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E Portfolio

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Electronic portfolio for elementary general/vocal music.

Electronic portfolio for elementary general/vocal music.

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  • 1. E-Portfolio <ul><li>Katie VanDenBerghe </li></ul><ul><li>Elementary Music </li></ul><ul><li>Portfolio </li></ul>
  • 2. Table of Contents <ul><li>Music Philosophy </li></ul><ul><li>Microteaching #1: “Walking Shoes” </li></ul><ul><li>Microteaching #2: “Drunken Sailor” </li></ul><ul><li>Microteaching #3: “Shalom Chaverim” </li></ul><ul><li>Microteaching #4: “Joshua” </li></ul><ul><li>National and NYS Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Children’s Choral Literature </li></ul><ul><li>Children’s Reading Literature </li></ul><ul><li>Textbook Review </li></ul><ul><li>Budget </li></ul><ul><li>Concert Program: “Happy Holidays” </li></ul><ul><li>Concert Program: Little Jazz Stars </li></ul>
  • 3. Music Philosophy <ul><li>All children possess musical aptitude which is distributed normally throughout the population. It follows that </li></ul><ul><li>some children have the potential to achieve more in music than they will in any other subject. </li></ul><ul><li>Children’s musical aptitudes solidify around age nine. They may lose some of that potential if their musical </li></ul><ul><li>abilities are not stimulated by the time they reach this critical period. It is especially important that young children </li></ul><ul><li>receive free, public music education to nurture these abilities. Older children also have a right to an education </li></ul><ul><li>that includes music, but their musical abilities need to be nurtured and encouraged at a young age in order for </li></ul><ul><li>them to reach their fullest potential. Every child deserves a quality music education which addresses his or her </li></ul><ul><li>aptitude and seeks to improve his or her musical abilities. </li></ul><ul><li>Music is essential to a well-rounded education. It is an important part of every modern culture as well as a </li></ul><ul><li>tangible link to cultures of the past. There are few children who will pursue music as a vocation, but it can become </li></ul><ul><li>an avocation, or even something they appreciate and understand. Children need to be taught to understand music </li></ul><ul><li>while they are in school. If they do not understand music and the elements of which it is comprised, they will not </li></ul><ul><li>fully appreciate the musical performances and recordings they hear later in life. </li></ul><ul><li>Music encourages creativity and independent thought within set guidelines (or sometimes without guidelines). </li></ul><ul><li>Composition and improvisation, teach students new ways of expressing themselves. Both are most meaningful </li></ul><ul><li>when students are taught to understand the music and its underlying functions. Then, they are truly able to make </li></ul><ul><li>music their own and express thoughts through music to which words may do little justice. </li></ul><ul><li>Music teaches children about culture in a unique way. Children get the chance to actually partake in an </li></ul><ul><li>important aspect of that culture, rather than just learning about it. They learn to sing and play the music of their </li></ul><ul><li>own culture as well as that of others. Children are able to make lasting connections to other cultures through </li></ul><ul><li>musical experiences. They can observe how the music of certain cultures are similar and different to each other </li></ul><ul><li>and learn to appreciate these differences. </li></ul><ul><li>Music is an essential element of all world cultures. All children have musical abilities, and deserve to have </li></ul><ul><li>these abilities developed. Music serves to produce well-rounded students who can think creatively. </li></ul>Table of Contents
  • 4. Microteaching #1: “I’m Gonna Put on My Walking Shoes Table of Contents
  • 5. Table of Contents
  • 6. Microteaching #2: “Drunken Sailor” Table of Contents
  • 7. Table of Contents
  • 8. Table of Contents
  • 9. Table of Contents
  • 10. Table of Contents
  • 11. Microteaching #3: “Shalom Chaverim” Table of Contents
  • 12. Table of Contents
  • 13. Table of Contents
  • 14. Table of Contents
  • 15. Microteaching #4: “Joshua” Table of Contents
  • 16. Table of Contents
  • 17. Table of Contents
  • 18. Table of Contents
  • 19. Table of Contents
  • 20. National and NYS Standards <ul><li>National (MENC) Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music. </li></ul><ul><li>Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music. </li></ul><ul><li>Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments. </li></ul><ul><li>Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines. </li></ul><ul><li>Reading and notating music. </li></ul><ul><li>Listening to, analyzing, and describing music. </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluating music and music performances. </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding the relationship between music, the arts, and disciplines outside the arts. </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding music in relation to history and culture. </li></ul><ul><li>New York State Learning Standards for the Arts </li></ul><ul><li>Creating, performing, and participating in the arts. </li></ul><ul><li>Knowing and using arts materials and resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Responding to and analyzing works of art. </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding the cultural dimensions and contributions of the arts. </li></ul>Table of Contents
  • 21. 1.) Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music <ul><li>Singing a given piece of music solo in the classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>Singing a given piece of music as a group in the classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>Singing the bassline to a given piece of music solo in the classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>Singing the bassline to a given piece of music as a group in the classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>Singing inner voices to a given piece of music solo in the classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>Singing inner voices to a given piece of music as a group in the classroom. </li></ul>Table of Contents Standards
  • 22. 2.) Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music. <ul><li>Playing on instruments a given piece of music solo in the classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>Playing on instruments a given piece of music as a group in the classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>Playing on instruments the bassline to a given piece of music solo in the classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>Playing on instruments the bassline to a given piece of music as a group in the classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>Playing on instruments inner voices to a given piece of music solo in the classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>Playing on instruments inner voices to a given piece of music as a group in the classroom. </li></ul>Table of Contents Standards
  • 23. 3.) Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments. <ul><li>Improvise vocally on neutral syllables as a group. </li></ul><ul><li>Improvising solo on neutral syllables. </li></ul><ul><li>Improvise vocally on scat syllables as a group. </li></ul><ul><li>Improvising solo on scat syllables. </li></ul><ul><li>Improvise melodies on instruments as a group. </li></ul><ul><li>Improvise solo melodies on instruments. </li></ul><ul><li>Improvise accompaniments as a group (bassline and inner voices). </li></ul><ul><li>Improvise basslines individually. </li></ul><ul><li>Improvise variations on a melody individually. </li></ul>Table of Contents Standards
  • 24. 4.) Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines. <ul><li>Have students compose a piece using any notes they choose (exploration). </li></ul><ul><li>After learning a specified song, have students compose a melody over the bassline to that song using only notes within the chords. </li></ul><ul><li>Have students create their own bassline using tonic and dominant functions, then compose melody over it using chord tones. </li></ul><ul><li>Repeat the previous two activities, but now allowing passing tones and other non-harmonic tones. </li></ul><ul><li>Add subdominant functions to basslines (and therefore melodies). </li></ul><ul><li>Give students a choice of any of about five songs, and have them work in groups to Orffestrate/Arrange these pieces for the class. </li></ul>Table of Contents Standards
  • 25. 5.) Reading and Notating Music <ul><li>After learning a song, have the notation on the board (or a poster) and use a pointer to follow along as they sing. </li></ul><ul><li>After learning a song, students are presented with the notation for that piece. They will know melodic and rhythmic solfege. Teach them where “do” is on the staff, show them which notes get the macrobeat and which notes get the microbeat and then have them make connections between what they can already sing and what they see. Have them sing entire piece through with melodic solfege. </li></ul><ul><li>When learning a new song present students with the notation and learn it from the page. </li></ul><ul><li>Read the notation for the basslines and inner voices to the pieces that are being learned as well. </li></ul><ul><li>After students have learned a song by ear, have them write down the melody and bassline. </li></ul><ul><li>After students have learned a song by ear, have them write down the melody and bassline and inner voices. </li></ul>Table of Contents Standards
  • 26. 6.) Listening to, analyzing, and describing music. <ul><li>Listen to a piece as students enter class and ask them to listen for specific elements within the music. </li></ul><ul><li>While listening to a given piece, lead students in expressive movement. </li></ul><ul><li>Allow students to lead movement. </li></ul><ul><li>Perform for the students and have them listen for certain elements. Have a discussion about what they heard. </li></ul><ul><li>Bring in guests to perform (it is important for them to see examples of live performers. These could even be the middle and high school students who attended the school in which you are teaching). </li></ul><ul><li>Take a field trip to an “OrKIDStra” Concert (Educational outreach of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra) or similar event and have students write about their experiences. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask students to keep a journal and write one entry per day about a new piece they have heard (this can be a live performance, a recording, something from the radio, etc). Provide them with websites, a music library, and a listening list which can help to guide them. </li></ul>Table of Contents Standards
  • 27. 7.) Evaluating music and music performances. <ul><li>Keeping a journal of music they have heard. </li></ul><ul><li>Taking a field trip to hear a professional group perform and then have a discussion in which students may express their reactions to the music. </li></ul><ul><li>Have students evaluate their own performances in class. </li></ul><ul><li>Have students give positive feedback about others’ performances in class. </li></ul><ul><li>Teach students about the elements of music and the sounds of each instrument and voice part to help guide their perceptions and evaluations of music. </li></ul>Table of Contents Standards
  • 28. 8.) Understanding the relationship between music, the arts, and disciplines outside the arts. <ul><li>Have students write a poem and then compose music for it. </li></ul><ul><li>Teach songs that are useful as study-aids/for remembering information. </li></ul><ul><li>Teach a unit about the ballet. Explain how music, dance, scenery, and costumes all work together to create a cohesive production. </li></ul><ul><li>Talk about movie soundtracks and how the music in movies helps to create certain emotions. </li></ul><ul><li>Teach some basic theory and relate the patterns within music to math and science. </li></ul>Table of Contents Standards
  • 29. 9.) Understanding music in relation to history and culture. <ul><li>Jazz Unit: talk about African-American culture and American history. </li></ul><ul><li>Classical Music Unit: discuss European history and culture. </li></ul><ul><li>Latin Music Unit. </li></ul><ul><li>African Drumming Unit. </li></ul><ul><li>Have students conduct a small research project on the music of a certain country (they each choose different countries) and then give a short presentation. </li></ul>Table of Contents Standards
  • 30. 1.) Creating, performing, and participating in the arts. <ul><li>Singing solo in the music classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>Singing as a group in the music classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>Participating in choir. </li></ul><ul><li>Playing on Orff instrunments in the classroom, </li></ul><ul><li>Playing the recorder in the classroom. </li></ul>Table of Contents Standards
  • 31. 2.) Knowing and using arts materials and resources. <ul><li>Listening project that involves going to the library to find a recording of a famous piece of classical music. </li></ul><ul><li>Spend a class in the computer lab going on a “webquest” (internet scavenger hunt) to find musical information. The websites will be listed on a worksheet, this is a way to introduce students to these resources in hopes that they will return during their leisure time. </li></ul><ul><li>Teach students about the different instrument families, what each instrument sounds like, and how they function in instrumental ensembles. </li></ul><ul><li>Take a field trip to hear the local professional orchestra perform. </li></ul><ul><li>Do a small research project on a composer, utilizing books from the library as well as online resources. </li></ul>Table of Contents Standards
  • 32. 3.)Responding to and analyzing works of art. <ul><li>Listen to a piece of music as students enter the class and tell them to pay attention to specific elements, then have a discussion about the piece afterward, comparing it to other music that they have heard. </li></ul><ul><li>Bring in live performers to the class and after they have played let them have a discussion with the students. </li></ul><ul><li>Have students keep a journal and write about one new piece that they listen to each day. </li></ul><ul><li>Give the students notation for a simple melody, then ask them to figure out the bassline. </li></ul><ul><li>Once they can find basslines ask them to figure out the inner voices, then talk about chord progressions. </li></ul>Table of Contents Standards
  • 33. 4.) Understanding the cultural dimensions and contributions of the arts. <ul><li>Teach a Jazz unit. This incorporates African-American music and culture as well as the first American musical genre. </li></ul><ul><li>Follow with a Latin Jazz unit. This shows the fusion of Latin and African-American music. </li></ul><ul><li>Teach a unit about African Drumming. </li></ul><ul><li>Talk about how music is involved in every part of our lives (holidays, birthdays, ceremonies, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Teach a unit on Asian music. </li></ul><ul><li>Teach Native American Music. </li></ul>Table of Contents Standards
  • 34. Children’s Choral Literature Table of Contents
  • 35. Children’s Choral Lit. Table of Contents <ul><li>A La Nanita Nana </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Arr. Christopher Azzara </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Oxford University Press </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unison Choir </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Range: D4-D5 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This is a Spanish Christmas carol and a gorgeous piece. It is in d minor and 3/8 so it offers some variety, but it is not too difficult. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fifty Nifty United States </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ray Charles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shawnee Press, Inc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Two Part Choir </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Range </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice I: C4-E5 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice II: C4-D5 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This piece is commonly used in fifth grade when students are learning U.S. Geography and is fun for the students while helping them to remember all 50 States </li></ul></ul>
  • 36. Table of Contents Children’s Choral Lit. <ul><li>All The Pretty Little Horses </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Arr. Valerie Showers Crescenz </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hinsaw Music Inc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Two Part Choir </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Range: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice I: B3-E5 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice II: B3-E5 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Traditional Lullaby </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The Erie Canal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Arr. Robert DeCormier </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lawson-Gould </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Two-Part Choir </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Range: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice I: E4-E5 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice II: G3-B4 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This is a great song to teach in fourth grade when students are learning about New York state history and about the Erie Canal. </li></ul></ul>
  • 37. Table of Contents Children’s Choral Lit. <ul><li>Banjo on My Knee (Oh, Susanna) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Steven Foster, Arr. Jerry Estes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Heritage Choral Series </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Two Part Choir </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ranges: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice I: C4-F5 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice II: C4-D5 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>American Folk Song </li></ul></ul><ul><li>How Can I Keep From Singing? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Arr. Ginger Littleton </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>BriLee Music </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unison/opt. Two Part Choir </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ranges: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice I: B3-C5 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice II: B3-D5 (F5) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quaker Song </li></ul></ul>
  • 38. Table of Contents Children’s Choral Lit. <ul><li>Oh, Dear! What Can The Matter Be? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Arr. Becki Mayo </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>BriLee Music </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Two Part Choir </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ranges: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice I: D4-Eb5 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice II: C#4-Eb5 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>English Folk Song </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Catalonian Carol </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Arr. Cary Ratcliff </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Boosey & Hawkes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Two Part Choir </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ranges: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice I: F4-Eb5 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice II: D4-Eb5 </li></ul></ul></ul>
  • 39. Table of Contents Children’s Choral Lit. <ul><li>Greensleeves </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Arr. Earlene Rentz </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>BriLee Music </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Two Part Choir </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ranges: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice I: B3-E5 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice II: (A3) B3-D5 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>English Folk Song. This is a little more difficult, so it may be more appropriate for an advanced fifth or sixth grade choir. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>All Things Bright and Beautiful </li></ul><ul><ul><li>John Rutter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hinshaw Music </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Two Part Choir </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ranges: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice I: B3-F5 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Voice II: B3-D5 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This is a lovely setting of a well-known children’s poem. </li></ul></ul>
  • 40. Children’s Reading Literature Table of Contents
  • 41. Children’s Reading Literature Table of Contents <ul><li>Looking For Bird in the Big City </li></ul><ul><li>By Robert Burleigh </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrated By: Marek Los </li></ul><ul><li>Harcourt, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>ISBN: 0-15-202031-4 </li></ul><ul><li>This is a historical fiction book about when Miles Davis went to look for Charlie Parker In New York City. </li></ul><ul><li>This book can be used when teaching scat because scat syllables are included on almost every page. </li></ul><ul><li>This is also an excellent tool for teaching jazz history and engaging student interest. </li></ul><ul><li>If I Only Had A Horn: Young Louis Armstrong </li></ul><ul><li>By Roxane Orgill </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrated By: Leonard Jenkins </li></ul><ul><li>Houghton-Mifflin </li></ul><ul><li>ISBN: 061825076X </li></ul><ul><li>This is a historical fiction book about Louis Armstrong. Ogill tries to remain as close to the truth as possible. </li></ul><ul><li>This is a great book to use when teaching Jazz History. </li></ul><ul><li>This also can be utitlized when teaching African-Ameican Music. </li></ul><ul><li>Music Is </li></ul><ul><li>By Lloyd Moss </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrated by Philippe Petit-Roulet </li></ul><ul><li>G.P. Putnam’s Sons </li></ul><ul><li>ISBN: 0-399-23336-9 </li></ul><ul><li>This book includes the many different ways music is part of our lives. </li></ul><ul><li>This can be used when teahing that music is a part of everything that we do. Then ask students when music was really important to them? </li></ul><ul><li>Ask students how they would describe music. </li></ul>
  • 42. Children’s Reading Literature Table of Contents <ul><li>Chicka Chicka Boom Boom </li></ul><ul><li>By Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrated by Lois Ehlert </li></ul><ul><li>Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers </li></ul><ul><li>ISBN: 0-671-67949-X </li></ul><ul><li>This is a wonderful book that has been established as a classic in children’s literature. It is very rhythmic. </li></ul><ul><li>This is great to use with Kindergartners and First-Graders as they are learning to write since it goes through all the letters. </li></ul><ul><li>This is also great when teaching rhythm and steady beat. Ask the students to keep a steady beat as the book is being read. </li></ul><ul><li>Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear? </li></ul><ul><li>By Bill Martin </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrated by Eric Carle </li></ul><ul><li>Longman </li></ul><ul><li>ISBN: 0582362881 </li></ul><ul><li>This book goes through the zoo asking each animal what other animal they hear. </li></ul><ul><li>Have an activity asking students which instruments they hear on a recording. </li></ul><ul><li>Have students write their own book asking an animal what instruments it hears </li></ul><ul><li>Have a game asking students what function they hear (tonic, Dominant, or subdominant). </li></ul><ul><li>Where the Wild Things Are </li></ul><ul><li>Written and Illustrated by Maurice Sendak </li></ul><ul><li>Harper Collins </li></ul><ul><li>ISBN: 0-06-025492-0 </li></ul><ul><li>This book is about a young boy’s adventures in his dreams after being sent to his room. </li></ul><ul><li>Have students go on a musical adventure. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask the students what kind of music they think would have been played during the “wild rumpus”. </li></ul>
  • 43. Children’s Reading Literature Table of Contents <ul><li>The Teddy Bear’s Picnic </li></ul><ul><li>By Jimmy Kennedy </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrated by Alexandra Day </li></ul><ul><li>Green Tiger Press </li></ul><ul><li>ISBN: 0-671-75589-7 </li></ul><ul><li>This is a story about all the teddy bears having a picnic. </li></ul><ul><li>This story can be read as a song. </li></ul><ul><li>Have students write a story about their own bear, then write a simple melody for it. </li></ul><ul><li>I Know A Shy Fellow Who Swallowed a Cello </li></ul><ul><li>By Barbara S. Garriel </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrated byJohn O'Brien </li></ul><ul><li>ISBN: 1590780434 </li></ul><ul><li>This is a similar story to “There was an Old lady who Swallowed a Fly” but using musical instruments. </li></ul><ul><li>This book should be sung to children. </li></ul><ul><li>Can have a discussion about each instrument that he eats and how that instrument sounds. </li></ul><ul><li>The Philharmonic Gets Dressed </li></ul><ul><li>By Karla Kuskin </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrated by Marc Simont </li></ul><ul><li>Harper Trophy </li></ul><ul><li>ISBN: 006443124X </li></ul><ul><li>This book tells the story of the members of a philharmonic orchestra getting ready to play on a Friday night. </li></ul><ul><li>This is an excellent tool to use when talking about the different instruments. </li></ul><ul><li>Can also be read bfroe taking a field trip to hear an orchestra perform. </li></ul>
  • 44. Children’s Reading Literature Table of Contents <ul><li>Bijou, Bonbon & Beau </li></ul><ul><li>By Joan Sweeney </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrated by Leslie Wu </li></ul><ul><li>Chronicle Books </li></ul><ul><li>ISBN: 0-8118-1975-2 </li></ul><ul><li>This is a historical fiction story that takes place in Paris with the Ballet and Degas. The story follows some stray kittens that live in the ballet studio. </li></ul><ul><li>This can be used in an interdisciplinary unit between music, art, and dance. </li></ul><ul><li>This can be used when learning about European Classical Music. </li></ul><ul><li>I Dreamed I was a Ballerina </li></ul><ul><li>A girlhood story by Anna Pavlova </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrated with art by Edgar Degas </li></ul><ul><li>The Metropolitan Museum of Art </li></ul><ul><li>ISBN: 0-689-84676-2 </li></ul><ul><li>This is a grogeous book. It uses a story by Anna Pavlova and Degas art to really bring the Ballet to life. </li></ul><ul><li>This is a great book to use in an interdisciplinary unit between music, art, and dance. Especially as the artowork is by Degas, the story is true and by one of the greatest ballet dancers in history, and Tchaikovsky referenced as the composer of the music. </li></ul><ul><li>This is a great resource for discussing European Classical Music. </li></ul><ul><li>If You Give A Moose A Muffin </li></ul><ul><li>By Laura Joffe Numeroff </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrated by Felicia Bond </li></ul><ul><li>Scholastic, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>ISBN: 0-590-45508-7 </li></ul><ul><li>This is a story about a moose who keeps asking for more and causes a great deal of mischief. </li></ul><ul><li>After reading this story, teach “The Muffin Man”. </li></ul><ul><li>After reading this story talk about songs that build on themselves like this story does, then sing (ex. “Oh, In The Woods). </li></ul>
  • 45. Music Textbook Review Table of Contents McGraw-Hill Silver-Burdett Music Content and Objectives Wide variety of music. I have the student book which does not include objectives Wide variety of music. I have the student book which does not include objectives Variety of song material, games, and activities Many songs, games, rhythm maps, listening guides, etc Many songs, games, rhythm maps, listening guides, etc Musical Experiences/active music making—do the authors give suggestions? Yes. Many pages have suggestions for movements to songs. There are listening guides. Rhythm and other musical games. Yes. Many pages have suggestions for movements to songs. There are listening guides. Rhythm and other musical games.
  • 46. Textbook Review Continued Table of Contents McGraw-Hill Silver-Burdett The overall design of the text—is there a logical sequence and approach to the lessons I have the student book so there are no lesson plans. However music is organized by theme rather than musical content. Organization seems more logical: exploring, learning the language of music, building musical skills, then has music based around themes. Consideration for student learning: Learning styles, developmental ideas, etc. This has a variety of activities and musical styles. Also has a variety of activities and styles, plus it is set up in a way that seems to reflect at least some focus on musical development. Multicultural material Includes Jazz, Spirituals, Latin-American music, music from many countries, etc. Has a feature on African Drumming and also includes Jazz, Spirituals, Latin-American music, music from many countries, etc.
  • 47. Textbook Review Continued Table of Contents McGraw-Hill Silver-Burdett National Standards/NYS Standards Do not see them, but are apparent in the music and activities. Do not see them, but are apparent in the music and activities. Supplementary matrials Listening examples of famous musicians (including Wynton Marsalis) and pieces. Listening examples Visual appeal, attractiveness of the book for the learner Very colorful, and many pictures (some photographs, some illustrations). Very colorful, and many pictures (some photographs, some illustrations).
  • 48. Budget <ul><li>musicmotion.com </li></ul><ul><li>musiciselementary.com </li></ul><ul><li>allposters.com </li></ul><ul><li>staples.com </li></ul><ul><li>All vendors have been given the school’s tax emempt number </li></ul>Table of Contents
  • 49. Budget (con’t) musicmotion.com Table of Contents Budget Item Item Number Cost Rationale Symphony Trimmer 1396 $3.98 This is a musical border the music bulletin board Discover the Instruments of the Orchestra Posters 6533 $24.95 These posters will be very useful when learning about the instruments. Silver Foil Pencil Box of 144 4824 $43.00 These pencils will be used as rewards for students. Beethoven’s Wig 6581 $18.95 This will be helpful in a classical unit, to help students relate to Beethoven’s music.
  • 50. Budget (continued) musiciselementary.com Table of Contents Budget Item Item Number Cost Rationale Kid’s Gathering Drum, 21” X 22” KD-5222-01 $153.50 This will be useful for both Orff, and African Drumming, as well as many other musical activities. Kid’s Gathering Drum, 8” X 16” KD-5816-01 $50.95 This will be useful for both Orff, and African Drumming, as well as many other musical activities. Djembe-Festival Series, large 21” X 12” DJ-FELG-13 $109.00 This will be useful for both Orff, and African Drumming, as well as many other musical activities. Kid’s Bongos KD-5400-01 $32.75 This will be useful for both Orff, and African Drumming, Latin Ameircan Music, as well as many other musical activities.
  • 51. Budget (continued) musiciselementary.com Table of Contents Budget Item Item Number Cost Rationale Kid’s Floor Tom KD-5080-01 $30.75 This will be useful for both Orff, and African Drumming, as well as many other musical activities. Rhythm Gourd 3275 $3.05 This is a useful auxillary percussion instrument. Sonar Global Beat Alto Xylophone, Fiberglass Bars AX-GBF $250.00 This is needed for Orff music and other musical activities. S50 Mallets for Metallophones and Xylophones Pair (4) S50 $104.00 These are needed for plating Orff Instruments. LP Wood Chickitas (3 pairs) LPM500W $12.00 These are useful auxillary percussion instruments. They are better than moraccas because they fit better into elementary children’s hands.
  • 52. Budget (con’t) allposters.com Table of Contents Budget Item Item Number Cost Rationale Louis Armstrong 399624 $29.98 This will be a visual representation of a musician students learn about in a jazz unit. Classical Composers 2115112 $20.98 This has many important classical composers pictured and is a visual representation of some of the musicians students will encounter in a classical music unit.
  • 53. Budget (con’t) staples.com Table of Contents Budget Item Item Number Cost Rationale Staples Dry Erase Markers, Chisel Tip, Assorted (2) 607069 $7.96 These are necessary for writing on the board. Crayola Classic Markers, Broad Line, 10 Box 860124 $3.24 These are necessary for making visuals. Staples 18” Acrylic Ruler 164657 $3.28 This is necessary for making visuals. White Poster Boards, 10 Pack, 22” X28” (2) 247403 $8.56 These are necessary for making visuals. Royal Brites 2-Cool Colors Poster Boards, Assorted, 22” X 28” 619705 $13.98 These are necessary for making visuals.
  • 54. Concert Program “Happy Holidays” Kindergarten: Jingle Bells <ul><li>3 Classes of Kindergarten students (70 Students) </li></ul><ul><li>4 Teachers (1 Music teacher and 3 Classroom Teachers) </li></ul><ul><li>1 Accompanist. </li></ul>Stage has a Black backdrop decorated with snowflakes that the students made in Art. Each student has a jingle bell bracelet and is wearing any combination of white, red, black, and green. All Students are on stage in groups with their classroom teacher. <ul><li>Each class sings a verse </li></ul><ul><li>All classes sing the refrain together </li></ul><ul><li>Students shake jingle bells on the beat </li></ul>Table of Contents
  • 55. Concert Program “Happy Holidays” Kindergarten: Dreidel Song <ul><li>3 Classes of Kindergarten students (70 Students) </li></ul><ul><li>4 Teachers (1 Music teacher and 3 Classroom Teachers) </li></ul><ul><li>1 Accompanist. </li></ul><ul><li>Stage has a Black backdrop decorated with snowflakes that the students made in Art. </li></ul><ul><li>Each student is wearing any combination of white, red, black, and green. </li></ul><ul><li>All Students are on stage in groups with their classroom teacher. They are sitting in circles pretending to play the Dreidel game. </li></ul><ul><li>One student is chosen to narrate a short passage that he or she has written about Hannukah. </li></ul><ul><li>All students sing the Dreidel Song together. </li></ul>Table of Contents
  • 56. Concert Program “Happy Holidays” First Grade: The Little Drummer Boy <ul><li>3 Classes of 1 st Grade students (70 Students) </li></ul><ul><li>4 Teachers (1 Music teacher and 3 Classroom Teachers) </li></ul><ul><li>1 Accompanist. </li></ul><ul><li>Stage has a Black backdrop decorated with snowflakes that the students made in Art. </li></ul><ul><li>Each student and is wearing any combination of white, red, black, and green. </li></ul><ul><li>All Students are on stage in groups with their classroom teacher. </li></ul><ul><li>One student from each class has been selected to play a drum </li></ul><ul><li>One student from each class has been selected to play the finger cymbals. </li></ul><ul><li>All classes sing first verse, then each class sings a verse, then all classes sing together. </li></ul>Table of Contents
  • 57. Concert Program “Happy Holidays” First Grade: Feliz Navidad <ul><li>3 Classes of 1st Grade students (70 Students) </li></ul><ul><li>4 Teachers (1 Music teacher and 3 Classroom Teachers) </li></ul><ul><li>1 Accompanist. </li></ul><ul><li>Stage has a Black backdrop decorated with snowflakes that the students made in Art. </li></ul><ul><li>Each student and is wearing any combination of white, red, black, and green. </li></ul><ul><li>All Students are on stage in groups with their classroom teacher. </li></ul><ul><li>All classes sing first verse, then each class sings a verse, then all classes sing together. </li></ul><ul><li>Two students from each class have been selected to play drums. </li></ul><ul><li>Students have been taught a simple Mexican dance and are dancing in groups on stage </li></ul>Table of Contents
  • 58. Concert Program “Happy Holidays” Finale: Rudolf the Red-Nosed Reindeer <ul><li>3 Classes of Kindergarten students (70 students) </li></ul><ul><li>3 Classes of 1st Grade students (70 Students) </li></ul><ul><li>4 Teachers (1 Music teacher and 3 Classroom Teachers) </li></ul><ul><li>1 Accompanist. </li></ul><ul><li>Stage has a Black backdrop decorated with snowflakes that the students made in Art. </li></ul><ul><li>Each student and is wearing any combination of white, red, black, and green. </li></ul><ul><li>Each student is also wearing a set of antlers and a red nose. </li></ul><ul><li>All Students are on stage in groups with their classroom teacher. </li></ul><ul><li>All students sing together </li></ul><ul><li>Parents are invited to join in the singing. </li></ul>Table of Contents
  • 59. Concert Program “Little Jazz Stars” 3 rd Grade: “When The Saints Go Marching In” 3 Classes of Third Grade students (60 students) 4 Teachers (1 Music teacher and 3 Classroom Teachers) 1 Accompanist. <ul><li>Stage has a backdrop that students made in Art that had been painted to look like New Orleans. </li></ul><ul><li>Students have been asked to look “hip” </li></ul><ul><li>Students are marching in two circles, one inside the other. </li></ul><ul><li>As they sing, they are pretending to play instruments in a New Orleans parade. </li></ul><ul><li>All students sing first refrain together </li></ul><ul><li>Then each class takes a turn singing a verse, while rest of students sing bassline </li></ul><ul><li>All stunts sing refrain one final time. </li></ul>Table of Contents
  • 60. Concert Program “Little Jazz Stars” 4 th Grade: “It Don’t Mean A Thing” <ul><li>3 Classes of Third Grade students (60 students) </li></ul><ul><li>4 Teachers (1 Music teacher and 3 Classroom Teachers) </li></ul><ul><li>1 Accompanist. </li></ul><ul><li>Stage has a backdrop that students made in Art that had been painted to look like New Orleans. </li></ul><ul><li>Students have been asked to look “hip” </li></ul><ul><li>All students sing through It Don’t Mean A Thing </li></ul><ul><li>Then a group of 9 students each take a turn to solo (3 from each class) while the rest of the students quietly sing the bassline and inner voices. </li></ul><ul><li>Final Chorus: Everyone sings together. </li></ul>Table of Contents
  • 61. Concert Program “Little Jazz Stars” 5 th Grade: Sing, Sing Sing <ul><li>Three 5 th grade classes (50 Students) </li></ul><ul><li>1 Teacher </li></ul><ul><li>1 Accompanist </li></ul><ul><li>This is a 5 th Grade jazz recorder ensemble </li></ul><ul><li>Students will stand on risers which have been set up on the floor in front of the stage. </li></ul><ul><li>Students have been told to look “hip” </li></ul><ul><li>All students play through Sing, Sing, Sing </li></ul><ul><li>Then a group of 9 students each take a turn to solo (3 from each class) while the rest of the students quietly play the bassline and inner voices. </li></ul><ul><li>Final Chorus: Everyone plays together. </li></ul>Table of Contents
  • 62. Concert Program “Little Jazz Stars” <ul><li>3 Classes of Third Grade students (60 students) </li></ul><ul><li>3 Classes of Fourth Grade students (60 Students) </li></ul><ul><li>3 Classes of Fifth Grade students (50 Students) </li></ul><ul><li>7 Teachers (1 Music teacher and 6 Classroom Teachers) </li></ul><ul><li>1 Accompanist. </li></ul>Finale: Peanut’s Theme <ul><li>Stage has a backdrop that students made in Art that had been painted to look like New Orleans. </li></ul><ul><li>Orff instruments have been set up on the floor in front of the risers. </li></ul><ul><li>Students are on both rises and stage. </li></ul><ul><li>Students have been asked to look “hip” </li></ul><ul><li>9 students have been selected to play borduns on orff instruments (1 From each class) </li></ul><ul><li>18 students are playing auxillary pecussion instruments (2 from each class) </li></ul><ul><li>The rest of the students are singing: alternating melody, bassline and inner voices. </li></ul>Table of Contents
  • 63. The End

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