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Types of ulcers
Types of ulcers
Types of ulcers
Types of ulcers
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Types of ulcers

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  • 1. Types of ulcers ulcer /ul·cer/ (ul´ser) a local defect, or excavation of the surface, of an organ or tissue, produced by sloughing of necrotic inflammatory tissue.They occur in all organs and tissues and are to be found under those headings, e.g. abomasal, corneal, gastric. corneal ulcer ulcerative keratitis. decubital ulcer , decubitus ulcer bedsore; an ulceration due to an arterial occlusion or prolonged pressure, as when a patient is confined to a bed or a wheelchair. duodenal ulcer a peptic ulcer situated in the duodenum. gastric ulcer an ulcer of the gastric mucosa. Hunner's ulcer one involving all layers of the bladder wall, occurring in chronic interstitial cystitis. jejunal ulcer an ulcer of the jejunum; such an ulcer following surgery is called a secondary jejunal u. marginal ulcer a gastric ulcer in the jejunal mucosa near the site of a gastrojejunostomy. peptic ulcer an ulceration of the mucous membrane of the esophagus, stomach, or duodenum, due to action of the acid gastric juice. perforating ulcer one involving the entire thickness of an organ or of the wall of an organ creating an opening on both surfaces. phagedenic ulcer 1. a necrotic lesion associated with prominent tissue destruction, due to secondary bacterial invasion of an existing cutaneous lesion or of intact skin in a person with impaired resistance as the result of systemic disease. 2. tropical phagedenic u. plantar ulcer a deep neurotrophic ulcer of the sole of the foot, resulting from repeated injury because of lack of sensation in the part; seen with diseases such as diabetes mellitus and leprosy. rodent ulcer ulcerating basal cell carcinoma of the skin. stercoraceous ulcer , stercoral ulcer one caused by pressure of impacted feces; also, a fistulous ulcer through which fecal matter escapes. stress ulcer peptic ulcer, usually gastric, resulting from stress. trophic ulcer one due to imperfect nutrition of the part. tropical ulcer 1. a lesion of cutaneous leishmaniasis. 2. tropical phagedenic u. tropical phagedenic ulcer a chronic, painful, phagedenic ulcer of unknown cause, usually on the lower limbs of malnourished children in the tropics. varicose ulcer an ulcer due to varicose veins. venereal ulcer a nonspecific term referring to the formation of ulcers resembling chancre or chancroid about the external genitalia. trophic ulcer An ulcer due to impaired nutrition of the part. trophic ulcer, a pressure ulcer caused by external trauma to a part of the body that is in poor condition because of disease, vascular insufficiency, or loss of afferent nerve fibers. Trophic ulcers may be painless or associated with severe causalgia. aphthous ulcer a small painful ulcer in the mouth, approximately 2 to 5 mm in diameter. It usually remains for five to seven days and heals within two weeks with no scarring.
  • 2. chronic leg ulcer ulceration of the lower leg caused by PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASE involving either arteries and arterioles or veins and venules of the affected limb. Arterial and venous ulcers are quite different and require different modes of treatment. Venous stasis ULCERS occur as a result of venous INSUFFICIENCY in the lower limb. The insufficiency is due to deep vein thrombosis and failure of the one-way valves that act during muscle contraction to prevent the backflow of blood. Chronic VARICOSITIES of the veins can also cause venous STASIS.PATIENT CARE. Stasis ulcers are difficult to treat because impaired blood flow interferes with the normal healing process and prolongs repair. Patient care is concerned with preventing a superimposed infection in the ulcer, increasing blood flow in the deeper veins, and decreasing pressure within the superficial veins. decubitus ulcer PRESSURE ULCER. duodenal ulcer an ulcer of the duodenum, one of the two most common types of PEPTIC ULCER. gastric ulcer an ulcer of the inner wall of the stomach, one of the two most common kinds of PEPTIC ULCER. Hunner's ulcer one involving all layers of the bladder wall, seen in interstitial CYSTITIS. hypertensive ischemic ulcer a manifestation of infarction of the skin due to arteriolar occlusion as part of a longstanding vascular disease, seen especially in women in late middle age, and presenting as a red painful plaque on the lower limb or ankle that later breaks down into a superficial ulcer surrounded by a zone of purpuric erythema. marginal ulcer a peptic ulcer occurring at the margin of a surgical anastomosis of the stomach and small intestine or duodenum. Marginal ulcers are a frequent complication of surgical treatment for peptic ulcer; they are difficult to control medically and often require further surgery. peptic ulcer An ulcer of the upper digestive tract, usually in the stomach or duodenum, where the mucous membrane is exposed to gastric secretions. Ulcers in the stomach and upper duodenum (first portion of the small intestine) caused by stomach acid and a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori. perforating ulcer one that involves the entire thickness of an organ, creating an opening on both surfaces. phagedenic ulcer 1. any of a group of conditions due to secondary bacterial invasion of a preexisting cutaneous lesion or the intact skin of an individual with impaired resistance as a result of a systemic disease, which is characterized by necrotic ulceration associated with prominent tissue destruction. 2. tropical phagedenic ulcer. pressure ulcer see PRESSURE ULCER. rodent ulcer ulcerating basal cell carcinoma of the skin. stasis ulcer ulceration on the ankle due to venous INSUFFICIENCY and venous STASIS. stress ulcer a type of PEPTIC ULCER, usually gastric, resulting from stress; possible predisposing factors include changes in the microcirculation of the gastric mucosa, increased permeability of the gastric mucosa barrier to H+, and impaired cell proliferation. trophic ulcer one due to imperfect nutrition of the part. tropical ulcer 1. a lesion of cutaneous LEISHMANIASIS. 2. tropical phagedenic ulcer. tropical phagedenic ulcer a chronic, painful phagedenic ulcer usually seen on the lower limbs of malnourished children in the tropics; the etiology is unknown, but spirochetes, fusiform
  • 3. bacilli, and other bacteria are often present in the developing lesion, and protein and vitamin deficiency with lowered resistance to infection may play a role in the etiology. varicose ulcer an ulcer due to VARICOSE VEINS. venereal ulcer a nonspecific term referring to the formation of ulcers resembling chancre or chancroid about the external genitalia; there are both sexually transmitted and other types. button ulcer collagenase ulcer a rapidly expanding, erosive ('melting') corneal ulcer, seen particularly in brachycephalic breeds of dogs. Curling's ulcer acute ulceration of the stomach or duodenum seen after severe burns of the body in humans. decubitus ulcer see decubitus ulcer. dendritic ulcer linear, branching pattern of ulceration on the cornea; characteristic of herpesvirus infections. See also herpetic keratitis. eosinophilic ulcer gastroduodenal ulcer common in foals 1-3 months old. Many are asymptomatic. Clinical cases manifest by mild, intermittent colic. geographic ulcer a large, superficial, irregularly shaped corneal ulcer, typically formed by the coalescence of several dendritic ulcers. infectious dermal ulcer a systemic, fatal bacteremia of snakes manifested by multiple, small cutaneous ulcers. Called also scale rot. intestinal ulcer is rare in all species. When they do occur, intestinal ulcers usually cause signs of chronic enteritis. It is a common lesion in adenocarcinoma of the intestine. melting ulcer see collagenase ulcer (above). ulcer mound a gastric ulcer viewed tangentially radiographically creates a mound in the otherwise smooth outline of radiopaque material in the stomach. perforating ulcer one that involves the entire thickness of an organ, creating an opening on both surfaces. phagedenic ulcer a necrotizing lesion in which tissue destruction is prominent. refractory ulcer a chronic, superficial corneal ulceration in dogs, particularly common in Boxers, that extends into the superficial stroma, often undermining epithelium at the edges. The cause is unknown but abnormalities of the basal epithelial cells and anterior stroma have been noted. Response to the usual methods of treatment for corneal ulceration is characteristically very slow; superficial keratectomy is the treatment of choice. Called also superficial corneal erosion syndrome, Boxer ulcer. stress ulcer
  • 4. superficial ulcerations or erosions of mucosa in the stomach, duodenum or colon. The possible predisposing factors include changes in the microcirculation of the gastric mucosa, increased permeability of the gastric mucosa barrier to H+, and impaired cell proliferation. stromal ulcer a corneal ulcer involving the stroma.

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