an alarm signal. All our relationships with networks and screens, whether willed or not, are of this order. Their structure is one of subordination, not of alienation -- the structure of the integrated circuit. Man or machine? Impossible to tell.“ _ Jean Baudrillard Xerox And Infinity [26]
  82. 82. S O M E O F O U R C H A R AC T E R I ST I C S T H AT S H O U L D BE WORKED WITH AND MIMICKED INF ORMATI O N PROCE SSI N G, RE F LE CT IO N , PAT T E RNDE CIPHE R I N G, DE CISION -M AK I N G SIGHT SOUND SME LL TAST E HAPT IC TOUCH 79_
  83. 83. THINGS OF THE FUTURE SHOULD COMPLIMENT HUMAN TRAITS. THEY SHOULD NEVER DISABLE HUMAN CHARACTERISTICS.
  84. 84. _82 THE SHAPE OF EMERGING TECHNOLOGY The transformative potential of Utopia depends on locating it in the future, on thinking through the process of transformation from the present, and identifying the potential agents of transformation _Ruth Levitas Dark Horizons: Science Fiction and the Dystopian Imagination It has never been easier to find new knowledge and to string the connections between ideas than it is right now. New technology is conceptualized as solutions that will build a happier, more productive, and beautiful life. Films present us with props, which are is merely physical conceptual shelled forms. These photos may appear as fictional props, but are actually just a small collection of designs in the last 2 years.
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  86. 86. _84 lorne covington INTERACTIVE PARTICIPATORY ARTIST NOIRFLUX.COM Lorne Covington is an independent interaction artist who develops projects for science and technology museums in New York State. By using technology such as Kinect, projectors, screens, and programming, Lorne has been able to envision new experiences through gestural and skeletal tracking. I visited Lorne’s studio to see his environment and learn more about what has brought him to the work he’s involved with today. Lorne has not only worked in participatory art, but is also a software developer, worked in high tech, robotics, and has studied animal behavior as an oceanographer. INTERACTIONS SHOULD BE NATURAL the first time made.
  87. 87. 85_ WHAT KIND OF WORK DO YOU DO? WHAT WORK HAVE YOU DONE IN THE PAST? About 4 years ago, I moved to Syracuse about and became a reclusive artist in my studio. I want everything to be ideally interactive from the first interaction. This goes into a lot of user experience and psychology. I was working in the high tech industry and spent many years managing product development. I was also an oceanographer for 4 years exploring the world. About 5 years ago, I got back into art and became interested in large, participatory art. WHAT GOT YOU STARTED? HAS SCIENCE FICTION INFLUENCED YOU IN OTHER WAYS? In 1981, I took a 3 year stint to start an interactive video company. This is a time when multimedia meant synchronized slide projectors. We thought we were 5 years ahead of our time. We did things called video disc players before they came out. I was working with producer Michael Phillips from Close Encounters of the Third Kind. His production studio was interested and wanted to use it. Then the PC came out and we lost to the new competition, IBM. Then, the only party interested was the government for military training so we pulled the plug. We wanted to make interactive films. I used to do 16millimeter films as a teenager and the key thing for me was that I grew up across the street from a large theatre with a huge screen. I would go and see movies that were larger than anything else and it felt like you were inside. That was a tremendous influence.
  88. 88. _86 WHAT IS YOUR APPROACH TO INTEGRATING NEW TECHNOLOGY? From the beginning, I have always been interested in the development of a narrative in the process not for storytelling but for exploratory learning. I want something with great personal involvement. Particularly if it touches you in your personal space. That has a hook - that has an emotional, visceral hook to it. I’ve been thinking a lot about how to allow someone to explore a situation on their own based on it’s own merits. WHAT DO YOU HOPE TO DO IN THE FUTURE WITH THIS TECHNOLOGY? We’re talking about doing a memorial for PAN AM flight 103 using virtual reality. You might walk through the plane, say who is this and know their story. It will personalize what happened and will help you explore the backstory and impact it had. WHAT PROJECTS ARE YOU WORKING ON? There’s one exhibition about the sun, and the other about quasi controlling a robot with your body. It’s not just an avatar, but he’ll become bored with you. The idea of this is to teach about space exploration and guided autonomy. The rovers on mars cannot be under direct control and make their own decisions due to the lag in communication.
  89. 89. CONCLUSIONS HOW YOU SEE ME The Oculus Rift Head-Mounted Display is an immersive digital technology piece. However, while it immerses you in one digital environment, it isolates you in a physical world. WHAT I SEE Using powerful information networks, such as Wikipedia, Oculus Rift can be used to navigate pure visualizations of information. When I took off the Rift, it was disjointing to re-enter reality. WHAT THE COMPUTER SEES To position itself in space, Oculus Rift makes judgements about where it is based on the direction that your head is in and where your head moves. Covington attached an infared camera to the top of the Rift to locate the wearers hands in space for an interactive information space. 87_
  90. 90. _88 COMPUTERS SEE OUR BODIES AS GROUPS OF CONNECTED AXIS POINTS
  91. 91. LEADING MOTION SENSING D E V E LO P I N G P L AT F O R M TO O L S X B OX KINECT KINECT DESIGN CONSTRAINTS Kinect is a great tool for designers and engineers to play with interactive full-body projects. However, the device was designed for a living room environment and therefore functions best at a 6FT range. 6FT 2FT LEAP INTERACTION AREA LEA P MOT ION 2FT 2 FT This desktop design is capable of being able to read our hands from 2FT above and on either side of the device. Therefore, the Leap device is intended for individual use. 89_
  92. 92. _90 “ M O O R E ’ S L AW ” - F U T U R I ST S P E C U L AT I O N LOW E R C O ST S O F H A R DWA R E TO DAY For a developer, technologies that we can build things with are lowering in costs significantly every year. The lower the cost, the lower the barrier to building, and the closer we are to having idealized interactions that almost disappear into our everyday. Coupled with our online interactions and information sharing, the low costs of hardware are allowing more and more people to participate in building things. $5 00 $20 0 0 20 0 8 PR OJEC TOR 2013 H E AD - MO UNT ED DISPLAY 201 3 2005 I NTEG RAT ED C IRC UITS 2013 3 D PRINT ER 2013 2010 MOTI ON SENSING TE CHNOLO GY 2013 100_
  93. 93. 91_ “MOORE’S LAW” SPECULATION Intel co-founder Gordon Moore predicted famously that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit will double every two years. This speculation is a cornerstone in discussions on lower barriers to technology and can be applied to other innovations. $ 2 0,000 1990 2 01 0
  94. 94. _92 GOOGLE GLASSES “Google Glass has the vision allowing us to continue to be in the world but also have access to the digital things that we need and love.” _Tom Chi TEDYouth 2012
  95. 95. 93_ THE USER INTERFACE THE SIZE OF THE DISPLAY A whole new interaction occurs when you put on a pair of Google Glasses. Saying “OK Glass”, tilting your head up, and a touch surface on the side brim to scroll are main interaction points. The Google Glass display occupies a small quadrant of your eye, towards the peripheral. This just enough room for one display at a time. COMPARATIVE FICTION HISTORY’S ROLE The Google X prototyping team cited Minority Report as the inspiration for designing an interaction we desire with technology. This technology is viewed as “disruptive” to the market today, but has a history of being imagined by authors of futurist speculations.
  96. 96. _94 LESSONS LEARNED FROM RAPID prototyping a wearable computer “I spent two years of my life building the user experience team for the google x division of google, and it’s a place I affectionately call the Department of Science Fiction because of the futuristic nature of the types of project we take on: self-driving cars, google glass, and other things that you’ll see soon enough.” _Tom Chi TEDYouth 2012 Google X’s explorer program is an open invitation for early adopters of the product to imagine and design software or hardware solutions for the Google Glass family. Tom Chi spoke at TEDYouth to educate the masses that building a product like Google Glass can happen with just a couple of quick building experiments using materials available at your fingertips. When a powerful corporation like Google or Intel asks outsiders to design for and with their product, it’s an indication of a new movement where the citizen is the participant and designer.
  97. 97. 95_ FIND THE QUICKEST PATH TO EXPERIENCE DOING IS THE BEST KIND OF THINKING Within one day, you want to be able have the experience that you are designing. Problems come up when you start to imagine what it looks like to have a digital display in your physical world. Using hairbands, chopsticks, binder clips, and fishing line, the team prototyped an experience like seen in Minority report. In 45 minutes, the team was able test and move past the idea of a design. USE MATERIALS THAT MOVE AT THE SPEED OF THOUGHT TO MAXIMIZE YOUR RATE OF LEARNING RAPID PROTOTYPING IS AN ACTION AVAILABLE TO ALL OF US To figure out how to design something for comfort, use materials with similar physical properties as the final material. What was discovered was that ears can carry more weight than your nose. When weight is placed on the back of your glasses, they sit more comfortably on your face. Expansive learning is the action of using paper, clay, and tape to find a new insight in an ancient technology. Through the process of rapid prototyping, you are able to do the learning that you do on behalf of humanity.
  98. 98. _26 9 A N A P P L I C AT I O N F O R G O O G L E G L A S S JOURNOVATION “It’s our over arching belief that the future for journalists is bright as long as they focus on how best to meet the needs of the audiences they seek to inform. Individual success stories abound, but they are often drowned out by the larger discussion about how to save the news industry and practices of the last century.” _ Journovation.syr.edu/about-us/ Google Glass is a technology being currently explored by journalism students in the Newhouse School of Communications at Syracuse University. Professors and advocates are pursuing “Civic Media” as a way to capture stories, engage participants, and provide an experience of the story to the consumer.
  99. 99. 97_ PROFESSOR DR4WARD Through the Google Glass explorer program, Professor DR4WARD created a class to envision future products that would be designed for and by Journalists.
  100. 100. _98 EXPERIENCING STORIES CREATES EMPATHY dan pacheco NEWHOUSE | SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY CIVICMEDIA.SYR.EDU Pacheco is the Peter A. Horvitz Endowed Chair in Journalism Innovation at the Newhouse School and publishes Journovation Central. Dan Pacheco is a digital journalist with 18 years of experience in news and information startups and new product development. He joined the launch team for Washingtonpost.com in 1994, where he produced its first business, technology and community sections. I met Pacheco visiting the Newhouse building to learn about how Google Glass is being integrated into the program. Pacheco believes in constant innovation and reinvention for individuals and industries.
  101. 101. TELL ME MORE ABOUT WHAT YOU DO. My role is chair of Journalism Innovation and my job is to explore the intersection of journalism and technology. Also, I teach some entrepreneurial skills to people who are interested in being journalists. More and more, jobs that they would have had are fewer because they are detracting in the field of journalism alone. The legacy world is subtracting and they’re trying to stabilize. HOW DOES ENTREPRENEURSHIP ASSIST JOURNALIST STUDENTS? There are new technologies showing up everyday for the individual journalist that creates a lot of opportunities for them. I’m all about preparing students for future growth so that they have permission to dream big and also thinking beyond the industries that were created in the early industrial revolution. WHAT SORTS OF PROJECTS AND WHAT TYPES OF SKILLS ARE BEING DEVELOPED? WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE PROJECT TO EXPERIENCE? We have found that there are people who are interested in filling the information gaps that these struggling legacy firms can’t fill even if they wanted to. The best project was with a whole bunch of sensors around a room while wearing a head-mounted display. The head-mount had x,y,z coordinates which allowed anyone to be and placed into an alternate world. While you’re in that space, the computer will feed you information as you experience this other environment. Understanding the impact fracking has on groundwater. You could create a game where people experience this with their hands and understand those a lot letter if they read it in a 40 inch piece of paper. Engage people around gesture-based technology in ways they’re not interested. 99_
  102. 102. _100 WHOSE PROJECT WAS THAT AND HOW MUCH DID IT COST TO PRODUCE? The technology was 100,000 dollars a year ago. We set this room up into a holodeck. Nonny de la Peña is using the technology for documentary film-making. Her project “Hunger in Los Angeles” has audio from an event in the setting and she re-created the event with avatars. You are in a food line when a person falls to the ground in a diabetic coma. You feel like you’re there because you hear the audio and you’re seeing things in 3D, some people end up crying. It makes people experience the story rather than just reading it. There are so many tragic stories everyday. We read about these things everyday but we tune it out because we can’t relate to it. WHAT IS THE BIGGEST RESULT YOU’VE SEEN FROM OVERLAYING TECHNOLOGY AND JOURNALISM? When you read or hear about the stories the next time, you feel empathic towards them because you feel like you were there in a way. This technology can be used to facilitate experiences.
  103. 103. CONCLUSIONS GOOGLE GLASS IS THE FUTURE IT IS A SEAMLESS INTERACTION The first interaction I had with Google Glasses were when I stepped into Professor DR4WARD’s office and met him wearing them. While skeptical at first, once I put them on for myself, I began to feel as though my life could be enhanced using them. To learn how to use Google Glasses, I had to be instructed how to move my hands and my head in coordination with the product. Once then, I was aware of how I was interacting with it. TECHNOLOGICAL DISTRACTIONS FADED INTO THE BACKGROUND GOOGLE GLASS IS A TOOL, NOT A PRODUCT The display sits in the corner of my eye, and while I’m talking to someone one-on-one, the prism will be lit if I am using it. However, if not in use the device will automatically turn off and slip away to reveal the world you’re actually in. The Google explorer program for Glass says something about how the company wants the product to develop. Rather than being told what it should or should not be, the Glasses are made to be designed with. 101_
  104. 104. 103_ CONCLUSIONS the product as the hero STORIES ARE A DESIGNER’S PORTEND TO THE FUTURE. OFTEN TIMES, THE PRODUCT IS THE PROTAGONIST AND SHAPER OF P E O P L E I N T H E S T O R Y. LEFT Products play a role in our lives. Bruce Sterling writes, “just as we shape things, they also shape us”. In this model, a feedback loop between human and machine is established.
  105. 105. _104 PRODUCTS CAN BE CHARACTERIZED “The individual has to find an aspect of myth that relates to his own life.” _Joseph Campbell The Power of Myth Contextualization is an activity where the background of a main character or product is highlighted and analyzed. In the process of analyzation, humans have the unique ability to have an honest perspective on the technosocial. The technosocial is the social life of technology. We can no longer ignore that technology has a life in ours. It wishes to breathe as we breathe, and we will design it that way to immortalize ourselves. As we design this technology, we need to have an understanding of the dialect we design into it, and it’s personification as a hero or villain. JUST AS A CHARACTER IS THE P R O D U C T O F I T ’ S E N V I R O N M E N T, A PRODUCT IS SHAPED THROUGH IT’S EXPERIENCES.
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  107. 107. _106 OUR LIFE EVOKES OUR CHARACTER. YOU FIND OUT MORE AS YOU GO ON.
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  109. 109. _108 THE LOVE LETTER & BREAK-UP LETTER “The Breakup Letter is a design research tool that Smart Design uses to understand the emotional connection between people and their products, services, and experiences.” _ Smart Design Smart Design: The Breakup Letter http://vimeo.com/11854531 When we interact with a story, we are leaning about the character and growing to love and empathize with their plight. Some of the most interesting stories are where things are imperfect. Learning about why that is, reflecting on the moments that didn’t work, and finding a replacement is in the hands of the user. Inanimate devices that we depend on for certain things in our lives can either play hero and villain - saving or breaking our lifestyles. To de-pack some of the mysteries of these relationships, I asked three very different people to write a love letter and break-up letter to a cornerstone object in their lives.
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  111. 111. _110 lucinda havenhand INTERIOR DESIGN PROFESSOR | SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY
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  113. 113. _112 ALI LLEWELLYN COMMUNITY MANAGER | OPENNASA
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  115. 115. _114 sebastian rodriguez DIGITAL DESIGNER | GOOGLE ARGENTINA
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  117. 117. _116 A THING SHOULD NOT BE BROUGHT TO LIFE FOR DEATH.
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  119. 119. _118 PATA PATA PAT ( i ) POTIOR to have a share in and take possession of PHYSICAL PHYSICA PHYSIC relating to the body, contact, or the operation of natural forces generally PHYSICAL
  120. 120. 119_ 50 GIRLS 50 AL WILLIAMSON a reader today looks at a piece of speculative fiction in comic-strip form. This particular comic is adapted from William Gibson Science Fiction. In this story, space suits are a lifeline for the characters.
  121. 121. _120 CHARACTERS CAN BE UNDERSTOOD IN THEIR R E L AT I O N S H I P S W I T H T E C H N O L O G Y. WHEN WE WORK TO G E T H E R , W E H AV E THE ABILITY TO TA K E M O R E I N TO C O N S I D E R AT I O N .
  122. 122. 121_ WE WANT TO BUILD THE FUTURE M A K E R S C R E AT E SOLUTIONS. JUST AS A CHARACTER IS THE PRODUCT OF I T ’ S E N V I R O N M E N T, A PRODUCT IS SHAPED THROUGH IT’S EXPERIENCES.
  123. 123. _122 A merry little surge of electricity piped by automatic alarm from the mood organ beside his bed awakened Rick Deckard. RESEARCH METHOD I read this story to 3 people and asked them to draw what they pictured being described in this excerpt from the story. Before bed every night, I would listen to a new chapter in this book. When I listened to the stories, I found myself forming images in my head of the speculative technology.
  124. 124. 123_ PHILLIP H. DICK do androids dream of electric sheep? He sighed, defeated by her threat. ‘I’ll dial what’s on my schedule for today.’ Examining the schedule for 3 January 1992, he saw that a businesslike professional attitude was called for. ‘If I dial by schedule,’ he said warily, ‘will you agree to also?’ He waited, canny enough not to commit himself until his wife had agreed to follow suit. ‘My schedule for today lists a sixhour self-accusatory depression,’ Iran said. ‘What? Why did you schedule that?’ It defeated the whole purpose of the mood organ. ‘I didn’t even know you could set it for that,’ he said gloomily. ‘I was sitting here one afternoon,’ Iran said, ‘and naturally I had turned on Buster Friendly and His Friendly Friends and he was talking about a big news item he’s about to break and then that awful commercial came on, the one I hate; you know, for Mountibank Lead Codpieces. And so for a minute I shut off the sound. And I heard the building, this building; I heard the - ’ She gestured. ‘Empty apartments,’ Rick said. Sometimes he heard them at night when he was supposed to be asleep. And yet, for this day and age a one-half occupied conapt building rated high in the scheme of population density; out in what had been before the war the suburbs one could find buildings entirely empty … or so he had heard. He had let the information remain second hand; like most people he did not care to experience it directly. ‘At that moment,’ Iran said, ‘when I had the TV sound off, I was in a 382 mood; I had just dialled it. So although I heard the emptiness intellectually, I didn’t feel it. My first reaction consisted of being grateful that we could afford a Penfield mood organ. But then I realized how unhealthy it was, sensing the absence of life, not just in this building but everywhere, and not reacting – do you see? I guess you don’t. But that used to be considered a sign of mental illness; they called it “absence of appropriate affect”. So I left the TV sound off and I sat down at my mood organ and I experimented. And I finally found a setting for despair.’ Her dark, pert face showed satisfaction, as if she had achieved something of worth. ‘So I put it on my schedule for twice a month: I think that’s a reasonable amount of time to feel hopeless about everything, about staying here on Earth after everybody who’s smart has emigrated, don’t you think?’ ‘But a mood like that,’ Rick said, ‘you’re apt to stay in it, not dial your way out. Despair like that, about total reality, is self. Perpetuating.’ ‘I programme an automatic resetting for three hours later,’ his wife said sleekly. ‘A 481. Awareness of the manifold possibilities open to me in the future; new hope that -’ ‘I know 481.’ he interrupted. He had dialled out the combination many times; he relied on it greatly. ‘Listen,’ he said, seating himself on his bed and taking hold of her hands to draw her down beside him, ‘even with an automatic cut-off its dangerous to undergo a depression, any kind. Forget what you’ve scheduled and I’ll forget what I’ve scheduled; we’ll dial a 104 together and both experience it, and then you stay in it while I reset mine for my usual businesslike attitude.
  125. 125. _124 futures We human beings are time-bound entities. SO are all our creations. _Bruce Sterling Shaping Things W H E N W E L A N D O N M A R S , I ’ L L LO O K B AC K U P AT T H E S TA R S A N D W O N D E R . . .“ W H AT ’ S N E X T ? ”. I believe that compelling stories can be both real and fictive. It’s easy to forget about realities we are far removed from. Ideas are sometimes bigger than us. When an idea widens our atomized view of the world, we are released with a jolt into the alternative. Making sense of the future is a process of synthesizing what is here now and how deeply it is rooted. Our science fiction indulgences have allowed us to de-mystify some of the most complex needs of human kind. Ideas do not end and begin at the same point. By openly sharing our own designs and ideas with one another, we can better design for the consideration of the greater good by understanding their needs. What lives beyond a frontier which has long been considered fictional? It is not the suspension of belief that matters, nor a nostalgia for the future - it is the critical understanding of how we will sustain humanity and God-given life in the design of assistive technologies.
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  127. 127. _GLOSSARY _H _A ADJACENCY HERO the attribute of being so near as to be touching a person, typically a man, who is admired or idealized for courage, outstanding achievements, or noble qualities. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY an umbrella term that includes assistive, adaptive, and rehabilitative devices for people with disabilities and also includes the process used in selecting, locating, _C _J JOURNEY Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Curabitur posuere ultricies orci, vitae vulputate nisi dignissim ut. C H A R AC T E R I Z AT I O N the way a writer makes a person in a story, book, play, movie, or television show seem like a real person. CRITICAL DESIGN To use designed artifacts as an embodied critique or commentary on consumer culture. _D DESIGN FICTION The deliberate use of diegetic prototypes to suspend disbelief about change. _F FUTURIST a person who studies the future and makes predictions about it based on current trends. FORESIGHT the ability to predict or the action of predicting what will happen to be needed in the future. _M MYTH a traditional story, esp. one concerning the early history of a people or explaining some natural or social phenomenon, and typically involving supernatural beings or events.
  128. 128. GLOSSARY_ _P _S PATA - P H Y S I C S SCIENCE FICTION the science of imaginary solutions fiction based on imagined future scientific or technological advances and major social or environmental changes, frequently portraying space or time travel and life on other planets. PROTOTYPE a first, typical or preliminary model of something, SINGULARITY the state, fact, quality, or condition of being at a singular state between man and machine. As a result, machine enables immortality. _R ROBOT S P E C U L AT I V E a machine capable of carrying out a complex series of actions automatically, esp. one programmable by a computer. the forming of a theory or conjecture without firm evidence. _T TECHNOLOGY An evolving process of toll creation to shape and control the environment. TECHNOPHILIA enthusiasm for new technology _# 3D PRINTING a process for making a physical object from a three-dimensional digital model, typically by laying down many successive thin layers of a material.
  129. 129. _CREDITS LUCINDA HAVENHAND is a interior designer and professor who has been an incredible mentor and friend throughout this process. Without her support and constant reflection, connecting my paths wouldn’t have been possible. ANTHONY DUNNE , industrial and interaction designer whose voice has been prominent in the field of design fiction. His term, “critical design” deals with designing possible future systems using current trends. ISAAC ASIMOV is a popular science fiction writer and futurist of the past. His writing, the Three Laws of Robotics is a base guideline of ethical concerns for future robotics designers. BRUCE STERLING is a science fiction writer well-regarded by the design community and is known for his term, “design fiction”. His book, Shaping Things is about the future of designed products and consumerism. DONALD NORMAN is a strong voice in the design community and has published his thoughts on future design in “The Design of Future Things”. NATHAN SHEDROFF is a designer whose book “Make It So” looks at science fiction interaction design media to mine lessons for design professionals.
  130. 130. CREDITS_ DAN PACHECO BRIAN DAVID JOHNSON is the chair for is Intel’s the Journalism futurist. Innovation Johnson program also writes science fiction in Newhouse School of and is leading an open call Communications at Syracuse for makers to build personal University. robots, under the title RobotHacks. SEBA RODRIGUEZ is the Digital product manager for Google Argentina and is a thoughtleader in the world of emerging technology. ALI LLEWELLYN is a community manager for NASA. I met Ali working for NASA’s open government initiative, which focuses on new technology, sharing data, and engaging citizen participation. RAY KURZWEIL is one of the most well-known futurists in the world, not only for his precognitive abilities but also for his advancements in assistive technology development. JEAN BAUDRILLARD is a theorist and philosopher whose book, “America” and “The System of Objects” discusses consumerism and
  131. 131. _BIBLIOGRAPHY Baudrillard, Jean. America. London: Verso, 19891988. Print. Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. [Book Club ed. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1967. Print. Dunne, Anthony, and Fiona Raby. “UMK.” UMK. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2013. <http:// www.unitedmicrokingdoms.org/>. Forbidden planet. Dir. Fred M. Wilcox. Perf. Walter Pidgeon, Anne Francis, Leslie Nielsen. Warner Home Video, 1965. Film. “Google.” Google. N.p., n.d. Web. 9 Dec. 2013. <http://www.google.com/>. “Hugo Gernsbeck.” Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 9 Dec. 2013. <http:// www.wikipedia.org/>. Johnson, Brian David, Cory Doctorow, Chris Warner, and S. Perkowitz. Science fiction prototyping designing the future with science fiction. San Rafael, Calif.: Morgan & Claypool, 2011. Print. “MAKE | DIY projects, how-tos, and inspiration from geeks, makers, and hackers.” MAKE. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2013. <http://makezine. com/>. Mau, Bruce, and Jennifer Leonard. Massive change. London: Phaidon, 2004. Print. May, Kyle. Sci-fi. New York, N.Y.: CLOG, 2013. Print. Minority report. Dir. Steven Spielburg. Perf. Tom Cruise. Twentieth century fox home entertainment, 2002. DVD. Segal, Stephen H.. Geek wisdom the sacred teachings of nerd culture. USA: Segal, 2011. Print.
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  133. 133. _IMAGE BIBLIOGRAPHY UMK Exhibit http://www.domusweb.it/content/dam/ domusweb/en/design/2013/06/28/united_ micro_kingdomsadesignfiction/dunneraby_united-micro-kingdoms9.jpg UMK Map http://www.unitedmicrokingdoms.org/ wp-content/themes/unitedmicrokingdom/_/ img/web-map.png Very Large Bike http://www.unitedmicrokingdoms.org/wpcontent/uploads/2013/04/L1004266-01.jpg Train http://www.phaidon.com/resource/train460x307.jpg Digicars http://static.guim.co.uk/ sys-images/Observer/Pix/ pictures/2013/5/1/1367412701977/UnitedMicro-Kingdoms-Row-010.jpg http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/ paleofuture/files/2013/02/jetsons-spacelypneumatic-tube.jpeg Full Body Scanner http://media.komonews.com/ images/091231_body_scanner.jpg The Star Trek Communicator http://www.oddballdaily.com/wp-content/ uploads/2011/07/cell-phones-bluetoothcommunicators-star-trek-ideas-technologyinventions-came-true.jpg Leap Motion http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/ onepercent/assets_c/2013/02/Screenshot-2013-02-28-at-12.24.27-thumb600x460-173914.jpg 2001: A Space Odyssey iPad http://cdn0.tnwcdn.com/files/2011/08/ Screen-shot-2011-08-23-at-8.55.01-AM520x234.png iPad in Context http://iknowrusty.com/wp-content/ uploads/2010/08/apple-ipad-tablet-ebook420x0.jpg Hal9000 http://images1.wikia.nocookie.net/__ cb20130429232306/dinos-vs-robots/imag es/6/6c/6a0120a65319a8970b0147e12ed3 84970b-800wi.jpg Nike Fuelband http://images.freshnessmag.com/wpcontent/uploads//2012/01/nike-plus-fuelband-03.jpg Star Trek Medicinal Scanner http://www.editinternational.com/images/ gallery/04a-trekmed_low.jpg Biocars http://www.domusweb.it/content/dam/ domusweb/en/design/2013/06/28/united_ micro_kingdomsadesignfiction/dunneraby_united-micro-kingdoms_8311.jpg Replicator Star Trek http://static3.wikia.nocookie.net/__ cb20050917222913/memoryalpha/en/ images/d/d6/Coffee_replicates_then_mug. jpg Hugo Gernsbeck http://cache.gawkerassets.com/ assets/images/gizmodo/2009/09/ cdbf49b0a4076157_large.jpg Total Recall : Body Scanner http://consumertraveler.com/wp-content/ uploads/total_recall.gif War of the Worlds http://news.bbc.co.uk/nol/shared/spl/hi/ pop_ups/03/sci_nat_mars_mania/img/4. jpg Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy : BabelFish http://mjmobbs.com/wp-content/ uploads/2010/08/babel1.jpg Metropolis http://retrothing.typepad.com/.a/6a00d834 52989a69e2013485c32be4970c-800wi Minority Report: Gestural Interaction http://www.cinemablography.org/ uploads/1/1/7/6/11768862/2494667_orig. jpeg War of the World’s Radio Broadcast http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ en/4/4a/WOTW-NYT-headline.jpg StarTac Phone http://cdn10.mixrmedia.com/wp-uploads/ ziggytek/blog/2009/08/startak1.jpg Futurama http://heckeranddecker.files.wordpress. com/2008/08/futurama-21.jpg Apple Earbuds http://img.ibtimes.com/www/data/images/ full/2012/09/13/304425-apple-earpods3-major-benefits-of-the-new-earbudsredesign-as-explaine.jpg Dick Tracy http://www.lifelounge.com.au/resources/ IMGRELATED/040510114115_LG8.jpg Forbidden Planet Driverless Car http://www.imcdb.org/i254017.jpg Hans Hollien Glasses http://criticundertheinfluence.files. wordpress.com/2009/03/austriennale. jpg?w=590 The Jetsons Wikipedia http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ commons/5/53/Wikipedia-logo-en-big.png Skype http://phandroid.s3.amazonaws.com/wpcontent/uploads/2013/02/Skype-Androidtablet.png twitter.com Siri http://www.sirifunny.com/wp-content/ uploads/2011/10/siri-hal.png Google Driverless car http://techyyouth.com/wp-content/ uploads/2013/01/Driverless-Car1.png Pebble Watch http://i.i.cbsi.com/cnwk.1d/i/tim/2013/04/01/ Pebble_Watch_35567496_01_620x433. jpg 4D Printing http://cdn.physorg.com/newman/gfx/ news/2013/architectunv.jpg Google Glass http://cdn1.sbnation.com/entry_photo_ images/7614815/googleglassbrin_large_ verge_medium_landscape.jpg Scanadu http://asset1.cbsistatic.com/ cnwk.1d/i/tim/2013/01/10/Scanadu_Scout_ temple_2_610x342.jpg Tesla Hyperloop http://www.occupycorporatism. com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/ susanne_posel_news_-elon-musksdream-is-coming-true-vacuum-tubecompany-is-building-a-3-mile-hyperlooptransport-system.jpg FORBIDDEN PLANET Setting http://4.bp.blogspot.com/X4BjZVRPzd4/UBH1Akvu1nI/ AAAAAAAAJc0/3984cb3HCxk/s640/ Forbidden+Planet-Hillinick-small.jpg Robby the Robot http://comicbookcollectorsclub.com/wpcontent/uploads/2012/06/Robby-the-Robot. jpg
  134. 134. IMAGE BIBLIOGRAPHY_ Wireless Technology http://cdn.ubergizmo.com/photos/2010/7/ iphone-4-antenna.jpg Natural Language Processing http://www.imore.com/sites/imore.com/files/ styles/large/public/field/image/2013/07/ ios_7_siri_hero.jpg?itok=5jiYzJHj Nanotechnological Manufacturing http://www.ralphmag.org/1/amoeba-micropos383x371.gif Thinker-Thing http://www.3ders.org/images/ThinkerThing-3d-objects-in-mind-3.jpg GLOBAL VILLAGE open.nasa.gov http://www.nasa.gov/images/ content/571702main_4-5_working_ outside_box_jsc_2_full.jpg 1939-40 World’s Fair Map http://www.worldsfairphotos.com/nywf39/ images/map_1940_small.jpg rep-rap logo http://reprap.org/mediawiki/images/1/1b/ RepRap-Logo.jpg Kickstarter http://www.forbeck.com/wp-content/ uploads/2013/05/2228832-2203520_ kickstarter_badge_funded.png Jimmy in shop http://3dprintsoftheworld.com/sites/default/ files/styles/medium/public/Jimmy-theRobot9_0.jpg?itok=Yu0Ru1Dx Brian David Johnson http://esof2012.org/wp-content/ uploads/2012/07/Brian_David_ Johnson-e1341361971176.png robot in google chat: http://treetrunkdings.files.wordpress. com/2013/11/robot-hacks-inmoov-demo-00. png Manifesto http://makezineblog.files.wordpress. com/2013/11/21st-century-robot-draft.pdf drawing of jimmy : http://venturebeat.files.wordpress. com/2013/09/intel-robot-jimmy.jpg?w=558 jimmy 3d model http://www.entrepreneur.com/dbimages/ article/intels-futurist-robot.jpg Jimmy unassembled http://makezineblog.files.wordpress.com/2 013/09/1209134_10202046445741322_210 5934242_n.jpg Leap Motion http://www.adxportland.com/wp-content/ uploads/2013/10/Volt2.png Eye tribe http://www.digitaltrends.com/wp-content/ uploads/2013/10/Eye-Tribe-tracker.jpg robto21.com http://robots21.com/ Bruce Sterling http://xark.typepad.com/my_weblog/ images/bruce_sterling_2_1.jpg Isaac Asimov http://www.notablebiographies.com/ images/uewb_01_img0047.jpg Google Glass with Map http://resources3.news.com.au/ images/2012/04/05/1226319/350419google-glasses.jpg Anthony Dunne http://sociablemedia. ensadlab.fr/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/00maxmollon2012-ensalab-IXDA-02.jpg Driverless Car http://www.funfus.com/wp-content/uploads/ driverless_car_interior1-420x0.jpg Donald Norman http://johnnyholland.org/wp-content/ uploads/DonaldANorman.jpg 3Doodler http://www.ascandalouslyfabulouslife.com/ wp-content/uploads/2013/04/3doodlerDrawing-in-thin-air-Image-VentureBeat.png Joseph Campbell http://www.elephantjournal.com/wpcontent/uploads/2009/03/picture-360.png XBOX Kinect http://www.technobuffalo.com/wp-content/ uploads/2010/11/kinect_post.jpg Jawbone UP http://i2.wp.com/pick.mydesy.com/wpcontent/uploads/2012/12/Jawbone-UP-4. jpg Siri http://static1.businessinsider.com/ image/4eaafd3e6bb3f7561c000029/ ex-apple-insider-people-are-embarrassedby-siri.jpg Scandu 2: http://www.inc.com/uploaded_files/ image/575x270/scanadu-pano_22204.jpg Oculus Rift http://f2p.su/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/ EVE-Valkyrie-550x343.jpg Thinker-Thing http://www.designboom.com/wp-content/ uploads/2013/05/3d-printing-with-the-minddesignboom01.jpg Google Glasses Large http://www.v3.co.uk/IMG/313/274313/googleglass-ear-bud-update-man-green-shirt370x229.jpg?1383134619 Display https://storage.googleapis.com/supportkms-prod/SNP_3082137_en_v2 FILES Manifesto http://makezineblog.files.wordpress. com/2013/11/21st-century-robot-draft.pdf Nathan Shedroff http://uxmas.com/images/uploads/nathanshedroff-186x186.jpg Ali Llewellyn http://b.vimeocdn.com/ ts/213/323/213323368_640.jpg Dan Pacheco http://suagazine.syr.edu/2013summer/ images/Horz_sum13/pacheco37.jpg Jean Baudrillard http://imago.yolasite.com/resources/ Baudrillard.gif Seba Rodriguez http://www.socialice.cl/wp-content/ uploads/2013/04/Camila-paredes-y-SebaRodriguez-.jpg Ray Kurzweil http://images.ted.com/images/ ted/1328_253x190.jpg Lucinda Havenhand http://vpa.syr.edu/sites/default/ files/imagecache/vpa_3col/profile/ Havenhand,Lucinda.jpg xerox & infinity http://insomnia.ac/essays/xerox_and_ infinity/
  135. 135. _NOTES
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