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Social media for non profits

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Prepared for Northwest Indiana Association of Fund Raising Professionals for a presentation on 1/24/13.

Prepared for Northwest Indiana Association of Fund Raising Professionals for a presentation on 1/24/13.


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  • My focus is on empowering clients to tell their story expertly and effectively, in a manner that supports their overall marketing goals.
  • I had blogged in my previous job, but used it similarly to a regular website. I didn’t “need” the many: many communication capability the way we needed it during this crisis.
  • You’ve heard of the book “Accidental Tourist” (also a movie with William Hurt.)? We were an accidental non-profit. We formed a team organically to address the needs of the situation. Unlike a regular, established organization we didn’t have clear long-term goals. At the beginning we used cell phones and email to keep network posted, but we soon tired of repeating the same news over and over. When others repeated it (too far from the source) we suffered from the telephone game phenomenon.
  • We didn’t know we needed Web 2.0, a platform that allows members of the network to connect directly to any other member, while still providing a central place for the people in charge of outbound communication to share their central message.
  • Social media isn’t easy, but it isn’t hard either. You need to have a plan and treat it like you do the rest of your marketing plan.It’s also not free. (It’s free like a St. Bernard puppy is free – it will cost you over the long haul, but you’re still probably pretty glad to have the puppy.) Your time isn’t free so make sure you track your efforts to make sure you’re getting expected results with your focused efforts.
  • Is social media the best thing since sliced bread? Is it the silver bullet? Nope. It’s pretty good, but unfocused efforts are (very) unlikely to yield the results you want to see.
  • Which one do you think will start a fire? The kids playing at it in the backyard are treating it like a fun experiment; it could happen, but it’s not likely. All alone on a desert island, you might be pretty motivated to make a fire and more likely to focus your efforts to get the necessary result.Which style best reflects your organization’s current approach?
  • There is no easy button. Sorry about that. But compared to what? Does your annual gala get put together all by itself? How about your newsletter? Why do we think social media should be magical?
  • Your unique communication blueprint depends on who you are as an organization, who you serve, your network of donors and volunteers, etc. Where are they spending time online? What information do they expect from you?
  • What have I said about this in the past? http://southshoregrants.wordpress.com/2012/07/13/come-on-in-the-water-is-fine/How I got started -- we couldn’t have been more non-profit than this... share story of Julie.Web 1.0 tools weren’t cutting it.Takeaway lessons:Make sure your website company is socially aware. Websites are still vitally important. Push/pull. Organic vs. paid.Free tools. Free like a St. Bernard puppy? $15k in costs over its lifetime. Better to pick a few things that you can do well, than to take on too much.Some in the moment posts were effective -- this is happening “RIGHT NOW”! Use that type of update with some reservation. People are a little overstimulated lately with so much messaging and asks happening. Reserve this for concentrated times of focus and increased need.Better: talk from the heart. Tell your story. Successes, setbacks, challenges. Acknowledge help and let everyone’s contribute in their unique way. Develop a voice, but offer guest post opportunities (crowd sourcing)Cultivate connections from all sources, get the team involved and get their networks engaged and talking to one another. Illustrate 1:1 efforts vs. many: many. Create the space for this conversation to happen -- don’t broadcast, facilitate, seed, connect, thank, share, ask.Book club friendsFamilyTeam members’ Facebook friendsResources we didn’t even think to ask for were made available -- give everyone a place to plug in and feel includedFree place to stayMeals showed upPress coverageDoctors recommendedBenefit stagedPrayers offersLayer on the social media layer when you’re doing what you would normally do anywayRaiser’s Edge Twitter integration: http://forums.blackbaud.com/forums/t/19878.aspxEmail signature. Donation link. Crowd source this, ask your fans to use your link and donate?Get a stack of business cards at a networking event, introduce into your language: are you on FB, LinkedIn, etc.? Prime the pump to connect laterCreate FB events and invite people or use EventbriteAdd blog functionality to your site if you don’t have it already. Make every post sharable.Make the connect, sign up for email and donate buttons as easy to find as possibleIntegrate your sites together. Just because someone finds you in one place doesn’t mean that’s the best place for them to consume your informationSocial jack time for your team -- coordinated, focused effortCurate information and shareSet up Google AlertsRound up your partners. Like their pages on Facebook. Follow them on Twitter. Link to them on LinkedIn.A picture tells 1000 words. Integrate multimedia into your posts. Example: client did a bike raffle and just listed the price. Take a picture of the bike, much better. At events take pictures or video, get permission to use. Get testimonial videos from clients served, volunteers or board members. Get multiple perspectives.Determining your social media DNA. Not a cookie cutter solution for all organizations. Certain elements in common, but the rest determined by your strengths and digital assets.Scheduling for things like Hootsuite.How social media influences giving infographic: http://social.razoo.com/2012/10/infographic-how-social-media-influences-giving/If you’re going to ask for donations on your website http://fundraising123.org/print/5506-minute guide to winning fundraising campaigns http://fundraising123.org/print/571Online fundraising in 10 easy steps http://fundraising123.org/print/3215 “Don’ts” of Nonprofit Website Design http://fundraising123.org/print/552http://www.bethkanter.org/http://topnonprofits.com/http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/https://fundrazr.com/pages/fundraising-widgetshttp://www.causes.com/
  • In the social media world, we are still trail blazing to some extent. Even if you don’t know exactly where you’re going, you still need to chart the best course you can and be willing to make corrections as necessary.
  • With no goals set and shared, efforts are not likely to be focused.
  • Fresh content keeps visitors coming back.
  • A picture tells 1000 words. Integrate multimedia into your posts. Example: client did a bike raffle and just listed the price. Take a picture of the bike, much better. At events take pictures or video, get permission to use. Get testimonial videos from clients served, volunteers or board members. Get multiple perspectives.
  • Use multi-media to capture your story in whatever way works best for you. Gary Vaynershuk doesn’t like to write so he does a video blog. Don’t pound a square peg into a round hole—find what works for you and keep doing it.
  • Scan images, upload whitepapers as pdfs, digitize!Curate information and shareSet up Google AlertsScheduling for things like Hootsuite.
  • Measure key outcomes most important for your organization as well as for each team member.
  • Add blog functionality to your site if you don’t have it already. Make every post sharable.Make the connect, sign up for email and donate buttons as easy to find as possibleIntegrate your sites together. Just because someone finds you in one place doesn’t mean that’s the best place for them to consume your informationSocial media update time for your team -- coordinated, focused effort
  • Messaging style is different in 2.0. Even after you get a fan to like you, a Twitter follower to follow or a LinkedIn connection to link, you still have to earn their attention and their reciprocity. Extend care nurturing these relationships, similarly to any social relationships you care about.
  • Create FB events and invite people or use Eventbrite
  • The days of asking people to “forward an email” should be over. There are much easier ways available today. Make sure you’re not asking your supporters to do extra work. Round up your partners. Like their pages on Facebook. Follow them on Twitter. Link to them on LinkedIn.
  • Watch for TMI (too much information). Facebook advises that one great quality post per day is preferred to multiple posts daily of lesser quality.
  • Quality posts are visually engaging, ask questions rather than broadcast a message, integrate multi-media or other links and provide information specific to your organization.
  • My family had very focused efforts for a relatively short duration (6 months). The “ROI” showed up in ways that weren’t always easy to measure, but these are some of the highlights.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Presented by Kathy Sipple, My Social Media Coach SOCIAL MEDIA MADE EASY EASIERJan. 24, 2013 9/13/12 Association of Fund Raising Professionals Kathy Sipple - 1
    • 2. Who is My Social Media Coach? • Kathy Sipple, Valparaiso, Indiana • 25+ year career in sales and marketing • Trained, presented to thousands of business owners and non-profits over the past 4 years via workshops, webinars • 2009 Indiana’s Most Influential Woman in Social MediaKathy Sipple9/13/12 CEOKathy Sipple - (Chief Empowerment Officer) 2
    • 3. 1 Call Changed Everything• July 2008 “regular” job, living life• Seeking answers• Dalai Lama• Literally made a U-turn9/13/12 Crisis Turning point, no map…yet Kathy Sipple - 3
    • 4. Accidental Non-Profit• Family health emergency• Didn’t know the scope or timeline• Traditional communication tools inadequate – Phone – Email• Confusion, burnout9/13/12 Sister JulieKathy SippleAnderson Legner - 4
    • 5. We didn’t know 2.0• Web site wasn’t right – Too impersonal – Didn’t fit needs• Had used a blog, limited vision• How to tap into a 2nd degree network?9/13/12 2.0 Popularized in 2004 by O’Reilly 5 Kathy Sipple - Media.
    • 6. Top social media myths• Social media is… easy. hard.• Social media is… free. Is it9/13/12 free? “Free” St. Bernard puppy lifetime costs. Kathy Sipple - 6
    • 7. What to expect?9/13/12 Hype: Unfocused effort will yield results. (Not true.) Kathy Sipple - 7
    • 8. Focus, Intention, Passion Source: Cast Away, 2000 20th Century FoxCommitment: 9/13/12 “Playing Sipple - vs. survival mode. Kathy at it” 8
    • 9. If only… Source: http://staples.com Easier?9/13/12 Compared to what? Kathy Sipple - 9
    • 10. Your Social Media DNA Source: http://appatomy.com/2011/03/appatomy-social-media-dna/Messaging:9/13/12 You Kathy you?-Who is your audience? are Sipple 10
    • 11. You Need a MapA social media strategy map helps your organization think through objectives,audience, strategy, tools, and measurement to support your organization’scommunications and Internet strategy.~ Beth Kanter Direction: 9/13/12 WithoutSipple - Kathy a destination, any path is fine. 11
    • 12. Map Making • Involve the team • Holistic approach, integrate • Editorial schedule • Google Drive spreadsheet to collaborate • URL’s created and shortened • Goals • Identify team members and action itemsLewis & Clark: 9/13/12 Expeditions are better with teamwork…and maps. Kathy Sipple - 12
    • 13. Where do you want to go?SMART Goals 9/13/12 Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, Timebound Kathy Sipple - 13
    • 14. Content = “The Cheese”• Digital strategy Build a better mousetrap• Attraction marketing “That cheese smells good”• Keep coming back “What’s the special?”• Google Keyword Tool What mice look for on Google? Content:9/13/12 Is yours tasty, fresh and relevant? Kathy Sipple - 14
    • 15. Taking Inventory: Content• Photos, video• Events• Press releases• Volunteer profiles• Journal subscriptions (email)• Google alerts• User generated content Content:9/13/12 What resources do you already 15 Kathy Sipple - have?
    • 16. Lead with Your Strengths “Gary9/13/12 V” “Crush it” in the social space with video. Kathy Sipple - 16
    • 17. Organizing Your Content• Digitize• File online – Google Drive• Tag with key words• Create email folder• Evernote Paperless?9/13/12 Digital makes- it easier to search. Kathy Sipple 17
    • 18. Keep Score• Number of Facebook likes• Facebook Insights• Google Analytics• Klout.com• Pay per click ads• Call to action• Donations Winning:9/13/12 Measure, monitor, adjust Kathy Sipple - 18
    • 19. Your Network • “Social” media • Real life connections • Database • Email list • Staff, volunteers, donors, clients, friends, family • Hidden networkSocial Capital 9/13/12 The Kathy Sipple - economy relationship 19
    • 20. Ambient Awareness • Not as intrusive • Ongoing conversation • Softer sell • Different messaging • Watch frequency, go for quality, consistency • Requires finesseConversation 9/13/12 The Kathy Sipple - new relationship economy 20
    • 21. Leverage: Sharing Source:9/13/12 http://conferencehound.com Kathy Sipple - 21
    • 22. It’s nice to share Leverage:9/13/12 If you create -it, make it easy to share Kathy Sipple 22
    • 23. Over-sharingBroadcasting: 9/13/12 Watch your tone, frequency & engagement Kathy Sipple - 23
    • 24. Quality beats quantityLess with more: 9/13/12 80/20 rule, a.k.a. Pareto Principle. Kathy Sipple - 24
    • 25. Example: Press Release • Leverage what you’re doing • Crowdsourcing • Engagement • Network diving • Email it + “share” • Amplify, team effortMany to many 9/13/12 Paradigm shift from 1:1 or broadcast messaging Kathy Sipple - 25
    • 26. Results• 500+ blog followers• Crowd sourced fundraising (without asking)• Referrals• Press• Today Julie blogs9/13/12 ROI Sometimes hard to measure Kathy Sipple - 26
    • 27. Need help?• Email subscription coaching - $12.99/month (New!)• Social Media Jump Start Package - $495 (2) hour strategy session (3) 1-hour coaching modules• Private coaching - $100/hour ($85/hour for non-profits) Further discount available for packages of 10+ hours.Kathy Sipple9/13/12 CEOKathy Sipple - (Chief Empowerment Officer) 27
    • 28. Let’s ConnectFACEBOOK:http://facebook.com/kathysipplehttp://www.facebook.com/mysocialmediacoachLinkedIn:http://www.LinkedIn.com/in/kathysippleTWITTER:http://twitter.com/kathysipple9/13/12Email: Kathy (at) mysocialmediacoach.com Kathy Sipple - 28
    • 29. Resource Links• How social media influences giving infographic: http://social.razoo.com/2012/10/infographic-how- social-media-influences-giving/• If you’re going to ask for donations on your website http://fundraising123.org/print/550• 6-minute guide to winning fundraising campaigns http://fundraising123.org/print/571• Online fundraising in 10 easy steps http://fundraising123.org/print/321• 5 “Don’ts” of Nonprofit Website Design http://fundraising123.org/print/552• http://www.bethkanter.org/• http://topnonprofits.com/• http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/• https://fundrazr.com/pages/fundraising-widgets• http://www.causes.com/Kathy Sipple9/13/12 CEOKathy Sipple - (Chief Empowerment Officer) 29
    • 30. References• Story about Julie’s Carepages site: http://www.qconline.com/archives/qco/print_display.php?id=424013• Interview with Georgia Geis, South Shore Grants, July 13, 2012 http://southshoregrants.wordpress.com/2012/07/13/come-on-in-the- water-is-fine/• Many images and words throughout this presentation are hyperlinked. Please click through to get original source sites.Kathy Sipple9/13/12 CEOKathy Sipple - (Chief Empowerment Officer) 30