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The evolution of marketing

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A short presentation about the evolution of marketing.

A short presentation about the evolution of marketing.


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  • 1. The evolution of marketing A short presentation by Katie Underhill
  • 2. Marketing is...  CIM: “Marketing is the management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitably.”  Dibb et al: “Marketing consists of individual and organisational activities that facilitate and expedite satisfying exchange relationships in a dynamic environment through the creation, distribution, promotion and pricing of goods, services and ideas.”  American Marketing Association: “Marketing is the process of planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion and distribution of ideas, goods and services to create exchanges that satisfy individual and organisational objectives.”
  • 3. What the definitions have in common  There’s a motivation for the selling organisation, i.e. ‘organisational objectives’, for example ‘profit’  Customer satisfaction is stressed as important  Marketing is a ‘mutual exchange’ where both supplier and customer make a gain  Marketing is a process that is planned and managed
  • 4. The evolution of marketing •Production orientation •Product orientation •Sales orientation •Marketing orientation
  • 5. Production orientation  Characteristics:  Produce as cheaply as possible  Keep prices low  “People will buy anything as long as it’s cheap enough”  Example: governments – NHS and education sectors
  • 6. Product orientation  Characteristics:  Products are designed to have a lot of features that meet the needs of a large number of customers  Take the view that if the product is right it will sell itself  Ultimately the cost of the product becomes too high as customers don’t want to pay for features they won’t use  Example: Gillette razors- who knew they needed 5 blades?!
  • 7. Sales orientation  Characteristics:  People will buy only if they are sold to  High pressure sales pitches  Often result in cancelled orders once the sales rep has left the room!  Generally supply exceeds demand so the org has to sell what it’s made rather than what the customer wants  Example: double glazing company
  • 8. Marketing orientation  Characteristics:  Look at what the customer wants/ needs  Acts accordingly  The customer is at the centre of everything the organisation does- activities are co-ordinated around customer needs  Example: Amazon  Market orientation is fundamental to the continuation and competitiveness of an organisation
  • 9.  A whole company approach  All departments act with the customer in mind  The company use and collect knowledge about the customer  They transmit information to the customers using a common message (brand) Some Key Points on Marketing Orientation
  • 10. Peter Drucker says…..  “The aim of marketing is to know and understand the customer so well that the product fits him and sells itself. Ideally, marketing should result in a customer who is ready to buy”

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