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Libr 263 chapter 4

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  • 1. What is a Good Book?The PicturesJames S. Jacobs & Michael O. Tunnellslides by Katrina Smith Image: Anders Ruff Custom Designs (cc) http://flic.kr/p/aexuJJ
  • 2. Developing the Ability to "See"Why spend time on good art for children?-Children need to learn how to recognize good art in a culture deluged with images-Children often more observant of tiny details than adults-Often the honest reaction to art is stomped out by an education system looking for the "fill-in-the-bubble" answer
  • 3. Developing the Ability to "See" Jacobs & Tunnell (1996) state: “Taste is broadened and cultivated by exposure;it is narrowed or allowed to lay fallow by restricting exposure.” (p. 35)
  • 4. Functions of Illustrations in Picture BooksSurvey Question:How can art support the text of a picture book?
  • 5. Functions of Illustrations in Picture Books Establishes setting beyond what the text can (or does) portray in words Henson, H. & Small, D. (2008). That book woman.
  • 6. Functions of Illustrations in Picture Books Define & develop characters Rosenberry, V. (2005). Veras Baby Sister.
  • 7. Functions of Illustrations in Picture Books Reinforce text with no additional extensions (most common type of illustration) Broach, E. & Small, D. (2007). When dinosaurs came with everything.
  • 8. Functions of Illustrations in Picture Books Provide differing viewpoint humorously opposed to text Falconer, I. (2001). Olivia saves the circus.
  • 9. Functions of Illustrations in Picture BooksSurvey Question:What is your favorite illustrator who uses humor to deepen the story of a picture book?
  • 10. Functions of Illustrations in Picture Books Provide interesting asides not related to main story line Noble, T. H. & Kellogg, S. (1980). The day Jimmys boa ate the wash.
  • 11. Functions of Illustrations in Picture Books Extend or develop plot Four animals crawled inside mitten. Fox on right foreshadows the fifth animal who will crawl inside the mitten on the next page. Brett, J. (1989) The Mitten.
  • 12. Style & Media in Picture BookIllustrationsDue to advances inpublishing methods,artists employ a huge variety ofof styles and media. Image: Rob Tiggelman(cc) http://flic.kr/p/xbV6j
  • 13. Style & Media in Picture Book Illustrations Realism closely represents people and objects as they appear. Salvador Dali Persistence of Memory Photograph detail by Jimmy Baikovicous (cc) http://flic.kr/p/aT2gF8McCloskey, R. (1952). One morning in Maine. Surrealism shows realism through different lenses in an attempt to show the "working of the unconscious mind by creating a dreamlike state" (Jacobs & Tunnel & p. 37).
  • 14. Style & Media in Picture Book Illustrations Impressionism gives emphasis on light, movement and color over detailBjork, C. & Anderson, L. (1987).Linnea in Monets Garden. Expressionism gives object expression to inner experiences Pilkey, D. (1996). God bless the gargoyles.
  • 15. Style & Media in Picture Book IllustrationsPainterly techniques:-paint-oil paints-pencil-graphite-ink Lionni, L. (1963). Swimmy.
  • 16. Style & Media in Picture Book IllustrationsGraphictechniques:-engraving-photography-woodcuts-found objects (fabric, paper, Freymann, S. & Elffers J. (2004) How are you peeling? recycled objects)
  • 17. Style & Media in Picture Book Illustrationsor a mix of several! Willems, M. (2004). Knuffle Bunny.
  • 18. Further Evaluating Childrens Book IllustrationIn quality picture book art"something of significance is said."Opposite is true as well. Poor quality art says nothing significant and is“flat line and color washes” Jacobs & Tunnell (1996, p. 38)
  • 19. Further Evaluating Childrens Book IllustrationAttention to detail necessitates hours of study in anatomy, botany and history to accurately portray objects, characters and historical settings. image: uwdigitalcollection (cc) http://flic.kr/p/6nNzsC
  • 20. Further Evaluating Childrens Book Illustration Creatively use any method to effectively tell a story or use any creative ways to tell a story! Sidman, J. & Berg, M. (2006). Meow Ruff: a story in concrete poetry.
  • 21. Works CitedBjork, C. & Anderson, L. (1987). Linnea in Monets garden. Stockholm: Raben & Sjogren.Brett, J. (1989) The Mitten. New York: Putnam & Grosset.Broach, E. & Small, D. (2007). When dinosaurs came with everything. New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers.Falconer, I. (2001). Olivia saves the circus. New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers.Freymann, S. & Elffers J. (2004). How are you peeling? New York: Scholastic.Henson, H. & Small, D. (2008). That book woman. New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers.Jacobs, J. S. & Tunnell, M. O. (1996). Children’s literature briefly. Englewood Cliffs: Merrill.Lionni, L. (1963). Swimmy. New York: Scholastic.McCloskey, R. (1952). One morning in Maine. New York: Puffin Books.Noble, T. H. & Kellogg, S. (1980). The Day Jimmys boa ate the wash. Columbus, OH: Newfield Publications.Rosenberry, V. (2005). Veras Baby Sister. New York: Henry Holt and Company.Sidman, J. & Berg, M. (2005). Meow ruff: A story in concrete poetry. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.Willems, M. (2004). Knuffle Bunny: A cautionary tale. New York: Hyperion Books for Children.

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