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  • 1. HEALTH AND COMFORT OCTOBER 28, 2010 PAGE 1 The word ergonomics means laws of (nomos) work (ergon). Ergonomics is the science of adapting the job and/or the equipment and the human to each other for optimal safety and productivity. Computers are a major area where ergonomics is relevant. Other areas are automobiles, cockpits, machinery and factories. -2010,Answers:Ergonomics How to Make You Comfortable Ergonomics Have
you
heard
of
the
word
 ergonomics?
Ergonomics
is
a
 science
that
helps
people
do
 their
jobs
or
use
their
tools
 comfortably
and
safely. Being
comfortable
while
using
 your
computer
is
important.
 Having
good
posture
while
at
 your
computer
workstation
will
 allow
your
body
to
be
 comfortable.
So
practice
your
 ergonomics,
and
stay
in
a
 healthy
comfort
zone. http://www.freemindworks.com/? p=185 http://www.accessmylibrary.com/ article-1G1-169989069/comfort- zone-ergonomics-brief.html
  • 2. HEALTH AND COMFORT OCTOBER 28, 2010 PAGE 2 Causes of repetitive strain •An overuse of the muscles on a continued repetitive basis •Cold temperatures •Vibrating equipment •Forceful activities •Poor posture or a badly organized work area that is not ergonomically sound •Holding the same posture on a continuous basis •Prolonged periods of work without a break •Stress has been proven to increase the incidence of repetitive strain injuries •Direct pressure or a blow to the body •Carrying heavy loads on a repeated basis •Fatigue RSI STATISTICS Bad hand & wrist position Bad posture - hunched over, eyes too close to screen Repetitive strain injuries are the nation's most common of all types, account for up to 60% of all reported occupational illnesses. Injuries diagnosed as carpal tunnel syndrome are the lengthiest absence reported for any major type of job- related injury or illness, at approximately 30 days. The Journal of the American Medical Association April 17, 1991: after carpal tunnel surgery, 57% report return of some preoperative symptoms, most commonly pain. It's been reported that NIOSH had forecast some years ago that 50% of the work force may suffer from RSIs by the year 2000. If you bring up the subject with almost anyone, you can see that it might have come true... it's hard not to encounter someone who's had a problem or knows someone who did. Carpal tunnel release operations are the second most common surgical procedure in the U.S. RSI is the the most costly occupational health problem, costing more than $20 billion a year. http://cupe.ca/health-and-safety/rsiday2005 http://www.repetitivestraininjury.org.uk/causes- of-rsi.html http://funtothinkabout.com/
  • 3. HEALTH AND COMFORT OCTOBER 28, 2010 PAGE 3 Engineering: Robots In The Classroom FAIRFAX, VA (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- While computers have taken over the classroom, kids still spend most of their day putting pen to paper. Despite that, 10 million children in the U.S qualify for therapy due to illegible handwriting. Now, a video game and a dash of robotic know how may be moving penmanship to the top of the class. “It feels like the robot is actually dragging my hand.” Ethan Betts told Ivanhoe. Now, they’re in the classroom helping kids like Ethan patch-up their penmanship. “It was kind of just a slop so my teacher she got really mad all the time.” Betts said. This tabletop robot dubbed “my scrivener” uses rehabilitation science to correct motor skills in kids. Studies show kids spend 30 to 60% of class time writing, but up to 20% have handwriting issues, meaning poor speed and legibility. “This is one of the first times … that we have a device that drives ink.” Dr. Sue Palso said. At George Mason University, doctor Sue Palsbo adapted a video gaming unit…type in a word and a robotic arm with pen guides the user in writing the same word over and over. She actually developed the device for occupational therapists and to help her daughter. “She was actually not doing very well in school because the teachers couldn’t read her answers." Dr. Palso said. “My scrivener” records data 100 times per second, so improvement can be documented, and at around 800 bucks, the goal is to put one in every classroom. “There was really an opportunity to see rapid progress.” Pam Hood-Szivek, Otr/L from Corvallis Children’s Therapy said. The proof is in Ethan, from screen to pen to paper, he’s on a new path. “I’m actually forgetting the old way.” Betts said. Doctor Palsbo is now entering the second round of trials for this device funded by the U.S government. Her goal now is to quantify the progress made with “my scrivener”. The Human Factors and Ergonomics Society contributed to the information contained in the TV portion of this report Feugiat: Duis aute in voluptate veli Liber: Pruca beynocguon doas no nam liber te conscient to factor tum. http://www.ivanhoe.com/science/story/2010/10/774a.html http://www.rhododendrites.com/blog/post.php?blogid=26 Penmanship robots now only for 120 kuai! Guaranteed to improve your handwriting in 2- 3 months or money back guarantee! Call 1-800- WRITINGWIZARD - 800 now for your own Penmanship robot!
  • 4. EORUM CLARITATEM VESTIG ATIONES OCTOBER 25, 2010 Computer game play 'aids health' Computer games can improve children's health despite research showing excessive playing causes aggression in the young, a new study claims. Nottingham Trent University professor Mark Griffiths said they can be a powerful distraction for youngsters undergoing painful cancer treatment. He also argues games can help develop social skills for children with attention disorders including autism. Mr Griffith's claims are made in the British Medical Journal out on Friday. The professor of gambling studies at Nottingham Trent University said more research must be done into both the positive and negative effects of gaming. 'Research trivialised' "Although playing video games is one of the most popular leisure activities in the world, research into its effects on players, both positive and negative, is often trivialised. "Some of this research deserves to be taken seriously, not least because video game playing has implications for health." He added that studies reported distracted patients had less nausea and lower blood pressure than controls who were simply asked to rest after treatment. 'Study addiction' Adverse effects - included aggressiveness, auditory hallucinations, repetitive strain injuries and obesity - have also been reported, but firm evidence is lacking, according to Mr Griffiths. He said: "On balance, there is little evidence that moderate frequency of play has serious adverse effects, but more evidence is needed on excessive play and on defining what constitutes excess in the first place. "There should also be long-term studies of the course of video game addiction." Bibliography • "Easily share a single mouse and keyboard between multiple computers with different operating systems without special hardware. | FreeMindWorks.com." FreeMindWorks - Ingenious, Powerful, Fluid Thinking. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Oct. 2010. <http://www.freemindworks.com/?p=185>. • "Article: Comfort zone.(ergonomics)(Brief article)." Access My Library - Promoting library advocacy. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Oct. 2010. <http://www.accessmylibrary.com/article-1G1-169989069/comfort- zone-ergonomics-brief.html>. • "Fight repetitive strain injuries: Annual International RSI Awareness Day < Health and safety | CUPE." Canadian Union of Public Employees | CUPE. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Oct. 2010. <http://cupe.ca/health- and-safety/rsiday2005>. • "Causes of repetitive strain injury." Repetitive Strain Injury. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Oct. 2010. <http:// www.repetitivestraininjury.org.uk/causes-of-rsi.html>.