Internship Learning Project

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  • First semester as an Academic AdvisorHey folks…so what do we actually do?Scope of my knowledge about what we do is limited, as by the time we picked the project most of my experience was in trainingWhat it can be like to be first year and first generationBoth via experience and research That as a population, first generation students are at risk in college environments and can benefit greatly (more so than their peers actually) from developing positive relationships with advisors, professors, etc. What it is like to be new here at WIUIncluding, recently, to academic advisingWhat COAA training can be likeFall Training- full day, divided into two major segmentsProfessional Development- periodic discussion or presentations & Spring semester retreat
  • Focus on advisors rather than on students- due to the vast differences in the advising relationship (students may see and advisor anywhere from one a semester to 8 times or more) and the wide variety of
  • “Separate first generation from millennial”“I think we need to know more from a first generation student's point of view about how they feel being a first generation student” “I guess what I'm saying is that advisors need to be aware or reminded of how ourstudents' feel, especially if they are first gen.”“I want to know what it is they don’t know…What “lingo” is foreign to them?” “sometimes overlook those things that seem so obvious to us but are not so obvious toa new student OR his/her family. Families would ask the questions, if they knew what to ask, right?”“I know we cover things at SOAR…”I feel like we cover something and I point at the screen and tell them that its important, but by the next meeting they haven’t done anything with that…
  • Action and degree are the same color- because the action that a learning outcome asks a learner to achieve indicates a degree or type of learning to occur
  • In order to involve the learner entirely and effectively in the learning process and toward the goal of integrating new knowledge into their total framework of understanding, we need to be sure that we are engaging the three dimensions in which meaning is madeCognative- How they are making meaning of information, or the framework for processingInerpersonal- making meaning of selves in relationIntrapersonal- meaning making in terms of the individuals values, beliefs, and conception of self
  • Sensory cortex & Concrete experience- the stuff we make meaning of and the input it comes in asReflective observation- making connections & meaning to what we already know (are)Generating plans based on all of this combinedMotor cortex- Acting on these plans to take all of the meaning we just made out for a test drive AND generate some new concrete experience to start the whole thing back over again
  • “Our concrete experience contains much of the information we need for understanding” (Zull, 2002 p. 145)To create new knowledge, we have to provide new experience“Prior knowledge is the beginning of new knowledge” (Zull 2002 p. 93)We also have to consider what we do know, as we have to begin there “Knowing is feeling.” (Zull, 2002 p. 73)“emotions tend to overpower cognition” (Zull, 2002 p. 74)“experiences have a ‘feel’ to them” (Zull, 2002 p. 145)“Reflection is the search for connections- literally!” (Zull, 2002 p. 165)Allows for integration necessary to complete learning cycle in action Teaching is Showing“We should show what we hope our students will eventually be able to do themselves.” (Zull, 2002 p. 147)Action is necessary“The only pathway that seems unproductive for learning is the pathway that excludes active testing of ideas, [which] lead the learner to keep her ideas inside rather tan showing them to the world beyond her brain.” (Zull, 2002, p.219
  • -Consume input in the form of a presentation or discussion lead by an expert(s), who can help point out the important information to those who may be novice to the subject Start with situating the students in the University setting, which is likely to provide a good basis for starting with what advisors know-Student panel input to hear more complete stories of first generation experience- opportunity to engage with arguably the same material but from a different vantage point and in a different way Variety of input should enhance attentive ability -Activity: create a definition of a first generation student- engage in action around the information that they have, reflect on the meaning they are making of the material presented; engage in large group discussion to test this against others understanding and further refine Define learning as mutually constructed Assessment Built in
  • Draw from previous experience, integrate what you have just made meaning of in the previous process of articulating a personal and collective definition Make meaning of this for yourself and/or with a small group of others, then engage in more active testing in large group discussion
  • Reflection: Personal experience is connected to feeling, this can be useful in order to motivate learning and enhance connections being made between the experience of fist generation students and their own experience- they know how it feels, they may be able to use this to better understand the perspective Activity: generate abstract hypothesis and articulate these to small group, thus actively testing them and getting feedback
  • Internship Learning Project

    1. 1. Katie Mey Western Illinois University ACADEMIC ADVISOR TRAINING: BUILDING SKILLS FOR WORKING WITH FIRST GENERATION STUDENTS
    2. 2. Start with what the learner knows HOW I PICKED MY INTERNSHIP LEARNING EXPERIENCE (ILE)
    3. 3.  First semester as an Academic Advisor  What it can be like to be first year and first generation  What it is like to be new here at WIU  What COAA training can be like  Fall Training- full day, divided into two major segments  Professional Development- periodic discussion or presentations & Spring semester retreat TWO OR THREE THINGS I KNOW FOR SURE
    4. 4. SOME BACKGROUND ON ACADEMIC ADVISING
    5. 5. Decentralized advising system  University Advising and Academic Services Center (UAASC)  Undeclared Advising (UA) & Transitional Advising (TAP)  Office of Academic Services (OAS)  Alternative Admissions Program  Tutoring  Departmental & Faculty Advisors  College and major specific advisors in areas across campus  Structure, personnel, and process vary widely  Counsil of Academic Advisors (COAA)  Non-regulatory, advisory counsil  Representatives from UAASC, Advising within each Academic College, and several related offices on campus (Admissions, Registrar, Athletic Advising, etc.) ACADEMIC ADVISING AT WIU
    6. 6.  The mission of the academic advising program at Western Illinois University is to support the overall mission of the University…  The academic advising program should identify resources to assist students in overcoming specific personal, physical, or educational problems or skill deficiencies. The academic advising program should identify environmental conditions that may negatively influence welfare and propose interventions that may neutralize such conditions.  The academic advising program must make strides to keep the university free from discrimination. It must not discriminate on the basis of ability; age; cultural identity; ethnicity; family educational history (e.g., first generation to attend college); gender identity and expression; nationality; political affiliation; race; religious affiliation; sex; sexual orientation; economic, marital, social, or veteran status; or any other basis included in institutional policies and codes and laws. Mission statement COUNSIL OF ACADEMIC ADVISORS
    7. 7. MAKING IT LEARNING CENTERED
    8. 8. INPUT - What does first gen mean - Realize other identities do not indicate someone being first gen - Know that they aren't that different from other students, but lack parental guidance - Separate first generation from millennial - need to know more from a first generation student's point of view about how they feel being a first generation student - advisors need to be aware or reminded of how our students' feel, especially if they are first gen . - I want to know what it is they don’t know … - What “lingo” is foreign to them? - How to identify what they don't know - “[we] sometimes overlook those things that seem so obvious to us but are not so obvious to a new student OR his/her family. Families would ask the questions, if they knew what to ask, right?” - ..point at the screen and show them something important to go take care of it but by the next meeting they haven’t done anything with that… - How to steer them to resources - I want to learn something I can do something with - Something practical I can use
    9. 9. Academic advisors who attend COAA training will… 1. Define “first generation student” for themselves and with others to create a common understanding within the advising community 2. Utilize advising experience to identify similarities and differences between first generation students and other first year college students to compare their respective needs 3. Recognize motivations and perspectives of first generation students in relation to their University and advising experience 4. Identify elements of University and advising environment that present particular difficulty to first generation students 5. Analyze current personal advising practices to recognize potential barriers they present to first generation students 6. Utilize knowledge of the University and first generation population to create strategies to effectively refer students to appropriate resources DEVELOPING LEARNING OUTCOMES
    10. 10.  Learning outcomes must have audience, action, condition and degree Academic advisors who attend COAA training will… 1. Define “first generation student” for themselves and with others to create a common understanding within the advising community DIAGRAMING LEARNING OUTCOMES (Learning Outcomes)
    11. 11.  Learning outcomes must have audience, action, condition and degree Academic advisors who attend COAA training will… 1. Define “first generation student” for themselves and with others to create a common understanding within the advising community 2. Utilize advising experience to identify similarities and differences between first generation students and other first year college students to compare their respective needs 3. Recognize motivations and perspectives of first generation students in relation to their University and advising experience 4. Identify elements of University and advising environment that present particular difficulty to first generation students 5. Analyze current personal advising practices to recognize potential barriers they present to first generation students 6. Utilize knowledge of the University and first generation population to create strategies to effectively refer students to appropriate resources DIAGRAMING LEARNING OUTCOMES
    12. 12.  Transformative learning outcomes must involve the three dimensions of self: cognitive, interpersonal, intrapersonal Academic advisors who attend COAA training will… 1. Define “first generation student” for themselves and with others to create a common understanding within the advising community DIAGRAM (TRANSFORMATIVE) LEARNING OUTCOMES (Shaping the Environment)
    13. 13.  Transformative learning outcomes must involve the three dimensions of self: cognitive, interpersonal, intrapersonal Academic advisors who attend COAA training will… 1. Define “first generation student” for themselves and with others to create a common understanding within the advising community 2. Utilize advising experience to identify similarities and differences between first generation students and other first year college students to compare their respective needs 3. Recognize motivations and perspectives of first generation students in relation to their University and advising experience 4. Identify elements of University and advising environment that they believe present particular difficulty to first generation students 5. Analyze current personal advising practices to recognize potential barriers they present to first generation students 6. Utilize knowledge of the University and first generation population to create strategies to effectively refer students to appropriate resources DIAGRAMING (TRANSFORMATIVE) LEARNING OUTCOMES
    14. 14. SHAPING THE ENVIRONMENT
    15. 15. Concrete Experience (Sensory Cortex) Reflective Observation (Back Integrative Cortex) Abstract Hypothesis (Front Integrative Cortex) Active Testing (Motor Cortex) LEARNING HAPPENS VIA THE LEARNING CYCLE We must engage all parts of the brain and complete the cycle (Zull, 2002)
    16. 16.  Learning occurs best with  Experience (input)  Repeated opportunities to engage with material  Multiple formats and contexts in which to engage  Opportunities for personal connection  Reflection, including internal and eternal processing  Active involvement  Basic process of learning involves SHAPING THE ENVIRONMENT Sense Integrate Act (Zull, 2002; Shaping the Environment)
    17. 17. LEARNINGPARTNERSHIPS MODEL Support  Validate learners’ capacity to know  Situate learning in learners’ experience  Define learning as mutually constructed meaning making Baxter Magolda, M.B. (2004)
    18. 18.  “Our concrete experience contains much of the information we need for understanding” (Zull, 2002 p. 145)  “Prior knowledge is the beginning of new knowledge” (Zull 2002 p. 93)  “Knowing is feeling.” (Zull, 2002 p. 73)  “Reflection is the search for connections- literally!” (Zull, 2002 p. 165)  Teaching is Showing  “We should show what we hope our students will eventually be able to do themselves.” (Zull, 2002 p. 147)  Action is necessary  “The only pathway that seems unproductive for learning is the pathway that excludes active testing of ideas, [which] lead the learner to keep her ideas inside rather tan showing them to the world beyond her brain.” (Zull, 2002, p.219) A FEW MORE THINGS ABOUT LEARNING
    19. 19.  COAA Training  Fall Training- full day, divided into two major segments  Professional Development- periodic discussion or presentations & Spring semester retreat  Context I am working with  Fall Training  30 minute morning presentation  Afternoon discussion (approximately three hours)  Professional Development  Two brown bag lunch discussions, one each semester (one hour each) SHAPING THE ENVIRONMENT
    20. 20.  Reflection prompts (Written)  Training workbook- individual writing prompts  Consideration of self in knowledge construction (situate in learners’ experience)  During and between training (multiple contexts)  Discussion prompts (Verbal)  Small and large group context (multiple contexts)  Work with others to construct meaning (Define learning as mutually constructed meaning making)  Activities (Interactive)  Testing of ideas in a group context (abstract hypothesis and active testing)  Generation of ideas by learners (Validate learner’s capacity to know) TOOLS USED
    21. 21. As a large group  Engage with a presentation: Professionals who can situate first generation students in University setting  Andy Borst, Sara Lytle, Karolynn Heuer, Financial aid advisor Student panel to speak to experiences  Multiple versions of the “first generation story” to engage with  Question and answer  Activity: On your own, develop a detailed definition of “first generation student” highlighting the components that are important to consider as an academic advisor. Then discuss these definitions as a group in order to develop a working definition for the group Define “first generation student” for themselves and with others to create a common understandin g within the advising community LEARNING OUTCOME 1
    22. 22. In small groups Discussion prompt: Considering all of your experience in relation to what we have been presented with so far today, what similarities and differences do you see between first generation students and their peers? Report back to the large group to make a “master list” for discussion. Utilize advising experience to identify similarities and differences between first generation students and other first year college students LEARNING OUTCOME 2
    23. 23. As individuals  Reflection prompt: What was the experience of your first day on the job as an academic advisor like? Your first week?  What did you think the job would entail? How did you feel as you were presented with all the documents and other information you would need to assimilate? How about your first time on MVS alone? How did you feel before or after your first (or worst) student appointment?  How might this relate to the way first generation students feel coming into an advising environment? In small groups  Activity: use your previous knowledge as well as what we have learned today to answer the following question on a college admissions application as if you were a hypothetical first generation student.  Why do you want to pursue a college education? Discuss what you would bring with you to college to help you be successful, as well as your motivation and goals. Recognize motivations and perspectives of first generation students in relation to their University and advising experience to compare their respective needs LEARNING OUTCOME 3
    24. 24. As a large group  Activity: if we were trying to construct a University and Advising Center designed to keep first generation students from succeeding, what would that look like? What practices, polices, and environments would be in place?  Which, if any, of these reflect WIU or our offices? As individuals  Reflection prompt: how would you feel were you a traditional age first year student facing these barriers? Identify elements of University and advising environment that present particular difficulty to first generation students LEARNING OUTCOME 4
    25. 25. As individuals  Reflection prompt: considering what we have learned today, over the course of the semester, reflect on your own daily advising practice and your experience in your office. What, if anything, do you that may create or perpetuate barriers for first generation students? Why are these things problematic?  Your thoughts will be solicited prior to Fall semester lunch discussion and used to guide our discussion. Analyze current personal advising practices to recognize potential barriers they present to first generation students LEARNING OUTCOME 5
    26. 26. As individuals  Engage with articles on best practices in working with first generation students As a large group  Discussion:  What do you think about the prominent themes in advisor submissions?  How can we to apply experience and knowledge gained about first generation population thus far to reduce these barriers or better aid first generation students in navigating them?  Activity: identify one element that you will change in your advising practice and describe how you will do so based on what we have learned Utilize knowledge of the University and first generation population to create strategies to advise and effectively refer students to appropriate resources First Brown Bag Discussion LEARNING OUTCOME 6
    27. 27. As individuals Engage with written articles on best practices in working with first generation students As a large group Discuss results of your implementation of previously identified strategies Identify continuing and new strategies for implementation Utilize knowledge of the University and first generation population to create strategies to advise and effectively refer students to appropriate resources LEARNING OUTCOME 6
    28. 28. ASSESSMENT
    29. 29.  Formative  Multiple large group discussion prompts allow for check-ins  What definition is developed  What thoughts are reported back to the large group & facilitator  What barriers are identified as a large group  What thoughts are submitted about personal advising practices  Small group activity collection  Response generated to hypothetical essay prompt  Discussion facilitator notes- small and large group  Workbook sampling  Summative  Advisor training evaluation form (Fall training)  Brown Bag Lunch evaluation (electronic) HOW WILL THIS BE ASSESSED?
    30. 30. Baxter Magolda, M.B. (2004) Learning partnerships model: A framework for promoting self-authorship. In M.B. Baxter Magolda & P.M. King (Eds.), Learning partnerships: Theory and models of practice to educate for self-authorship (pp. 37-62). Sterling, VA; Stylus Publishing. Learning Outcomes [Powerpoint slides] Personal Collection of Sarah Schoper, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL Shaping the Environment [Powerpoint slides] Personal Collection of Sarah Schoper, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL Zull, J.E. (2002). The art of changing the brain. Sterling, VA; Stylus Publishing. REFERENCES

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