Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Intro To Sim Vote Training
Intro To Sim Vote Training
Intro To Sim Vote Training
Intro To Sim Vote Training
Intro To Sim Vote Training
Intro To Sim Vote Training
Intro To Sim Vote Training
Intro To Sim Vote Training
Intro To Sim Vote Training
Intro To Sim Vote Training
Intro To Sim Vote Training
Intro To Sim Vote Training
Intro To Sim Vote Training
Intro To Sim Vote Training
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Intro To Sim Vote Training

345

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
1 Comment
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Here is the script in case anyone is interested:
    Intro to SIMVote2009 Webinar Script

    Slide 1: Welcome to the Training!

    Welcome to the SIMVote2009 training webinar. My name is Katie Taylor, and I am the Program Director for Mobilize.org. I am excited that you are interested in bringing this program to your campus. Whether you are an administrator, classroom teacher, or a student leader, SIMVote can fit well into many different formats, structures, and venues.

    Slide 2: What is SIMVote?

    SIMVote was inspired by the large number of young Californians who participated in the 2008 elections. We believe the vast majority of these young voters will look for opportunities to stay civically engaged and vote again. The challenge facing us is to provide opportunities for them to take further acts of civic engagement before the “small” elections of 2009 to build upon their experiences.
    Additionally, there are many young Californians who were not able to participate in voting in 2008 because they were not yet 18 years old, did not register in time, or who had trouble voting on Election Day. SIMVote2009 aims to support Californian Millennials in their need for meaningful experiences and related outcomes, giving them long-term civic capacity.
    Through workshops on elections and democracy and interactive activities utilizing the Arsalyn Program’s Democracy in Action: A Civic Education Curriculum, and introductory seminars on organizing around issues, using the Mobilizer’s Guidebook, the students will engage with the issues that drive elections, the processes of holding elections and the issues that affect elections in our democracy.
    They then can join other students to work on projects that address the issues and problems they have learned about and discussed in the classroom. The Simulation Elections will be the central event of the program but every campus will have the opportunity for a continuing program of civic education and civic engagement beyond the Simulation Elections. SIMVote is created to be flexible - each school gets to decide whether to incorporate it into many days of curriculum, just one day centered on the Simulation Election, as an ASB project, as a club on campus, or in any form that fits each school’s needs the best.

    Slide 3: Background on Arsalyn

    Arsalyn Program of Ludwick Family Foundation was created to encourage young Americans to become informed and active participants in the electoral process. Arsalyn views the civic and political engagement of young people as beneficial to the country, community and character. Arsalyn is firmly committed to a non-partisan, non-issue-based and inclusive approach to ensure that voting becomes a lifetime commitment on the part of our nation's young adults.

    Slide 4: Background about Mobilize.org

    Millennial-Generated. Millennial-Led: From an idea of one Millennial at UC Berkeley to a nationwide network of Millennials, Mobilize.org is the national civic engagement organization dedicated to Millennial Generation ideas, discussion, and empowerment.

    Our Mission: Mobilize.org is an all-partisan civic engagement organization dedicated to educating, empowering, and energizing Millennials to increase our civic engagement and political participation. We work to show Millennials how public policy impacts our lives, and more importantly – how we can impact public policy.

    Slide 5: Goals of SIMVote

    SIMVote works to educate Californian high school students about their potential impact on public policy and politics in their communities, states, and country, to create an awareness about issues affecting ALL elections, and to provide students with the information to continue to educate themselves.

    SIMVote works to empower students by providing them with the tools to participate in traditional politics and voting, by providing avenues for participation in communities and service, and by providing students with the information to continue to empower themselves.

    SIMVote works to energize students through the SIMElection by showing them their power, increasing their enthusiasm, and maintaining and channelling their participatory momentum.

    Slide 6: SIMVote Resources

    This training will address the variety of resources available to you as SIMVote Campus Leaders. Before we address this list of resources, I want to stress that
    Mobilize.org staff, especially me, Katie Taylor, are here for you every step of the way. If at any point you have a question, you want to brainstorm about your implementation of SIMVote, or you need help acquiring resources and materials, please do not hesitate to get in touch with me. My contact information is in the last slide of this webinar.

    Slide 7: SIMVote2009 Packet
    This participant packet designed as a resource for SIMVote participating schools is meant to be a comprehensive resource; however, as things change, as school implement this program and experiences successes and challenges, and as we learn more about upcoming elections, we want this packet to be updated as we go. Therefore, we are excited and thrilled to provide you with hard copies; however, for your convenience, we are also creating an online space in which all participating schools will be able to edit, update, and comment on this resource. By using this online space, we at Mobilize.org will learn how to improve SIMVote, and also will be able to respond in real time to challenges, and help advertise your successes, throughout the semesters. To receive more copies of this packet, or to order personalized certificates and business cards for participants, please contact me, Katie Taylor.

    Slide 8: Good Workshop Structure

    As we began to pull together the participant packet, we thought long and hard about the best workshops we’ve attended and presented. From that brainstorm, came this structure which appears in the participant packets. You are more than welcome to deviate from this as you see fit, and please let us know what elements of workshops have worked best for you – we would love to incorporate a variety of structures.

    Slide 9: Workshops

    This is a list of the different workshops that we’ve outlined in the SIMVote participant packet. If you don’t see the topic you want to present, no worries! You are encouraged to design your own workshops, and please share these with us. If you want help creating a workshop on a different topic, just shoot me an email and we’ll help you out!

    Slide 10: Mobilizers Guidebook

    The Mobilizer’s Guidebook is a compilation of Mobilize.org’s lessons learned. Our organization started off as an idea, and now we are a national non-profit with bi-coastal offices and Mobilizers in all 50 states.

    We have carefully measured our success, learned from our failures, and written it all down for your benefit. As you read our guidebook you will find helpful tips on how to choose your issue, build your staff, form your coalition, throw events, and gain media attention. These are the first steps toward building an activist movement, whatever your cause may be.

    Use this book as it is intended, as a guide, but improvise where you need to. Every group is different, feel free tailor our model to your needs! We hope reading over the Mobilizer’s Guidebook helps you anticipate what lies ahead of you, and that it generates discussion and ideas on how to meet the goals you set.

    All SIMVote participating schools get a great discount on buying a copy of the Mobilizer’s Guidebook for all your students. Please contact me, Katie Taylor, for more information about this resource.

    Slide 11: DIA

    Democracy in Action is curriculum designed based on California State education standards, and formulated into 5 lessons that can be incorporated into classrooms by teachers or with student instructors.

    As a part of SIMVote, you will receive free electronic copies of the Arsalyn Program’s Democracy in Action curriculum. There are three versions of this curriculum, one for elementary school students, one for middle school students, and one for high school students. Each of these has excellent worksheets, lesson plans, and presentation ideas.

    It is the hope of the Arsalyn Program that Democracy in Action will be implemented nation-wide and help break the cycle of youth political disengagement. If you at any time have questions about how to use these curriculum, do not hesitate to contact Christian Johnson at the Arsalyn Program for support. His contact information is included in the last slide of this webinar.

    Slide 12: Intro to Democracy 2.0

    Democracy 2.0 is the founding principle of Mobilize.org, and an understanding of it helps understand how we at Mobilize.org have designed SIMVote and our hopes for this program’s impact in California and beyond.

    On March 11, 2002, Mobilize.org embarked on a journey to form its theory of change: Democracy 2.0. Although the organization began with its own definition of Democracy 2.0, 'Young people not only contributing to, but also building the democracy they want to inherit,' it was the input of thousands of members of the Millennial Generation that shaped the vision of Democracy 2.0 and created a theory of change through the eyes of a millennial.

    Democracy 2.0: Millennial-Generated Change to American Governance was developed by members of the Millennial Generation in an effort to reflect the six years of Mobilize.org's civic engagement work, focusing on the last eight months of research and experience in the field with fellow members of our generation.

    The root of Democracy 2.0 is found at the level of the individual millennial identifying problems at the local, state and national levels. Once problems are identified, one must engage in conversations, searching for innovative solutions to the problems they have identified. Mobilize.org seeks to empower the individual past the deliberation stage, enabling members of the Millennial Generation to implement their own solutions. Through the success of Millennial-generated initiatives, the goal of Democracy 2.0 is to institutionalize Millennial-generated solutions as a staple of American governance at all levels.

    Democracy 2.0 emerged as a rationale for Mobilize.org at its inception. Mobilize.org Founder David Smith, along with other founding members, felt that much of the partisan bickering, dirty campaigning, and lack of outreach to young people from campaigns and elected officials demonstrated that decision makers in government were not setting themselves up to make the best decisions for the Millennial Generation.

    The idea was not a new one. Mobilize.org had been refining this model since its founding, along with a host of other organizations in the dialogue and deliberation field. While the 'Citizen at the Center' report directed attention to this movement and gave these organizations common language, Democracy 2.0 gave the Millennial Generation language that resonated with its members and a model upon which they could build.

    From the use of technology to enable conversation to the sponsorship of Millennial-generated projects to address issues such as the environment, civic engagement, and campaign finance reform, Mobilize.org has had the unique opportunity to see its theory of change in action.

    Much has been said and written about the Millennial Generation. Now, it is our turn to share what democracy could like in the twenty-first century.

    Slide 13: FAQs

    Here are three big and important questions – but I’m sure you have more. Please do not hesitate to get in touch with me for further information or with any concerns. To learn more about implementing a successful SIMVote on your campus, please see the next webinar entitled Implementing SIMVote2009.

    Slide 14: Conclusions

    Thanks for your time and participation in this webinar. Please shoot me an email and let me know what you think! I look forward to working with you and your campus. Please email or call me so we can finalize this partnership. Thanks again, and keep Mobilizin’!
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
345
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
1
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. SIMVote2009 <ul><li>Because Every Election is a BIG Election </li></ul><ul><li>Webinar and Campus Leader Training </li></ul>
  • 2. What is SIMVote? <ul><li>SIMVote is... </li></ul><ul><li>An opportunity for students and teacher to take the academic knowledge and put it into “real-life” practice </li></ul><ul><li>Educational: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Students (and sometimes teachers and parents) learn about voting processes, civic engagement opportunities, and local government structures </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Empowering: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Students (and sometimes teachers and parents) learn how to take their knowledge and serve their communities, engage in politics, and be overall engaged citizens. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Energizing: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>SIMVote keeps students (and sometimes teachers and parents) inspired to continue to be engaged citizens. SIMVote works to build and maintain participatory momentum. </li></ul></ul>
  • 3. About the Arsalyn Program <ul><li>Arsalyn Program of Ludwick Family Foundation was created to encourage young Americans to become informed and active participants in the electoral process. Arsalyn views the civic and political engagement of young people as beneficial to the country, community and character. Arsalyn is firmly committed to a non-partisan, non-issue-based and inclusive approach to ensure that voting becomes a lifetime commitment on the part of our nation's young adults. </li></ul><ul><li>For more information: http://www.arsalyn.org / </li></ul>
  • 4. About Mobilize.org <ul><li>Mobilize.org is an all-partisan network dedicated to educating, empowering, and energizing Millennials to increase our civic engagement and political participation. We work to show Millennials how public policy impacts our lives, and more importantly – how we can impact public policy. </li></ul><ul><li>Mobilize.org was founded by David B. Smith in 2002, whose guidance has enabled Mobilize.org to continue its impact and growth over the last seven years. </li></ul><ul><li>For more information: http://www.mobilize.org . </li></ul>
  • 5. SIMVote Goals: <ul><li>Inform young students of their potential impact in American Public Policy </li></ul><ul><li>Provide students with the tools to participate in traditional politics/voting </li></ul><ul><li>Provide pathways for youth civic engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Create a campus-wide awareness for local and federal issues effecting elections </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct a campus-wide SIMElection </li></ul>
  • 6. SIMVote Resources <ul><li>SIMVote09 Packet </li></ul><ul><li>Mobilizer’s Guidebook </li></ul><ul><li>Democracy in Action </li></ul><ul><li>Democracy 2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>Mobilize.org staff </li></ul><ul><li>Arsalyn Staff </li></ul>
  • 7. SIMVote 2009 Packet <ul><li>Overview of the Program </li></ul><ul><li>Workshop Outlines/Ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Resource Lists </li></ul><ul><li>Democracy in Action Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Templates for the Media </li></ul><ul><li>Follow Up Surveys </li></ul><ul><li>Participant Certificates and Business Cards </li></ul>
  • 8. Workshop Outline <ul><li>Workshop 101: How to Give an Effective Workshop </li></ul><ul><li>General Workshop Outline </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction to the Topic – hook your audience! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use a “thinking” question or a fun activity designed to start conversation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Why this Topic/Area/Idea is important – make this as interactive as possible (have people contribute out loud, vote, write on the board). Let the audience direct the conversation to a certain extent – sometimes you have to relinquish a little control to get great participation. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Background information/history of the topic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Statistics and information: present these as “can you guess how many…”, “what do you think…” and then share the facts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why we are talking about it today: relate the topic to your audiences’ lives. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What can we do about it? – Ask the audience to brainstorm, have examples of what others have done/are doing to solve this problem </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Have a “walk-away” plan prepared or ask the group to brainstorm a plan and agree to carry it out, either as individuals or as a group. It is important to have action steps in your workshop! The goal of this section of the workshop is to arm your audience with the tools to start solving the problems. </li></ul></ul>
  • 9. Workshop Topics <ul><li>Democracy </li></ul><ul><li>Citizenship </li></ul><ul><li>Political Parties </li></ul><ul><li>Absentee Voting </li></ul><ul><li>Civic Engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Be a Poll Worker </li></ul><ul><li>Civil, Human, and Natural Rights </li></ul><ul><li>Media, New Media, and Information for Engagement </li></ul><ul><li>The Obama Administration & Issues Affecting Millennials </li></ul><ul><li>Engaged Millennials Internationally </li></ul><ul><li>Taking the Myth out of Youth Voting </li></ul><ul><li>Community Service </li></ul><ul><li>Running for Office </li></ul><ul><li>Turning Ideas into Action </li></ul><ul><li>Policy Workshops: The Environment, Student Debt, Internships, and Entrepreneurship </li></ul>
  • 10. Mobilizer’s Guidebook <ul><li>The Mobilizer’s Guidebook is a compilation of Mobilize.org’s lessons learned. </li></ul><ul><li>The 10 Steps to Political Advocacy detailed in the Guidebook transcend party lines. We all must go through the same process and learn the same skills to effectively organize and advocate for our causes. </li></ul><ul><li>Helpful tips on: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>how to choose your issue, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>build your staff, form your coalition, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>throw events, and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>gain media attention. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>These are the first steps toward building an activist movement, whatever your cause may be. </li></ul>
  • 11. Democracy In Action <ul><li>In a nutshell, the Democracy in Action curriculum entails: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>four 45-minute lessons about democracy and voting for elementary school students, middle school students, and high school students </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>a fifth session consisting of a voting simulation (with real voting machines) timed to coincide with a “real” election </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Excellent worksheets on democracy, citizenship, voting, and rights </li></ul></ul><ul><li>For more on DIA: see the SIMVote2009 Participant Packet and the Democracy in Action curriculum books </li></ul>
  • 12. Democracy 2.0 <ul><li>Definition: &quot;Young people not only contributing to, but also building the democracy they want to inherit” </li></ul><ul><li>Formed through the input of thousands of members of the Millennial Generation that shaped the vision of Democracy 2.0 and created a theory of change through the eyes of a Millennial. </li></ul><ul><li>Democracy 2.0: Millennial-Generated Change to American Governance was developed by members of the Millennial Generation in an effort to reflect the six years of Mobilize.org's civic engagement work, focusing on the last eight months of research and experience in the field with fellow members of our generation. </li></ul><ul><li>The root of Democracy 2.0: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Individual Millennial identifying problems at the local, state and national levels. Once problems are identified. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Engaging in conversations, searching for innovative solutions to the problems they have identified. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mobilize.org seeks to empower the individual past the deliberation stage, enabling members of the Millennial Generation to implement their own solutions. Through the success of Millennial-generated initiatives, the goal of Democracy 2.0 is to institutionalize Millennial-generated solutions as a staple of American governance at all levels. </li></ul></ul>
  • 13. FAQs <ul><li>How do you implement SIMVote 2009? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>SIMVote is created to be flexible - each school gets to decide whether to incorporate it into many days of curriculum, just one day centered on the Simulation Election, as an ASB project, as a club on campus, or in any form that fits each school’s needs the best </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What is the election simulation? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This is one fun aspect of the SIMVote 2009. Each school will be provided with the necessary resources/materials, information and tools to conduct a fictitious election that will allow students to become familiar with the election process. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>How much does the program cost? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>With a generous grant from Arsalyn Program, Mobilize.org and the Arsalyn Program are pleased to bring this project to high schools throughout California for free! We can help you raise funds for additional events you would like to hold, help you book speakers you would like to bring, and implement the program YOU want to have at your school. </li></ul></ul>
  • 14. THE END! <ul><li>KATIE TAYLOR </li></ul><ul><li>Program Director, Mobilize.org </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>cell: (925) 788-0438 </li></ul><ul><li>CHRISTIAN LINDKE </li></ul><ul><li>Program Director, Arsalyn Program </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>626-914-5404 </li></ul>

×