• Like
Chris hamnett
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

Chris hamnett

  • 594 views
Published

ØKONOMISK SEGREGERTE BYER. LONDON 2011

ØKONOMISK SEGREGERTE BYER. LONDON 2011

Published in Education , Travel , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
594
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Inequality and housing in London Chris Hamnett Professor of Geography King’s College London
  • 2. London: international financial centre• London is one of the world’s major financial  centres, and the premier financial centre in  Europe. Like Paris and New York, it is also an  attractive place to live and to invest with many  wealthy international property owners• It has a lot of very highly paid jobs in financial and  business services such as corporate law. • It has unequal earnings and income distribution  which has implications for access to housing
  • 3. London in the C19th• London today is very different from London in  the C19th which, like other major European  cities, had major concentrations of the poor in  the central areas of the city. Because of poor  transportation, the poor had to live in close  proximity to potential jobs, many of which  were casual. As a result central London had  many large slum areas of poor housing as well  as rich areas of luxury housing.  
  • 4. The Changing Economic Structure• The economic structure of London, like Paris  and New York, has changed greatly in recent  decades. Go back 50 years, to 1961, and over  a third of the working population of London  were employed in manufacturing industry and  just 10% in banking, finance and business  services. Today the proportions have  reversed. About 1/3 in finance and business  services and less than 7% in manufacturing  industry. 
  • 5. The Changing Employment Structure of Greater London, 1961-1998 35 30 25 20 1961% 1981%% 1991% 15 1998% 10 5 0 Finance, Transport and Public Admin, Manufacturing Other Services Construction Primary and Business Distribution Health, Educ Industry Utilities Services
  • 6. Changes in occupational structure• The change in industrial structure has had a  major effect on the structure of occupations  and incomes. There are a lot more high skilled  and highly paid professional and managerial  workers and a much smaller industrial  working class today than in the past. This has  had big implications for the housing market  and the growth of home ownership and rising  prices.
  • 7. Social polarisation or….• There has been major debate in recent years  about the nature of social changes in global  and world cities like London. Some writers  think that such cities are  becomingincreasingly socially polarized  between a growing highly skilled and high  income group and a growing low skill and low  income group, with a major decrease in the  size of the middle class and income groups. In  this view there are more rich and more poor  and less in the middle.
  • 8. Proletarianisation or professionalisatio• Others take a different view. Some traditional  marxists argue that there is a process of job de‐ skilling and growth of low income working  population. This is called proletarianisation. • My view is that the growth of high skilled and  professional managerial and technical jobs in  some cities has been accompanied by decline in  working class jobs, though there may have been  some increase in low paid service jobs. I term this  professionalisation. What has happened is Oslo?
  • 9. A desirable place to live• Not surprisingly, London is an expensive city,  particularly in terms of its desirable residential  areas like Kensington and Westminster where  prices are very high.  • A report in last weeks Financial Times ‘A World  Apart’ said that ‘financial capitals constitute a  prime property market that is decoupled from  national economies’• Foreign buyers account for 60% of all buyers in  the prime central London market and 70% >£10m• The most expensive development is 1, Hyde Park
  • 10. Spatially displaced demand• You might think that this is good news, but is it  really good news for most Londoners, and for  middle and low income groups? • I do not think it is good news because high  income groups who push up residential property  prices at the top end have an effect on the rest of  the market, making housing less affordable in the  city as their high incomes and purchasing power  push up prices across the city as a whole.  
  • 11. The survival of the fittest?• In 1964 ruth glass, an émigré German social  scientist, coined the term gentrification to  describe what was happening in some parts of  inner London. She said that:• ‘One by one, many of the working class quarters  of London have been invaded by the middle  classes – upper and lower…Once this process of  gentrification starts in a district it goes on rapidly  until all or most of the original working class  occupiers are displaced and the whole social  character of the district is displaced’.
  • 12. The survival of the fittest• She added: ‘any district in or near London, however  dingy or unfashionable, is likely to become expensive,  and London may quite soon be a city which illustrates  the principle of the survival of the financially fittest,  who can still afford to work and live there’.       • The notion of the survival of the financially fittest is  fascinating one, and if we look at the changing  structure of house prices in London, New York or Paris  or the other major world cities, it is clear that prices in  the expensive areas have risen over the last 30 years  so fast that, without social or rent controlled housing,  it is almost impossible for any bar the affluent to live  there.
  • 13. Spatially displaced demand• The increase in property prices, and rents, in the  most expensive areas also has an impact in other  areas through spatially displaced demand. • People who would like to live in most expensive  areas but can’t afford to look for property in  adjacent, but slightly cheaper areas, pushing up  prices there. Then, in turn the people who would  like to buy in these areas get forced further out  to cheaper areas where they also help to push up  prices. 
  • 14. The multi‐bowl water fountain• The best analogy of the city housing market is  a multi‐bowl water fountain where the jet of  water at the top fills the top bowl. The water  then spills over into the next bigger bowl, and  so on down into the bottom and biggest bowl. • Each bowl is bigger in diameter and they are  filled progressively by water from the topmost  bowl. The same with property prices which  cascade downwards from the top.  
  • 15. Pushed out or into social housing• The process of growing gentrification in inner  London has meant that property prices have  risen more rapidly in inner London than in  outer London as a result, lower income buyers  have been forced further out to find property  which is affordable. The main areas of low  income residents in inner London are now  social housing which now houses the poor,  economically inactive and unemployed etc.  But social housing has been shrinking…..
  • 16. Cuts to housing benefits in London• The displacement of low income groups from  inner London as a result of rising prices will be  compounded by the changes which are taking  place in government welfare policy, especially  the level of housing benefits. • Because of high rents in london, a proportion  of low income residents depend on HB which  is paid by central government to bridge the  gap between their income and their rents.  
  • 17. Cutting housing benefit• The overall cost of HB has risen dramatically in  Britain in recent years, from £2.5bn to £21bn.  London takes a large share of the overall cost.• The government have decided that they must  cut this and have put in place various policies  to do so including capping benefits, reducing  the sector of the market that low income  families can live in, and capping overall  benefit payments to median post tax  earnings. 
  • 18. Pushing out the poor?• The implication of the cuts is that many low  income households who currently live in inner  or central London will find that the level of hB  will no longer pay their rents. They will have  to move out of the central expensive areas  into cheaper areas in outer London. We are  thus seeing a process of large scale  displacement of low income groups out of the  expensive parts of central and inner London.  This will increase social segregation.
  • 19. Lessons for Oslo• You need to decide whether you want to have  a reasonable degree of socialmix in the central  and inner city, with both low income and high  income residents or whether you want the  market to decide this for you. If the decision is  that you want a mix of residents in the more  expensive areas, this may require a degree of  financial help to low income households. This  may already occur. Be grateful you are not like  London with a high proportion of big earners.