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Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
Nsw curriculum history
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Nsw curriculum history

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  • The BOS will be giving further advice on the implementation of Maths and Science in particular, noting the disjointed nature of implementation K-6 ≠ 7-10.
  • Filter content
  • The planning of integrated learning units
  • NSW public schools will be provided with additional support to implement the new syllabuses for the Australian Curriculum. Additional funding of $22.8 million ($13.7 million for the 2012/13 financial year and $9.1 million for 2013/14) has been allocated to support public schools in planning for the introduction of the new syllabuses.   The Department’s implementation support strategy focuses on building teacher and principal capacity and will facilitate school-level curriculum planning and decision making. There are four elements to the support strategy: expert policy support and curriculum advice for schools; online access to registered professional learning courses, teaching and learning materials and social media tools to encourage collegial networks; enhanced school funding for professional learning; and following advice from the Board of Studies, and agreed by me, the NSW Government has determined that an additional School Development Day will be provided for all teachers in NSW public schools on Tuesday 30 April 2013. E-mail (16/10/1012) Dr Michele Bruniges AM DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF EDUCATION AND COMMUNITIES MANAGING DIRECTOR OF TAFE NSW  
  • High quality, registered professional learning courses provided by NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre 37 new courses in development for flexible delivery, facilitated by regions or schools The learner and the new curriculum (2 hours) Teaching for the new curriculum (2 hours) Your school and the new syllabuses (8 courses: K-6 and 7-10 for English, mathematics, science and history) (5 hours) Programming fro quality teaching and assessing (time to be finalised)
  • The easiest way to get there.
  • Parent – texting student absences, booking parent teacher interviews via a ticketing website based in Melbourne, students would be uploading vodcasts for HSC assessment via a server in Launceston and having fun with voice-overs in the creation of machinema films, let alone the fact that when I send handouts to the photocopier via a company from New York. It’s a long way from Funk and Wagnall's encyclopaedia and the Commodor 64 computer.
  • Need to stress that it is NOT a step-by-step guide in how to write a program.
  • This is to come….
  • 10 hour course, and what the course will explore.
  • Decisions to be made throughout the school structure. Processes and practices are critical and not just the products. Not just a focus on the document. It’s what happens in the classroom … *Differentiating for teachers
  • Guy Claxton’s research on the learning powered school See curriculum programming and planning p4 Pre-data Learning relationships Progression of learning – next slide
  • Explicit quality criteria Engagement Social support Students’ self-regulation Student direction
  • PHOTO!
  • The year based Australian curriculum content has been organised into stages, which include outcomes and stage statements. The Australian curriculum general capabilities and cross-curriculum priorities have been developed into cross-curriculum areas that have been identified.
  • All teachers have a responsibility to teach the syllabus requirements to students in each stage of learning K-10. With a K-10 syllabus the transition of knowledge, understanding and skills from Stage 3 to Stage 4 and again from Stage 5 to Stage 6 learning is now clearly described using a consistent syllabus structure and description of content. This means that the description of K-6 learning can now be clearly understood by teachers of Years 7-10 and vice a versus. The syllabus also supports teachers of stages 4 and 5 to develop a meaningful pathway of learning, with consideration given to the development of substantial historical learning for all students that provides significant support for those wishing to undertake Stage 6 history.
  • The seven General capabilities and three Cross-curriculum priorities of the Australian Curriculum have been embedded in the new content of the NSW syllabuses as 13 Cross-curriculum Areas, as appropriate to individual Learning Areas at this time. The 13 cross curriculum areas are largely based on those currently in all BOS syllabuses. For a full description of each priority for history go to: http://news.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/index.cfm/2012/11/12/Learning-across-the-curriculum. Learning across the curriculum is found on pages 31-33 of the hard copy volume 2 for 7-10 and pages 29- 31 of the pdf version.
  • Stage statements are new for secondary teachers. Stage statements have been a feature of K-6 syllabuses for many years. The stage statements, along with the syllabus outcomes incorporate the Australian Curriculum achievement standards. This means that NSW teachers can assess and report on student achievement against the syllabus outcomes. The stage statements are useful statements to gauge student progress throughout a stage of learning and can often provide a reference for report comments.
  • The inclusion of Key Historical Concepts is an inclusion in the Australian curriculum that is emphasised in the NSW History syllabus. Specific key historical concepts are described for each stage of learning K-10. The concepts provide a description of students level of engagement with the content at each stage. The historical concepts integrate with historical skills and knowledge and understanding and provide an important description of students understanding of history for teachers. A continuum of concepts is available at: http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/assets/global/files/history_continuum.pdf refer to page 2 of this 3 page document.
  • Specific listed historical skills are described for each stage of learning K-10. The skills provide a description of students level of engagement with the historical inquiry process for each stage. The historical skills integrate with historical concepts, knowledge and understanding. A continuum of skills is available at: http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/assets/global/files/history_continuum.pdf refer to page 3 of this 3 page document.
  • This diagram is sourced from the syllabus and shows the relationship between key historical concepts and skills and the specific themes / time periods used in the syllabus to organise the content.
  • The common format and K-10 pdf / online versions of the syllabus allow secondary teachers to read and understand the students learning K-6, particularly for Stage 3. The stage statements provide a concise summary of what students are expected to achieve by the end of each stage.
  • The HSIE K-6 syllabus has 4 content strand organisers: Change and continuity; Cultures; Environments and Social Systems and Structures. For the first time, primary teachers have a separate History syllabus which the BOS advises replaces only the Change and continuity strand.
  • History implementation K-6 is delayed to enable primary teachers to implement both History and Geography at the same time. However the knowledge and understanding of students in going into Year 7 is still substantial as all students have engaged with the clear descriptions of history in the HSIE K-6 Change and continuity strand.
  • Early Stage 1 Personal and family history is about a students own history and that of their family. Stage 1 Present and past family life is about similarities and difference in family life, past and present The Past and in the present is about changes and continuities in the local area Stage 2 Community and remembrance is about identity and diversity in local and national communities First contacts is about world exploration and British settlement of Australia Stage 3 The Australian colonies is about development of Australia as a nation Australia as a nation is about the development of Australian democracy.
  • The 4 historical periods described in the syllabus overviews provide a clear chronological structure to student learning 7-10. Stage 4 - The ancient world (approx. 60,000BC – c. AD 650) and The ancient to the modern world (c. AD 650 – c. 1750) Stage 5 - The making of the modern world (1750 – 1945) and The modern world and Australia (1945 to present) The chronological structure supports both teachers and students to understand the interconnection of world events on specific timeframes and the opportunity to study selected aspects in detail.
  • As with the current syllabus, all students must undertake a site study which may, if appropriate be a virtual site study.
  • The overview content identifies important features of the historical period at the relevant year level and provides an expansive chronology that helps students understand broad patterns of historical change. Overviews are approximately 10% of teaching time. Overview content may be integrated in ways appropriate to the specific local context; and it may be integrated with the content of other depth-study selected topic. The order and detail in which content is taught is a school based planning and programming decision which needs to be done in a considered and informed manner.
  • There are six depth studies described for both Stage 4 and Stage 5. The content in each topic is designed to allow detailed study of specific aspects of the historical period. Learning for each of the two historical periods included in each of Stage 4 and Stage 5 includes an overview and three depth studies, with up to four topics to select from in each depth study. For Stage 4 a topic needs to be selected from each depth study. While in Stage 5 there are 2 core study – depth studies that are mandatory, of the remaining 4 depth studies, only 2 need to be selected at a minimum. Note that selected outcomes are aligned to depth studies, where all topics for each depth study references the same outcomes. However all outcomes are addressed in each stage regardless of depth study topics chosen. Note that all Stage 5 outcomes are covered in the 2 mandatory core studies. This then enables considerable flexibility in the selection of the specific depth study topics to meet the interests and learning needs of students.
  • Stage 4 has two parts, each with 50 hours minimum teaching time. Note the progressive chronology used from Year 7 to Year 8.
  • In Stage 4 students study a range of depth studies from the ancient times to the beginning of the modern period. Depth Study 1- Investigating the Ancient Past . The role of the historian and archaeologist, and the different approaches to investigating history are closely examined. This depth study has many aspects of the current NSW History syllabus Depth Studies 2 and 3 provide students with an opportunity to study a range of societies and civilisations from the past, with an in-depth study of one society e.g. Egypt or Greece, or China or India. Depth Studies 2 and 3 have some aspects the current NSW History Syllabus Topic 2 Societies and Civilisation of the Past . These depth studies provide great scope for student interest and engagement and local knowledge can be applied where applicable. Note that there is no specific time allocated to each depth study, e.g. teachers may plan and program to include the overview in depth study 1, support depth study 2 with a some brief intense teaching and then explore depth study 3 in more detail using a teacher directed and support inquiry process.
  • The second part of Stage 4 is The Ancient to the Modern World . Teachers can select a range of options contained within the three Depth Studies. In Depth Study 4 the options of Vikings or the Renaissance will be familiar to teachers. The Ottoman Empire is a new and engaging option. This may be a topic that is already available included in the schools elective history course. Consideration can be given to moving this course to the mandatory history course. It is not possible to include this topic in both courses without change, if the topic is addressed in a substantially different manner, such as different timeframes / events and individuals then the topic could remain in the elective history course. In Depth Study 5 and 6, new and engaging options such as Angkor and the Khmer Empire and Polynesian Expansion will allow teachers to enhance student engagement. In Depth Study 6, both the Black Death in Asia, Europe and Africa and the Spanish Conquest of the Americas will have aspects that are familiar to NSW teachers. Careful consideration needs to be given to planning a meaningful pattern of study through the depth study topics e.g. south-east Asian options, east Asian options, Europe / American / Pacific options are just some of the pathway choices available.
  • Stage 5 has two areas of learning, Making of the Modern World and The Modern World and Australia . Unlike the current syllabus which identifies 100 indicative hours in Stage 5 with no time allocated to individual topics, the syllabus identifies 50 hours for each part. The time allocation is a minimum. The history of Australia is investigated as part of events and themes of the world at the time. The Modern World and Australia has a stronger focus on Australian History and less on World History. The Core studies from each time frame are mandatory teaching, however teachers can select at least 2 of the other 4 Depth Studies, including the option to develop a school identified topic for Depth Study 6 taken from an aspect from either of the Stage 5 overviews. This provides considerable scope to engage students in rigorous historical inquiry.
  • The Making of the Modern World sees significant change from the current NSW syllabus. This starts from 1750, the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. A World History approach is adopted. There is a clear focus on Industrialization, Nationalism, Imperialism, and colonisation and their effects on Australia. Students study the World Wars, their causes, course, and consequences with a particular emphasis on Australia, Gallipoli and the birth of the Anzac legend. Teachers will find most of these topics familiar, and many resources currently exist to support programming and teaching these Depth Studies.
  • Stage 5 The Modern World and Australia presents teachers with a great deal of scope to engage and to gain knowledge of the transformation of the modern world during a time of political turmoil, global conflict and international cooperation. These Depth Studies also provide students with a necessary context for understanding Australia's development, its place within the Asia-Pacific region, and its global standing. Rights and Freedoms are also studied with a close link to the broader Civil Rights Movements. Depth study 5 The Globalising World provides a basis for study of the Modern World and the social and cultural history of post war Australia. Students investigate in depth one major global influence that has shaped Australian society from Popular Culture, or The Environment Movement OR Migration Experience. Teachers will find familiarity between this Depth Study and current NSW History syllabus Stage 5 Topic 7 People Power and Politics and Topic 8 Australia’s Social and Cultural History in the Post War Period .
  • Stage 5, Depth Study 6 provides significant opportunities for a school developed topic. Depth study 6 topics can be identified from either of the stage 5 overviews. A number of suggestions are provided in the syllabus at the end of Stage 5 http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/hsie/history-k10/content/1044/
  • However the syllabus topics are very broad and a focus needs to be identified – some examples.
  • The implementation timeline is described in the memorandum available at: http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/australian-curriculum/pdf_doc/120731-memo-to-principals-update-on-ac-implementation.pdf
  • Refer to page 30 of the hard copy syllabus Refer to page 28 of the pdf syllabus dowload Refer to http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/hsie/history-k10/content-for-stages-and-site-studies/ Note that the syllabus states that the topics chosen in the Elective History course must not overlap or duplicate significantly any of the topics select from the History K-10 syllabus.
  • Curriculum requirements for students with special needs http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/curriculum-requirements/ Life skills outcomes at: http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/life-skills-outcomes/ Life skills content at: http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/life-skills-content-nav/ Explanation of adjustments at: http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/adjustments/ Advice about assessment and reporting at: http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/assessment-and-reporting/
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Australian Curriculum in NSW public schoolsSupporting the implementation of new syllabuses and History K-10 Anne Southwell HSIE Advisor Early Learning and Primary Education Directorate
    • 2. Outline1. Time-lines for implementation2. Implementation support3. The opportunities – reaching into the professional learning courses a) Planning and programming b) High expectations c) Differentiation d) Assessment4. History K-65. History 7-10 NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 3. Timeline for implementation K- 6 2013 2014 2015 2016English Implementation Implementation Implementation Planning andMathematics professional Optional Implementation Implementation learningScience and Optional Implementation ImplementationTechnologyHistory Optional Optional Implementation NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 4. Timeline for implementation 7-10 2013 2014 2015 2016English Implementation Implementation Implementation Years 7and 9 Years 8 and 10Mathematics Planning and Implementation Implementation Implementation professional Years 7and 9 Years 8 and 10 learningScience Implementation Implementation Implementation Years 7and 9 Years 8 and 10History Implementation Implementation Implementation Years 7and 9 Years 8 and 10 Joint memorandum to principals 31st July NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 5. Syllabus documentationhttp://syllabus.bos. nsw.edu.au/ NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 6. Syllabus documentation Left-hand navigation panel Filter by: •Syllabus •Stage •Learning Across the Curriculum areas NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 7. Implementation support Expert policy Enhanced support and school curriculum funding for advice for professional schools learning Registered professional Additional learning courses, School teaching and Development learning materials Day and social media 30/04/13 tools NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 8. Curriculum specific professional learning courses High quality, registered professional learning courses provided by the Learning and Leadership Portfolio New courses delivered flexibly and facilitated by schools ­ The learner and the new curriculum ­ Teaching for the new curriculum ­ Your school and the new syllabuses ­ Programming the new syllabuses Accessed through MyPL@Edu Accredited with the NSWIT for teachers at Professional Competence and higher See your principal to schedule these courses NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 9. Building capacity resources: 7-10• Resources are being developed to build teachers capacity to understand aspects of the syllabuses that are new or may be challenging.• They are intended to be used for professional learning and to complement familiarisation with the new syllabuses. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 10. Building capacity resources: K-6 Learning area Title of resource Using digital and multimodal texts K-6 English Exploring composing K-6 Engaging personally with texts Teaching fractions: a primary concern Mathematics Teaching data: Stage 3 dot points Using the numeracy continuum with the new syllabus NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 11. Building capacity resources: 7-10 Learning area Title of resource Exploring new text requirements English Teaching grammar in Years 7-10 Putting the basics into context: spelling, punctuation and comprehension Shaping statistics in Stage 4 Mathematics Shaping statistics in Stage 5 Working scientifically Science An inquiry approach: A model explored The nature, development, use and influence of science World history approach History Overviews and depth studies Patterns of study for history 7-10 NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 12. Accessing the Australian Curriculum in NSWwebsite NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 13. 1. The learner and the new curriculum• What are the needs of the learners of today and in the future?• How will the new curriculum meet the needs of learners?• What is the diversity of learning needs in your classroom?• How will the content you teach and the way you teach cater for the diverse learners in your classroom?• What are some of the capacities needed by today’s learners?• What does this mean for teaching practice? NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 14. 1. The learner and the new curriculum• Provides a focus on diverse learning needs in the 21st Century and introduces the new syllabuses.• Course duration: 2 hours at the key stage of Professional competence. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 15. 21st Century education NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 16. 2. Teaching for the new curriculum• Assists schools to implement the new curriculum effectively by exploring planning and programming, teaching and assessment practices.• Course duration: 2 hours NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 17. 2. Teaching for the new curriculum• Curriculum planning and programming is the process of translating policies, curriculum requirements and NSW syllabuses into teaching, assessing and reporting practices• Consider how planning and programming are currently done in your school• Explore reasons for planning and programming• Explore principles that identify some key features of effective curriculum planning and programming• Develop a sequence for planning and programming. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 18. 3. Your school and the new syllabuses• Courses in English, mathematics, science (incorporating technology in K-6) and history (7-10).  Aim and rationale  A walk through the syllabus, highlighting some of its key features  Progression of learning via objectives and outcomes  Audit  Action plan NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 19. 3. Your school and the new syllabuses Audit Physical requirements Capacity to address Cross syllabus objective and content outcomes Content Reporting requirements Learning programs Assessment Current resources NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 20. 4. Programming for quality teaching andassessing• There is an expectation that you have engaged with the Curriculum planning and programming for quality teaching, assessing and reporting document and have considered current practices for curriculum planning.• Generate a unit of learning that aligns with a scope and sequence and provides rich opportunities for learning and assessment based on the NSW syllabuses for the Australian Curriculum. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 21. Maang NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 22. Maang NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 23. BOS Online Program Builder NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 24. Let’s dig a little deeper NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 25. The opportunitiesPlanning and programmingHigh expectationsDifferentiationAssessment
    • 26. Teaching for the new curriculum NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 27. Curriculum planning and programming 1. be responsive to student needs 2. provide a seamless progression of learning within and across school years 3. focus on learning of high intellectual quality and significance 4. make explicit high expectations for learning and achievement 5. enhance professional practice through collaborative development and evaluation. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 28. A sequence for curriculum planning andprogramming Leadership: clear actions, Leadership: clear actions, Units of learning containing: Units of learning containing: responsibilities and reflection responsibilities and reflection •Strategies for differentiation •Strategies for differentiation Programming: to support Programming: to support •Assessment for, as and of learning •Assessment for, as and of learning quality teaching, assessing and quality teaching, assessing and •Explicit high expectations •Explicit high expectations reporting •High intellectual quality and significance •High intellectual quality and significance reportingScope and sequence: • Work from the scope and sequencesystematic and explicit plan for • Monitor, assess and record students’building student knowledge, achievement and developmentskills, understandings, values • Engage and enrich student experienceand attitudes NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 29. Responsive to students’ needsEvery student …•has unique abilities and potential•has needs shaped by background•is entitled to learning across the curriculum•needs teachers to accept that learning experiences aresocial and collaborative•needs teachers to cater for abilities•needs teachers to have high expectations References: A Research Basis Supporting Differentiated Instruction The learner and the new curriculum NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 30. Responsive to student needsTeachers should consider the diverse range of studentlearning abilities and needs when planning andprogramming. Differentiation of learning programs mayinclude changes to one or more of the following:•learning environment (environment and resourcesavailable)•content (what students learn)•process (how students learn)•product (how students demonstrate their learning) Reference: The teacher and the new curriculum NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 31. High expectationsStudent learning is more likely to be successfulwhen teachers have high expectations for everystudent and differentiate their practice to supportstudent learning. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 32. High expectationsHigh expectations of all students High expectations of all studentsare communicated, and conceptual are communicated, and conceptualrisk taking is encouraged and risk taking is encouraged andrewarded. rewarded. Quality teaching in NSW public schools. Discussion paper Quality teaching in NSW public schools. Discussion paper (May 2003) NSWDET (May 2003) NSWDET NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 33. High expectationsCurriculum planning and programming processes, particularly at the unitand lesson level, should assist teachers to:• find out what each student already knows and can do• set challenging learning tasks and assessments• build bridges between prior knowledge and experiences and newknowledge• provide graduated assistance or scaffolding to support student learning• provide effective feedback and encourage students to reflect on theirlearning. Curriculum planning and programming for quality teaching, assessing and reporting. (October 2012) DEC NSW NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 34. AssessmentAssessment:provides opportunities for teachers to gather evidenceabout student achievement in relation to outcomesenables students to demonstrate what they know and candoclarifies student understanding of concepts and promotesdeeper understandingprovides evidence that current understanding is a suitablebasis for future learning. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 35. Assessment of, for and as learningAssessment of learning assists teachers in usingevidence of student learning to assessachievement against outcomes andstandards.Assessment for learning involves teachers usingevidence about students knowledge,understanding and skills to inform theirteaching.Assessment as learning occurs when studentsare their own assessors. Students monitortheir own learning, ask questions and use arange of strategies to decide what they knowand can do, and how to use assessment for newlearning. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 36. Assessment The Board of Studies NSW released Advice on Assessment on 12 October 2012, with the following introduction: The new Board of Studies K–10 syllabuses for the Australian curriculum continue to promote a standards-referenced approach to assessing and reporting student achievement in NSW and the importance of assessment for, as and of learning as essential components of good teaching and learning. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 37. Principles of Assessment and ReportingPrinciples of Assessment andReporting in NSW Public Schools. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 38. Wrap up Welfare HSC Budgets Reports Accreditation NAPLAN ICT Programs Schedules Targets Literacy Excursions Sport WPS TARS Priorities Performance Integration ILPs NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 39. Key features of the History K-10 Syllabus
    • 40. How does the NSW History K-10 syllabusinclude the Australian Curriculum? Australian Curriculum New NSW syllabuses Year-based Content Stage-based Outcomes and content General capabilities, Cross-curriculum areas Cross-curriculum priorities embedded in content as appropriate to individual learning areas NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 41. The place of history K-10 syllabus NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 42. AimThe aim of the History syllabus is tostimulate students interest in and enjoymentof exploring the past, to develop a criticalunderstanding of the past and its impact onthe present, to develop the critical skills ofhistorical inquiry and to enable students toparticipate as active, informed andresponsible citizens. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 43. Learning across the curriculumLearning across the curriculum enables students to develop understanding about andaddress the contemporary issues they face.•Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and culture•Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia•Sustainability•Critical and creative thinking•Ethical understanding•Information and communication technology capability•Intercultural understanding•Literacy•Numeracy•Personal and social capability•Civics and citizenship•Difference and diversity•Work and enterprise NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 44. Stage statementsStage statements are summaries of theknowledge, understanding, skills, values andattitudes that have been developed by students asa result of achieving the outcomes for each stageof learning.Replaces the Foundation Statements for K-6 NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 45. ConceptsA continuum of learning with descriptions forall stages:•Continuity and change•Cause and effect•Perspectives•Empathetic understanding•Significance•Contestability NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 46. Historical skillsDescribed for all stages:•Comprehension, chronology, terms and concepts•Analysis and use of sources•Perspectives and interpretations•Empathetic understanding•Research•Explanation and communication NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 47. 10. Organisation of content NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 48. History K – 6
    • 49. • History K-6 only replaces the strand of Change and Continuity• The remaining strands of the current HSIE K-6 syllabus still need to be taught• The time allocated to Human Society and Its Environment will remain the same in primary schools. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 50. When will History K-6 be implemented?• 2015 Optional• 2016 Mandatory• However there are significant similarities HSIE K-6 to the content for historical knowledge and understanding• Primary teachers may be unfamiliar with key historical concepts and historical skills. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 51. Primary content Stage 1 Stage 3 Stage 2 The Australian Present and Early Stage 1 Community and colonies past family life Personal and remembrance and andfamily histories and Australia as a The Past in the First contacts nation Present NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 52. What is different• A separate syllabus for History that is still part of the HSIE KLA• The other parts of the HSIE KLA are in phase 2 and 3 of Australian Curriculum, and will roll out progressively over time• The new history syllabus only replaces the Change and continuity strand• Specific syllabus names topics, with 2 per stage, and one in Early Stage 1• There is one history topic for each year of K-6• Advise and support will be provided on how to implement History within the HSIE KLA closer to the implementation timeline. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 53. Historical concepts and skillsTeachers can look at the historical concepts andskills described in the new syllabus and apply tothe outcomes and content of the change andcontinuity strand of the current HSIE K-6 syllabus. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 54. Current practise K-6The units of work and sample scope andsequences for all stages, provided on TeachingHSIE provides support to refresh and update HSIEthat will assist in the transition to the Australiancurriculum for History, Geography, Civics andcitizenship and Economics and business. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 55. Stages 4 and 5 The ancient The ancient The modern The making world to the world and of the (approx. modern world Australia modern world60,000BC – c. (c. AD 650 – (1945 to (1750 – 1945) AD 650) c. 1750) present) NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 56. Site Study• All students must complete a site study in Stages 4 and 5.• A virtual site study can be used if appropriate. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 57. Overviews Identify a specific historical period •take approximately 10% of teaching time •may be used as an overall introduction to the Depth Studies or •may be integrated within one or more of historical period depth studies. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 58. Depth Studies • for each historical period there are three depth studies • within each depth study there are up to four electives • Each depth study focusses on a particular society, event, movement or development NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 59. Stage 4Consists of two parts, each with 50 hours minimumteaching time1.The Ancient World • Students investigate ancient history from the time of the earliest human communities to the end of the ancient period (approx 60 000 BCE to c.650 CE)1.From the Ancient to the Modern World • Students focus on the history of the end of the ancient period to the beginning of the modern period (approx c.650 CE - 1750) NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 60. Stage 4: The Ancient World NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 61. Stage 4: The Ancient to the Modern World NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 62. Stage 5Consists of two parts, each with 50 hours minimumteaching time1.Making of the Modern World • Students study the making of the modern world from 1750 to 1918.2.The Modern World and Australia • Students focus on the history of the Modern World and Australia from 1918 to the present. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 63. Stage 5: The Making of the Modern World NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 64. Stage 5: The Modern World and Australia NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 65. Depth Study 6 – the possibilities for a contemporary topic toengage students • The Vietnam Era • The Holocaust • UN Peacekeepers • Terrorism • Genocide • Gulf War – Iraq War • European Union • Internet • Arab Spring • China • Threat of Nuclear War • etc NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 66. Depth Study 6 – give each topic a focus• People Power’: Non-Violent Revolutions 1986-2010• ‘A Problem From Hell’: Genocide since the 1990s• ‘Jihad’: Global Terrorism and International responses 2001-2011• ‘Awakening Giant’: China’s Transformation 1989-2010• Russia from Yeltsin to Putin, 1990-2010• ‘Eve of Destruction’: Dealing with the Threat of Nuclear Weapons 1990- 2010• ‘Pax Democratica’: Citizens’ Movements for Global Democracy 1990-2010• ‘The Digital Revolution’: The Origin of Cyberspace 1991-2010• ‘Soldiers of Peace’: UN Peacekeeping in Rwanda and East Timor 1993- 2002• ‘Euro Zone’: The History of the European Union 1993-2011• ‘Mission Accomplished’?: US Intervention in the Middle East 1990-2010• ‘Apartheid to Democracy’: South Africa 1980-2010• ‘Castro’s Vision Under Challenge’: Cuba 1990-2010 NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 67. When will History 7-10 be implemented?• 2014 Years 7 and 9• 2015 Years 8 and 10• 2016 all years NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 68. Elective history• The current provision for an additional elective study of History will remain.• Students may undertake 100 or 200 hours in Stage 4 and/or Stage 5.• The elective course is the current History Years 7-10 syllabus (2003).• The topics chosen from elective History must not overlap significantly with any topics selected from the K-10 History syllabus. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 69. Life skills• Advice about students with special education needs is provided in the syllabus introduction• life skill outcomes for stage 4 and 5• content for stages 4 and 5• Additional support materials are under development. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 70. What is familiar?• objectives and outcomes• stages• key inquiry questions and an inquiry based approach• site studies – mandatory for Stage 4 and 5• elective history for stage 4 and/or stage 5• life skills outcomes – now with the stage 4 and stage 5 content NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 71. Key differences• content is organised in Overviews and Depth Studies• chronological time frame 7-10• clearly articulated continuum of historical concepts and skills• stage statements. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 72. OpportunitiesClear chronology and choices from Year 7 through toYear 10 that allows flexibility for:•topic selection that support community interests•topic choices that engage students in historical inquiry•in depth historical inquiry•the development of an optional school based topic inStage 5•schools plan a cohesive pathway of learning in historyfrom Year 7 through to years 11 and 12 in both modernand ancient history. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 73. Resources for the new syllabus• Many of the existing resources will be suitable for the new syllabus• Resources labelled for the Australian Curriculum are not necessarily suitable for the new History syllabus• K-6 resources may not be appropriate for the new (or existing syllabus)• Teachers will require support for new content or school developed topics• Access to resources both state and national will continue to be available though the portal NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 74. Questions? NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre
    • 75. Thank you Anne Southwell HSIE Advisor Early Learning and Primary Education Directorate Phone 9886 7156 Anne.southwell@det.nsw.edu.au NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre

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