PdC School Board Farm to School 1 1 10
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PdC School Board Farm to School 1 1 10

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presentation about the crawford county, WI farm-to-school program given to the Prairie du Chien school board - Feb 1, 2010

presentation about the crawford county, WI farm-to-school program given to the Prairie du Chien school board - Feb 1, 2010

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  • Introduction: Self, history of my involvement (where I’m coming from….farmer, parent, advocate). WHL – Farm to School Initiative based in Madison, WI. Joint project of REAP Food Group and CIAS. Focus was Madison Metropolitan School District 2002-2006, 2007+ beginning to branch out to other school districts.
  • Farm to School Nationwide Existing programs in 400 school districts in 23 states What is Farm to School? Accomplish goal #1 by introducing students to the process of growing food: a) Food Education Activities: farm trips, meet-the-farmer days, classroom activities, gardening, composting food waste b) Eating opportunities in cafeteria and classrooms Accomplish #2 by: a) Schools purchase produce and other foods from local growers/businesses b) Serve fresh (i.e. salad bar, snacks) or integrate into menu items (i.e. muffins, tortilla wraps, rice pilaf, chili, soups) Farm to School takes many different forms in the more than 400 school districts nationwide who have projects **Michigan – some school districts purchasing as a group from apple growers on opposite side of state in order to get a large enough delivery arranged
  • There are some alarming trends that are harming our children’s health and their ability to learn and do well in school. For example: Diets are falling short of the mark— 1. Only 2 percent of children actually meet the recommendations of the Food Guide Pyramid 2 Less than 15 percent of school children eat the recommended servings of fruit 3. Teenagers today drink twice as much carbonated soda as milk Childhood obesity is recognized as a national epidemic. The percentage of young people who are overweight has more than doubled since 1970. The 2003-04 National Survey of Children’s Health reports that 13.5% of Wisconsin children ages 10 – 17 are overweight, resulting in a state rank of 28 th in nation. The 2005 Wisconsin Youth Risk Behavior Survey states that 24% of all (high school) students are at risk for becoming overweight or are overweight according to their Body Mass Index. Too many children are physically inactive: nearly half of young people ages 12-21 do not engage in physical activity on a regular basis As many as 30,000 children have Type 2 diabetes, a type of diabetes that was once almost entirely limited to adults and hence used to be named ‘adult onset diabetes.’
  • Each dollar spent locally creates an economic benefit of $3-5 as it gets recirculated in the local economy. Locally purchased foods are often fresher than their counterparts traveling longer distances. This can result in better flavor and more choices in varieties as well. Food traveling 10-100 miles vs. 1,500-2,500 miles to get to our plates reduces the carbon footprint substantially. Choosing to purchase from growers using sustainable growing practices (such as organic producers or those utilizing Integrated Pest Management practices, crop rotations, etc..) can minimize risks for chemical contamination of food, soil, and waterways. Schools (and other institutions such as hospitals, colleges, nursing homes, etc..) can become a reliable market for producers given their consistent needs for product.
  • Dealing with school food is a complex issue. The more pieces of the pie you have engaged the better.
  • School fundraisers are a great way to integrate farm-to-school programming. See a full listing of fundraiser items and order form at our website: www.reapfoodgroup.org/farmtoschool, click ‘school fundraiser.’ Over $18,500 in total sales among 8 participating Madison schools in ‘06. 12 schools participating in 2007.
  • Educational component of WHL has been very successful in gaining support of teachers and parents and getting students excited about trying new foods. Tastings are one way we’ve introduced new foods in a fun atmosphere.
  • trying
  • Educational component of WHL has been very successful in gaining support of teachers and parents and getting students excited about trying new foods. Tastings are one way we’ve introduced new foods in a fun atmosphere.
  • Educational component of WHL has been very successful in gaining support of teachers and parents and getting students excited about trying new foods. Tastings are one way we’ve introduced new foods in a fun atmosphere.
  • Educational component of WHL has been very successful in gaining support of teachers and parents and getting students excited about trying new foods. Tastings are one way we’ve introduced new foods in a fun atmosphere.
  • Educational component of WHL has been very successful in gaining support of teachers and parents and getting students excited about trying new foods. Tastings are one way we’ve introduced new foods in a fun atmosphere.
  • trying
  • trying

PdC School Board Farm to School 1 1 10 PdC School Board Farm to School 1 1 10 Presentation Transcript

  • Farm to School “Linking the Land with the Lunchroom”
  • Farm to School Programs
    • Primary Goals :
      • Improve student diets by increasing offerings of fresh fruits and vegetables in school
      • Support local farms by creating additional markets for their products
    • Takes many forms:
      • School gardens – learning & eating
      • Food education in the classroom
      • Field trips to gardens and farms
      • School purchase foods direct from farms for special events, snacks, meals
      • Weekly snacks
  • Children’s Health: Alarming Trends
    • Diets are falling short of the mark
    • Obesity rates are skyrocketing
    • Desirable physical activity levels are not being met
    • Adult diseases are showing up in children
  • Benefits Of Farm to School Projects
    • Increases quality food for students
    • Supports local farmers, local community, & local economy (positive public relations)
    • Lowers environmental impacts
  • Food Service Staff, size, budgeting, operations, rate of participation Suppliers Local farmers, food processors, distributors Project Coordination Funding Community Support Parents, volunteers Schools Administration, teachers, students, school board Climate Seasonal and Political
    • Fall 2007- Met with PdC Admin Team to introduce the idea
    • Met with key people including food service staff, parents, teachers, farmers
    • Spring 2008: Formed “Food-4-Thought” committee at B.A. Kennedy
    Farm to School in Crawford County
    • Core group of 10 people
    • Created 2 year workplan
    • Applied for and was awarded 2 Americorps volunteers for 2008-2009 school year and then again for the 2009-2010 to work thoughtout the County
    • - Nutrition educator
    • - Food procurement
    B.A. Kennedy Food-4-Thought
    • Wauzeka-Steuben - Formed spring 2009 with the local foods in the cafeteria and classroom lessons
    • Seneca – Began 1/10 with harvest of the month in the cafeteria and plans to add classroom lesson
    • Countywide oversight committee – Formed fall 2009 with representation from each school
    Countywide Food-4-Thought Expansion
    • Local procurement through the cafeteria when possible
    • Harvest of the Month
      • Classroom lessons
      • Local food in the cafeteria
    • B.A. Kennedy Snack
      • Healthy snack every Tuesday and Friday
    • School Garden at B.A.Kennedy
    Food-4-Thought
    • For the 2008-2009 school year almost $18,000 was donated or raised for the program (not counting the snack program)
    • Already in the 2009-2010 school year, over 50 volunteers have helped with the program for a total of over 225 hours
    Community Support/Involvement
  • Community Donations
  • Local Melons at BA Kennedy Students gobbled up watermelon and cantaloupe from local farmers in September “ It was nice to have fresh fruit”
  • Sourcing Shihata’s Apples
  • September – Apples
  • October 2009 - Pumpkin & Their Kin
  • Wauzeka October Features
    • Roasted garden veggies – zucchini, potatoes, carrots, peppers & onions
    • Gyros with cucumber sauce for a Greek theme lunch
    • Assorted baked squash
    • Butternut squash soup
    • Pumpkin soup
  • Pumpkin Soup Students are served soup from a pumpkin for Halloween “ The soup was awesome!!”
  • November 2009 & 2010 – Succotash & Cranberries – Historical Significant
  • Cranberries Tasty, Sweet Harvest from bog They are very tart Fruit  Drake Coleman 3rd Grade Bluffview   January 09 – Cranberries & Wetland Eco- Systems
  • January 2010 – Root vegetables
  • February 09 – Potatoes
  • March 09 – Goat Farming & Cheese Making
  • April 09 – Bees & Pollination
  • Grass Fed Beef Students gobbled up local grass fed burgers and visit with the farmer “ This was the best burger ever!”
  • BA Kennedy Snack Program – 2009-2010
    • Goal - Provide Kindergarten – 2 nd grade students with a fresh, local, healthy snack every Tuesday and Friday
    • Funding – Parents pay $10 per semester
    • Logistics
      • Food Service Director, Donna Heilmann sources and preps the food through the food service
      • Snacks are placed in a designated fridge in the teacher workroom for the teacher to pick up
      • Parent volunteers help as needed
  • Benefits of a School Garden
    • Provides a context for understanding seasons and life cycles.
    • Creates an opportunity to work cooperatively and teach the value of meaningful work.
    • Improves nutrition and highlights healthy foods.
    • Demonstrates where food really comes from.
    • Encourages students to try new things including foods they may not eat at home.
    • Reinforces classroom curriculum across many subject areas.
    • Encourages community involvement – neighbors, volunteers, parents, community businesses, and service organizations.
    • Teaches life skills.
    • Improves aesthetics around the school.
    • Gardens build a sense of pride, ownership, and accomplishment .
  • B.A. Kennedy School Garden from green space to growing space
  • Planting!
  • More Planting!
  • 4H Summer Partnership
  • All Done!
  • Harvest Hootenanny
    • The harvest of the month program impacts over 900 students in Crawford County per month
    • Over 250 children at B.A. Kennedy receive a healthy snack 2 times a week every week - & they love it
    • B.A. Kennedy student have a garden which provides snacks, education, exploration and fun
    • Already this school year, over 1000 lb of produce has been purchased locally for the schools
    • The food service directors say that they have seen an increase in the amount of fruits and vegetables the children are eat during lunch because of the program
    Impact
  • Tony Evers, State Superintendent, has chosen our Food -4-Thought program to receive the “Standing up for Rural Wisconsin” award to be given Feb. 22 in Madison