Sp teaching programs pp prue

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Prue Greene's presentation on the new English Syllabus in the NSW version of the National Curriculum

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  • The ACARA content is in the NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum English K-10 document verbatim. It is identified by a code (as shown on the slide above).The Australian Curriculum is written in years and NSW works in stages. The NSW Board of Studies got permission to merge some of the Australian Curriculum in to the one content point if the content was almost the same within the two years of a stage.NSW teachers need only use the NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum as it contains all the ACARA content.
  • Click to animate – use the time between each animation for discussion.NSW syllabuses will continue to have stage-based outcomes and content.The seven general capabilities and three cross-curriculum priorities of the Australian Curriculum have been embedded in the new content of the NSW syllabuses as 13 Learning across the curriculum areas, as appropriate to individual learning areas. The 13 areas are largely based on those currently in all BOS syllabuses.
  • General messages
  • Important pages of document.
  • This slide shows the mode-specific outcomes in K-6.
  • In primary school communicating and shaping meaning is broken down in to incremental steps, which reflects the needs and way in which students learn.In stages 4 and 5 the critical thinking skills are broken in to smaller pieces as students now have the communicative skills to more deeply explore critical thinking in English.
  • The Board has attempted to create a stronger sense of a continuum of English learning K-10.The key verbs used at the start of content points seem to suggest the sequential nature of learning.
  • The purpose of this diagram is to show “the integrated relationship between objectives, learning outcomes and key processes” in the English syllabus. At the very centre of learning in English K-10 is the concept of making meaning through language. Students make meaning of texts they read, listen to and view; they also make meaning through their own writing, speaking and representing (or creating texts with visual content). “Responding and composing” have been given their own circle as they are the most important processes in English – they cover all the modes of communication. Responding refers to reading, listening and viewing. Composing refers to writing, speaking and representing. The next circle moving outwards shows three other key processes that may be considered to be aspects of responding and composing – indeed, they represent the personal, social and linguistic aspects of responding and composing. The key processes are used as organisers of content throughout the syllabus K-10.The next three circles represent the outcomes and objectives. It may be helpful to check out the ‘values and attitudes’ objectives on page 14 of the syllabus.
  • This slide shows that there have been relatively few changes in the objectives for 7-10.
  • These processes are key to the study of English.In ES1-S3 within certain outcomesthey change and develop according to the learning needs of the students.
  • Typical 7-10 content page. Note the only significant structural difference is that the outcomes in 7-10 are not give descriptors or labels as they are in K-6. One possible reason for not providing descriptors in 7-10 is that the outcomes tend to be more generic and cannot be easily labelled. Another difference between K-6 and 7-10 content pages is that the Life Skills outcomes only relate to 7-10.
  • Typical 7-10 content page (continued).
  • The overall structure of the syllabus is familiar to secondary English teachers but the content is no longer organised by ‘learn to’ and ‘learn abouts’ and therefore not a an easy and immediate cross-over.
  • Discuss photo: have English teachers changed in 46 years? How well do we cope as a profession with big changes, like new syllabuses?
  • This is a cross-curriculum priority from the AC, now a learning across the curriculum area in NSW syllabuses.What are the implications for English?
  • While our current syllabuses have quite a strong focus on ATSI histories and cultures, the particular concepts mentioned here provide an opportunity for renewed focus.
  • ES1 example of the content that is tagged as ‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures’ from learning across the curriculum.
  • This is the first time that NSW teachers have been required to teach content about the English language – about its evolution through history and its importance in the world today.
  • The draft syllabus identifies EAD students as a group, but provides no guidelines on how they should be taught.The ESL scaleshave been developed on the basis of four assumptions:That the acquisition of English is a precondition for successful schooling in Australia for students whose first language is not English.That the English language starting point for ESL learners is different from that of students from English-speaking background. That ESL learners' points of entry to Australian schools differ from those of Australian-born students from English-speaking backgrounds.That ESL students' patterns of development in listening, speaking, reading and writing differ significantly from those of students from English backgrounds.
  • Much of the grammar in AC: English is covered in the English K-6 Syllabus, e.g. the Stage 2 content description about subject and verb agreement is actually in Stage 1 in the K-6 syllabus. However, some primary teachers may have difficulties with the teaching of grammar – lack of exposure to grammar in their own schooling and possibly even their teacher training.
  • Grammar will definitely be a challenge for most secondary teachers – for all the reasons why it might be problematic for primary teachers, plus there is little explicit reference to the teaching of grammar in the NSW 7-10 syllabus.
  • The explicit focus on comprehension strategies provides a strong validation of the approach taken in FoR 3-6. Does the fact that comprehension strategies are still a focus in Stages 4 and 5 strengthen the argument for extending FoR 3-6 into high school?
  • The current English K-6 Syllabus includes the requirement to teach literature, but the AC: English content provides more detail about what is required and emphasises that the study of literature, not just the experience of literature, starts from Kindergarten.
  • Representing is a term not used in the current English K-6 Syllabus. There are some references to viewing under Reading and to what secondary teachers would call representing under Writing, but this is not a strong feature. The very organisational structure of the current English K-6 Syllabus indicates that viewing and representing are not given as much priority as other modes. Technology has progressed significantly since the English K-6 Syllabus was first written, so it is not surprising that multimodal texts now need to be given greater attention. The focus on representing and viewing, visual and multimodal texts is much stronger in the current 7-10 syllabus, but some secondary teachers may be still lacking confidence in this aspect of English.
  • Punctuation is mentioned in the current 7-10 syllabus but not given as much specific attention as this.
  • So too with spelling.
  • In the past secondary English teachers have assumed that handwriting was taught only in primary school. The AC: English content description for Stage 4 suggests that they share this responsibility.
  • What are the conventions for citing? Is there value in standardising this for NSW, or DEC at least? Does citing and referencing differ across subjects?
  • Sp teaching programs pp prue

    1. 1. New NSW English Syllabus K-12Prue Greene, Senior Curriculum Support Officer English K-12 The English and Literacy team, CLIC NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    2. 2. Implementation timelines NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    3. 3. ACARA and the NSW curriculumHow does the Australian Curriculum English work the NSWSyllabus for the Australian curriculum English K-10 ?• The NSW BOS has written a syllabus for the Australian curriculum.• This document contains all the ACARA content.• The content is coded and identified.• (ACELA1437) or (ACELY1663, ACELY1673) or (ACELT1586) • ACELA = Australian Curriculum: English – Language • ACELT = Australian Curriculum: English – Literature • ACELY = Australian Curriculum: English – Literacy NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    4. 4. Designing the NSW SyllabusesAustralian Curriculum New NSW syllabuses(ACARA) (Board of Studies NSW)Year-based content Stage-based outcomes and contentGeneral Learning across thecapabilities, cross- curriculum areascurriculum priorities embedded in content as appropriate to individual learning areas NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    5. 5. Key messages
    6. 6. Key messages English K-10Content and Pedagogy• Multimodal outcomes• New content, represents a pedagogical shift, reflecting, imagining and expressing• Imaginative, informative and persuasive texts• Digital content has caught up with the 21st century.• Visual literacy explicitly taught• Text requirements for each year and stage• Bigger emphasis on literary texts• K-10 syllabus bridges the divide between S3 and S4 and serves to inform teachers of learning both prior and beyond a stage• The new K-10 syllabus includes much similar content to the current K-6 and 7-10 syllabus documents NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    7. 7. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    8. 8. Speaking and listeningWriting and representingReading and viewingSpeaking and listeningWriting and representingReading and viewing NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    9. 9. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    10. 10. The sequential nature of learning across stages Stage 1 Demonstrate Stage 2 Recognise Respond Uses Stage 3 Plans Composes Compares Stage 4 Identifies Thinks Discusses imaginatively, creatively Responds to and critically Stage 5 Effectively uses a wide range of processes Critically assesses and Demonstrates adapts understanding of a Describes and explains broadening world effect Investigates relationships between and among texts Evaluates NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    11. 11. Aims and structure NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    12. 12. Objectives Current syllabus A communicate through speaking, listening, readin g, writing, viewing and representing B use language to shape and make meaning according to purpose, audience and context C think in ways that are imaginative, creative, interpretive and critical D express themselves and their relationships with others and their world E learn and reflect on their learning through their study of English NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    13. 13. Objectives Stage 4 Outcomes New syllabus Stage 4 OutcomesThrough responding to and composing a wide range oftexts in context and through close study of texts,students will develop skills, knowledge and Current Newunderstanding in order to: A student: A student: 1 responds to and composes texts for understanding, EN4-1A responds to and composes texts for interpretation, critical analysis and pleasure understanding, interpretation, critical analysis and A communicate through pleasure speaking, listening, reading, speak, listen, read, write, view and represent 2 uses a range of processes for responding to and EN4-2A effectively uses a widening range of processes, writing, viewing and composing texts skills, strategies and knowledge for responding to and representing composing texts in different media and technologies 3 responds to and composes texts in different technologies 4 uses and describes language forms and features, and EN4-3B uses and describes language forms and features, B use language to shape structures of texts appropriate to different purposes, audiences and contexts and structures of texts appropriate to different purposes, audiences and contexts and make meaning use language and communicate appropriately and effectively to according 5 makes informed language choices to shape meaning EN4-4B makes effective language choices to creatively purpose, audience and with accuracy, clarity and coherence shape meaning with accuracy, clarity and coherence context 6 draws on experience, information and ideas to EN4-5C thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and imaginatively and interpretively respond to and critically about information, ideas, and arguments to compose texts respond to and compose texts C think in ways that are think in ways that are imaginative, interpretive 7 thinks critically and interpretively about information, imaginative, creative, inter and critical ideas and arguments to respond to and compose texts pretive and critical 8 makes connections between and among texts EN4-6C identifies and explains connections between and among texts D express themselves express themselves and their relationships with 9 demonstrates understanding that texts express views of their broadening world and their relationships within it EN4-7D demonstrates understanding of how texts can express aspects of their broadening world and their relationships within it and their relationships with others and the world others and their world 10 identifies, considers and appreciates cultural EN4-8D identifies, considers and appreciates cultural expression in texts expression in texts learn and reflect on their learning through their 11 uses, reflects on and assesses individual and EN4-9E uses, reflects on, assesses and adapts their study of English. collaborative skills for learning. individual and collaborative skills for learning E learn and reflect on their learning through their study of English NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    14. 14. Content organisers - Key processes Engaging personally with texts Developing and applying contextual knowledge Understanding and applying knowledge about language forms and features Respond to and compose texts NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    15. 15. Life Skills Outcome outcome added (Stages 4&5) Link to Australian Curriculum Content isorganised by key processes (Content organisers) Learning Across the Curriculum reference NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    16. 16. ESL Scaleslinked to each Outcome NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    17. 17. Content? NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    18. 18. What aspects of AC:English contentmight be new/challenging to teachers? Photo (taken in 1966) belonging to Kevin Dooley, available for free use through Creative Commons NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    19. 19. K-10Focus on Asia• Asia and Australia’s relationship with Asia is a learning across the curriculum area in the draft syllabus.• Content and text requirements include texts that provide insights about the peoples and cultures of Asia• Explicit references to Asia in content are limited, but many opportunities. • e.g. Stage 1: Students respond to texts from a range of cultures and experiences (11D).• Some other considerations: • Place of Asian languages in Australia • Cultural sensitivity to Asia in communication. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    20. 20. K-10Understanding ATSI cultures• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures is a learning across the curriculum area in the draft syllabus - includes the concepts of Country and Place, People, Culture and Identity.• Some considerations: • Texts about ATSI histories and cultures • Texts written by ATSI people • Place of Aboriginal languages and dialects in Australia • Cultural sensitivity to ATSI people in communication• Some references to ATSI cultures in NSW content, but many opportunities in content derived from AC: • e.g. Stage 5: Students compare and evaluate a range of representations of individuals and groups in different historical, social and cultural contexts (8D). NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    21. 21. K-10Understanding ATSI cultures content K-6ES1use opportunities to write begin to identify some engage with andin their home language language features of appreciate theand dialect and make familiar spoken texts imaginative use ofbasic connections with (ENe-6B) language throughEnglish, including storytelling (ENe-10C)Aboriginal languages andAboriginal English (ENe-2A) NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    22. 22. K-10Appreciating the English language• e.g. Stage 2: Students: Understand that languages have different written and visual communication systems, different oral traditions and different ways of constructing meaning (1A) • Understand that Standard Australian English is one of many social dialects used in Australia, and that while it originated in England it has been influenced by many other languages (1A). NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    23. 23. K-10Appreciating the English language• e.g. Stage 4: Students: • Understand the influence and impact that the English language has had on other languages or dialects and how English has been influenced in return (4B) • Analyse and explain how language has evolved over time and how technology and the media have influenced language use and forms of communication (2A). NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    24. 24. K-10Catering for EAL/D students• EAL = English as an Additional Language = ESL EAD = English as an Additional Dialect• ESL scales should be used to support teaching of EAL students Level statement Outcome statementsThe structure of the ESL scales:The strandsOral Interaction (listening and speaking)Reading and RespondingWriting.The strand organisersCommunicationLanguage and cultural understandingLanguage structures and featuresStrategiesPointers, Language examplesshow the teacher what to look for in deciding whether an outcomehas been achieved. They are not a checklist of required achievementsEg; Uses some common courtesy and situational formulae(Good morning, Excuse me, Very good’, Finished’,) NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    25. 25. K-10Grammar• e.g. Stage 1: Students use subject-verb and noun- pronoun agreement when composing texts and responding to texts orally and in writing (6B).• e.g. Stage 2: Students understand that a clause is a unit of meaning usually containing a subject and a verb and that these need to be in agreement (6B).• e.g. Stage 3: Students understand the difference between main and subordinate clauses and that a complex sentence involves at least one subordinate clause (6B). NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    26. 26. K-10Grammar• e.g. Stage 4: Students analyse and examine how effective authors control and use a variety of clause structures, including embedded clauses (3B).• e.g. Stage 5: Students: • Analyse and evaluate the effectiveness of a wide range of clause and sentence structures as authors design and craft texts (3B) • Understand how certain abstract nouns can be used to summarise preceding or subsequent stretches of texts (3B) • Understand how higher order concepts are developed in complex texts through language features including nominalisation, apposition and embedding of clauses (3B). NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    27. 27. K-10Comprehension strategies• e.g. Stage 2: Students use comprehension strategies to build literal and inferred meaning and begin to evaluate texts by drawing on growing knowledge of context, text structures and language features• e.g. Stage 3: Students use comprehension strategies to interpret and analyse information, integrating and linking ideas from a variety of print and digital sources• e.g. Stage 4: Students use comprehension strategies to interpret, analyse and synthesise ideas and information, critiquing ideas and issues from a variety of textual sources• e.g. Stage 5: Students use comprehension strategies to compare and contrast information within and between texts, identifying and analysing embedded perspectives, and evaluating supporting evidence NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    28. 28. K-6Study of literature• e.g. Early Stage 1: Students: • Share feelings and thoughts about the events and characters in texts • Recognise some different types of literary texts and identify some characteristic features of literary texts• e.g. Stage 3: Students: • Use metalanguage to describe the effects of ideas, text structures and language features on particular audiences • Present a point of view about particular literary texts using appropriate metalanguage, and reflecting on the viewpoints of others NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    29. 29. K-6Visual and multimodal texts• e.g. Stage 1: Students construct texts that incorporate supporting images using software, including word processing programs• e.g. Stage 2: Students use a range of software including word processing programs to construct, edit and publish written text, and select, edit and place visual, print and audio features• e.g. Stage 3: Students use a range of software including word processing programs with fluency to construct, edit and publish written text, and select, edit and place visual, print and audio features• Working across the modes may be a challenge for some K-6 teachers. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    30. 30. 7-10Punctuation• e.g. Stage 4: Students: • Understand the use of punctuation conventions, including colons, semicolons, dashes and brackets in formal and informal texts • Understand the use of punctuation to support meaning in complex sentences with prepositional phrases and embedded clauses• e.g. Stage 5: Students: • Understand how punctuation is used along with layout and font variations in constructing texts for different audiences and purposes NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    31. 31. 7-10Spelling• e.g. Stage 4: • Students understand how to use spelling rules and word origins, for example Greek and Latin roots, base words, suffixes, prefixes, spelling patterns and generalisations to learn new words and how to spell them• e.g. Stage 5: • Students understand how to use knowledge of the spelling system to spell unusual and technical words accurately, for example those based on uncommon Greek and Latin roots NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    32. 32. 7-10Handwriting• e.g. Stage 4: • Students consolidate a personal handwriting style that is legible, fluent and automatic and supports writing for extended periods NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    33. 33. 7-10Citing and Referencing• e.g. Stage 4: • Students understand conventions for citing others, and how to reference these in different ways NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    34. 34. Key concepts – syllabus threads 7-10 Aestheticism Hybridity/subversion Appreciation Imagery Appropriation Interconnectedness Artistry/craft Interpretation Characterisation Intertextuality Communication Narrative voice Contextualisation Perspective/point of view Creativity Persuasion Cultural heritage Representation Cultural perspective Reflection Cultural representation Rhetoric Cultural identity Stagecraft Genre Transformation Voice NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    35. 35. DEC support NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    36. 36. Resources NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    37. 37. Courses NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre

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