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Searfoss SGP

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  • The first one is Children and Family Ministry. Every Sunday I spend my day devoted to working with children at church. My greatest ambition is to become a Children and Family Ministry Director and plant children’s programs in different churches and tie it all together so that families can celebrate and practice their faith as a family and serve together. Which is why having families serve together and serve other families is important to me. It allows me to work with my favorite groups of people and help them learn to serve as a family. This also is what I will be going to school for in the fall.
  • The second part of this is the part that many people don’t know about me. I have a pain disorder called reflex nuerovascular dystrophy. It’s why you’ll see me walking in the hallways often, not show up to class often, or any other thing you may have heard. My pain feels like sharp needles attacking every part of my body the inside and the outside of it. I go to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia every week and for a month I lived there. There is no cure necessarily for RND but there is something they would like to try. They try to retrain your brain so that the nerves that are functioning inside my body will learn to function correctly. In order to retrain the brain they spend nine hours a day inflicting pain on you. They basically are trying to outdo the pain you already feel. So they burn your skin, poke you with sharp items, and lots of other painful tactics to try to “help it.”
  • The second part of this is the part that many people don’t know about me. I have a pain disorder called reflex nuerovascular dystrophy. It’s why you’ll see me walking in the hallways often, not show up to class often, or any other thing you may have heard. My pain feels like sharp needles attacking every part of my body the inside and the outside of it. I go to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia every week and for a month I lived there. There is no cure necessarily for RND but there is something they would like to try. They try to retrain your brain so that the nerves that are functioning inside my body will learn to function correctly. In order to retrain the brain they spend nine hours a day inflicting pain on you. They basically are trying to outdo the pain you already feel. So they burn your skin, poke you with sharp items, and lots of other painful tactics to try to “help it.”
  • The second part of this is the part that many people don’t know about me. I have a pain disorder called reflex nuerovascular dystrophy. It’s why you’ll see me walking in the hallways often, not show up to class often, or any other thing you may have heard. My pain feels like sharp needles attacking every part of my body the inside and the outside of it. I go to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia every week and for a month I lived there. There is no cure necessarily for RND but there is something they would like to try. They try to retrain your brain so that the nerves that are functioning inside my body will learn to function correctly. In order to retrain the brain they spend nine hours a day inflicting pain on you. They basically are trying to outdo the pain you already feel. So they burn your skin, poke you with sharp items, and lots of other painful tactics to try to “help it.”
  • The second part of this is the part that many people don’t know about me. I have a pain disorder called reflex nuerovascular dystrophy. It’s why you’ll see me walking in the hallways often, not show up to class often, or any other thing you may have heard. My pain feels like sharp needles attacking every part of my body the inside and the outside of it. I go to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia every week and for a month I lived there. There is no cure necessarily for RND but there is something they would like to try. They try to retrain your brain so that the nerves that are functioning inside my body will learn to function correctly. In order to retrain the brain they spend nine hours a day inflicting pain on you. They basically are trying to outdo the pain you already feel. So they burn your skin, poke you with sharp items, and lots of other painful tactics to try to “help it.”
  • The second part of this is the part that many people don’t know about me. I have a pain disorder called reflex nuerovascular dystrophy. It’s why you’ll see me walking in the hallways often, not show up to class often, or any other thing you may have heard. My pain feels like sharp needles attacking every part of my body the inside and the outside of it. I go to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia every week and for a month I lived there. There is no cure necessarily for RND but there is something they would like to try. They try to retrain your brain so that the nerves that are functioning inside my body will learn to function correctly. In order to retrain the brain they spend nine hours a day inflicting pain on you. They basically are trying to outdo the pain you already feel. So they burn your skin, poke you with sharp items, and lots of other painful tactics to try to “help it.”
  • And finally, the third piece is my “sisters.” Though I saw many children and families at CHOP these girls pulled my heart strings so fast. They all have my pain too and they all silently suffer. I wanted to be able to start a project where kids are taken care of with gifts and company because our medical journey is so lonely.
  • Researchers look at the close family in three different age brackets. First is the “Parents” group which consists of whomever are the primary caretakers of the children living at home. The 2nd group is the “Teenagers” group which consists of middle and high school students. The 3rd group is the “Children” group which are the ages of infancy through the end of elementary school. The idea with this chart is that many families branch out in these three separate areas and tend to the needs of the group without bringing it back to the family unit. It ends with arrows which connect to other outlets like peers, friends, coworkers, etc. Family ministry really tries to tie it all back together to create this flowing chart. Every area of “family” should be taken cared for appropriately such as having their own friends, activities, social circles, etc but it should always come back to the family. Without a family being a unit, an individual has no true foundation.
  • These statistics are focused in on the larger amount of family volunteers and the quote promotes the idea that everyone can serve and can benefit from serving. It’s not just a one way street.
  • More statistics that show and prove the need for people to serve as a family and what it really does for the family.
  • These quotes are from expert, Jenny Friedman’s book, “The Busy Family’s Guide to Volunteering” on why families should volunteer and the benefits it has on their family.
  • This list may only be made up of 5 values, but these values are commonly ones parents want to be installed in their children. Family volunteering teaches these values by experience. Nothing is greater than the actual experience and so much can be learned just by helping other people.
  • Everyone in a family should be able to be a part of a service activity. Obviously, newborn children are not able to do many things, but if you visit a nursing home or senior center, bringing young children can be really comforting. There are many different opportunities young children can have as well to serve so there should never be a need to get a sitter. Volunteering can always be done together. Invite friends to come along “adopt” them into your family for the day. Groups of families-serve together with the families your family gets along great with. Ideas like that will be what changes our community, when it gets to be so big that families are serving together regularly.
  • These are just a list of some ideas of projects families can do together. But the list can be endless and always families can be more creative and think about projects that are personal for their family or people they love.
  • Three easy steps: 1. Start Young-instill this in children young. 2. Start Small- don’t take on more than you can. 3. Dream Big- find something you’re passionate about and find a way to work up to a place where you do so much for a cause you’re passionate about
  • The above list are reasons why serving as a family is good for the family but specifically for the teenagers and children. It’s good for them to see good examples of their parent’s character. It brings out intellectual curiosity in the children because they are seeing real life in front of their eyes. It’s a life changing experience for everyone. It gives exposure to others and other living conditions. It helps the individual’s personal character development/learn to be more compassionate.
  • A lot of children can be easily encouraged and influenced to do something when they see others doing it too. Before volunteering read books to the kids about some of their favorite characters such as, “Franklin” or “ The Berenstain Bears” who have volunteered and helped other people out too. Another idea which can easily help influence teenagers is bringing along a friend to join the family for the day, or even joining up with another family so that they have friends serving with them as well. It may be cliche but have kids think they are coming up with the idea to serve. If you talk about a family who needs help, wait to hear what the child has to say about a solution. If they can become passionate about something, they’ll be more eager to help. And always go to a place where a child can feel like they are doing something to make a difference. There are many “grown up” jobs but having a special job for the child to do is so exciting for them.
  • The family that is being helped by volunteers may never actually interact with those special people who helped them. However, it’s important to remember that the hurting families benefit greatly from the family’s act of kindness. First of all, it reminds the family that they have support out there. That somebody cares for their family and is thinking of them. It also shows a great deal of love. Often times families feel victimized that their child is in the hospital and it’s a personal attack or their fault. Acts of kindness remind them that they have people who love their family and want to help them in anyway they can during their battle. Volunteers may also help with healthy communication among the family. Being someone for the family to vent to or being a distraction and tell of all the things going on out in the “real world.” Volunteers can be good listeners and allow cooped up family members to release some thoughts inside their head. And of course whether volunteers see the family or not, laughing is essential and laughter can be brought to the hurting family whether they are there laughing with them or sent something silly to brighten up their day with. Volunteers make a huge impact on each family in many personal ways as well.
  • Going into a situation where you’re ready to serve can be overwhelming to the families who need help. It’s important that we are actually helping them verses adding to their already stressed out days.
  • Mom’s need space to be allowed to be who they are in the moment. A lot of people look to Mom to be the strong one, but Mom has a lot on her plate. She needs space to be bossy because she’s her baby’s advocate. She needs space to make decisions without being corrected. She needs space for faults when she makes them because she’s tired and is fighting so hard for her family. She needs time with her child to have fun and laugh. She needs to create memories even though they’re in a place that’s not associated with fun. She needs time with her other children to remind them that they are loved and to be able to see life outside the hospital. She needs time for herself. Whether this means she goes off alone or goes out with her husband or a friend. She needs time away from the hospital to breathe and recharge. Mom needs proactive help. A lot of people say, “if you need anything give me a call” but that’s not helpful. She needs someone who says “I’m coming over to clean the house which day this week works best for you” or someone who comes to the house carrying a weeks worth of groceries without being asked. Those are the people that help the most. And also, meals. Meals are important part of family life and also something that usually is placed on Mom’s plate. Making meals for the family is always huge and even bringing in meals to the hospital for Mom and Dad is a great change from hospital food.
  • Dad’s typically are wired in a way that they feel that they are the protector. In a place like the hospital, they have no control of what’s going on. And when it comes to their hurting child. They really can’t do anything and that’s a helpless situation. Child Life Specialist, Kara Landrum says that Dads need a job to do. Something that a nurse might usually do, let the Dad do. Like running down to the playroom and finding a DVD for their child or getting something from the cafeteria that the child’s craving. It’s important to keep them busy. Dads also need distractions. Going out with a friend one night and having a night out from the hospital or anything like that can help Dads to get out of those four walls and do something for themselves. Dads need constant communication and assurance about what’s going on with their child and what’s going to happen. Kara Landrum also mentioned that it is more common that people talk just to the mother, but Dad is just as important in this process and needs to be in the loop constantly as well.

  • The Ronald McDonald House houses families of patients who are living at CHOP. The Mission Statement above states that they are trying to support the programs that will be for the well being of the patients. Maggie’s Ministry helps these families by coming and delivering packages of essentials the family may need during their child’s stay at CHOP. Maggie’s Ministry and the Ronald McDonald House both serve the family and try to take care of and support the family in anyway they can.
  • The Ronald McDonald House is mostly volunteer based. Their main goals as a facility are to house families who have children who are in the hospital that may not be able to stay with their child overnight, have other children with them, have a child who is going to the hospital daily, but not living there, or people who have a large commute. They provide meals for the families that are staying there but also provide kitchen space if families want to make meals as a family or feel more at home. They also provide activities for siblings and families to take their minds off of the crazy day they’ve had. And they transport families to the hospital from the Ronald McDonald House.
  • The Ronald McDonald House vision statement goes on to say that they try to be a part of the solution by improving the lives of children and their families. The Ronald McDonald house relies on the help of the medical teams as well as the help of volunteers and donors who wish to help too. The Ronald McDonald House has been such a positive experience for so many that they wish to give back and help other families. This is where Bruce and Helen come in and where they choose to give back.


  • Maggie Achuff is a “forever 4 year old.” Maggie passed away of Neuroblastoma on August 7, 2008 after fighting cancer for 2 years and 2 months. She leaves behind her Mother, Helen, Father, Bruce, older sister, Molly, and older brother Rocco.
  • Maggie’s blood type is B Positive. This soon became their family slogan and is now what they encourage other families to do. Be Positive! Have hope. Bruce and Helen Achuff serve as a family and encourage other families to serve together to help those families who have a child/sibling at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.



  • Because of this project, Hope Community Church has reinstated Maggie’s Ministry into the church and has decided to take on more sick families and rally around them in any ways their families need. Also, the Children’s Ministry will collect toys for Bingo Night, and the Middle and High School Ministries will be making and collecting CDs for the teens at CHOP.
  • Here is the list of my works cited. Jenny Friedman is the author who really stands out to me most on this page. She is really is big on the idea that families should serve together and has written many articles and books and also has a website on the subject. The other one that stands out to me on this page is the interview with Kara Landrum. She is a child life specialist at CHOP and was incredibly insightful on the children in the hospital.
  • Again these are the additional sources I used. My favorites on these pages are interviews because my heart was moved most when I got to talk to families who both served and were served. It’s really moving. And my favorite book was “Raise Kids Who Will Make a Difference” by Susan Vogt. She really was a fabulous author and was very insightful about family values.
  • For my class activity, everyone is going to be handed an empty CD. Everyone will make a list of songs that they would recommend to teenagers or if any adults are in the room to parents of songs they feel are songs of hope. OR they can make CD mixes of the most popular and appropriate songs to keep their minds off of the busy day.
  • The above is my conclusion. I think what really shocked me most and what I learned with the statistics is the big effect that takes place in the family when service is a part of their normal routine. The above statements are the key points of my project and what I think and hope everyone walks away remembering.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Serving Families In Need Families Serving Together to Help Other Families with Children in the Hospital Pres en tati on : K atie S ea rf os s
    • 2. Thesis
    • 3. Thesis When a family has a child in the hospital, donating money will help them meet ends, but donating time will help them feel loved and cared for. Serving those families does not just impact everyone who has been affected by the child in the hospital; it also helps the family who serves together grow stronger as a unit.
    • 4. Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss
    • 5. Personal Relevance Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss
    • 6. Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss
    • 7. Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss
    • 8. Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss
    • 9. Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss
    • 10. Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss
    • 11. Pictures taken by: Katie Searfoss
    • 12. Bringing Back The Family in Ministry Pictures taken by: Katie Searfoss
    • 13. Bringing Back The Family in Ministry Pictures taken by: Katie Searfoss
    • 14. 2001 Report: America’s Family Volunteers Friedman, Jenny. The Busy Family's Guide to Volunteering. Beltsville, Maryland: Robins Lane Press, 2003. Print. Pictures taken by: Katie Searfoss
    • 15. 2001 Report: America’s Family Volunteers • 51% of all volunteers had taken part in some volunteer activity with a family member. • The larger the household size, the more often families volunteered together “All of us are givers and receivers, contributing what we can and benefiting from the bounty of what we obtain from others.” (“The Busy Family’s Guide to Volunteering” Friedman p.11) Friedman, Jenny. The Busy Family's Guide to Volunteering. Beltsville, Maryland: Robins Lane Press, 2003. Print. Pictures taken by: Katie Searfoss
    • 16. Continued Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss
    • 17. Continued Spouses are 60% more likely to stay married when they volunteer together 90.6% of family volunteers said compassion for those in need was one reason they volunteered. 37% had a family member or friend who benefited from the activity. Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss
    • 18. Effects on the Ser ving Family Friedman, Jenny. The Busy Family's Guide to Volunteering. Beltsville, Maryland: Robins Lane Press, 2003. Print. Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss
    • 19. Effects on the Ser ving Family “The rewards for these families are important lessons in compassion, empathy, and community responsibility.” “Many families feel that it brings them closer together by improving communication and enriching their relationships.” “Every family has something to contribute. And every family, at sometime or another, benefits from and depends on the services of other volunteers.” Friedman, Jenny. The Busy Family's Guide to Volunteering. Beltsville, Maryland: Robins Lane Press, 2003. Print. (“The Busy Family’s Guide to Volunteering” Friedman p.9&10) Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss
    • 20. Volunteering Teaches Important Values Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss Vogt, Susan V. Raising Kids Who Will Make a Difference. Chicago: LoyolaPress, 2002. Print.
    • 21. Volunteering Teaches Important Values Compassion Empathy Gratitude Good Stewardship Community Responsibility Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss Vogt, Susan V. Raising Kids Who Will Make a Difference. Chicago: LoyolaPress, 2002. Print.
    • 22. Who Can Ser ve Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss Vogt, Susan V. Raising Kids Who Will Make a Difference. Chicago: LoyolaPress, 2002. Print.
    • 23. Who Can Ser ve Every family member Groups of families Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss Vogt, Susan V. Raising Kids Who Will Make a Difference. Chicago: LoyolaPress, 2002. Print.
    • 24. What You Can Do Vogt, Susan V. Raising Kids Who Will Make a Difference. Chicago: LoyolaPress, 2002. Print. Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss
    • 25. What You Can Do Donate food to a food pantry Walk to fight disease Put together activity boxes Visit a nursing home Clean Deliver Meals Vogt, Susan V. Raising Kids Who Will Make a Difference. Chicago: LoyolaPress, 2002. Print. Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss
    • 26. How They Can Ser ve Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss Vogt, Susan V. Raising Kids Who Will Make a Difference. Chicago: LoyolaPress, 2002. Print.
    • 27. How They Can Ser ve Start young Start small Dream big Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss Vogt, Susan V. Raising Kids Who Will Make a Difference. Chicago: LoyolaPress, 2002. Print.
    • 28. Why They Should Ser ve Vogt, Susan V. Raising Kids Who Will Make a Difference. Chicago: LoyolaPress, 2002. Print. Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss
    • 29. Why They Should Ser ve Examples of parents Intellectual curiosity A life-changing experience Exposure to others Personal character development Vogt, Susan V. Raising Kids Who Will Make a Difference. Chicago: LoyolaPress, 2002. Print. Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss
    • 30. How to Get Children to Want to Help Heiss, Renee. Helping Kids Help. Chicago: Zephyr Press, 2007. Print.
    • 31. How to Get Children to Want to Help Stories Bring their friends along Let them have a voice in deciding where the family should volunteer Go to a site where the kids can have an important job to do Heiss, Renee. Helping Kids Help. Chicago: Zephyr Press, 2007. Print.
    • 32. Effects on the Hurting Family Achuff, Bruce, and Helen Achuff. Maggie's Ministry. MaggiesMinistry, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010.
    • 33. Effects on the Hurting Family Support Love Healthy communication Laughs Achuff, Bruce, and Helen Achuff. Maggie's Ministry. MaggiesMinistry, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010.
    • 34. Families What the Families Need Achuff, Bruce, and Helen Achuff. Maggie's Ministry. MaggiesMinistry, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010.
    • 35. Mom Achuff, Bruce, and Helen Achuff. Maggie's Ministry. MaggiesMinistry, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010.
    • 36. Mom Space Time with sick child Time with other children Time for herself Proactive help Meals Achuff, Bruce, and Helen Achuff. Maggie's Ministry. MaggiesMinistry, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010.
    • 37. Dads www.carepages.com
    • 38. Dads A job to do Distractions Reassurance and communication One on one time with sick child One on one time with wife www.carepages.com
    • 39. Siblings Achuff, Bruce, and Helen Achuff. Maggie's Ministry. MaggiesMinistry, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010.
    • 40. Siblings Someone to talk to Trust Attention Somewhere safe to go Communication Time with Mom/Dad Achuff, Bruce, and Helen Achuff. Maggie's Ministry. MaggiesMinistry, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010.
    • 41. Ronald McDonald House Ronald McDonald House Charities. RMHC, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010. <http://rmhc.org>.
    • 42. Ronald McDonald House Mission Statement: “To create, find and support programs that directly improve the health and well being of children.” Ronald McDonald House Charities. RMHC, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010. <http://rmhc.org>.
    • 43. What it is That They Do Ronald McDonald House Charities. RMHC, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010. <http://rmhc.org>.
    • 44. What it is That They Do House families who have kids in the hospital Transport families to the hospital Provide activities for siblings and families Feed families and provide kitchen space Ronald McDonald House Charities. RMHC, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010. <http://rmhc.org>.
    • 45. “I’m Loving It” Ronald McDonald House Charities. RMHC, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010. <http://rmhc.org>.
    • 46. “I’m Loving It” “We believe that when you change a child’s life, you change a family’s, which can change a community, and ultimately the world.” -Ronald McDonald House Vision Statement Ronald McDonald House Charities. RMHC, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010. <http://rmhc.org>.
    • 47. Application Getting Families Involved We C a n M a k e An Im p act !
    • 48. Maggie’s Ministry A Tribute to Maggie Lynn Achuff Achuff, Bruce, and Helen Achuff. Maggie's Ministry. MaggiesMinistry, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010.
    • 49. Achuff, Bruce, and Helen Achuff. Maggie's Ministry. MaggiesMinistry, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010.
    • 50. Maggie’s Ministry Achuff, Bruce, and Helen Achuff. Maggie's Ministry. MaggiesMinistry, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010.
    • 51. Maggie’s Ministry Maggie’s Ministry began August 22, 2008 Mission: “To help children and their families in tangible ways, the same way we were helped.”- Bruce and Helen Achuff Achuff, Bruce, and Helen Achuff. Maggie's Ministry. MaggiesMinistry, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010.
    • 52. Promotion Movie
    • 53. Application
    • 54. Application Rebuild Maggie’s Help them learn how Ministry at Hope to serve as a family Community Church Create relationships Find a family who needs help Meet the needs of sick families Set up 6 families who are willing to help Strengthen a family by service
    • 55. Future of Project Maggie’s Ministry will be reinstated in the church. 6 families will rally around 1 sick family and help them receive the support they need and deserve. Donations will be collected for Bingo Night in the Children’s Ministry CDs will be made and collected in the Middle and High School Ministry
    • 56. Works Cited Achuff, Bruce, and Helen Achuff. Maggie's Ministry. MaggiesMinistry, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010. <http://www.maggiesministry.webs.com>. The Center on Philanthropy. The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2007. Indiana: Giving USA Foundation, 2008. Print. Giving USA . Change Effect. "Kids Serving Other Kids." Kidology. Kidology, 2010. Web. 27 Apr. 2010. <http://www.kidology.org>. FamilyCares. "Family Volunteering." Family Cares. FamilyCares, 2008. Web. 27 Apr. 2010. <http://www.familycares.org>. Friedman, Jenny. The Busy Family's Guide to Volunteering. Beltsville, Maryland: Robins Lane Press, 2003. Print. "Who Knew Family Volunteering Could Be So Easy." Doing Good Together. Doing Good Together, 2010. Web. 27 Apr. 2010. <http://www.doinggoodtogether.org>. "Give Spot." Give Spot. StartSpot Mediaworks, Inc, 2009. Web. 27 Apr. 2010. <http://www.givespot.com>. Heiss, Renee. Helping Kids Help. Chicago: Zephyr Press, 2007. Print. Landrum, Kara. Personal interview. 3 Mar. 2010. Love, Missy. Personal interview. 28 Feb. 2010. McClure, Lori. Personal interview. 17 Feb. 2010.
    • 57. Works Cited Ocker, Caleb. Personal interview. 19 Feb. 2010. Ocker, Laura. Personal interview. 15 Feb. 2010. Prince, Russ Alan, and Karen Maru File. The Seven Faces of Philanthropy. San Francisco: Jossey- Bass, 1994. Print. Reynard, David. Personal interview. 27 Feb. 2010. Ronald McDonald House Charities. RMHC, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010. <http://rmhc.org>. Sharp, Kiley. Personal interview. 27 Feb. 2010. University of Wisconsin Hospitals. "Kids Helping Kids." Supporting The Children's Hospital. UW Health, 2009. Web. 27 Apr. 2010. <http://www.uwhealth.org/childrens-hospital-donations/ kids-helping-kids/11859>. Vogt, Susan V. Raising Kids Who Will Make a Difference. Chicago: LoyolaPress, 2002. Print. "Volunteer Opportunities." The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. CHOP, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2010. <http://www.chop.edu>. "Volunteers." Volunteer Match. VolunteerMatch, 2008. Web. 27 Apr. 2010. <http://www.volunteermatch.org>. Weisman, Carol. Raising Charitable Children. St. Louis: F.E. Robbins & Sons Press, 2008. Print. Zeiler, Freddi. A Kids Guide to Giving. Norwalk: InnovativeKids, 2006. Print.
    • 58. Class Activity Care Packages: CDs of Hope
    • 59. Conclusion Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss
    • 60. Conclusion Families who serve together create longer lasting connections with one another Service doesn’t just provide joy for the family with a sick child, but joy for the family who is serving Having children start young with serving peeks curiosity and instills values in them and makes serving others a habit in their life Pictures Taken By: Katie Searfoss

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